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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 8th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 8th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for September 8th, 2018. 


Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right, let me know if you can see my screen or sorry, not my screen. Let me know if you can see me, the video and if you've got audio we can talk. Cool. Awesome. Sam: All right, sorry about today. I've been trying to get on for the last 20 minutes. It's like something's up with Facebook Live today. It just showed a blank, like a black screen. I tried it on Firefox and Firefox couldn't detect my camera, so then I tried it on Safari. Safari doesn't even work for Facebook Live, and then I tried on Chrome again and finally got it to work, but yes, something's up with it. Sam: Anyway, if it's your first time on one of these calls, welcome. How these calls go is I hold one of them every Saturday and we do them once a week and we go from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, and that's the time in New York. If you want to know when it is, it's just every Saturday 3 p.m. Eastern till 5 p.m. Eastern, you can put it in your calendar and we do them almost every Saturday, I would say like 90% or 80%, 90% of the time, and I give you advance notice if we're not going to be doing one. Otherwise, you can assume we're always going to be doing one and how these calls go, or these live streams go is you just show up, and you can ask me any questions you want in that comments section to the right hand side. Then I go through in the order that they're asked and answer them. That's pretty much what we do. Let's go ahead and get started here. Sam: So Willis Jura has a question. He says, "I'm struggling to make enough time for daily mindset work. Please, would you share some pointers on how to effectively incorporate this daily? How much time should I spend on this each morning and night? Should I read the full journal aloud or just the dream board?", and goes, "I'm thinking to cover my bedroom wall as one giant dream board. Would you recommend for or against this? How many affirmations would you say is ideal to work with each day?" Sam: Good question, and the trick to it is is that you just have to look at it like at the minimum. You know what I mean? Because it's near impossible, well it's not impossible but most people find it near impossible to every single morning and every single night read through the whole thing in detail without missing any pieces, but it's hard. Sometimes at night you're really tired and you want to just fall asleep. Sometimes in the morning you've woken up late and you got to rush to things. The trick is, is just to look at it at a minimum. You want to have the intention to read through the whole thing every morning and every night but if you can't do that, then just at least look at it and read all of your goals. Sam: If you were to look at anything in there, it would be your new identity, so the Willis Jura identity, the person you want to become because it's just giving you a reminder every single day. The other one are the goals, see like oh yeah that's what I'm trying to do, that's what I'm aiming for, that's what I'm doing right because we're very forgetful and a perfect illustration of this would be in this fictional movie called 50 First Dates and it's an Adam Sandler comedy movie/love story and in that movie, this girl who he falls in love with, every night she goes to bed and falls asleep. She forgets who she is and who her husband is and what her life is and what she's doing. Her memory gets cleared basically every time she goes to sleep. Sam: To help her remember, her husband, Adam Sandler just makes her a videotape. He puts it on her bed next to her in the morning, so when she wakes up in the morning, she looks at it and it just says, "Watch this.", and she just sees a tape. It says, "Watch this." She puts it in and then she watches it and the video explains everything, like this is who you are. This is what happened. This is why you can't remember things and these are your kids. This is your husband. This is what we're doing and this is your life and all of this stuff and that helps her remember everything and then now she knows and then she she gets out of bed and she's good. That's an extreme case and it's a fictional movie, but the point is that's pretty much what we're trying to do with this mindset pack, right? We're trying to take some time to sit down and really figure out what our strengths and weaknesses are and then who we are right now then who we want to become in order to achieve our goals. Sam: Really, the best way to do is to look at your goals, what you want in life far out into the future and then think what sort of person would I need to be to achieve those goals but what sort of human being would just achieve these goals I want to just with ease, and then you describe the characteristics of this human, might be disciplined, might be good at sales, good at all sorts of different things, whatever is required that is the human about focusing, about working hard, all of these different things. Sam: Then you define those characteristics and you're like, yes, if somebody existed and they had those characteristics, they would easily achieve their goal. There wouldn't be a question about it. Then what we're trying to do then is acquire those characteristics. Instead, what most humans do, they see a goal they want, right? Well actually, most people don't even think about what they want. Most people don't think about what they want, and they never make any attempt to achieve what they want because they don't even know what that is but somehow they just live every day kind of feeling like they should want something but they don't know what and kind of like they should learn something or do something to try and get what they want but they don't know what they want so they don't know what to do. Sam: It's just frustration and confusion. That's most people. Then you've got people who are slightly more advanced and they might actually think long term and what they actually want with some sort of clarity and then they define what they want. Then the mistake they make is then they try to get what they want as they are. Let's say someone is poor, shy and not very skilled a really anything and is full of fear, full of doubt, full of all of this stuff, with no skills, no experience anything. This is who the person is. The goal they want to achieve is quite big. It requires focus, hard work, it requires skills and different things and it requires relentless drive. Then what this person does is because they want that thing, they just try to achieve that thing as they are, which doesn't work because that person who they are right now, they have what they have. Their life and what they have is the byproduct of who they are. Who they are gets what they have but they're now trying to stay who they are and get something different, which just doesn't work. Sam: You have to instead look at the goal, find out what sort of person you'd need to be to achieve it, and then instead of trying to achieve the goal, try to become the person and then it's way easier because instead of trying to make a million dollars, which is bloody confusing and hard and everything, instead what you're trying to do is get disciplined, develop focus, work hard, learn skills, that's easier. Those are things you can actually start working on and then once you have those, the million dollars just happens. It's just the byproduct of the skills and the person so that's really what we're trying to do with the mindset pack is we think about the goals, define the characteristics we need to have. Then we remind ourselves every day of who we're trying to become, and the goals we're trying to achieve and we just keep reminding ourselves, keep reminding ourselves and that keeps us working and chipping towards that goal, and every day, it doesn't seem like it's making much progress. Sam: I always remember doing this mindset stuff and I was like, I don't feel like I'm much more skilled or confident each day. I don't feel like I'm rich. I'm actually not any richer in the week since I've been doing this mindset thing because, you know, in the beginning, you're full of doubt. Then you're like, I wonder if this thing is even real or just some like, whoo, whoo thing that's just made up and am I just being stupid. Sam: There's all sorts of questions going through your mind, but what's fascinating is with time, it makes a huge impact. The trick is consistency over time and if you just keep reminding yourself all the time of it, and you do it consistently over a period of time, massive things happen. You've just got to stick to it and understand why we're doing it, and you have to come back round and answer your question specifically, how much time should you spend on it? At least one minute, just the least one minute if you can do more, but if you can't do more than a minute, don't get anxious or beat yourself up. That's fine. The trick is just to look. Sam: Naylor Moosa says, "Sam, when you shed your old self to become your new self each time, how do you cope with your old habits, in particular, the way your body is used to the old emotional state of being? Can you talk about it?? How do you cope with old habits, in particular, the way your body is used to the old emotional state of being. I'm not too sure if I understand that question but yeah, your question's kind of confused because you said when you shed your old self to become your new self, how do you cope with your old habits. Sam: Well, by getting rid of your old habits and acquiring new ones, that is actually how you become your new self and shed your old self. You can't really become your new self and still be having your old habits and old emotions and things like that. That would mean that you're still kind of the old self. That's kind of how this thing works. I would say that the question's confused in that you haven't fully made the transformation yet, which is fine because when you fully do change, the other things are gone, and there might be an inkling of it there somewhere but for the most part, it is gone and there is no desire or there's no trigger or anything for that thing anymore. Sam: All right. Welcome, Daniele Lisling. All right, Willis has another question. Please would you advise part of my ideal consulting service is to enable six and seven figure entrepreneurs to contribute in a meaningful way to social enterprise. I'm currently thinking to test this as a paid co-giving structure for entrepreneurs, for example, whereby I would assemble a team of ecommerce entrepreneurs to partner with social enterprise that makes coffee here in Columbia. I would manage a three month project to give the social enterprise -- this doesn't really solve the problem for entrepreneurs but might be in desire for some, I'm about to interview 30 entrepreneurs this month to find out more. Would you please share how would you structure market validation interviews with my entrepreneur clients? One idea I had is to charge the successful entrepreneurs to manage the project so that their contribution is efficient and effective. Do you have any ideas here? Sam: You said it yourself in your question, you said, this doesn't really solve a problem, and you're right, because what you've done here is you have chosen your niche, which is like six and seven figure entrepreneurs. That's what you've defined it is, and then you haven't defined a problem. You haven't found a problem that exists in that niche. You then just thought this is the niche and actually I just want to enable them to contribute in a meaningful way to social enterprise, which it doesn't really make sense. It's just like you chose the niche and then you just assumed that this is what they should want and then from there, you jumped another arc. There's two, there's a few arcs in here that just kind of pinged off. That was the first one. Sam: The second one was, I'm thinking to test this as a paid co giving structure for entrepreneurs, whereby I'll assemble a team of ecommerce expert. That's another arc and then we are going over to like, making coffee here in Columbia, and then yeah, so those things that we boop, boop, boop, they were kind of like mind spasms. You know what I mean? You need to connect these dots. They need to line up, and what I would do, you ask the question how would you structure market validation interviews with my entrepreneur clients. Sam: First of all, they're not clients yet, right? These are just, this is the market. You're wanting to talk to the market, participants in the market, which is six and seven figure entrepreneurs and the key to really good questioning and really good research and really good understanding is to fully wipe your mind of all preconceived ideas, all assumptions, all everything. You just have to go blank because it's understanding the other person. Sam: The more of you you inject into your understanding of the other person, you're not understanding the other person. You're really just looking at yourself, but you think you're looking at the other person when you're not really, and that's how people screw it up. You got to forget about what you want to do with social enterprise, coffee, Columbia, ecommerce entrepreneurs, wipe that off and just focus on talking to these six and seven figure entrepreneurs and understanding the problem and why it's a problem, why they haven't fixed the problem, how they've tried to solve the problem and failed, whether they are aware of anyone in their position has incurred this problem and solved it, who they are, what did they do, why did they solve it instead of you? Then if you're aware that somebody has this problem like you and they solved it, and you haven't, why haven't you solved it? There's so many whys and you need to understand all of these whys and once you understand them all, it just goes poof into your face, and you will see it. Sam: It's impossible not to see it when you see it, because all the dots line up and you're like, "Ahh, this is absolutely what needs to happen." That happens when you found a niche. You've talked to them, you've identified the problem, and you know why it's a problem and you have a good idea about how to solve it, you know where to look to solve it, and everything starts lining up and then next, what you should do, you should solve it, and if you don't have the skills necessary to solve it, learn them and just do anything you can to solve that problem for those people and then you have a business and you'll be very successful. That is what you do. Sam: The biggest mistake people make is just biased research or actually no research at all. Most people don't research anything. They just assume that they know what people want, which is insane and then they don't talk to anyone to check. Then they create their whole service or product and everything, and then they go out to sell it to them, and they wonder why they don't want it. That's what most people do, and then the next level from there would probably be people who talk to the market, but they come in with preconceived ideas about what they want, or they just can't let go of the experience and the skills that they have personally, so they manipulate the conversations with the research participants in that they twist their questions and they hear selectively just so that they hear what they want, which is that the market needs what they're already good at. Sam: Then the same thing happens. They provide something that no one wants, no one buys it, they fail. These are the two mistakes and you want to avoid both of them, and the way to solve it is what I just told you how to do, no preconceived ideas, ask them, talk to the market, connect the dots. Josh, you're with us overseas. Yeah, I did a Facebook Live today on my laptop and it wasn't working. I had to use my phone in the end. Yeah dude it was messed up. I'm on my laptop so I managed to get it working in the end. Sam: Adam Merst, interested in your take on food and diet and how that affects your day to day energy and health and fitness in general. Good question. On a very simple level, a human being as a system, and it's an organic system. It's an organic machine, really. We're just like a car but we're organic instead of metal and things and our fuel is food and that's our fuel and that's how we grow. We start small and we end up growing. All of that has to come from somewhere. It comes from your food, and that's how you have energy from food. If you don't believe me, just stop eating and see how it goes and see how much energy you got. That's where our energy and growth and everything comes from. Sam: Now, so if that's the source of our energy, and then we are looking for energy to do work and things, then wouldn't it come from the source? Wouldn't it be better to have good sources than poor sources? Yes, it's just a no brainer, really. I don't see how other people don't see that, that if you eat bad food, you will not perform very well and if you eat bad food to an extreme, you will die. If you eat really clean food, you will perform better and your system, your body and your mind and everything will work much better. Sam: Same with exercise. Exercise is, our system needs to be used, otherwise it has entropy. If any system isn't used, it has entropy. If you don't use your brain, you have Alzheimer's, and if you don't move any of your muscles, if you just lay down in bed for years, you wouldn't be able to walk. Your muscles would have failed, like they would have just gone away almost. You have to use it or you lose it basically. The brain and the body are actually extremely interconnected because it runs through the whole nervous system, and so if you're actually in better shape, then your mind works better, just like having good sleep. If you have good sleep, your brain works better. If you eat good food, your brain works better and if you exercise and you keep yourself in good shape, your brain works better. Sam: If business requires the use of our brain and if any advantage in brain function creates a business advantage and the source of that is food and exercise and sleep, then we should probably make sure that we have good food, exercise and sleep. This is so elementary, man. This is so simple in in common sense but yet people don't understand why they just go drink a whole bunch of alcohol and then have a really bad sleep and then not eat, then go to McDonald's in the morning and then have Monster Energy Drink and then they sit down to do some work and nothing special comes out. That's pretty obvious to me. If I did those things and then tried to do some work, nothing special would happen. Sam: You got to work on having clean inputs. Good inputs means good outputs. Garbage in means garbage out, and specifically my diet, every person first of all has different, they run on different, especially with the diet because there's no one thing works for everyone sort of diet. Sam: Some people really, their bodies really like fat. Some people really need protein. Some people, everyone's different you need to find out what you run best on. For me, well, there's one thing that no body really runs good on, and that is sugar and alcohol and all that crap, right? Sugar is a huge one. If you take sugar out of your diet, you will be a lot calmer and a lot more logical and a lot smarter. Your cognitive function will be a lot sharper because what happens in your brain is when you get good at something, there's synapses that fire down a certain path. They go boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, and that's doing something that you've learned and trained it to do, and because that synapse has fired down that path with repetition, that's practice and every time it fires down, it makes that cable in your mind stronger and and wider. The synapses in your minds, they take the path of least resistance, so if it's going to fire somewhere and it comes to a fork, and one's much more traveled than the other, then it's just going to automatically arc down that one because that's where it's got the least resistance. Sam: That's what you're doing when you're training yourself. That's what you're doing inside your brain and it's how your brain works. That's why habit is just a very, very strong cable in your brain and it's very hard to start making it arc down the other way but just with repetition and time, it happens and then the other cable starts to fade away, and it's bam, down that way. Sam: That's how you train yourself but when you have sugar and they've done these tests with EG machines and everything, when you have sugar in your system, the synapse, it's chaotic, so even though you've trained it and you've got a way more well traveled path than it's supposed to go, it will just fire the other damn way for no reason, but the only reason it does that is because there is sugar in the system and it causes chaos by that. Sam: That's why all professional athletes and stuff there, I don't know about all of them but I know Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant and then they were completely taken off sugar and they stayed completely off it because it made them unreliable. They could be trained and they could have perfected something but when it gets into the heat of the moment, they malfunction. That can happen because of sugar in your system, and that's why you want to get rid of it because it does crazy stuff and what you'll notice is that first of all, if you try to go off it, you will you have a real withdrawal. You'll get a headache behind your eyes and things and it's a basically a drug, sugar but it's just a socially acceptable one like alcohol and once you start weaning off it, what you'll notice is you just get so much calmer, like you won't have waves of emotion in you for no reason. You are just calm and your thoughts are more organized and clear, and everything is clear. It's like seeing better. Sam: Then when you have it in your system, you just feel anxious or sad or angry or something because you have these waves of emotions and it's really strange after being clear, you're like, why am I feeling anxious or scared? There is nothing for me to be scared of but you're just feeling it because the sugar's in your system. That's really weird and I would highly recommend people try going off it. It's definitely good for you and it makes you a better business and it makes your mind better, everything better. Sam: What I mean by no sugar is you can't fully have no sugar because it's present in fruits and vegetables and all sorts of things. No sugar is defined as less than 20 milligrams per day. If you have less than 20 milligrams per day, then that's considered like no sugar, right? I recommend you try it. I don't have sugar, I don't have dairy. I don't have bread, gluten, wheat, those sorts of things. Those are the three I avoid. I don't have any alcohol either, and yeah, I just try to have fats, proteins, vegetables, fruits, things like that. I definitely noticed a huge difference when I started eating better and also sleeping better and exercise too. The combination of those three is like you're just multiplying your performance by probably 5x to 10x. Sam: Shawn Joiner says, "Same as Daniel Lambert, I am thinking how to organically reach people for [inaudible 00:30:27]. I have people that I've helped before but in an informal way. I'm thinking how to organically reach people for social skills and emotional intelligence. Yes, so you're looking at it backwards, man. You don't try to reach people for a particular type of training and then not know how to reach the people because if you don't know how to reach the people, then how do you know that the people want the training because in order to understand that you must have had to have reached the people, to talk to them, to understand that they want this training, which means that it's impossible for you to now know that they want training and then not know how to reach them. This is what's going on and so you're looking at it backwards. You're trying to go the wrong way. You have to forget about what you think they want and find the person you're trying to help. Sam: What is the niche? Define it, who do you want to help? Then talk to them what is their problem and then you want to give them the solution to that problem. That is your offer. That is what you're selling to them. That is your business. That creates value. That's how it works, but you're just going around the other way. Sam: Lewis says, "Loving the course so far. Sam, any tips for selling to analytical people? My niche is coaching self taught software developers to land their first job." Sam: Yes, so like the sales script I've created and the one that I gave to you, it is very analytical and it's designed to, to really work well with analytical people because that's what I am. There's a lot of that in that script, because to me, when I learned all of the sales training stuff, I couldn't stand it because it's just like how to speak louder or how to basically trick people and manipulate them into doing these things, and how to do all of this crap. Sam: I was just like, I can't do this, even if I can learn this, but I'm never going to be comfortable doing this. If I was on the other end of this, I'd be able to see through all of this. I'll pull it to pieces and it would never work and so I was like, this can't be the way so the script I designed is made to do it properly and it's informed, you're helping the other person make an informed decision and you're not selling to them unless it is valuable to them, and it makes total sense. You can absolutely use that method that I've shown you there to sell to analytical people, 100%. Sam: So Elau [inaudible 00:33:24] says, "When do you recommend sending the client the agreement? Would you say it's best doing it right after the transaction is made?" Sam: Yes. Talk to them, sell them, collect the card, process it, bam, that's done. Payment's taken care of, and then you can send to them over an agreement just for them to sign and then you're good, then you can start, best to do it that way. Don't send the agreement before the payment because it just slows everything down and it confuses things. Sam: Joshua says, "You mentioned in the dark force video that you let go of your identity so you can be the becoming self. Does that mean you should let go of your identity as an entrepreneur as well? Am I getting the wrong idea?" Yes. I mean, you're thinking about it too much in words. I might use any word to describe myself at any given moment, just without actually thinking that's what my identity is. I might call myself an entrepreneur, a business person, a business owner, I might call myself a CEO. I might call myself a problem solver or all sorts of things, but that isn't my identity, and I don't really think I'm an entrepreneur and that's my identity, right? It's not that. It's not a word. An identity isn't a word. It's more a collection of characteristics and a worldview and habits and biases and tendencies. Sam: All of these things make an identity, not a word or label. That's why I really detest labels because they're just so, how can one word accurately describe a person or anything. It's a word. It's so abstract from reality. How can one word explain anything? A million words can't even actually explain reality exactly how it is, so one word is just that. That's why I don't like labels and I really recommend you don't look too closely at labels too, because they can really confuse you. Sam: I seek to understand how the thing works and the nature of the thing and the cause effect relationships with it and the interconnections between the different things. I seek to understand how the thing works in its nature, not its label, and so what's funny with me is I'm really bad at remembering names, people's names, I don't remember them at all and the names of lots of things I don't remember but I do always remember exactly how the thing works and what the thing was like and the nature of the thing and that's what you should do. Avoid the labels. They cause confusion. Understand the nature. Sam: Robert Vitaly says, "Sam, I'm testing a new part of my current market with a $2,000 offer with strategy sessions to teach them how to become a teacher after the intention of automating it after I really understand the needs and problems. Yeah, there's no question here first of all, but you just made a statement about what you're doing. I can kind of understand what the question might be but yeah, you can see here how this is interesting. Sam: You're doing a $2,000 offer and you're going to teach these people how to become a teacher with the intention of automating it after you really understand their needs and problems. It's kind of gone a bit confusing in here but I mean you should understand their needs and problems before you know what you should be selling them, because otherwise, how do you know what to sell them? Then you should never have the intention of automating it. You should just forget about all of the intentions after it. Your only intention should be in the beginning to understand, and then once you understand, your intention is to solve, and then once you solve, your intention is just to solve for as many people as possible, and that's really it and that's when the automation and the scaling serves the intention of serving as many as possible, solving as many as possible. Sam: You got to have these things lined up clearly. Otherwise, it can make your actions confused because the logic and intent behind the actions is confused. Sam: Nayla Moosa says, "Should we make the client sign a contract before entering into a coaching business with him? If so, do you provide a model that can be used in the program?" Yeah, I do provide you with it. It's in week six, and I can't remember what module it is in but let me find out. I'll go into the portal. Week six and it is, I think it might be setting client, yes setting client expectations which is week six module two and it says there consulting services agreement and the video, which I recommend watching explains when and how to use the agreement, how to adapt it to your own business and your scenario. It answers your question. Sam: Dan Lee says, "As I'm about a week into the 30 day attack, I'm having good results with organic outreach, started scheduling calls and I'm very encouraged. However, I feel so engrossed in being outreach and SS focused that by the end of the week, my own mindset feels very strained and tired. What are the best strategies for keeping your own mind stay at an optimal level? Do you take a day to reset or build strong daily activities to keep your mindset strong? Sam: Yes, so if it's feeling strained and tired, that's good. The brain's like a muscle and muscles, the more you use that thing, the harder you push it to its limits, it grows, it's stronger, and you can overdo it just like you can overdo your muscles. If you just went to the gym all day, every day all the time, you'd snap tendons and you could ruin your whole body and you wouldn't gain much muscle at all. Sam: You can do the same thing to your mind. You want to push it as hard as it can possibly go, and then give it some time to rest. Now the minimum sleep that you need on average for it to recover at the end of each day is like eight hours. In between days, you need a good eight hour block of sleep. Seven is minimum but if you're getting six or five or four, if you're getting four, you're in danger zone and you're basically delusional and I would never, ever, ever and trust someone who's had four hours of sleep with anything, not even myself. I wouldn't want to drive a car. I wouldn't want to do anything in that state because mistakes are so likely to happen. It's just not worth it. Make sure you're having at least eight hours of sleep a night or seven, between seven and eight and then you need to take at least one day off per week. Sam: I take Sundays off so I work 12 hours a day, six days a week. I start at 9 a.m. working and I work until 9 p.m., which is 12 hours and I do that Monday through Saturday and that means that I take 12 hours off because the 24 hours a day, I work 12. The other 12 is off. I sleep eight hours a day. I mean yes, sleep eight hours a night and then one day off on Sunday just completely relaxing hanging out and that's perfect for me. That's really where I found that I can work as much and as hard as possible without finding diminishing returns, without getting to that spot where I shouldn't really be working. I'm clocking more hours but I'm not doing anything. Sam: Now, you might not be able to do that at first but you just keep working towards that and don't worry if you get tired or if your mind's exhausted. That's good. That means you're pushing yourself Sam: Morgan Less says, "Sam, I wish you best. We made 31 strategy sessions and are ready to iterate. What should we do? How can we best move forward scientifically and effectively? We made 31 strategy sessions and are ready to iterate, what should we do and how can we best move forward? Sam: Yes, so you know the answer to that question, because you did the 30 strategy sessions and from those, you should have the recordings and you should have your notes and you should have all of what happened on those calls and you should know things you said that worked or that seems to be constructive towards the outcome you wanted with the call and you should know the things you see and the tangents you went down and the sorts of things that you said that were destructive to the outcome of the call. Sam: You're trying to do more of what works, less of what doesn't, and you're just trying to optimize. You said, you iterate. Is it right, that's how you would iterate? What do you iterate exactly? I don't know because I didn't do them and I don't know the feedback. You have the feedback so you should compile that and use it to adjust. Sam: Cherry says, "My niche is Baby Boomers who need to up their retirement funds, who need to top up their retirement funds. I'm planning on offering them help with deciding their next steps, i.e. start a lifestyle business or get a remote part time job. Do you think that I'm taking on too much if I offer that? As you said to keep it simple and offer something I don't need to spend much time on. Should I rather choose one business I can help him with? Yes, so when I said you want to offer them something that you're not going to spend too much time on, at first, you're going to have to spend a lot of time on it because you have to understand it, you have to deliver results, you have to solve the problem. You don't even really know what to do so that's going to be hard. It's going to require time, so don't think that if it's hard and it requires time, that you're doing the wrong thing. I mean it's always going to happen and then with experience, you can remove the waste and it gets more efficient. Now, what should you help these people do? Well, you should and Steve, right now you found the market, which is people who are retired or people who I'm guessing it's people who are retired or people who are planning on retirement, let's say it's people who are retired and the problem is that they need to top up their retirement funds, which means that they just need money, really. Retired people who need money and so you need to figure out how to help them get money. That's it a simple level. Sam: Now instead, what you did is you assumed that you knew the solution and you thought, well, I could teach them how to get a remote job or how to start a side business sort of thing. What you want to do instead is you went to the market to find the problem. You should go to the market to find the solution and there will be people who have experienced this thing that your market's experiencing, who have figured it out and solved it. There is bound to be thousands, hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, probably millions of people who were retired and then needed money but were now retired and they found a way to get money. Absolutely, that's going to be out there. Sam: If I was you, I would look for those people. Who are the people who had that problem and fixed it and then look at the array of people who did it and what they did and who did it best. Who got, and best would be defined as who got the most money in the most efficient way possible. The best would be defined as most with least. That's efficiency. That's what you want to look for. Who is the person you can find who had this problem and solved it in the most efficient way? How did they do it? Then how can I make this a universal solution to these other people? Sam: That way, your chances of getting it right just exponentially increased because you're grounding your solution on an already existing successful application instead of an idea. That's what I would do if I was you. Sam: Susanna DeWatt says, sorry if I said your name wrong. "Hi, Sam, I just joined today. Can you give me any advice on how to start finding a niche? I'm a neuro scientist and a paramedic but I'm trying to do something on my own and become an independent worker." Cool, so first of all, welcome on joining the program. How do you pick your niche? Well, I'll tell you how to do it in the course in week one so you should watch [inaudible 00:49:13]. What you need to do is in a simple sense, like picking your niche is more of a love decision than a logic decision. The bad way to do it is to look at your skills and what you're qualified in like, oh, I've got an English degree or a communications degree or whatever and all I've done for years of data entry using Excel Windows 97 version. That's not what you look at at all. You forget about that. Sam: What you look at instead is what you're interested in and everybody is interested in something. There is no way to be alive and not be interested in something and you just need to find out what you're interested in. There's some signs for this. You want to look at your YouTube video watching history, so go to YouTube and you'll be able to see your history of watching videos. Their will be signs in there, signals, patterns, all sorts of things, right? I got my friend to do this. He didn't know what he was interested in. He's a lawyer and all this and I was like, "Dude pull up your YouTube thing right now." He pulls it up and it's just all golf videos, and I was like what the hell I was like you're interested in golf. He's like yeah. I was like all right, you're like a maniac at this thing like. This is just full of golf. Then I found, then he told me oh yeah I'm subscribed to these golf things. He pays money for this stuff. He gets his golf magazines. He plays golf all the time. A lot of his friends do golf and then on his phone, he is always watching golf videos and also, I then turned to his girlfriend and actually I talked to his girlfriend separately and I asked her, "Hey, what does Henry talk about all the time? What does he just not shut up about?" She said golf. Sam: These are good places to go to find out what somebody is interested in. People are really bad at telling you what they're interested in because they quite often can't see what's beneath the nose. If I asked Henry what he's interested in, he would probably say he'd just think of his skills and his career and his history and his qualifications, which is law or the law, and then he can't tell me anything else. Sam: Then I got to look at different places that aren't him but that show what he's interested, YouTube video watching history, great one, and then asking your partner if you've got a wife or boyfriend or girlfriend or whatever, ask that person, "Hey, what is something that I just don't shut up about?" They will always know, oh it's this, it's this thing and things are good ways to figure out what you're really interested in. Sam: Another one is your favorite movie. What is your favorite movie of all time? What's fascinating about this is that people choose their favorite movie based on their affinity to the main character, so someone's favorite movie is most commonly selected because they see themselves more like that character, the main character in that movie, than any other character in any other movie, which is why that is their favorite movie. Sam: If you want to learn a lot about a person, ask them what their favorite movie is, and then look at the character and then it will show you all sorts of stuff, things that the person would never reveal to you, but you can't tell the person before what you're going to do with this information. You just have to ask them what the movie is. These sorts of questions really pull out the nature of the person, their character and also their interests, and when you're picking a niche, you're looking at just pure interest. It's a love decision. It's kind of how you find a boyfriend, a girlfriend, a wife whatever. You don't sit down and you assess your skills and look at their skills or you don't say that you're a lawyer or you're a paramedic, and then therefore you should marry a paramedic, nor do you assess anything like that. It's something different. That's how you pick your niche, and it's just interest, curiosity, passion, and that's how you pick it. Then if you choose something you're truly interested in, then you'll be successful at it. People say you can't make money in the dentist niche or you can't make money in the real estate niche or you can't make money in the accounting niche. It's not true. You can make money in any niche if you're really interested in it, you'll find a way, and so it's interests that we're looking for. That is the thing and you cannot tell me that you're not interested in anything because you're lying. Go look at those places, you'll find it. Sam: Ryan Ramos says, "I love hearing you talk about health. Sam, what's your diet like?" My diet is, so I eat at home, which makes things easy. I don't like going out to restaurants and stuff so I have a chef and I haven't had one for the last two weeks because I just moved but I will have one by next week and I had one for the previous year, and with the chef, she plans meal plans and for that, we do 50% vegetarian, 50% include meat or fish or something like that and that I think is good. I don't think it's wise to have 100% meat meals and it can be very hard for most people to have 100% vegetarian meals and get all the things they need. I know it can be done. It absolutely can but it's very hard. Sam: That's why we just do the 50-50 thing, and then everything's organic and healthy. There's no sugars in it or bad oils or anything like that. Most of the time, it just means that I'm eating some sort of damn salad like all vegetables and things like that, but when it's made well, it tastes good. That's part of why having a chef is great too because they can make things that a food tastes good because quite often, if you try to make a healthy meal yourself and you're not used to it and you have no experience doing it, it won't taste very good. It's basically my diet. Kenny says, "Hi Sam. Thanks for all the value. I'm struggling with my offer. I feel like I'm losing momentum, especially since going back to work, work and family balance. I haven't been able to focus on consulting. What do you recommend?" Sam: Yeah. You said I'm struggling with my offer and then I feel like I'm losing momentum, especially since going back to work, work and family balance. I haven't been able to focus on consulting. What would you recommend? Sam: Yes, so let's look at the root, what appears to be the root cause here, which is you're not really struggling with your offer. You're really struggling with everything. The reason why you're struggling with everything is because you haven't been able to focus on it, and the reason why that might be is because you have a family and you also have a job. You need to do some restructuring here. You need to do some cleaning and some shuffling and some sacrificing. You need to do a restructure of of your whole life because if you focus in the midst of absolute chaos is pretty much damn impossible. It might be possible but definitely not all the time. You might be able to pull it off and in the moment but if you put someone in there all the time, there's no way they're going to focus. They're going to break and so you really need to make sure your environment is set up correctly if you want to do well and what I would look at if I was you is I'll just track your time for seven days. Carry a notebook with you. Whoops, phone fell out then. Carry a notebook with you for seven days and set a timer on your phone to go off every 30 minutes. Sam: [inaudible 00:59:17] That will do it. Every 30 minutes, it will buzz. It will get your attention and take you out of whatever you're doing, and then you've just got to write down what you did with that time and track when you wake up in the morning. Track when you go to bed at night. Track how long it takes you to do everything that you do, if you're driving or doing something, preparing for something like making meals, cooking, exercising, spending time with kids, at work, commuting, showering, eating, everything. I mean everything, you got to track it and then once you've done it for seven days, first of all, don't get stressed out about it because there's no point in being stressed out about it now because you haven't done anything. Of course it's not working because you haven't done anything so don't worry about that. The first thing we have to do is see, we have to get a baseline. We need to know what's going on, a baseline measurement and that is as you are now, so you don't really need to change now because we just need to get a baseline. Sam: After those seven days, you can see where all your time went and then you need to bucket it into categories. Look at all of the different things that it's going into and then loosely organize them into buckets. It might be cooking, cleaning, doing dishes, doing laundry. It might be mowing the lawns, gardening. I have no idea what you're doing. Figure out where it's going and then look at those buckets and then be like, where's most of my time going? A lot's going to go to sleep, a lot's going to go to work if you've got a job and then you need some for your family but you're not going to need as much each day as you would for doing your job probably and sleeping because if those are both eight hours, this one probably won't quite be eight and then you've got all this admin. I guarantee you where a lot of your time is just getting sucked. Sam: Everyone in the world's time is being sucked. It's just generic admin and that's going to be things like paying bills, clearing the mailbox, mowing the lawn, picking some weed out of your bush outside, just a whole bunch of stuff that isn't really a value to your family. They don't really care if there's weed in the bush and it isn't really a value to you and it isn't a value to your job, isn't a value to your health and it isn't a value to the business and so these things are wasteful and so you just stop, eliminate it and then just keep cutting out all of these things and as you sacrifice all of this stuff, you will have more time and you'll have way more energy to put into this business but you need to clear room for it because it sounds like there isn't much room for it right now. That's what I'll do. Daniel Lambert says, "Source on the sugar thing, like a hint what to search for." Well I don't know what you need to search for. I don't know what you mean by that. Is it a study? Is it how to not have sugar? I don't know what you mean but where I first learned about not having sugar was in the book Relentless by, I forgot this guy's name, I told you I'm bad at names. I know the last name's like Gerber or something like that but the book's Relentless and I know the nature of the book and he talks about how he trained Michael and Kobe and he talks about how he takes all of his clients off sugar and then he explains why he takes his clients off sugar and that's how I first became aware of it and then I started searching it on the internet and why people go off sugar, why athletes do and why high performance requires no sugar, all these things and that's how I found out about it and you can go look at those sources too if you want to. Sam: The best way, I don't like studies because you can find a study that tells you anything. I can find you a study that says sugar's good for you, all right, because somebody somewhere just twisted the so-called facts to make a point, and then someone will say it's bad, someone will say they're for everything, so I don't like studies, especially articles. There's information on both sides, and they've both got strong arguments. That's why I like experiments. To me, the ultimate truth is experimentation. What I'd like to do is try it. I'm like, all right, looks like this might work, might not work. I think it probably will so let's try it, and let the results speak, and I went off it, and I saw the results, then to test it really because I didn't know if I was being delusional and having a placebo effect. I ate sugar. After I'd done 30 days off sugar, I went and got this ice cream cookie sandwich from this place in New York called Insomnia Cookie, which is 1,500 calories of just crap and sugar, but it tastes pretty good. Sam: I had one of those and a friend, and both of us have been off sugar for 30 days. I was like, when I went back to work afterwards, I just was like, man, this is quite an experience. That's all I can explain. It's just waves of just illogical emotion, there is no cause for the emotion. There's no reason for your body's reaction to it or your mind's reaction to it because there's nothing in your immediate environment that warrants this thing but it's happening. Sam: Yeah, I was like, we need to get back off the stuff. It definitely helped me a ton. That's why I recommend forgetting about the articles and stuff because you'll find them on both sides. Try it for yourself and see what happens. Experiments are the best. Sam: Leandro says, "Hey, how can I get another notebook like the one I received from your boxes?" Send an email to [email protected] and they will take care of you. I'm not sure if we actually have the ability to do that right now but I know that house is working on it and we're going to order some different things that people are going to need, so we at least can add your name to the list and let you know when we can but we might already have a solution, I'm not 100% sure. That's why I said [inaudible 01:06:38]. Sam: All right, and then Ryan Ramos says, "I know a lot of successful business people that drink alcohol, smoke weed or use cocaine daily, not necessarily all of those at the same time but it seems most people choose one of those. What do you think about business people using drugs, alcohol, weed or cocaine daily?" Sam: Just because you know business people that do those things doesn't mean that those things are good and I know people back from school and stuff who have drunk alcohol daily. I know people who have smoked weed daily and I don't think I know anyone who's done cocaine daily but I know people have done a lot of it and none of them are evolving too well, both physically, mentally and financially and in every single dimension, they're not evolving too well and it's pretty obvious that it's not the best for you. If you have a drink every now and then because you really like wine, go for it and if you want to smoke weed every now and then, go for it or do anything every now and then, go for it, but if you're going to do that stuff daily like that's going to mess you up and you will not be as good at business because business requires cognition and those things will harm your cognition. Sam: Weed and alcohol, weed especially seriously impairs your cognition like it removes your drive. I mean, it can make you more creative but it completely removes your drive like that thing inside you that's like a fire that makes you want to go and work and execute and look at time closely and make sure you're being efficient and being productive and getting things done, weed removes that thing and it impairs it and if you do it too much, it completely kills it and that's why a lot of people like who smoke a lot of weed, they don't have really much drive or intent. I'm not saying that's a bad thing. Who knows? Maybe that's what everyone in the world supposed to do, but it doesn't look very constructive to me and alcohol is a bad one too. Cocaine, it's really bad too so just because people are doing it, doesn't mean you should do it. I wouldn't even, I'd recommend those people don't. If you want to really be efficient, just look at the most efficient people in the world. Sam: If you study Steve Jobs and what sort of discipline went into creating him was extreme. The foods he ate, the information he listens to, the sacrifices he made, the focus and energy and intensity he put into these different things, one thing a lot of normal people don't understand is that energy comes from restraint. If you get really good at self discipline and restraint, then it just lights a fire in you. If you have this impulse to do something or to consume something, or to do anything and you catch it and you don't do it, that just like grows this energy that you can just, it just creates a lot of power and so like Steve Jobs was very good at that. He would do all of these weird things too. He wouldn't put furniture in his house because he would see the open space. He wants to fill it. When we see space, we want to put stuff in it, but he wouldn't and that sort that builds a lot of energy. Sam: The same thing with diet. If you're strict with your diet and you eat clean, that builds a lot of restraint, like all sorts of things can actually give you a lot of energy and a lot of mental power. Quite often what happens with people with drugs and alcohol and fast food and social media and stuff, is they lose all self discipline. They want to do something, they have the slightest impulse to do it and they just, it's happening. Before they, there was even a moment's thought of should I do this or not, there was no effort to try and not do it, and once you've lost that, you can't do anything. You can't build anything constructive. You can't focus. Once you've lost that thing, you're almost useless so you've got to be very strict and have self discipline to keep that thing. Sam: Daniel Lambert says, tips for researching individuals in organic outreach, seems many in the individual coaching field are challenged there. You can't find them in the way you can search for businesses. Tips for reaching individuals in organic outreach, seems many in the individual coaching field are challenged there, you can't. Yes, so here's your problem. You have really defined your niche as individual coaching, right? Then you're saying to me, so what is individual coaching? What is individual? Individual is a person, an individual person. There's 8 billion of them in the world, and then coaching is coaching that person, all right? Now you're telling me that you can't find them in the way you can search for businesses. Dude, just look out your window, go outside, go on to the internet, look in the comment section where there's a lot of individuals. They're very easy to find. They're much easier to find than businesses. There's more of them. There's 8 billion of them. Sam: They're easy to find and so your thing, your query here is invalid but really the problem you have here is the defining of your niche because it's too broad and you don't even really know who you're looking for and when you don't know who you're looking for, you can't find them because if you're truly, if your niche truly was individuals, they're everywhere. You'd have no trouble finding them, but your problem is that you think it's this thing but you don't know what this thing is so you can't find them. You have to get more specific. Individual coaching isn't a niche. Who are you helping? Like what is your niche? Is it going to be, you know it might be people with irritable bowel syndrome. It might be people who are addicted to porn, addicted to video games. It might be accountants. It might be CEOs. It might be like woman who, might be moms over 40 who want to lose weight, right? It might be troubled marriages, which is like the husband and wife in the troubled marriage. Who is the niche? It's not individuals. Sam: You need to define it better. When you define it better, you'll be able to find the people. Martha says, my niche is people who have relationship problem as a result of an affair. See, this is way better. This is clear. I have some trouble with the direct outreach because I noticed that people in that the groups do not talk openly about having such problems. Perhaps it's the Dutch mentality. Do you have any tips for direct outreach I can try? You see this one's a better question because the thing, the niche is better defined and this is, you can see how this is much richer in its information and so I think this is a great niche, by the way, because these people definitely exist. It is a serious problem and people would definitely pay money to solve this problem. It's a good one, but now, so we know it exists and it has good signals, but the problem you're having is in the direct outreach so it sounds like you've found groups that people are in, but the thing you notice is that the people in the groups don't talk openly about having such problems. Sam: This is understandable right, because it's a kind of a big thing to come out and say in a public forum on Facebook. I don't think it's the Dutch mentality. I think it's just not a common thing to just go and broadcast to the world like hey, I just had an affair and my marriage is screwed, just thought I'd tell you guys. No, this, I'd be almost more concerned if someone said that than not because it's kind of a weird thing to say. You need to, this doesn't mean it's not a good niche. It just means you have to be [inaudible 01:16:45] strategically in how we find people and reach them and stuff. Hunter Otis had, he has similar, like very similar niche to you and that he's helping people who are addicted to porn. Sam: Most often, these are married people or people in a relationship who are addicted to porn because being single and addicted to porn is, it's still a problem but at least it doesn't bring like, it doesn't blow up the relationship like and so Hunter found with these people, a lot of the time they're not, they haven't even, their wife doesn't even know, the girlfriend doesn't even know, or maybe the girlfriend or wife does know and the people aren't open about it. You know, people just don't go on the internet and be like, hey everyone, I'm addicted to porn. It's harder to find them and really, what I think you should do is, you should definitely Hunter Otis. Hunter Otis, O-T-I-S, you should also watch his interview. I did a customer interview with him. Sam: If you look at my YouTube channel and you go to customer interviews, find Hunter Otis' YouTube video, watch the whole thing because it will be helpful for you because it's similar to this. Then also message him because he'll be able to give you some good insights. Then I would, see what happens there and then get an idea what you should do. Also, I would, you're going to have to, I don't know if this is what you're going to have to do but my first thing I would do if I was in your situation was I would talk to Hunter because he has some good information because he's been where you are, and then what I would do is do what he was doing. Then if I was to guess, it's going to be, you have to put out some sort of stimulus to react, to get a reaction from them with a, you know message you and put their hands up, right? You just have to put some stimulus out there. Sam: You're going to have it on your Facebook profile like what you do, like who you help, I have blank blank blank blank, probably got your website and then you should have that know when, to people if they look at your profile on Facebook. You're joining these groups and you can see in these groups, I would post this in these groups to be honest just at, this is a very sneaky way to do it. It's a ninja way to do it. What I would do is I would go into this group. I'm assuming this group has people who were, who have had an affair or something, I don't know but go into that group and then post in there and just tell people what your problem is. Be like, hey everyone my, I really want to help. I'm really wanting to help couples where there's been an affair, fix their relationship and everything. Sam: This is what I'm very passionate about. This is what I want to do, et cetera. Then I would say the problem I'm facing is that I don't know how to find these people and reach out to them and try to help them because they don't say these things. I know there's people who struggle with this, but I don't know how to find them. Can I please ask for your advice? What should I do and what would you do if I'm in your situation? Sam: I would ask that in the groups because it's not promotional but because you're not saying, "Hey, I help people do this and this, message me for strategy session, you're not doing it." You're asking them for advice, honestly. Through doing that, you're also telling them what you do and then people might message you directly because they might be like oh, this person can help or those people will tell you how to do it. That's what I would do and talk to Hunter and watch his interview. Sam: Then we've got another question. Can you explain a bit more about thinking in first principles? It makes a lot of sense to me, but I really don't know how to go about applying it when analyzing judgements and opinions. Sure. I explain it in week six and it's in week six, one of the modules I talk about first principles and all this, and what it really is, is it's just this is how most people make decisions. They look at what everybody else is doing. If they are trying to decide, should I do this thing? Well, first of all though, look at what everybody else is doing and they'll think if a lot of people are doing it, then it must be right. That's a weird delusional thought process, but that's one thing they do, or they might go whoa, this is like, they might think if everybody thinks this is what I should do, this is what I should do. They might also then reason by analogy or like a saying or a phrase. Sam: A classic example is people say, those that can't do teach. There's actually a lot of truth in that, there's a reason why that's a saying because there's a lot, a vast majority of teachers haven't done what they're teaching and they're trying to teach people how to do it, but they've never done it, which is very messed up. There's a lot of truth in that saying, but what they will do then is they might look at someone like me and be like, instead of really looking into it, they would just say that I'm teaching people how to do stuff, so they would just be like, oh, he's teaching people how to do stuff and those that can't do teach so he mustn't be able to do. He can't do, those that can't do teach. That's literally this person's delusional thought process. Sam: That's how normal people think. They reason by analogy, sayings, catchphrases, memes, what's popular and what's unpopular and public opinion, perception and what everyone's doing and what's been done traditionally. This is normal people's thinking and it's just a recipe for mediocrity. It will certainly get you to fit in with people and be average if that's what you want to do, but other than that it's useless. To really do something good, you have to think differently, and because you can't, if everybody in a particular scenario has a problem using the way they think, and they can't find the solution using the way they think, then it is almost impossible to find the solution using the same thinking. Sam: That's where first principles can be very useful because you don't use the tracks that everybody else is using. You instead come into the situation and you boil it down to its basic components or fundamentals. Let's say those that can't do teach, you're looking at somebody, say you're looking at me on the internet and you're like, okay this guy Sam's teaching people how to do making money on the internet thing or how to run some ads or do sales calls or whatever. Now the weird way to do it, the normal person would be like Sam's teaching and he's telling me he knows that he can help me make money sounds too good to be true. That's right. Things that are too good to be true aren't true. That's the first logic reason. Sam: Then the second one comes along, it's like also those that can't do teach, Sam's teaching okay, so those that can't do teach. He's teaching so he can't do. All right so this guy can't do and also it's too good to be true, and also this looks like a scam. Why? I don't know because it's too good to be true and he doesn't know how to do it and he's telling people he can teach them how to do it and he's doing it but I know he can't do it because those that can't do teach and he's teaching. Therefore he mustn't be able to do so it's a scam and then they're like, I'm smart and I'm going to tell everybody about this because this guy doesn't know how to do. He's also a scammer and this is too good to be true. They're like oh I'm not going to do this thing. That's how crazy thinking happens, normal person's thinking but kind of crazy. Instead, what first principles would do is it would just forget about all that crap and it just does a brutal [inaudible 01:26:52] people, nobody looks. Sam: People hear something on the news, they think oh that's the way it is and then they just go out there and start just repeating what they heard on the news and never check, that's what most people do. Very few people take the time and energy to look. Instead, if you were analyzing me on the internet, what you'd do is be like, all right, what's he promising that he's able to do and what is he saying that he's done.? Sam: Now let's fact check this. Does he know how to do Facebook ads? Well, you could start looking. Does he do Facebook ads? A good way to test something is if someone says that it works and if someone says they think it's a good idea, then look to see if that person is doing it, because if a person says you should do something because it's a good idea and they're not doing it, they're lying. That's the first check. Okay, that's congruent. He is running Facebook is and he must be doing well with them because there's a lot of them and they cost money and he would be broke if he just spends a lot of money on ads and never made any money so he must know something about ads and he's using them so that adds up. Sam: If he's using them and he's successful by using it, then there's a high probability that he's going to be able to teach me how to do ads and be successful because he is, all right first thing, what about sales calls, you could learn about that and assess that and then also, he's going to teach me how to get clients. Does he have any clients? To pay for those ads, you would need clients. He's paying for those ads. Therefore he must have clients and then also there's lots of testimonials, those also must be clients. They've got results. He's telling me he's going to be able to get me results and then timeframe. When did he start? Find out that, then what was the trajectory over the timeline and then how does that timeline compare to the average person and then is it an anomaly or is it a norm? Sam: Then all right, so this is actually quite rapid timeline acceleration, quite good results in quite a short amount of time, quite good student results compared to the baseline average of the rest of the market. There's probably something to learn here. I don't know if I'm actually going to be successful from this. That I can't know without doing but this looks like there'll be something that I'll learn in here. That would be first principles thinking. That whole process I just ran you through, the delusional person and the scientist, that's the difference and you want to be more like the scientist. That's how you do everything. You put everything under the microscope. You assess everything and it doesn't matter if someone has authority. It doesn't matter if someone has a title, a label, a uniform. Those to me, I am skeptical of authority, labels, certificates, degrees, experts, certified experts. A certified expert with a uniform, I'm especially skeptical because those things don't mean that they're an expert. Sam: It's to look and be perceived as one but doesn't mean that they are one, so it's just a different way of looking at everything. That's what it is. I know the most successful people in the world use it because it's just a way of thinking differently and being more realistic than not using it and I teach you how to use it in week six of the program and it just takes practice too and it takes courage because often you're going to go against everybody and if you've never stood up against everybody before, then it's going to be terrifying. Just start using it on your friends first, when someone says something, just be like, wait a minute, whoa, why did you say this? How do you know that's true? Then just start, just chipping at it. Sam: Then see, I like doing this with people is they'll say something and people are just like, oh yeah, they just accept it. It's never assessed because that's not polite, but I'm not very polite, because I think it's actually impolite to lie to people. I think I'm actually being polite by saving people from believing the lie and so I even have a different version of polite so I will instead drill into that and find out whether it's true or not. If it's true, I'll be like well, it's really good, thanks for that. I really learned something here or if it's not, I'll be like, dude, that's not true. Sam: That's what you should do. Just start doing it with your friends and family and your wife or your girlfriend, but you'll probably get told off for that. I get told off for that. I get told that I'm like speaking to a computer and also I get told that I'm a robot but it's just the way of thinking because most people never dig beneath the surface. They're just oh, how's the weather? Oh it's good. How's things at the job? Yeah, good. How are the kids? Yep, good. Yeah. Then the other person's like, you want a beer? Yeah. That's most people and I can't stand it. Sam: Next question, Nayla says, "Can you let us know the name of the Michael Jordan documentary that you refer to in your video, please? Are there any other documentaries that you recommend? Sure. There's lots of Michael Jordan ones by the way. The one I remember that I liked the most, I liked all of them, but the one that I liked the most was Michael Jordan to the Max, Michael Jordan to the Max. I like that one and other ones are good too. I also liked Kobe Bryant's one, which is called Muse, Kobe Bryant Muse, and the Defiant Ones is one of my favorite ones. I would say the Defiant Ones is probably my favorite even compared to the Michael Jordan one and the Kobe Bryant one, and that's a good start. There's a lot of documentaries to watch so those are good but make sure you do the course too. Isaac says, "When doing direct outreach and chatting on Facebook and Messenger, I've been offering a little video consultation with its own template and webpage for them. That's been the most engaging with my prospects but I don't think it's scalable. Should I stick with giving them a little video consultation for free like you have done in the lumpy mail pages?" Sam: Yes. You're messaging people and sending them a video assessment as well as a templated page or site or something, that's a lot of work for every single person you're messaging. That's going to slow you down big time, and also it's kind of desperate in that people will be like, did this person really just do all of this, and I've never spoken to them before. Sam: They must have a lot of time, and if they must have a lot of time, they must have much to do. Therefore they must not have many clients. They wanted to get me as a client, they don't have any probably so this is kind of risky. You can see how this is going to play out. You don't need to do what you're doing to earn a strategy session with people, so you can forget about that. It's a nice gesture, but it's not necessary and instead, your time can then be used on other things. Sam: What I would do instead is understand their problem. Really, really understand their problem and then figure out what a solution to that is, and then when you get that thing right, when you reach out to people, all you need to say is what you do and they will message you back and want to have a strategy session and then want to buy from you because you know how to solve their problem. When you know how to solve a really painful problem for somebody, you don't need to send them a template and all this stuff because you're the person that they've been waiting for forever, so it just happens. Instead, your effort and attention and energy should be on finding out what the problem is and solving that problem. Sam: Amanda Rush says, "I'm doing digital marketing for.", oh I just lost that question. Sorry about that. If I missed anybody's question, it's because they just fly past on the screen sometimes because there's a lot of people on and a lot of people asking questions and I can't scroll up. It stops you from being able to scroll upwards, so it only goes one way. I'm so sorry about that. Sam: Nayla says, "It's obvious [inaudible 01:36:56] after four years, I would have quit.", oh no, I missed that question. Sam: All right, so Julian Wedgeman says, "Hi Sam, how did your life change when you started to wake up early? Why did you decide to do it?" Sam: Yes. Right now, I don't think I wake up that early. I wake up at 6:50 right now, which is of course 7 a.m., which I don't think is early. I think there's a lot of people who wake up earlier than that and I've tried waking up earlier like 5 a.m., 4 a.m. and stuff and the thing is about the four and the five is it doesn't make sense for me because I need eight hours of sleep, and if I'm going to wake up at 4 a.m., man I got to go to bed insanely early and then it doesn't make sense and I'm not willing to sacrifice sleep to wake up early. That's mindless and so I just looked at if I want to have eight hours of sleep and I'm setting myself up to fail if I've got to be asleep by 8 p.m. or something because it's still light at that time and there's still things going on, plus my wife would be like you're going to bed at eight o'clock. It doesn't make sense so really going to bed at 11 a.m. is like, well I actually get into bed at 10 and I'll read or something and go to sleep at like 11 because it takes me at least an hour to really wind down, fall asleep and then that means I have to wake up at seven. That's as early as I could really get it, get my wake up time and have it make sense. That's what I think everybody should do is get their wake up time as early as possible so that they're still able to have enough sleep and that it makes sense and that they're not setting themselves up for failure because they've got to go to bed at 7 p.m. or 8 p.m. or something like that. Sam: Then the trick to it isn't necessarily the time you wake up. The trick to it is a routine and a consistent behavior in habit. Waking up just whenever you want all the time, it's not as good as people think. People who've been in a routine for ages and had a job and all of this, they probably think it's just heaven but honestly, it kind of sucks because you get so unproductive and it's kind of hard to plan things. It gets a bit chaotic and you're not getting things done, and then you get frustrated and it's actually not very good. Sam: It's best just to get a very well ingrained habit down that becomes a standard because once something becomes a standard, you don't ever have to think about it. It's like when am I going to go to bed? 10? When am I falling asleep? 11. Then when am I going to wake up? 6:50. When do I go to the gym? 7. When do I have a shower and breakfast? 8. What do I have for breakfast? A smoothie. What's in the smoothie? The same stuff. What time is meditation? 8:30. How long is meditation? 20 minutes. When does the day start? 9. Sam: That's just the same for me all the time, and I'll probably keep it like forever. That's just what it is, and that means that I don't have to put any mental bandwidth into any of those decisions and once you do that, you construct your calendar and your schedule and everything around that, you get more reliable because you know how much time you can allocate in different areas and it's also good for your relationship, and everything, friends and family too because you can better make commitments because you know you can't say yes to anything on the weeknights, and you can only meet this person at this time. Sam: You can tell them that and it might be strict but it's better to stick to your word than put it in and then cancel on them, and it also gives people an understanding of how they should work with you and deal with you. My wife knows that we spend all of Sunday together. We take a vacation every three months, four a year, seven days every three months so she knows when we're going to take one and she looks forward to those and she knows when we're going to spend a full day together each week, and then she knows when we're going to spend together, spend time together at night and it's the same so she doesn't have to ask me. She doesn't worry if it's going to happen. It just is, and that's the beauty of setting a routine like that and creating a standard template of behavior because it allows everybody else to integrate with you way better and it allows you to be more efficient. Sam: That's what I'd recommend more than just saying wake up really early. There's a bit more in it than just waking up early because you can wake up early, deprive yourself of sleep and then be an early riser but be delusional and unproductive and make massive errors, so yeah. Sam: All right. Well, that is the end of this Q&A, and what we do is we go from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, which is the New York time. We do it every Saturday and if you asked a question on this session but you didn't get an answer, it's because of two things. One is you could have shown up, like most probably you showed up late. You asked your question and I don't have time to get to it so if you want to ask your question and get an answer, show up early, show up on time. You'll get to ask multiple. I'll answer multiple or you asked a question and I missed it because it's moving and that scenario, if it happens next time, just ask it again and I'll get it. Sam: If you enjoyed this session, just click that Like button. Give me some feedback if you liked it. I know you liked it, and also once again apologies for showing up late, had some issues with the webcam thing but usually, this thing is reliable, never had any issues with it before so usually we start on time. Then thanks everyone for attending. I hope you have an awesome weekend and I will see you on the next one of these live streams next Saturday. It will be happening that Saturday so put it in your calendar and yep, look forward to speaking with you soon. See you later.

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