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Watch Me Solve My Clients Problems LIVE! (May 19, 2018)

Watch Me Solve My Clients Problems LIVE! (May 19, 2018)

Summary


Want to see behind the scenes of what it's like to be a Consulting Accelerator customer?

Check out this Q&A call recording where I answer hundreds of customers questions LIVE!

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Transcript / MP3

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All right. I can see a few people jumping on here. Just let me know in that comment box if you've got video working good and you can hear me speaking as well, audio and video. I can we've got Matt on here, Joshua, Angie, Catcher. How's it going? Benita is on here. Just someone confirm that there's audio working. All right. Cool. Thanks, Catcher. Perfect. Sam: So what we're going to do is same old thing, which we do every Saturday, is I'm going to go from 3:00 PM till 5:00 PM, so for two hours and I'm going to answer questions. So if you've got any questions, just type your question into that comment box and I'll go through them one at a time, first come first serve. That's how it's going to go. So let's get started. Sam: Matt Wiseman says, "My niche target is people who manage teams of data scientists. It can range from startups to Fortune 500 companies. However, the majority will most likely be in larger businesses. Do you think Facebook Ads will be an effective strategy for getting strategy sessions or do you suggest a different medium or method? My initial testing to target anyone with the job titles of data science manager or data science director. Thanks for your thoughts." Sam: Okay. So yeah, Facebook Ads will be an effective way to reach them. However, I think you're thinking too linear about it. You can target just general interests of data scientists. So you could target things like Amazon web services or you could target segment, which is a type of ... or what are the other? What are the things that ... Different statistics things like R and all of that and [inaudible 00:02:49] and all of those different things that they use. Sam: So I wouldn't just target the job title. That's one way to do it, but I would also look at the different interest groups that they have because there'll be fan pages of different software apps and different statistics apps and things that only those people would like. So I would target those two. Sam: Remember with Facebook, we're not trying to laser target people. Think about it as a billboard, right? You might put a billboard out in the street and you're selling a Rolex watch. So you put it on 5th Avenue, but there's no guarantee that everyone who goes up 5th Avenue has enough money to buy a Rolex. In fact, a lot of them won't. Sam: So we're putting it in front of the general audience and we know that the people which we want are somewhere in there, but we're not going too specific because when we go too specific, we miss a whole bunch of people. A lot of people probably don't put data science manager or data science director on Facebook, but they would like other things that are related to that. So you want to have a nice, broad net and then you'll add as what calls out the specific interest. Sam: So targeting isn't really how we target people. Targeting is just trying to create a ring fence around a group of people, which we believe our prospects are in and then the ad, the actual message is what pulls out the specific people. Sam: Joshua says, "Hi," Angie, Catcher. Benita has got some questions. "Number one, I'm getting some mixed feedback with this whole GDPR thing and I'm not sure how to continue targeting business owners in the EU zone slash UK." Is that a question? It just sounds like a statement. "Do we need cookies on our website to be GDPR-compliant?" Every website has cookies on it, anyway. If you've got a Facebook pixel on it, Google Analytics, it's pretty much impossible to have a website without having a cookie on it these days. Sam: I mean, it sounds like you're confused. So with the whole GDPR thing, I think most people with small businesses, they don't really have that much to worry about because Google Analytics and Facebook and all of them, they have to make sure they're compliant. I'll just find a simple checklist on the internet somewhere. I would Google just GDPR compliance checklist and then just go through that checklist and make sure you're good with those things. Sam: This is like one of those big buzz things like Bitcoin or the royal wedding or something. It's just a real buzz term right now, so everyone's talking about it, everyone's freaking out about it and all of this crap. For small businesses, they don't really have that much to worry about. They can just read a checklist on the internet and you're fine. Just make sure that you just read one of those checklists. It doesn't need to be a big freaking out scenario. Sam: "What's the best way to call people in the USA and Canada and Australia?" That would be Skype. The best thing for doing strategy session calls is Skype and what you want to do is download the desktop app and you then want to get a Skype number, a local number. That means that you can call someone's cellphone through your Skype and it will show up as a local number as if the person who you're calling, it looks to them like you're just calling them on your phone. Also, you have a phone number for your Skype instead of just having a Skype. Sam: Then I would get an international calling plan. I'm pretty sure you can get unlimited international for barely anything. It's cheap as and that's what I would do. The best thing about that is you can call internationally for way cheaper than you could on a phone and you can call both phones and Skype accounts and you have a local number and you can record the calls. To record the calls, you want to use Skype call recorder. Another name for it is Ecamm call recorder. If you Google Skype call recorder, you'll be able to find it. That tool is really good. It records video calls and it records audio calls. Sam: The calls that I do, the customer interviews that I do and that you see me posting with a screen that's split down the middle and it's me there and then there's a customer there, I use Skype call recorder to do that. It's a really good tool. Sam: "Four, I am adding 50 people a day on LinkedIn. How many people should I add a day on Facebook?" Up to 50. That's fine. "Five, will you send your children to college or university?" No, not unless they really want to go. If they ask me ... It totally depends on what you want, right? If someone wants to go to college because they want to hang out with people and enjoy those college years and go out to bars and get drunk and stuff, then they should go to college. Sam: If someone wants to be successful in a particular career path or they know what they want and they know the objective that they're trying to obtain, then college is an inefficient means to reach the end. I would tell them a much more efficient means, which in most cases is just going straight to the real world. It's a much better training ground in the real world than it is in the abstract world, which is a college. Sam: "Number six, who would you say is the most successful person in the world and why?" Well, it depends at what. You know what I mean? I don't think any one person is better than another person. People are just the best in the world at different things. I really like Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant in basketball because those guys are like wizards. Then I really like in business, for me, it's Jeff Bezos. Sam: Business, my number one is Jeff Bezos. That guy is smart on another level. He's smart, the smartest guy I've ever heard of. His company is the biggest, most valuable company in the history of the world. He's the richest man in the history of the world. It looks like Amazon will probably be the first company to reach a trillion-dollar valuation, so Bezon. Then in sports, I'd probably say Michael Jordan and followed by him, Kobe Bryant. It depends in all different things. It's different people, right? Sam: "Seven, how do you delete false reviews on your Facebook fan page? Facebook support has not been helpful at all despite contacting them several times." I don't allow people to post reviews on my Facebook fan page pretty much for that reason. If I can't control it, then I don't want to use it because otherwise, I can end up ... People try and smear me and attack me all the time. I don't want to give them a platform to do that. So I don't use it. Sam: Catcher says, "Yes, all looks good." Thanks. We got Angie, Darren, Elsa, Armand, Joshua. Cool. Elsa says, "Hey, Sam. Do you have any advice on how to keep your spouse and family happy when you need to work harder and longer hours on your business?" Yes. So this is always a tough one, but you need to ... The best thing you can do is have an honest, serious conversation about it, instead of just you're working later and then you know that they're grumpy and it's never really spoken about. That's the worst. It's passive. You want to sit down and have a proper conversation about it and set some expectations like, "Hey, this is what I'm trying to do. This is why it's important to me. This is why I really want to do this. Are you going to support me with this? All right. Let's set. This is what I roughly estimate that I need to do." Sam: I'll give you an example. My wife knows that this is extremely important to me, right? She knew that from the very beginning. Also, I told her that I need to work very hard and for a long time. I said that I need to work 12 hours a day, six days a week, so 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, so six days a week, 12 hours a day, but I did promise her Sunday. All of Sunday, you have my full undivided attention. I won't check an email. I won't do anything. Sunday is just for you. Then after 9:00, I'm just with her and then we also go on vacations every 90 days. Sam: So every 90 days, we go on a seven-day vacation anywhere in the world she wants. When I'm on those seven-day vacations, I turn everything off. I don't check email, don't check my phone, don't check anything. It's just her time. There's that. We do go well on vacations together and I do shut off at certain times and I do make time for her, but what is the best way to describe it? I've set the expectations, so it's not like anything is of a surprise. You know what I mean? I think that's what you have to do. You have to sit down and map it out and draw it out on a piece of paper and just get on the same page. Sam: Tobias says, "Hey, Sam. I am stuck on one exercise. Currently, I am in the binary poll exercise and I've had to write down my dreams. Making seven figures and moving out with my wife to Dubai. In that question, what traits and characteristics, things I don't like about the people I do not like. Wrote down cannot save money, have high debts, think they know everything better than anyone else, telling false marketing strategies on the market. In question nine, you asked how my currently burning calls are in direct conflict and I am still thinking about it, but I cannot see the relation. Can you help me out? Maybe just giving a hint." Cool. Sam: What this exercise helps you to do is first of all, we judge other people with this exercise. So it's like, "Write down the people you don't like and then the things you don't like about them." Then a lot of the time, the reason people don't like other people is because they're doing something that you need to actually do to get where you want to go. A lot of the time, the things aren't actually accurate. They're just judgments we've made of other people that are assumed. They're not factual a lot of the time. Sam: So the second one here is interesting. You said, "Think they know everything better than everyone else." Probably to achieve your dreams, you're going to have to get more aggressive. These people sound like they're more aggressive and they're willing to really put themselves out there and they're really willing to show self-confidence and they're confident in themselves and they're bold, right? Your phrase there is, "Think they know everything better than everyone else." Sam: You probably need to start thinking that you know everything better than everyone else. To do that, it's going to take practice, but you're also going to have to push yourself. So you're going to need to be more bold and more aggressive and more out there to achieve what you want to achieve. That's one of the reasons why you're judging those other people because it's something you let yourself. Sam: Telling false marketing strategies on the market, they might not be false strategies. I would really just look at this through. Just consider the fact that these assumptions might not be accurate. I recon it's all on that second one because a lot of the time, I'll tell you what happens most common with this exercise. People will judge someone else for being a know-it-all or for just saying whatever they want or for being more active on social media or being up themselves or being cocky or being things like that, right? They think, "Oh, that person is so cocky and that person is arrogant and that person is all of this stuff." Sam: Then they're very reserved, never say anything and just stay within their skin, but that's why they don't like those other people. Then they want a goal that requires them to be bold and aggressive and so that's why. So you probably need to act a bit more like them. That's how the exercise works. This exercise is never to do things like if they actually don't save any money and if they actually have high debts, which might not be true, then it's not to say that we want to go and do that, all right? We're just looking at this and how we might have got these things wrongs and how we might need to do some of this. Sam: Because what happens is our own judgments of other people are just reflections of our own insecurities. What we're seeing out there in other people isn't really the truth. It's more the truth viewed through our eyes, which has a massive distortion with what we personally believe and have issues with. Sam: Elsa says, "Sam, I'm feeling new to my field and had been learning as much as I can about it. When developing my minimum viable offer in week one, how do you suggest I copy the winning solution without falling into a monkey see, monkey do pit? Thanks." Monkey see, monkey do is when you see someone doing something and then you copy it without seeing if that thing actually works, right? It's just assuming that that works, but a smarter way is to find out who's doing the best, look at what they're doing, make sure it works for them and that you're not just hearing false signals and you're never assuming anything. Sam: Then try that yourself, try that with your clients and make sure it works with them. Only when it's proven to work and you've seen it with your own eyes do you fully trust the thing. Monkey see, monkey do is just blind trust. When someone says that, "Hey, use this funnel because this works," and so people just start using it without ever testing it, without ever questioning it. You can look at what other people are doing and then try that yourself and see if it works. The key thing here is copying isn't bad, but fact checking is important. Sam: Joshua Westover says, "Hey, Sam. I plan on pursuing the niche of helping people overcome their fear of flying. I've managed to overcome this fear myself to the point where I started taking flying lessons last summer. I know this is also a market as companies like British Airways and easyJet run their coaching courses at airports on this very thing. Do you think I can just target anyone who has that fear or should I be more specific like business owners touring, musicians, et cetera?" Sam: This is a cool one. I like this because I know it will definitely be a thing and I know that some people will take this to the extreme that they don't fly and they take trains and boats and shit. Man, that's a burden because it's excruciating enough to fly somewhere. It takes so much time and it sucks. Imagine having to take a train or a boat. Oh, my God! So it would definitely be a good niche. I would definitely look into it. Sam: I would start just with the fear of flying. Then if you find there's a specific niche within there that you want to focus on, you can do that. I would start just with the fear of flying because that's already niched enough, I think. Sam: Briten says, "I am brand new in digital marketing. Have you ever considered training us in the beginning to price our services based on client's revenue or profit margins?" No, never. That's crazy. We price on value and we never ever, ever just price based on how much money someone's got. Imagine if I had a question when you board Accelerator and it's like, "How much money do you make a year?" You put in 100 grand a year and it changes the price to 10 grand. Then you put in a million and it's 50 grand. It just changes the price. That's weird and that's not fair. Sam: You want to have uniform pricing based on everyone because you should treat everyone equally. What you'll find is that the bigger businesses will probably want you to do a higher level of service for them. For example, the people who come in to Accelerator and they're making a lot of money, they might go through Accelerator, then they'll join Uplevel and they'll join Quantum Mastermind. So they end up spending more money with me and everything, but only because the value increases, not because I just changed my pricing because they have more money. I would never do that. Always price on value and never discriminate or change things based on the individual. Sam: Donald Dang says, "If you could only have one La Croix flavor to drink for the rest of your life, what would that flavor be?" It would be Pamplemousse, definitely, 100%. Mitch Gonzales says, "How do you go about innovation within a niche?" It's simple. It's just solving the problem and then thinking how far you can take that thing. So a perfect example is Apple. They saw the phone and they saw a Blackberry and then they started thinking, "What else could a phone do? Imagine if it had a camera on the front and one on the back. Imagine if it could take videos. Imagine if there was an app store where anyone could create apps and there was literally millions of apps available. Imagine if the speakers were really good. Imagine if it could play movies. Imagine if it was a touchscreen." Sam: They just stretched things as far as they could. They started to dream like, "How far could we take this thing?" Another perfect example would be with Consulting Accelerator, right? The simple problem I'm trying to help people with is how to start a consulting business and get clients and make money. You don't just solve that problem and then it's done. You can always solve it better. There's always a way to improve things. Sam: So I could improve the ease of use and the user experience. I could make the content portal easier to navigate, more intuitive, better looking. I could make mp3 available, as well as video. I could have player speed controls available. I could have the transcript available. Then I started thinking, "Well, what about search?" Every info product I've ever purchased and used, it never had search. So you go through the training and then you're a member. There's one part that you want to go back and have a look at, but you can't find it. Sam: So what you have to do is you have to go back, navigate through these weeks, start randomly clicking in the videos at different points trying to find this different thing and you can't find it. That sucks. I dreamed about like, "What if you could just search like in Google?" Then I thought, "Well, how are you going to search videos because videos aren't searchable?" Then I thought, "What about a transcript of every video that was searchable?" Then I thought, "Well, then the search is going to have to have some PageRank algorithm and some way for it to optimize based on the right search results." Sam: Then I started working with my developers to put an algorithm in there and to make the search accurate. Then I start thinking about all of this other stuff. Then I sent out a survey this year. I was thinking, "How can I make it better again?" That survey, people talked about wanting more human connection. I thought, "Well, I could do a Facebook live with everyone once a week." People liked that. Then I thought, "Oh, well, I could do these Instagram story things each day to let people know what's going on behind the scenes." Sam: Then I thought, "We could do customer interviews because people wanted to hear about other people and how they were using the program." So I was like, "All right. Let's start doing those customer interviews." Yeah, just always thinking, "How can we make it better?" Because I'm still solving the same problem, "How do we help someone start a consulting business and get a client?" Someone can start a consulting business easier. I can make it easier for them to do that. I can make it more simple and I can remove friction. Sam: Removing friction is a big thing. The more you remove friction, the better. All great innovations just remove friction. Another one would be, I'll give you a perfect example with Uber and a taxi. With a taxi, you have to call a phone number and order one. This is if you're at house and you live in the suburbs instead of in Manhattan or something, right? So you call a taxi company. They tell you that a taxi is going to come. All ready, you've had to look up a phone number, dial it, wait , talk to someone, tell them you want a taxi, tell them your address and now they're saying one is coming to you. It could be 10 minutes, but you don't know. There's no way for you to actually when it is coming. Then it arrives, then you get into the taxi, then you have to tell them where you want to go. Then they take you where you want to go and then you have to pay with cash or a card and sign a receipt or whatever and all of that. Sam: So all Uber did was they looked at that and they were like, "How can we remove friction? What if you didn't have to call a phone number? What if you just press a button? Then what if you could just see when it was coming? What if you didn't have to tell the person where you wanted to go? You could just plot it. What if you could just walk out of the cab at the end without paying and it just auto charge you?" All Uber is is a taxi company with way less friction, but that's how they've innovated. Sam: So you can think about removing friction, making it easier, making it faster, making it simpler and you can think about helping people achieve bigger results, all sorts of things. I want to help people start a consulting business faster than anyone else, so I'm constantly thinking, "How can we compress it down and help someone do it quick?" I'm also thinking, "How can we help people do it that don't know anything about business? How can we make it more simple and more sticky for the average person to understand? How can we help them achieve massive results instead of just one client?" That's what I'm thinking about, "How can I keep stretching it and stretching it and stretching it?" Sam: Darren says, "Would Facebook Ads work for services that charge less than 500 or is it really only products and services that cost thousands?" No, it can still work for products, for services that cost 500. It just depends what type of service it is, right? Sam: "Is digital marketing still a viable niche option?" Yes. Digital marketing is huge, man. Digital marketing is pretty much no longer even a niche because within digital marketing, there's so many different types of digital marketing and it's still fine. I mean, you just got to ... Remember that a niche is never not viable. It's all derived from the customer and their problem. So if you talk to the market and you talk to people and you find that they have problems, then it's viable. Provided people have problems, anything is viable. Sam: Athan Oward says, "Hey, Sam. What were the biggest challenges you faced with the whole done-for-you stage? Were there any big obstacles you didn't expect or come up when you started to scale up?" Well, yeah, man. This is business, right? So it doesn't mater what you're doing. There's always obstacles that you don't expect. You expect that. That's pretty much the only thing that I expect is that there will be obstacles that I didn't expect. Sam: What I found the main one to be was just complexity with too many humans. So when you're doing done-for-you as an agency, if you've got to do a lot of stuff and it's very customizable. So you've got to create landing pages, do ads. You've got to pull information from the owner, follow up with them with email and stuff. You've got to keep them up-to-date. You've got to publish things, manage things. It works well with a few clients, but as soon as you start to have lots of clients, then you can no longer do it yourself and you now have to hire other people to do it. Sam: Then once you get enough of those people, then you need people to manage those people. Then you when you get enough of those managers, then you need a manager to manage the managers. Very quickly, this thing becomes quite chaotic. That's why the whole agency business model, it is not one that scales. In the history of the world, there's never really been an agency model that's scaled very big. Advertising agencies and all of those, they reach their limits. The only businesses that really scale big are product-based businesses. Sam: That's why if you look at the training in week one called Evolution of a Consultant, I talk about starting with done-for-you and then moving to coaching and then moving to online training programs because once you move to training programs, you can really scale up, but you don't want to start with training programs. You want to start in the trenches doing the done-for-you because that's the best place to learn. Then you want to start going up. Sam: I would look at two things. The first one would be week one, Evolution of a Consultant. The second one would be week seven of the Accelerator program. In week seven of the Accelerator, I talk about going to that next level and moving from done-for-you and one-on-one to leverage training programs. Sam: Angie Kinston says, "Question one, do you believe that Facebook Ads and webinar training will get oversaturated? If so, is there a next best outlet? Been seeing a lot of commenters saying, 'How much will I have to pay for this one?' et cetera." All right. First of all, Facebook Ads and webinars will never get old because they're just a channel, right? That's like saying, "Books are dead." Book is a channel. It's the content and information within those channels that is important. So books will never be dead. Facebook Ads and webinar training will never be dead because it's just a channel to deliver information and content. So you got to understand that. Sam: Also, you have to look at how you've constructed this argument in your brain because you said, "Do you believe that they will be dead?" and it's because you've spent seeing a lot of commenters saying, "How much will I have to pay for this one?" That is not a reason to believe that that is true, right? The only way that you would know if webinars had stopped working is if you were running a webinar with ads that was working and now it had stopped working and then you tried lots of different webinars with ads that still fail to work and then you talk to hundreds of people in different industries that were doing webinars with Facebook Ads and they had no longer worked. Sam: Only then would you come to the logical conclusion that maybe Facebook Ads and webinars had started not to work not because someone was just saying some stuff on a comment. Never ever, ever look at comments and think that they have any meaning. Often, comments are just ways to get a very distorted view. You have to protect your views on things and make sure you guard them and only move them with facts and data because otherwise, you can get steered in all of these different directions for no good reason at all. Sam: Matt McDonald says, "I'm doing marketing research to nail down the biggest problems of my niche. Do you think response rate would be better via cold email or Facebook messages?" I would try both, but I'm guessing it's going to be Facebook messages, but try both and see. Sam: Mitch Gonzales says, "Do you recommend hiring an in-house team or do it all virtual? Do you wish you'd started building a team earlier on rather than being a solopreneur with a couple of VAs, et cetera? What do you recommend if I want to get to eight figures?" When you're starting, use contractors because they're way cheaper and you have less risk and you only have to pay them when you get money, which means that you're safeguarded. You only want to hire an internal team and have employees and stuff when you've built quite a business that can handle that pull on it because employees cost money and overhead and that overhead is due every month regardless of whether you've had a really good month or not. Sam: So go as far as you can with contractors, definitely, and go as far as you can with a virtual business, working from home, keep it all cheap, keep it simple and only once you're at a point when you can really excel would I do that. Sam: Jacob says, "What do you like most about your 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina? I'm in the market for a new one." I've always used them, man. For years, I've used 15-inch MacBook Pros and the highest spec one I could get. They have never failed me. I'm the ultimate tester of a laptop because I work 12 hours a day, six days a week all the time. My laptop gets absolutely used. It's probably the number one tool I use out of anything. So it makes sense that I'd want a good one. Sam: I've never had any issues with them ever, except for recently with this latest one, when the keys stopped working, but that's not that bad. I only really consider it a really bad one when it becomes unreliable like it just shuts off or it gets slow or it has a terminal hard drive failure or something like that. The only issue I've ever had in six years is my B key stopping to work. I'm fine with that. Sam: So I would absolutely get one. Every one that I've ever seen going to Mac loves it. The way you know Macs are better than PCs is because of the way the traffic flows. A lot of people flow from PC to Mac, but you never see many people flow from Mac to PC. Based on those traffic flows, you can judge. With regards to the 13-inch one or the 15-inch one, the traffic flows go from 13 to 15 and never 15 to 13. I've tried both and I would get this. In my opinion, it's the best one you can get. Sam: Deepak says he's targeting executives for his niche. Someone asked him, "What's your qualification?" "How would you answer them? I want to do live coaching for executives." I would just say why you want to help them. A qualification doesn't mean that you just have to have a university degree. There's no university degree in coaching executives. Even if there was, it's not that impressive. You just want to talk about the method that you use and all of that. Just explain why you're good at what you do or explain how you plan to help the person achieve what they want to achieve. Sam: Benita says, "How do you prevent people from reviewing your Facebook fan page?" You can turn reviews off. In the settings, you can turn reviews completely off. Julian Wageman says, "Hey, Sam. I'm afraid to do research for my niche by calling people and talking with them. How did you overcome this fear as an introvert?" What I would always do is I never really cold call people, right? I would send them an email or a LinkedIn message or Facebook or whatever first and then I would start the conversation that way. Then I would ask them if we could do a call and then I'd move to the call. Sam: So that was one thing I did tactically to make it way easier. In terms of mindset, you've just got to understand what is more painful. I mean, it's a choice, right? Do you want to get outside of your comfort zone and face your fear or do you want to never achieve your dream and fail? I don't think there's anything more painful than failing and not achieving your dream ever. So I'm pretty much willing to take on any pain that isn't to avoid that. So you got to look at it like that. You got to get real and then you just have to act. Sam: Donald Dang says, "How do you make your offer sound perfect to the potential client? I tried using that. Well, I help people making 10 grand a month and help them get to 25 grand a month, for example, but based on my feedback, it's not very effective." Well, how you make anything perfect is with practice, right? Practice makes perfect. That saying is very true. How do you do practice? Well, repetition. How many sales calls have you done? How many offers have you made? Sam: The sheer number of strategy sessions you do will be the biggest indicator of your skill and the money that you make. Every single student I have who's got to seven figures has done more than 1,000 strategy sessions. Nobody's got to seven figures with doing less than a thousand. The people who have got to eight figures, they've got up into 3,000 or more strategy sessions, right? So it's just practice and repetition and the sheer volume of calls you do. You just need to keep trying, keep trying, keep trying, listen to feedback, iterate, do more of what works, do less of what doesn't work and just keep going, bam, bam, bam, bam, bam. That's how you get good. Sam: Mitch Kenny says, "Hi. How's it going?" Alark says, "How do you think Steve Jobs did customer research so well? How was he so good at identifying the market's deep pains and creating the perfect solution, e.g. iPod, MacBook, iPhone, et cetera?" I mean, he was very good at envisioning how something could be developed. Steve Jobs didn't really invent the phone. It was invented way before. Even the smart phone, he didn't even really invent that. I mean, there was the Blackberry, which could do a bunch of stuff. Sam: He also didn't even really invent the ... He invented the iPod, but what is the iPod? Well, it's a portable music device. Those existed before the iPod. What he did is he saw these old school walkmans with CDs or tapes or those ones that they were only 20 megabytes and you could put 10 songs on them. It was a little USB thing. He would look at things like that and think, "How could this be better? How far could this thing be developed?" He really just stretched and perfected existing innovations. Sam: So he looked at things that already existed and were already popular, but then tried to make them extreme. He would have done a lot of market research with them and it's pretty easy to identify. If someone had an mp3 player that could only hold 20 songs or you'd ask them, "What could be better with this?" "Oh, I wish it could hold more than 20 songs. I wish it looked better than this. I wish its battery lasted longer. I wish it did all of these things." His real skill was being able to stretch thing past where people thought were possible. Sam: Joshua Westover says, "Do you have any suggestions for where I can find people in the fear of flying niche other than Facebook groups?" Probably I would just start looking in forums and Facebook groups and things like that. What you can do is you can join Facebook groups, look at the people that post in there and then look at their Facebook profile. Sam: Then look at the things that they like and look at the other groups they're in and start looking at their photos and just start stalking all of these people and just psychoanalyzing them and trying to figure out who they are and all of these things because there'll be clues everywhere. It might be in the photos that they've got. It might be in their job titles. It might be in the other pages that they like. It might be in the nature or the sentiment of the things that they post and share with their friends on Facebook, right? Sam: You can identify these people at one place, but then you can start tracing them to all of their other places. You just want to map out that whole space. The map can start from a Facebook group, but then you have to start tracing it back and start finding where all these different folks go. Sam: What you'll probably find is that people who have, if you're flying, they're probably very anxious people. They probably have anxiety issues. Then that will probably get you into a lot of anxiety forums and then you can probably start targeting different topics of anxiety and mental health and things like that, but I don't know. I'm not looking into this stuff. You want to go and look into it and just follow the rabbit hole and just see how far it goes. Sam: Geraldine Mower says, "Hey, Sam. My question is related with public. Since March until I've had 352 surveys, one client and approximately five people thinking of making numbers in order to ..." Shit! I just missed that question. Sorry. Can you please ask that question again. It's starting to fly real quick. Sam: Eddie says, "Buy ads with a credit card while having cashflow. Also, focus on paying off debt or ignore debt while growing the business." Always try to not have any debt, all right? You never want to purposefully have debt because it isn't a good thing. What debt really is is it's having a better today at the cost of tomorrow. So you're borrowing from your future. That's how you've got to understand debt. You can have a way better today if you have a shitty five years. So that's debt. You want to try and not do that, but if you absolutely must use it to get what you want, then you want to use it. You want to make sure that you use it wisely and only as a last resort. Sam: Julian Wageman says, "Hi, Sam. Do you know if there's enough money in a niche if they are able to pay you well? I want to help massage salons get clients doing digital marketing. Is this a good niche?" Well, I don't know. You have to talk to massage salons and then ask them what their problems are. If you talk to let's say 20 or 30 massage salons and they all told you that their number one problem was they can't get clients and they want to get clients. Then if you've found that the best way to get massage salons clients was digital marketing, then that would probably be a good niche. Sam: Ultimately, we're not going to know until we try and sell it to them and ultimately, when we do sell them and have them as clients. Only then do we really know. So you just have to work through in stages. Don't worry about what my opinion is. Don't worry about what other people's opinions are of it. Only trust what actually happens, right? Talk to them, ask them, "What is your problem?" If you find that's their problem, try this as a solution. If it works, good. If it doesn't and you've tried it enough, then it's probably not a good one. Only an experiment can give us an answer. Sam: Joy Sheen says, "Hi." How's it going, Joy? Elaine Cohen says, "Hi, Sam. My niche is targeting small to medium software companies get more customers. I am getting only hundred of potential clients, LinkedIn, Google. I have already one client. How do I go to thousands and more potential clients to scale up after I have proof of concept with such a small number of potential one I'm currently finding?" You're worrying to far into the future. Don't worry about scaling until you get to scaling because it's like driving a car on a country road at night. Your headlights only show you that far in front of the car. That's all that you need to get to where you want to go. They don't illuminate the entire path. Sam: So don't think too far and even worry about that because you're not there yet. Honestly, the path unfolds itself as you keep going. I used to wonder, when I had two clients, I used to stress out. I was like, "Man, maybe this consulting thing can't scale. Maybe I should do a different niche. Maybe I should do all this stuff because I don't know if it will be able to go where I want it to go." As I've kept going along the road, I keep finding ways to make it bigger, bigger, bigger, bigger beyond where I could ever imagine. Sam: Right now, I can see how I can get this business to 100 million a year. Crystal clear, I can see exactly every detail, every little piece to get there. If I can do that, then the company is worth $1 billion. Now, back when I started, there's no way in hell I could have imagined a consulting business being worth a billion dollars. No way. The more you keep going, the more the path unfolds and reveals itself. So just keep going. Keep getting more clients, keep stacking them on and things will start to reveal themselves as you progress. Sam: Eddie Hanman says also, "Your flow is on point there, Sam." Thanks, Eddie. Julian says, "Hi, Sam. In an old video on your YouTube channel, you say that working in the right industry is the most important thing. You say that a good CEO cannot excel in a bad industry, but that an average CEO can succeed in not a good industry. Now, you often say that a niche does not matter. Did you change your option?" Yes. It's not just the industry. It's also the company. It's a bunch of different things. Sam: For example, if you put ... What's a business that's absolutely flying right now? When Google first launched and it was just steamrolling ahead, you could put an average CEO in that business and it would have kicked, just flying because it was an awesome business. The product was absolutely dialed in and the need is huge and ever-growing. So it's like a rising tide that is rising regardless of what the CEO does. Sam: A sunset industry with a sunset business like Coca-Cola, for example. Less people are drinking Coke because of the way the trends are moving. More people are health conscious. More people now don't like sugar and all of this stuff. So you could put a really good CEO in that business and it's going to be harder and it's also more mature. So it's not just the industry. It's all sorts of different things, but because we're choosing our industry and our business, we're only going where things are good. Sam: So we're looking for an industry paired with a business that makes it good, but don't just look at one variable. It's always a combination of variables, right? We could look at Coca-Cola and it's going down and we could say, "Oh, well, being a CEO of any drink company is really bad right now." That's not true. Well, Coke is going down like La Croix is going up because they provide a drink that's a replacement for Coke and it doesn't have sugar in it and all of that. Sam: So the drink companies that don't have sugar, they're doing better, but the ones that do have sugar, they're getting worse. So it's not just the industry. It's a combination of company, product and industry. Sam: Julian Wageman says, "Hi, Sam. People I don't like are people who hurt others and harm themselves. Do I need to hurt others and myself in order to become successful?" Obviously not, but we want to analyze whether this is true or not because I don't know what you mean by hurt. I don't know if you mean that these people actually beat other people with their fists or whether they humiliate people and just mock them on the internet. I don't know what you mean. So you need to detail exactly how these people hurt other people and themselves. Only then can I start to see what might be going on in your mind. Sam: Maranis says, "Hello, Sam from [inaudible 00:54:31]" How's it going? Mitch says, "At what point did you move out of your parents' garage income, age, et cetera? I just turned 21 and I still live with my dad in the basement, but making good money now. What's your advice?" I moved out of my parents' garage when I was making, I think our company was only making nine grand a month or something, but that was revenue, right? We still had some expenses. Sam: I would move out the moment you can because there's just a particular mindset that comes when you're living in your dad's basement. No matter how good the business is doing, you're never going to feel that empowered working out of your dad's basement. So you want to make sure that the moment you can, move out, be independent and have your own place and make sure it's a nice environment because your environment actually has an effect on you. Sam: For me, I need lots of natural light. There's no way I could work in a basement, man. I would get depressed because there'd be no windows, there'd be no natural light on me. That's why I chose this apartment, which is all glass and good views. Then even our office just has tons of windows because I just found for me, natural light makes me feel a lot better. I don't know how much money you're making at the moment and it's definitely, you shouldn't be in your dad's basement. Go out, get your own place. Sam: Larissa Funton says ... This is Julian Wageman, "Me too." Najub Hashimi says, "Hi, Sam. I always stop doing the work just right before when I'm about to achieve something. For three years, I've just bought programs and never stick to any of them. Do you have any tips for that? I mean, when I sit down to do the work, it does not feel real to me and I get bored. When I think about achieving my financial goals, I feel nervous and stressed." What you have is you're probably having some identity crisis that comes from it because you probably have a lot of beliefs about actually like maybe it's talking to strangers or achieving success or money or what other people are going to think about you. There's probably a lot of external, social society things that are influencing you or family or friends or things like that and it makes it hard for you to commit to something. Sam: Also, it's hard for me to understand when you sit down to do the work, it does not feel real to you, "... and I get bored." I don't know what that means. What do you mean by it doesn't feel real to you? Probably what you need is you just need ... It's a new behavior for you. You probably never committed to something, dug into it and just started taking action and just going for it. For you, maybe commitment and sacrifice and all of these things are new things to you and you're trying to change your behavior and the way you work. Whenever you try and change your behavior, you face a lot of resistance, right? Sam: So if some has done one thing, a particular way for a long period time and then you try and change it, it's painful and it's hard to get them to change. So yeah, I'm guessing you probably haven't been a relentless action-taker and a high-achiever and a competitive person, but that's now what you need to be to do what you need to do. You have to just feel those pulse inside you. When you sit down to take action, you have to feel what's going on. You're probably going to feel anxious. You're going to have all of these thoughts pop up into your mind like telling you to do this, do that, do that, do that and you just have to just sit there with that and feel all of that coming and just ignore it. Sam: You have to really, really train yourself. When I go to do something difficult, I sit there and I'm like, "Holy shit!" There's like a storm going on inside me. It's like pulling me this way, this way and I just have to sit and not act on those urges. I just have to let them go, let them go, let them go. Then once I've let them all go, I can then start focusing and going on it. Sam: It sounds to me like you're just feeling the slightest little impulse and then just, bam, you're off. You've got to get more disciplined than that. You got to be able to just watch your own mind and what's going on. Everyone feels this different urges and pulse and distractions, but really, really well-trained people, they still feel them, but they ignore them. Like me, I still feel fear and all of that stuff, but I'm good at just ignoring it and not letting it affect me. Sam: Joshua Westover says, "One objection that has come up with multiple people in my niche is that their fear of flying is very personal to them and people seem to be cautious when speaking about it. Do you have any tips on how I can get people to trust me and feel comfortable with opening up to me in direct outreach?" Practice. Dude, this isn't that bad. Hunter Otis helps people become porn-free, right? I'm sure it's harder for people to talk about being addicted to porn than it is that they're scared of flying. So you just practice. People will open up to you with practice. Sam: Biaggio says, "Sam, hello. My niche is within the talent workforce acquisition. Do you agree to use Facebook Ads in order to scale my business even with the intense competition within this industry sector and what's your opinion on this?" Yes. I'm in probably one of the most competitive damn industries there is like selling training on the internet, on Facebook and it still works. Competition is relevant. When you're the best, you beat the competition, regardless of who it is. You just need to focus on it, master it and practice and it will work. Sam: Donald Dang says, "I remember in one of your older videos you mentioned some things you'd do if you would start or love it. You mentioned working your business during the day and getting a telesales job during the night. Do you still stand by this advice?" It depends. If I was like day one new, I would probably do that just because I didn't know what to do. If I even thought I had the ability to get a client, then I would just get a client and just have low expenses and then just focus all in on my business. Sam: I really think once you can just get one or two clients and make some money to cover your bills, it's best to put all of your attention and time into your business because if you have a job and a business, the job is just sucking so much of your energy and I didn't make massive progress in my business until I quit my job. I've never seen anyone really crush it with a job because it just takes up too much of your life. It just sucks and then you don't have much left to give. Sam: Evonair says, "Hi, Sam. I'm getting a lot of very polite "No, thank yous" or "I'm too busy now, but let's talk in a month" responses to my direct outreach messages. What do you think this indicates? Perhaps I'm not being bold enough and my niche offer is old. Thanks." It indicates that you need to do more. Keep trying and then try iterating. Try different things. Keep trying. Try different angles, trial and error and practice. You know more than me because you've been doing this. Your first hunch here, you said to me, "What do you think this indicates?" and then you said, "Perhaps I'm not being bold enough and my niche offer is old." So you already know. Sam: You're asking me, but then you're telling me what to say. So trust that instinct that you've just had. You've been doing this yourself. You've been listening to them and you've been talking to them and your instincts tell you that you need to be more bold. Be more bold and see how that goes. Then by the time you do that, your instincts will probably tell you to try something else. Trust those instincts and just keep following them and keep iterating and tweaking and keep taking action and you'll go where you want to go. Practice. Sam: Julian Wageman says, "How important is it that you are already very familiar with your niche? Is it wrong to choose a niche that you don't know much about?" No. You can choose any niche you want. The only thing really that's important is that you have some interest in it. If you absolutely hate what your niche is, then you probably shouldn't choose it because you need to like this thing or be interested or curious in it. If you are, then good. Then you can pick that niche and then look at their problems. Sam: Really good niches are ones that you're really interested in and passionate about and also, they have big problems that you can solve. That's what makes a good niche. The skills can always be learned. Honestly, the skill is probably the easiest part. If you're interested in something and there's big problems to solve, you'll get the skills. So just think about it that way. Think skill is least important, passion is important and then problems is important and you can always fill in the skills. Sam: Monsour says, "Hi, Sam. How do you suggest the best minimum viable offer should be for consulting services to manufacturing industry?" Dude, I don't know. What are you selling? This doesn't tell me anything. It sounds to me that you haven't gone through the course fully, video-by-video, watched every minute of every video, taken action on everything because if you had done that, you wouldn't ask this question. You just need to work through it step-by-step and you'll figure out what you need to do, but don't jump any steps, don't skip anything. Sam: Mark Borsma says, "Hi, Sam. Do you find that more personalized direct outreach messages get a lot better response rate?" Yes, I do. Anytime you personalize something, it gets a way better response. "I'm in the gambling addiction niche and I've started contacting potential clients via Facebook and what your opinion on this. Also, would brochures and letterbox drops be a waste of time in the local community?" What's my opinion on your niche? Well, it's a definitely a problem. It depends what your solution is and how you're able to communicate it with them, which will result in them buying or not. Sam: My opinion on that niche, yeah, it's a good one if you have something to offer and you can communicate it. Yes, make things more personal. Every time you personalize, results are better. Dropping brochures and letterbox stamps, I don't think that's a good idea. There's no element of feedback there. If you drop out all of these brochures, then you're not going to get any feedback back. What you want to do is just private message people, start conversations that way because every single instance you're going to get feedback and you can personalize on every single instance. Sam: Joshua Westover says, "I'm curious about where you got the domain name consulting.com from. Was it a case of having to negotiate a price with somebody who already owned it?" Yes, it was. The domain name is 20 years old or something. I had to buy it off somebody else. Sam: Simon Reinhardt says, "Hi, Sam. Which program should we use when we create an online course?" It depends on what you mean by program, whether you mean the software or whether you mean which training program that I offer. If it's the training program that I offer, Consulting Accelerator shows you how to do done-for-you and one-on-one consulting. I have another program called Uplevel Consulting. Uplevel shows you how to focus on programs and online courses. If you want to learn more about Uplevel, look at week seven in Consulting Accelerator. Week seven will tell you everything about it. Sam: If you want to know what software to host your training program in, then I would look at Kajabi. That's the one that I've used and that my other students use. We've got a discount link for it, which is consulting.com/kajabi. Sam: Larissa Funton says, "Sam, I help individuals with health problems from unhealthy eating habits and you help them eat healthier and improve their health. I don't know how to build a six-week program to follow my coach." So you've mixed up the steps here. You can't train a good program until you've helped these people one-on-one or with proper consulting or coaching. You need to get some one-on-one clients first and coach them via the phone or via Skype and then figure out what works. Conduct a recipe and with time, you'll get a formula, a special recipe that you know that if you take people through, they'll get these results. That's what happens with practice and experience. Sam: Once you have that formula and that recipe, then you're ready to build a training program or a course. If you don't know how to build that, then I'm assuming you don't have the recipe. If you don't have the recipe, then either you haven't done any one-on-one or you haven't done enough one-on-one. Do enough and then it will happen. Sam: Manny says, "Hi, Sam. Currently picking my niche. Thinking about helping personal trainers get and retain clients. Is that specific enough in your opinion?" Yes, if that's their problem. So you want to talk to personal trainers and see if that's their problem. If it's their problem, then that would be a great solution. Simple as that. Sam: Janine Tan says, "Hi, Sam. I've got a huge financial problem right now. I remember you were also in the same situation when you started. How did you focus on shifting your mindset to positivity and working on your goals? How did you fix your personal finances?" First of all, when you're in a really shit situation, understand that it's natural not to feel great, right? That's the human survival mechanism at work. When a human is in a bad situation, they're freaking out, that's normal. It's actually worse to be in a bad situation and not be freaking out. Sam: If people are in a bad situation and they're relaxed and happy, then they're screwed because their brain is malfunctioning. So you just have to understand that that's normal, first of all. Then you have to use that energy that you've got to really drive you and you have to channel that energy into just taking relentless action because the only thing that's really going to shift your mindset and make you feel happy is getting out of that situation and taking action. Sam: So don't sit there without doing any action and think, just by thinking that you can feel happy and empowered because you're not going to. You have to do work and get out of that danger zone to start feeling good. You have to channel that negative energy, the fear, the discomfort and all of that, you've got to use it. I love that energy so much. For me, the bad energy drives me more than any positive energy. I like that dark energy. I like being with my back up against the wall and outnumbered and all of that stuff. I like it when people are attacking me and I'm in those bad situations because man, it makes me go. That's when I can just move. Sam: You've got to use that. It's powerful stuff to get where you want to go. Don't think that just by doing some mindset and reading a self-help book that it's going to change that. Only action will fix it. Sam: Elsa says, "Sam, the niche I've picked is high performance and productivity for female entrepreneurs. I'm a busy mom." There's a loud siren here. Let's wait for it to pass. Elsa says, "Sam, the niche I've picked is high performance and productivity for female entrepreneurs. I'm a busy mom and I know that entrepreneurial moms will be interested in my offer. Would you advice me to narrow down my niche to entrepreneurial moms or keep it broader as female entrepreneurs?" Sam: I would start out with it as just female entrepreneurs. Yeah, I'd start out with female entrepreneurs because it's still specific, but it's a little bit broader. Then you can work with both. You can work with the entrepreneurial moms and the female entrepreneurs. Then you can make your decision based on actual experience. You might want to narrow it further or you might want to still keep serving both. I would start broader because even though it's broader, it's still not that broad. Sam: Julian Wageman says, "Hey, Sam. How do you know if your niche is too small or too big to enter into? How do you know if you should niche down even more or make it bigger?" Honestly, you'll just know when you start taking action. Generally, it's too specific when you can't find anyone to talk to. It's too broad when your message is really diluted and you don't even know who you should be talking to. You should just be able to find that balance through actually implementing it and trial and error. You'll just be able to get a sense for it and be able to judge it. Sam: Jacob Farrow says, "Sam, what's your view on tax havens such as the Cayman Islands or Bahamas to name a few? Would you consider Saint Lucia a tax haven as well? Is it wise to set up offshore bank accounts and tax havens to protect yourself? Are there really any catchers or barriers to setting these up? Would be keen to hear about your views and whether you think it's worth in the long run." Sam: It's a lot of work to actually build a company structure that works with one of those things. A lot of people think that they can just open a company in the Cayman Islands and have a bank account there and make money and put it in their bank account and that they don't have to pay any tax. It's not like that. People that do that end up going to jail. You will get caught if you do that. Sam: It's not that simple. It's extremely complex. You actually need to have the company there. So there needs to be an office. There needs to be a director there on the ground, then the bank accounts have to be there, the servers have to be there, the staff has to be there, all of the intellectual property has to be there. You'll have to fly there for board meetings and there'll have to be lawyers there present to take minutes and record those board meetings. That's just the start of it and then it goes way further. Sam: It's not worth looking at until you're making a lot of money. So as soon as you've had to pay a million dollars in tax, then start looking at that stuff. The guys in my Quantum Mastermind, I've told them strategies at that level like Andrew Argew and dudes like that. Until you've had to pay a million dollars in tax, don't worry about it. Your time is better spent just making more money and focusing on making more money instead of trying to have a more efficient structure because you can always do the other one later. Sam: Debra says, "Absolutely loving your program. My niche is women that are in the corporate and professional world that are well-accomplished but are overlooked for the real opportunities that can get them visible and their ideas ignored, even credited to someone else. I help them stand out as an authority in their industry, get really visible and build their credibility so that they are sought after and can command higher fees. What are your thoughts on that? Would I have to niche down further on that?" Sam: No. I mean, it sounds like a good start, but start with it. Start talking to people. Start offering them things. Start the conversations and through those conversations, it will get more refined. It will get more honed and developed. Right now, that's perfect for the idea stage. You've done all you need to do for the idea stage and now, you need to just actually start implementing. Sam: Julian says, "Hi, Sam. How many hours do you spend reading books each week?" I don't block out time to read them, so I don't have a structure there. Most of my time is spent working, so implementing. When I have a lapse of motivation or if I'm really exhausted, I'll read a book or if I need to get motivated, I'll read a book or if I have executed everything I need to execute and now I'm trying to get new ideas and new ways of thinking to make things better or improve things, then I'll read a book. Sam: If I know what I need to be doing, then I won't read anything. I'll just be head down, just driving. Sometimes I do that for a long time. Sometimes I won't read a book for months because all I'm doing is implementing because I know what I need to be doing. When you know what you need to be doing, the most important thing is doing it and no book is more important than doing it. So it's just mixed. It depends on what I'm trying to do, what situation I'm in. Sam: Janine says, "Hi, Sam. I'm helping SMEs to achieve their business goals by offering financial statement preparation and analysis with the help of my uncle's accounting software." Cool. Got a question or you were just telling me what you're doing? Elsa says, "Sam, in a niche like high performance and productivity where the client is the one actually doing the work, how do you suggest starting with done-for-you services?" You can't be them, so you can't do full done-for-you. Done-for-you would be just one-on-one in this scenario and you talking to them on a phone call or a Skype call. That would be where you start in the high performance coaching market. Sam: Deepak says, "I intend to work with executives. Do they have difficult traits to work with and teams of being coachable and with your expectations? Why would an executive want to work with me or any personal development coach? Can they not attend or be part of the big names in the personal development industry like Tony Robbins? What should I do to make myself the self PD coach for the executives in the industry?" Dude, if you're asking me these questions, then you haven't looked into this. If you want to work with executives, cool. Then you need to start talking to executives and asking them what their problems are. Sam: Right now, your brain is like, "I want to do this. I want to work with executives, but I have a worry that they're not going to be coachable and then I'm also worrying how they're going to want to work with me and then why would they work with somebody else?" You're thinking too much. Thinking is not what you want to do. You want to talk to the executives and find out what their problems are. If you can articulate what their problems are and then you want to start thinking, "Well, how can I help them solve those problems?" Then all of a sudden, the big names like Tony Robbins and stuff, they're out of the question, right? Sam: Why do people buy my programs instead of Tony Robbins' programs when they could buy Tony Robbins' programs? It's because when it comes to getting people a business and getting them clients and making them money, this is better than Tony Robbins because I'm solving a specific problem. Tony Robbins helps more with self-help and motivation. If you really want to get motivated and pumped up, then Tony Robbins would kick my ass at that. I don't really do that stuff. I don't even do any live events and I don't really like getting all pumped up and motivated. I just like to win. So we're very different. Sam: If you focus on a problem and you can solve it, then you beat Tony Robbins because he isn't doing that, unless all these executives want is motivation, right? You just haven't done the work. You just need to follow the process that's in the program step-by-step and do it. Sam: Janine Tan says, "Hi, Sam. What's your view on offering general services before specializing?" You are helping SMEs achieve their business goals. Again, these things are messed up when they're not derived from the client, the problem. So you're helping SMEs achieve their business goals by offering financial statement preparation analysis. You said you're doing that because your uncle has a software accounting company, right? That's the wrong way to do it. You're looking at your uncle and the fact he has a software company and then thinking, "Oh, I'm going to offer that to them." That's the wrong way. You're going the wrong way. You need to talk to the market. Sam: First of all, who are SMEs? Get more specific with that. Then you need to talk to them and ask them what their problems are. Once you've identified what their problems are, then you need to think, "How can I solve those problems?" If you can solve their problems with your uncle's accounting software and doing the stuff, then cool, you've got a fit, but don't try and match it the other way around. That's when things get confusing. Sam: I can always tell what way someone has done something. If someone's gone from the market then found the problem and then attached the solution, I can tell. When someone's done it the other way around, it's so obvious because it just doesn't make any sense. There's a big tangle. Sam: "Hi, Sam. Thanks so much." Oh, this is Thomas Lacy's question. "Hi, Sam. Thanks so much for all the support. Could you comment on the best resources and tips for delegation and using network effects, leverage, et cetera? Obviously, had several clients through referrals. Yet, I want to maximize network effects such as calling 10 friends and telling them to bring me clients [inaudible 01:25:04]" I mean, the best way that you can do that is just to have a referral scheme. You could say to them, "If you refer me one friend, I'll give you this much money off or I'll pay you this much money in cash," or something like that. You just need to have a basic referral program that you use with your clients. Then they might start telling other people. Sam: Joward says, "Hi, Sam. Have been looking at the tech recruitment niche since November last year. I found many problems in this niche and a lot of the distortion from the truth. My offer is to help tech recruiters become more efficient through market knowledge and improve feedback. I have about six strategy sessions with my niche and have tried at different angles from offering recruiters done-for-you consulting and make more placements to offering actual businesses, done-for-you ... One, should I consider getting a job as the tech recruiter myself to master the niche? Two, I feel this is taking too long, seven months. Should I just stick to the niche no matter how long it takes to crack?" Sam: I think what's going on here is that you have been thinking about this, but not doing enough, right? You need to start talking to them because I remember, I spoke to you three weeks ago and you've done five calls or something, right? Three weeks ago, you would have been in this niche for six months, right? So it's not time. Time is not how long you've been. You're measuring time by days and months, but really, it's measured by number of calls. Sam: If someone did five calls in one day, then they've really spent more time in this niche than you have in seven months. So measure time not by actual time, but by calls because that's the true measure of this. You're right. It is taking too long for you because you're not striking the hammer enough. You need to be on course everyday. So that's the problem. You don't need to go get a job as one and you don't need to wait more time. You just need to take more action, have more calls. Sam: Just think about it like this. If you don't talk to someone in the niche once a day, then you're not even doing any work. Just think about it like that. Then if you talk to at least one person everyday, then you're making progress. Sam: Debbie Glasser says, "Hi, Sam. I'm deciding between two niches and would like your opinion on a question I have about one of them. I write for the corporate wellness programs. The industry's standard for communicating any message with an employee to initiate action is five messages on three different medians. In my world, this means they do not know what is important to the reader or they don't know who they are talking to or how to connect with them. Do you agree with this problem I see?" Sam: Yes. We need to stop trying to guess what their problem is. We need to just go to the person and ask them. You could go to two sides. You could go to the employees within the corporate wellness program and ask for their opinion on their corporate wellness program and then you could go to the CEO and ask for their opinion on it and then you could also go to the person who's in charge of the corporate wellness program and get their opinion on it. You want to get all three perspectives on it and then you'll be able to tell what the problem is. Sam: Don't try and guess what problems exist. That's a bad way to do it. It's a recipe for messing it up. You don't want to take chances on this stuff. You want to know, know for sure. You want to base your business on facts, not guesses. Sam: Ola says, "Hi, Sam. Do you think it's a good idea to call everybody I shortlisted about my market research questions and then call them after I create my offer or is it going to be too awkward and they will know that a month ago I didn't know what their problem is and now I want to charge 2,000 for consulting?" You're thinking about it the wrong way. Two months ago, you asked them what their biggest problem was and they said, "This is my problem." Two months later, you come back with a solution to their problem. They don't care about anything else other than solving their problem. So if you really do have a solution, they're stoked. You're thinking about this the wrong way. The only thing that matters is solving the problem, remember? Sam: Joshua Westover says, "Have you read the book, The Secret? If so, what do you think of it?" No, I haven't read the book, but I've seen the movie. I mean, it's great, but it doesn't provide you with actions. It's just like a lot of the self-help stuff. It's like think positive, think all of this crap and don't get me wrong. I think it's better to think positive than to think negative. Also, if you're in a shitty situation, then the only thing that fixes that is doing something about it. Of course, you're going to be negative if you're in a shitty situation. If you're positive in a shitty situation, then you're delusional. Sam: So I don't want to get motivated if my life sucks because I don't want to be happy if my life sucks. I want to be unhappy, so that I can fix it. That's why that stuff can be good, but I like fixing things actually instead of just thinking nice thoughts. Sam: Aram says, "What's the proper dollar estimate to experiment with Facebook advertising to find ad and funnel fit with the cold traffic? I know it takes time, some investment on the front and to get place on ROI." I mean, you can pretty much expect that it's going to cost you to optimize everything and to find everything. It will cost you at least 500 bucks, maybe 1,000 bucks to properly test it. Sam: Debra says, "Loving your program." I have already answered your question. Deepak says, "What would be a proper coaching package for life coaching for executives, six months or 12 months?" Dude, look at these questions. You're asking me what would be best for these executives. I'm not one, you're not one and we're talking about, "Should it be six months? Should it be 12 months? Would it be at least a grand a month, upfront payment five grand for six months? Does that sound okay for me, who is a beginner in my niche?" Man, these are the wrong questions. Sam: You need to talk to the market. You need to find out what their problems are and then you need to find a solution to their problems. Then you need to assess the nature of that solution. Is it best provided as a one-off or is it best provided as an ongoing thing? Then what is the nature of solving that problem with the solution? Is it going to take six weeks, six months, one year? Those things dictate the timelines, not my opinion of it or your opinion of it. You're going the wrong way here. Sam: Then you want to price on value, not based on how much we think we should charge them. Honestly, you need to go through the training program one-by-one and I can see from my dashboard how much of what video you've watched. I can see everything. So you want to make sure that you go through the training. I'll know if you didn't. Sam: Khalid says, "Hi, Sam. I got a client in my niche, cosmetic surgeon, who agreed to pay me two grand a month for managing Facebook Ads," nice work, "landing pages and email marketing. I was honest with him that I'm new to this and he agreed to pay me from the second month after seeing results. From the course, I know how to do Facebook Ads and email marketing, but I don't know how to design landing pages and funnel that converts well. Any ideas where I can start?" Sam: Yes. So you want to look at other cosmetic surgeons that are running Facebook Ads. You want to find them. You want to find out who the best case study is and then model what they're doing. That's what you want to do. Google search for best funnel for cosmetic surgeons or how to run ads for cosmetic surgeons. Start searching for things. Other people will figure out what you're trying to figure out. You want to find out who they are and learn from them and then implement that for your person and then iterate, tweak and improve. Sam: Simon says, "Which program should we use for Cera?" I don't know what that is. What is Cera? Mauricio says, "Hello, Sam. Based on your experience, what's the best strategy to read a book?" It's just to read it, to sit and just read. It takes time and patience, but that's how you do it. I prefer physical books, if you're asking for that. I don't like audiobooks because I don't have as much comprehension with them. Also, I can't underline them. I really need to underline and circle stuff because what happens is later on, I come back to it and then I want to find the 80/20 in the book, so that I can go back and flip through it. You can't do that with a Kindle and stuff or an audiobook. Sam: Mauricio says, "Hi, Sam. Do you recommend any live seminars? If so, which ones do you recommend? By the way, you should open live seminars for us students. We would be more than happy to learn live." No, I don't recommend any. You just need to do the work. You know what this program tells you what to do. Then the only thing you need to do is do it. You don't need anything else to make you do that. I think later on, we might offer one a year or something, but I'm not in a hurry to do them because I'm trying to channel all of my energy into making these programs better online because online programs can reach so many more people than live events. Sam: Plus, a live event only goes for three days or two days. These things go for years, so that's why I channel most of my energy into making these communities better, the content portal better, the training better, the systems better, all of that stuff because it has a longer tail than an event. Sam: Eddie Hanlen says, "How much of your money should you be investing in your business and in new education and courses, AKA, when should I join your mastermind?" Well, it depends. You should always be investing in your education in some way, shape or form. You should always be buying new books, reading them. If ever you need to learn something, you should be learning it. There should never be a time when you're not investing in any form of self-improvement or education. There should never be a time when you're not investing in your business. You should always be investing in it. Sam: How much? You want to invest a lot back, but not too much because you've got to keep a safety net there for unforeseen events and things. You always keep trying to grow your cash pile. I call it the war chest. I'm always trying to grow the war chest, so that you've got cash available because one of my biggest advantages is how much cash I have available because it means I can do things that other people can't and it means that I can write out storms that other people can't. So I can get into gnarly situations and outlive everyone. I can also bite off bigger battles. Sam: You want to keep working on growing that cash, but you also want to be investing as well. The key is just don't be blowing it on ... Your personal life is the last place you want to be spending it. You want to live well and eat well and do all of that, but you don't want to be buying luxury crap or buying cars and stuff like that. You should be investing into your education and into your business. If you want to join the mastermind, I mean, just send me a message on Facebook and we can chat about it and you can see whether it's the right fit for you. Sam: Julian says, "Sam, I don't like people who take drugs and speak rude to others. Do I need to be more like them in order to succeed?" No, you don't. That's interesting what your one is and I wonder what that means. So maybe what it means is that you need to be a little bit more ... What is the word? Maybe you need to be a little bit more aggressive or experimental or something because we don't look at these things so black and white. If the people that you wrote down that you dislike the most are people that do drugs and are rude to other people, then that doesn't mean that it's their black and white, that it just means that. Sam: We want to look at what's behind that. So maybe you don't like the people who do drugs because they're really experimental and all of that. Maybe in your life and business, you need to be a little bit more open-minded and a little bit more experimental. It doesn't mean that you should go out and do drugs. It means that you just should be a bit more open-minded, a bit more experimental. Then if you don't like people who are rude to others, then maybe that means that you need to be a bit more aggressive and maybe you're a bit too worried about hurting other people's feelings right now. So maybe you're really worried all the time about hurting other people's feelings and all of that and you need to push harder there. Sam: So that's how we look at this experiment. We look at why we don't like those things and then maybe the reason behind that and whether we might be missing some of that, but it's not a black and white experiment where it's like, "Oh, they're doing that, let's do that." I hope that makes sense. Sam: Rob Allery says, "Sounds like she's emotionally in the wrong vibration and needs to figure out the reason why she's doing the things she's doing because of her paradigm, which is more into habits." I don't know who you're talking about, Rob, with that one. Sam: Jacob says, "In week two of Accelerator, you mentioned that you don't believe in free. In recent times, you give a lot more away for free. You do more blog videos, social media and even offer a seven-day free trial. Has the market feedback changed your view on free or is it still the trial and experiment you're testing right now? Has your results improved since you gave so much away?" Yes. What I mean by this is that it's not that you shouldn't do anything free. It's that where is most of your energy going? When I look at a lot of people in my market, without a doubt, most of their energy goes into their personal brand and their image and the content and social media that they put out there. Then it goes into their products. Sam: So most people in my space, you see all of their time goes into their social media, their content that's free, blogs, podcasts, interviews, all of that stuff and speaking on stage or getting more famous. All of their energy goes there. Their products, these things over here that are neglected, they don't get any of their attention. So their products suck, but their personal brand is pumping. Sam: What I believe is the opposite, so I want most of my attention and energy to go into my products and not that much into my personal brand because I want my personal brand to be built off the results of my clients, not about how many podcasts I've been on or some crap like that because in the longterm, that's what matters. In the longterm, it's not about who has the most followers or the most likes or the most fame. In the longterm, it's about who offers the most value to customers. So that's my view on it. It's not that I don't ever want to give away anything for free. It's just that my main thing is my products and my customers, not the public. Most people, they put all of their effort into the public and no effort into their customers. To me, that's backwards, totally back of the front. Sam: Simon Reinhardt says, "Sam ..." I've already asked that question. Angie Kinston says, "Sam, I really appreciate these Facebook live sessions with you. It's rare that you get to speak with the top person in any organization. It's priceless." Thanks, Angie. Bryce says, "Price isn't full." Thanks, Bryce. Sam: Angelo says, "Hi, Sam. Thanks for your time. I am in the social and digital marketing niche for accountants and currently building skills for it. What is the best course and place to learn these skills and be competent enough to get results before I get started and approach my market? I'm at week two at the moment, so I'm not sure if I should skip to later in this course and then learn the skills and come back or if there's another course." I would complete this course and then take action and you'll learn from taking action. Sam: This course will teach you lots about digital marketing, funnels, automation, Facebook Ads, sales. It will teach you all of that stuff. Then to really master for your market, you're only going to learn that by implementing it and working with your market. That's what I would do. Sam: Jesus Romo says, "Sam, when offering digital marketing, how do we determine whether to offer Google Ads or Facebook Ads to the customer?" We offer it based on their problem and which solution is a better fit. I would look at, let's say your market is dentists, right? We'd look at dentists and we'd look at the entire industry and figure out what works best for them. Is it AdWords or is it Facebook? Then we would offer what best solves their problem. Sam: We're always looking to provide the most efficient and effective method to solve their problem. That's what it is. If all of a sudden that changes, we change. We're always just offering what works best. Sam: Ellie Halory says, "I need Uplevel. Still waiting for week seven to be unlocked after uploading [inaudible 01:45:56] Can't wait." Cool. Thanks, Elle. Andrew Gareth says, "Do you see a real difference between how you sell and market intimate coaching services and done-for-you consulting services? I asked because there's a big difference in my view where the intimacy of marketing needs to match the intimacy of the service, just like there's no buy one, get one free brain surgery offers." Sam: Yeah. I mean, maybe you need to change the energy of it a little bit. I mean, you've got to understand that this method which we use is pretty simple. It's like we're talking to this person about this problem which they have and then about the solution that we have that solves their problem. It doesn't matter who we're talking to. That's still the structure of the situation. Every human situation that has a buying decision is one where there's a problem and a solution. So it doesn't matter what it is. Our offer still works. We don't do any gimmicky things like a buy one, get one free. We don't do that with our situation. That's typically just what's done with commodity products and things like that. Sam: I think the method we've got works well or you just might change the language a bit. You might change the imagery. You might change your tone of speaking and things like that. Still, the mechanics of the system will still work. Sam: Sam Sheepler says, "Sam, thanks for the course. In on week two and this is transformational stuff. I've been self-employed my entire career and this is going to be like napalm for the fire. I can already tell my stuff is gold." Awesome. Good to hear that, Sam. Looking forward to seeing your post in the community when you quit. Sam: Irina says, "Hey, Sam. What do you think is the greatest skill for success? I know there's probably a few, but if you had to pick just one, what would you go with? If it's mindset, then what's one that speak of mindset?" Yes. This is a good one. It's one thing. Never ever, ever, ever giving up. That's the only skill that I have, really. If you never give up, then you got nothing to worry about. Seriously, that's it. The people who fail just give up. They give in. The people who never give up, they always win. Sam: Mark says, "These live calls are really helpful. Thanks, Mark. Lindsey Ritman says, "Hi, Sam. I keep getting stuck up. Tried for two times and I've stopped a little after week two both times. It was strange how the training affected my partner. It honestly scared me. Do other people have issues with getting their significant other to be supportive of these personal transformation and recreating yourself?" Sam: Yes. I mean, anytime you do something like this, it's going to affect your partner because if you had never talked about starting your own business before to your partner ever and then out of the blue, all of a sudden, you're now listening to trainings, doing mindset stuff, doing all of that, it does freak people out because they think, "Oh, this is some ruru stuff. This is wishful thinking. You don't really think this is going to work." That's normal. You got to understand that if this just came out of the blue, it is weird to someone who hasn't been in this world. Sam: So you've just got to talk to your partner and say, "Hey, this is important and I want to change. Are you okay with that?" Then just communicate with them and explain things to them. It's totally normal that partners and things will freak out because it's like a cult. Entrepreneurship is like a cult because they believe in working hard and they believe in working without getting paid initially, which no employee would ever believe that because employees expect to get paid every hour all the time and never do anything without definite reward. Employees believe that no one can really be successful. It's just a fluke, so there's no point in trying and you may as well just be an employee. They believe that most self-help stuff is bullshit. Sam: They believe those things because it helps them come to terms with their mediocrity. It's their story as to why they aren't great. So if you all of a sudden introduce stuff that challenges that story, then it's challenging them. You know what I mean? It's totally normal. You just have to communicate with your partner and explain things to them. Sam: Matt Press says, "Hi, Sam. I've heard you say a couple of times to avoid helping someone start something from scratch, e.g. a business. Yet, in the course you say to forget about whether you can help and to believe in your ability to figure things out. So could you explain, please, because I think I've got a niche that would want that, but I haven't got the experience. All I have is digital marketing knowledge and the tactics in the Consulting Accelerator." Sam: So you've just matched two things I said, but there's other things I said there. You should, first of all, help businesses grow. Existing businesses, you should help them grow first before you start helping people start a business because starting is way harder than helping them grow. Helping them grow is easier and it's lower hanging fruit. If you've found an opportunity to help people start a particular business in this particular niche, then that's cool, but I would first help existing established businesses in this niche grow. Once you've dialed that in and mastered that perfect, now, help them start. Sam: You can absolutely do it, but you want to do it in that order because it will make your life a lot easier. I've never seen anyone do it the other way around. That's my advice. You can still do it, but do it in that order. You'll do it faster and you'll do it easier and everything. Sam: We're going to go till 5:00 PM, which is five more minutes, so I'll keep doing some more questions here. "Hi, Sam. I'm on week five. Should I start with organic methods and then come back when I have my proof of concept or finish the whole course and then put on practice week five?" "I'm on week five. Should I start with organic methods?" Yeah, always start with organic first. Do the organic methods. Try and get your first one to three clients that way. Once you've got that, then do ads, right? Organic first, then ads. Sam: Taylor Renee says, "Sam, do you take one day of rest per week?" Yes. I take Sundays off for two reasons. One is because I actually needed to rest. Otherwise, I get burnt out. Two is to spend time with my wife. That's why. Sam: John Egelmonk says, "Sam Ovens and others, setting up a foreign corporation and offshore accounts is a major deal and it takes a specialized niche person to do it for you." Yup, that's correct. I know because consulting.com is in Ireland. It's in Dublin. That's why I've done it. It cost me $300,000 in lawyers' fees and I had a team of about 12 lawyers and it took me about six months. So it is a big deal and it is complicated. Sam: Donald Dang says, "How did you get a US visa to stay in New York City? Are you on a green card or a work type visa? How would you approach this if I live in Canada and want to eventually move and live down in the States?" I did what I do whenever I want to do anything. I went to Google and then I searched, "How do I move to America?" and then Google populated some results. I clicked on them, found some people to talk to and then I had a found lawyer, spoke to him and then he said, "You need to get an O-1 visa," and so I got an O-1 visa. Now, I'm here on an O-1 visa. Sam: It will be different for you because you're in Canada, probably, but New Zealand was hard to come in from. New Zealand is one of the hardest ones. Canada has got to be way easier. Honestly, just Google it and then find a lawyer and talk to them. They'll do a free consultation with you and tell you what your options are, but find a specialist lawyer, someone who just helps people with these visas because they're specialist visa lawyers, not just generic lawyers. Sam: Debra actually says, "Thank you." Thanks, Debra. Mitchel Paul Clark says, "Thanks for everything, Sam. What would be the best sales books you have been reading that have helped you?" I like SPIN Selling. I really like that one. I think it's by Neil Rackham. That and the sales training and the sales script in this course. The best thing that help me with sales is practice. Practice will help you more than any sales training in the world. Sam: Liz Timoni White says, "Knowing is not the same as doing. Isn't that the truth? Yup. I know a lot of professors and university lecturers that know, but they can't do. Doing is the ultimate knowing. "My name is pronounced as Sheeway. Oh, I have not been as active in the group. Can you explain a little about referring friends to sign up for the consulting course?" Sure. Well, if you have any friends that you think would like to start their own business and change their life, then you should tell them about it and I would just tell them about it over Facebook chat or the phone or however you talk to your friends, maybe in person. Then if they're interested, then you can click that refer a friend button and then you can put their email address in there and you can refer them. When you refer them, they'll be able to join with a discount and then you'll also get paid money as well. Sam: We're at 5:00 now. I'll do two more questions, then we're done here. If your question didn't get answered today, then you just need to show up earlier next time. These happen every Saturday from 3:00 PM till 5:00. If you want to get your question answered, you got to show up at 3:00. Sam: Tobias Forester says, "Hi, Sam. Week two is mind-blowing and I just realized that all the work I'm doing in 10 hours I could also do that in three. How do you structure your tasks for the next day? Are you doing that with the time blocks? Thanks a lot." Yes. You got to cut the fat. Most of what people do is nothing. It's just admin or messing around. So you've just got to identify what truly is action. Now, I can tell you what action is. It's doing strategy sessions. If your whole day is filled with strategy sessions and you do that consistently, there is no other outcome possible than being rich, seriously. Never seen it happen ever. Whenever someone does it, they get rich. Sam: That's what your time should be spent doing. If you can't get strategy sessions, then you want to be generating strategy sessions. How do we do that? Well, we should be adding people as friends on Facebook, joining Facebook groups where our niche exists, adding people within that group on Facebook. When they accept our friend request, we should be messaging them. We should be trying to get them on a 15-minute chat. Then from 15-minute chats to strategy sessions. That's all we should be doing. Generating strategy sessions, doing strategy sessions. If you do that consistently, you will be rich. Sam: Isaac Pinero says, "How important is producing content to market to potential clients versus actually getting clients? I am currently going hard in direct outreach via LinkedIn. Even if you cold call every now and then to get my first free seven-day trial clients for digital marketing, I get a bit overwhelmed because as I'm sending out all outreach emails, a part of me feels like none of it will be effective unless I drop a few blog out or video content. Am I diluting myself?" Sam: Yes. You want to have at least a little bit of content on your Facebook profile and on your LinkedIn profile. Nothing major, just some posts and things like that, just so that when you add people as friends or LinkedIn connections, if they look at your profile, they're like, "Oh, this guy is in my world." So add them, accept. Then when you message them and then they look at your profile, they're like, "Oh, this guy is in my world," so they're more likely to reply, but that's it. Sam: It's just there to make you look like you're in their world. It's just there to make you look like an insider. That's it. So make sure you've got something on your pages, but the main activity is direct messaging and adding people. That's the main thing. Cool. Sam: Well, we're at 5:00 now. That's the end of this session today. Like I said, if you didn't get your question answered, then you want to show up earlier. We do these from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM every Saturday. So get here on time and you'll get your question answered. If you guys enjoyed this, just click that like button. Give me some feedback. Click like if you enjoyed it. Thanks everyone for attending. Our next one of these is going to be next Saturday. Then Nick Hauser and Jesse Clark will be doing the Q&A calls throughout the week as well. Also, if you need help, Facebook group is the place to go. So thanks everyone for attending. Looking forward to speaking with you soon.

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