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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 29th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 29th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for September 29th, 2018.     

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: Right. I can see a couple of people jumping on here. I can see Edward Tang, Shirad, [00:00:30] Sterling Cooley. So just to make sure we've got everything working, can you guys let me know if you've got audio and video working, if you can hear my voice, you can see my video, just let me know. Awesome. Got KM Black on, got Mohammad. Thanks, Sterling, for letting me know that we've got audio and video working. Toby Kline says, "Hey." [00:01:00] Awesome. Well, let's go ahead and jump right into it. So if it's your first time on one of these, how these calls go is I do one of them pretty much every single Saturday, and they go from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM Eastern time. That's the time in New York, and I do them almost every Saturday. Some Saturdays I've got to travel or something so they [00:01:30] don't happen then, but I usually let you know. And also, how the calls work is we basically just do a Q&A. So people ask questions in that comments box to the right hand side, and then I just answer the questions live. I go through them in sequential order in the order in which they're asked. And let's jump into them right now. So Jennifer Lee says, "Question. What percentage of your revenue comes from Consulting Accelerated versus Uplevel [00:02:00] versus Quantum, and does Consulting Accelerator drive most of the sales from people in Quantum? And what are the interrelationships between these three programs? Well, it's a bit complicated, like it's hard for me to just answer that question because I started just with doing like Uplevel, and I was just doing strategy sessions and Uplevel, and that was all I was doing. And then I started doing the mastermind, and then I head Uplevel and the mastermind. And most people came from Uplevel and then [00:02:30] joined the mastermind, and no one joined the mastermind without first coming through Uplevel, and Uplevel was the only thing I was selling, so that's kind of how it worked for awhile. I was able to grow up to like 350 grand a month just using that model. And then I started doing Consulting Accelerator and then that was totally different. Even when I was doing Accelerator, most of it came from Accelerator. And the reason why is because I couldn't balance both [00:03:00] things at the same time. It was very hard for me to sell Uplevel and to also do Accelerator. So we started making most of our money through Accelerator and Uplevel kind of, it didn't get enough attention, like the sales part of it, to really keep it going. So then I had to hire a whole team and everything. And only really this year have we been able to balance like all three. It's very hard to balance all of them. So now we've got Accelerator running well, and [00:03:30] we've got Uplevel running well with sales reps and ads and all of that, and Quantum running really well too. And the typical path would probably be some people come in on Accelerator, and then they buy Uplevel, and then they buy Quantum. But also, some people come directly in and buy quantum, and some people come directly in and buy Uplevel. And I would say that half of the people that come into [00:04:00] Uplevel just come straight into Uplevel and half of the other people come through Accelerator, right? Then Quantum, I would say 75 percent of the people come from Uplevel and only 25 percent come directly straight in. So you're asking ... That's kind of like answering the question. You can see how it's a little bit more complicated than the question [00:04:30] assumes, but you also asked in terms of revenue. So I mean, it's changing now because we're scaling Uplevel up. But for example, like last month we made about ... I'm just trying to think, it would have been probably like 1.6, 1.7 million Accelerator, probably like 500, [00:05:00] 000 Uplevel, and then probably like 200,000 Quantum or something. Something like that, but that's changing because we're dialing Uplevel in more. All I can tell you is to do three things is very hard. You know, I've got a lot of people on my team. I've been doing this for a long time, and it's very hard to do three things. That's why I just say focus on one thing. Dial [00:05:30] that in first, and then go and do the other thing. The worst thing you can do is just try to do three things all at the beginning. I see some people try to kind of copy the model of having like an Accelerator program, and then an Uplevel, and then like a Quantum mastermind sort of thing. And they try to model that, but you have to build it brick by brick. You can't just go and build the whole thing. It doesn't work that way. You got to build it layer by layer. And then Edward [00:06:00] Tang says, "Should we get into the habit of recording and documenting everything we do on our entrepreneurial journey so that we can accumulate assets to sell in the later future?" No, you shouldn't. You just keep the main thing the main thing. The main thing is just building a company that adds value to your market and solves a problem for [00:06:30] them, and that's all you should be focusing on. If you do that, then you create an asset not in the future, but now. So you do that and you create it. Don't worry about the other thing, just to keep the main thing, the main thing. See a bunch of people just saying, "Hey, Sam." Cool. [00:07:00] Alright, next question is Toby Klein. So Toby says, "Some weeks ago, you wrote a blog post called Hacking High Performance. In it, you stated that high performance requires four parts, mental, biological, environment, and system. I understand how the first three and the components, if applied correctly, can lead to better performance, but can you go into the system part in more detail? Does system, in this context, mean how the other three parts are organized [00:07:30] and orchestrated to get us so that the whole functions as efficiently and with as little friction as possible? I find this topic fascinating and since my niche is athletes, I would be grateful if you could help me understand the system [inaudible 00:07:44]." Sure, good question. So we've got environment. An environment is like our home and our office and things, right? And also our social circles, and [00:08:00] our city, and our country, and all of that. That's like our environment, and that affects our performance. It has a huge effect on us. And so you want to work on improving your environment. You've also got biological, and that's like your physical body and things. You need to optimize that too. I mean, if you eat really bad food and drink alcohol, like even the [00:08:30] smartest person in the world is going to be pretty useless if they're just drinking alcohol and eating McDonald's, right? And if they don't get much sleep, they're going to be useless. So like you need to work on that part too. You need to have good food, good sleep, exercise and all that so that part works well. So you're making your environment better, your biological self better, and then you've also got like the mental part. The mental part is like impulse control. [00:09:00] So you know, not giving into impulses, self control, and discipline, and really not being drawn to instant gratification, being able to prolong gratification, being able to work on something knowing that you're not gonna get gratification for maybe a year or maybe longer. That's what it's all about mentally. And so you've got these three components, [00:09:30] and you've got to work on all of these three for high performance. But then there's another thing, which is system, right? Which is what you're asking about. And when I say system, I'm talking about the interconnections in between these three things. So we tend to just look at the things, but not the space in between the things. And the space in between these things is as much as important as the things. [00:10:00] The space in between them is how these things connect and how, like what pattern and sequence these things connect in. So which one comes first, and then how does that interact with that, and then how does that come back around and influence that? And then how does that influence that? Like it's understanding the flows and the sequencing between all of this. And so when I say a system, systems and more powerful than willpower and everything. [00:10:30] A perfect example of a system would be a routine. So you know, if someone average has a really good routine, they will outperform somebody who's exceptionally smart without a routine. A routine is a system, and it makes a person superhuman. And another system could be like having a system for going to bed and waking up at the exact same time, and having an alarm that notifies you and all of that, and having a tracking [00:11:00] system so you can monitor it all, and having data points for different things. It's really how you systemize ... You figure out what the optimal things are for each, like what's the optimal mental state to be in? What's the optimal environment to have, and what's the optimal biological state to be in? And then you define that [00:11:30] clearly, and then put systems in place that you can maintain that, because if you don't standardize things and turn them into a system, then any progress just falls back over time. And that's why it's important to put the systems in place. So that's what I mean by that. And then Joshua Westover says, "Hey Sam. Is there a benchmark amount of strategy sessions you should be aiming to generate every week before considering adjusting your offer or niche?" [00:12:00] So I think the minimum you'd want to do would be like 40 to 100. 40 to 100, I'd say. And Richard Lloyd says, "I'm in the process of validating an idea to help trainers post their paper based materials in apps, but I'm having trouble [00:12:30] with wording and message to presale the idea before it has been built. Can you talk about your experience of getting people to buy into your SnapInspect app before it was built? What sort of wording works well in a cold email or presales funnel to get a presale?" Yeah. So with SnapInspect, I created full prototypes of it. So I used this thing called [00:13:00] Keynotopia. You can Google it, Keynotopia. And what it basically is, is you buy it for like 20 bucks or something, like just a Keynote template that has all of the different components and buttons and things for a standard like iOS app, and you can drag all of those things around and actually build a prototype of what your app is going to do and look like, screen by screen, button by button. [00:13:30] And then what you can actually do is you can hyperlink the buttons. So you can select that element, like a button, and then hyperlink it to another slide and then when it goes to that other slide, it will show you the next screen. And when you hyperlink all of these different buttons together to different slides, and you have actually like a prototype, then you can put on your phone or your computer, and you can actually click around in it. And you can actually show people [00:14:00] exactly how the app would work. Like people couldn't even really tell the difference between the prototype and the one that worked. And what's funny is I bet you I can find the actual video. Let me have a quick look here. I found it. Six years ago. [inaudible 00:14:27] So I'll link you to it. [00:14:30] So Richard, wait. I'm just replying to your comment here. There [00:15:00] you go. I just replied to your comment with the actual video. So this video, which you can see here from like 2011, it's back when I did this, this whole video here is actually not a real app. This is just like a Keynote presentation that's hyperlinked together, and it's not even a real app or [00:15:30] anything, but it's a perfect demo of how the app is going to be. And so what I did is I made the prototype, I validated the prototype with the market, and then I created this video, this demo video, which I just sent you there. And then I had that, and I also had a PDF, like five page, what did I call it, like an info pack about how the [00:16:00] app worked and what benefits it brings, and all of that. And that is what I used to get presales because you've got to have something. You just can't say, "Oh, I've got this app, but I can't show you it. I can't show you any pictures of it or anything like that." You've got to have something, and that's what I used. I used the info pack PDF as well as that video that I could link people to and they could see. I [00:16:30] used a combination of cold calling and cold emailing, and that's what I used to get the presales. Alright. Now because I replied to that question, by the time I came back here, it skipped a whole bunch of questions, and I can't scroll back up. So if I missed your question, I didn't do it on purpose. You'll just have to ask it again. James [00:17:00] Hanmax says, "My niche is porn and sexual addiction. Is it more important to have a well-formed program before selling or," oh shit. It's funny. It's like I knew as soon as I told people that I had missed their questions because it was scrolling up too fast, that created more people just copy pasting their questions in, which then made me miss more questions, which has now introduced [00:17:30] a feedback loop because I've missed more people's questions and they're probably gonna do the same. So I'm going to miss a few questions here based on what's happening. So Bonnie Manhattan says, "Curious, do you live in New York City or California?" So I live in California now. I only recently moved, and I actually still have my apartment in New York right now [00:18:00] and my office, and my whole team is still in the New York office, but my team's going to start migrating over and we'll be fully transitioned over to California, and we won't have a New York office, I won't have my apartment or anything anymore, probably by the end of this year. Toby Klein says, " [00:18:30] Sam, let's assume you're just getting started. You don't have any clients and you also have a nine to five job to pay the bills. You're not wasting time on social media. You don't drink alcohol and you don't go out and evenings. Which of the following things you are currently doing would you be willing to sacrifice to cut back?" Damn, that question jumped as well. That was a good one. I'm going to just have to start reading questions that are down a bit further so that I can keep up. Morgan Less says, "I'm having a hard time doing," [00:19:00] did it again. Nathan Messagi says, "Hey Sam, my dentist client is saying the leads I'm getting him are unreachable." Okay. Well, define unreachable. You know, that's a word. What does he mean? Tell me, give me examples, specific examples. Break it down. You get this thing, then what do you do? And then how do you know it's unreachable? Define the problem and then fix it. [00:19:30] Vicki Horden says, "Hello from the UK. Thanks for sharing your course." Thanks, Vicki. Bonnie says, "What book are you reading right now?" I'm reading The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins. And then JC Sawyer says, "A question about ClickFunnels. I'm ready to attract my first organic clients in the woman with irreversible hair loss niche. [00:20:00] I'll start with direct outreach to women from my research calls who asked me to keep them informed about it's launch. Question, I don't want to get distracted from my client acquisition by first setting up my entire funnel, but could it be useful to sit up just my home page and have that button link to an application? Wondering if this will help establish authority for the official launch with the woman I'm already connected with and help me screen to find the three percent truly interested." I think [00:20:30] you can just have a home page, like you can just use ClickFunnels, just create one home page, and just have a picture of you, and just say what you do, and then just have a button to like just apply or something. It's fast enough to create. You'll be able to create the homepage in one hour, and it can only really help. We don't want to overkill it and try and build some fancy website, but one page is fine. Max says, "When to inform our prospects during sales calls that they will also [00:21:00] need to pay for Facebook ads in addition to our management fee?" So you would just say that when they ask like, how does it work? You'd be like, "Well, how it works is we run ads on your behalf, so it's your ad account, your fan page and everything. You own the assets, you own the data, and we're basically just managing it for you on your behalf. You would load your credit card in there, and it will charge your [00:21:30] credit card directly, and then we can decide on a budget that works for you. And I recommend that the starting budget should be like a thousand dollars minimum, and we can start at about a grand or two grand and then kind of scale up from there. And then to do all of this, my management fee is like two grand a month." That explains it. Just say it like that. Joe Wood says, "Did you know your passion from day [00:22:00] one when you started making money in business, or is this something you gradually explored along the way? And what is your ultimate passion and true calling right now?" Yeah. So my ultimate passion is really just building things, honestly. It's building things and learning. I've done this since I was a kid. I'd build tree huts, I'd build go carts, race cars. I'd build all sorts [00:22:30] of stuff, and now I just build businesses and programs and things like that, and teams. I just like building things and watching them get bigger and having the challenge of trying to figure out how to go to that next level up. I also like the learning process and the discovery process along the way. That's really what I like. I'm not in business just to make money. That's not why I do [00:23:00] this. The money is great, and it certainly is a positive, but the main thing I like doing is building stuff and learning. So Duncan says, "You have spoken about the importance of having a T shape skill set. What would you say your own T shape skillset is made up of?" That's a good question, and [00:23:30] it's quite interesting. I know quite a lot about a broad range of things and then I'm quite specific on some things. I know about, I know how accounting works, right? And I know that quite well, and same with tax and corporate structures and all that stuff. So I know the commercial financial side quite well. And then I know the [00:24:00] technology side quite well because I've designed and built software before like SnapInspect, and so I know that quite well. And then I know systems very well. So how to optimize a system, what goes into a system, how to make it more efficient, and then I also know marketing, so all about copywriting, advertising, direct response, [00:24:30] and then even into PPC like Facebook ads and how the PPC ads work, funnels, conversion rate optimization, probability. I also know quite a lot about psychology and neuroscience and things, like what makes a brain and a person do that, do what they do. And then there's some philosophy in there, and then there's ... What else would be in there? Then there's also some sales, like I know how [00:25:00] to do that, and I know how to create products, good products. So product management and product design, so how to really understand what the market wants, like really understanding well, and then create a product that's really going to satisfy and make people like it. I would say that's one of the core pieces I have that a lot of other people don't have. They just become like "marketers" or "salespeople" and they don't know how to make good products. What they haven't realized [00:25:30] is the product is more powerful than the salesperson or the marketer. You put a great marketer and put them in charge of selling a shitty product, that ain't gonna make it move. Same with a salesperson. You get a great salesperson, you give them a shitty product, you're not going to sell it. So the product is a multiplier of the sales and the marketing, as far as I'm concerned. So yeah, I really tie together all of those different pieces, like the product development, and [00:26:00] the marketing, and the sales, and the conversion rates, and the technology, and all of that as well as the psychology and the financial stuff. And it's kind of what's in Accelerator. If you look at Accelerator, we just don't teach you how to do ads, we just don't teach you how to do funnels, or just how to do sales, or how to do marketing, or copywriting, or we don't even just teach you the mindset stuff. We teach you all of it. And even in week, what week is it? Week six [00:26:30] in Accelerator, we even go into how to think, so like how to actually have clean thinking and how to use the first principles method, scientific method, all of these different things, and also how to manage your finances and all of that. So kind of what's in Accelerator, that kind of array of things is that you can tell what might T shape is because it's reflected in the program. And I didn't [00:27:00] actually set out to do that. I didn't sit down and think in advance, "Oh, I'm going to go and acquire these skills and then string them all together and then use them." That's not how it worked. I started off by trying to make a product like SnapInspect, and then I quickly figured out that just knowing how to make a good product isn't enough. You need to also know how to market it and how to sell it. So I had to [00:27:30] learn marketing, I had to learn sales, and I had to learn the technology. I had to learn all of these things, and then I had to manage the business and figure out how to make it actually make money, and accounting, and metrics, and probabilities. So I had to learn these things not by my intentions, but by actual need. I was forced to learn these things as a necessity and then one day, they all just clicked together and [00:28:00] I was like, whoa. Now I can see everything properly. That's what I think is missing a lot in the business world is people just get too stuck on one thing. Like they'll learn copywriting and they think that they're God because they know how to write words properly. That's just words. And then someone might know Facebook ads well and think they're awesome, but there's just some ads. And then someone might think that they know product development really well, but that's just that. [00:28:30] You need to know all of these different things, and that's kind of the point that I drive home in Accelerator, and that's why Accelerator covers all of these different things in one program. So Naila says, "How do you implement the 20 percent to get 80 percent result?" Damn, I missed that question, please ask one again. So John Wood says, "You said on one [00:29:00] of your Q&As the best way to maintain execution is not to rely on motivation, but to create discipline. How do you keep your emotions from destroying the discipline you have when they are really strong and intense?" Yeah, so discipline is like a muscle, right? If you've never been to the gym before, if you've never [00:29:30] worked out, then if you go and start trying to lift some weights, you're going to be really weak, and it's really going to hurt. You're probably not going to like it that much, but after awhile, you start to get stronger and you and you start to adapt. And that's what self discipline is like. Self discipline, you've got to think of it as like a muscle. It's like a mental muscle, and so you need to just keep working on it, keep working on [00:30:00] it, keep working on it, and it gets stronger, stronger, stronger, stronger. And then you'll be able to control yourself. It's just practice and you've got to start small. The key is to start really small. You don't try and work 12 hours a day six days a week within intense focus just straight out of the gates. That's impossible. And so what you do instead is you just try to set a very simple [00:30:30] discipline for yourself like, "I'm going to go to bed at this time and I'm going to wake up at this time." Alright? That is where I would start. If you can't discipline yourself to go to bed at the same time and wake up at the same time, you can't do shit. If you can't do that, then you can't do anything. So that's where it starts. Set a time for yourself. Like me, I'm in bed by 11:00, and I wake up at 6:50, 7:00. [00:31:00] If I just stick to that discipline, then ... Sam: ... [inaudible 00:31:00] and if I just stick to that discipline, I've already my built momentum. Then the next thing to have is going to the gym. So I make sure I go to the gym. Even if I don't want to go, I just go and do it. And then I also do meditation and that's another one of those things, I do it every single day. If you build just discipline around these small things, like exercise, gym, sleep, meditation ... [00:31:30] If you build discipline around these things, then it starts to flow into everything else you do. That's the trick to it. Just start with something small and keep building it up. [Joshua Westover 00:31:46] says, what would you recommend to do about a client who keeps rescheduling coaching calls? A six-week course is taking around 10 weeks. I said that they have to stick to the work I give them to [00:32:00] see results, but one of my clients is having trouble keeping a schedule. What should I do in this situation? Yeah, well you can't reschedule coaching calls. There is no rescheduling. So, you know, it's like with strategy sessions. I don't have a reschedule option. If somebody schedules something with me and then they want to reschedule it, it's no. You can do it, or don't. Don't allow people to reschedule. If somebody [00:32:30] has an actual legit disaster, okay, fine. But if someone just wants to reschedule and it isn't a legitimate disaster, then no. You have to be strict on them. Remember you're trying to coach them, right? And part of coaching is teaching these people to grow up. And you're basically coaching them to not grow up because you're just letting them run free all over the place. [00:33:00] So [Mohamed 00:33:03] says, hey, Sam, I have reached a point where I've sent messages to every member in my niche, United Arab Emirates. Should I change it? Well, if you've sent a message to every single individual in your niche and you believe you should change it, then ... Dude, you should ... I can't even really answer this question for you. You should know what you should do. You're the one closest to the situation. You've been living [00:33:30] it. I haven't. And so you should know what to do. And you'll know. If you think you should change it, and this is the question that keeps coming into your head every damned day, then yeah, you should probably change it. But if you think that you're just being weak and giving in and really you haven't tried properly, then don't change it and just try properly. You'll know the answer. [Sean G 00:33:53] says, you mentioned in one of your past Q & As about a mastermind training. [00:34:00] Someone asked about the book Relentless and you said it was in your mastermind training. Yeah, so I said mindset training and that's in week two. And I don't know the exact module, but it is ... Actually I can tell you because of the Hive Mind search thing. It is ... If you just type the word relentless [00:34:30] in search, you should be able to find it. Yeah, so, looking at week two it's either in week two module six, new paradigm and world view, or week two module seven, rolling god's loaded dice. It [00:35:00] is in one of those two modules. I can see from the search, and if I look here ... Yeah, it's in one of those modules. You can just use the search tool and find it. But that's what I was referring to. Yeah, so I've already replied to yours, [Duncan Felix 00:35:25], about the t-shaped thing. [Adrien Predesku 00:35:29] [00:35:30] says, hi, Sam, quick question for you. I plan to take my first client and work for free for reviews. Do we count this first client as proof of concept, because, in the end it's for free and maybe they just accepted because of this. No, a free client isn't a proof of concept. Because part of your proof of concept is proof that the market is seeing enough value [00:36:00] in what you're offering that they're willing to pay money for it. And so you do have a proof of concept in a way, but it's a proof of concept that the market sees enough value in it that they're willing to pay nothing for it. And take you on for free. That is what you've proved. But that isn't really what you're aiming to do. So your proof of concept is really a proof of concept when it mirrors what we're actually trying to do, which is a client seeing [00:36:30] enough value in what you're offering to the extent that they'd pay money for it. And not just one client but multiple. Donald [Dang 00:36:38] says, what's your advice in hiring a great contractor? I interviewed some Filipino contractors by video Skype and I have a good feeling about one. But this is still the first time I've tried to hire one. I don't know what to look for. Yeah, so, that's a very hard question. It depends what the contractor is doing, [00:37:00] it depends ... It depends on so many things. Like, if it's just for a VA or an assistant, you want to look for somebody who's hungry. Like more than anything, I look for somebody who's very, very hungry, very curious, and very interested and dedicated. Because if somebody has those elements, then they will acquire any skill. I'm not so much looking for skill, I'm looking for interest, curiosity, determination ... [00:37:30] Those things are what you should look for. And also somebody that's honest. You do not want someone who's not honest. [Stefano 00:37:41] says how much does Uplevel Consulting cost? If you want to learn more about Uplevel, go to week seven, it's called the next level, and you can learn more about Uplevel there and then schedule a strategy session. Vincent says, I want a big house, craz ... Oh ... I missed that question. [Avelle 00:38:03] [00:38:00] says, hey, Sam, I'm having trouble getting responses for cold emails. What do you think is critical in creating a cold email that gets a response? What do you think is critical in creating a message that gets a response on LinkedIn? Yeah, so, it has to be personal. It shouldn't look like you've just copied and pasted some damned template message. It should be like a natural [00:38:30] conversation. You know, you should add someone as a friend first or a connection, they should accept that first, before you message them. And then when you do message them, it should be personal. You should just introduce yourself and ask a very short, quick question. Because you're encouraging them to reply back, and then you take the conversation deeper, deeper, deeper. You don't start by asking a bunch of different questions, because then the person has to think too much and they don't want to think too much. This is a first introduction. They just want to, bam, quick think, quick reply, boom. [00:39:00] And then it starts to go along. Also you should have a profile that aligns to what the profile of the person you're trying to have a conversation with is. So if you're talking to accountants, you should have on your profile that you know a lot and you're very interested in the field of accounting. Because then the person you're adding as a friend or a connection will be like, oh, this guy's one of us. [Nathan 00:39:25] says, my newest client is saying ... Oh I've already [00:39:30] answered this. The same leads generating two other dentist clients tons of Invisalign patients. How can I fix this? Is the front desk lying to the dentist about the lead quality? I don't know. This is an interesting one. What I would recommend doing is trying to reach [00:40:00] the leads. Just fact-check. Fact-check the front desk. It is highly likely that if you're generating leads for two other businesses and they're getting clients out of it, but this other business, you're generating the same leads the same way but they're not getting clients out of it and they're saying you're unreachable, that's not conclusive. But it is probable that they're doing something wrong or that they're lying. So just fact-check them. Call the leads yourself and see if they are [00:40:30] responsive. And just check them. [Naila 00:40:37] says what do you think of Facebook social learning unit feature for an online course? Terrible. Don't use it. Facebook is not an environment for focused learning. Facebook is an environment for distraction and socializing. You know, I think it has a good purpose for like these livestream Q & As, right? Someone is coming [00:41:00] here to ask a question and get a response, and then this is what they're doing. Or they might come to chat with some friends who are in the same field that they're in, right? These things are good. Having some friends and socializing with some friends and being in a community and a group, these things are good, but not ... You don't want to learn in this environment. You don't go and learn in a social environment. You learn when it's quiet and focused [00:41:30] and there's no distraction and then you socialize and you combine these two. Max says, in which part of the sales course should we ... Oh, I've already answered this. Yeah, this was a good question I wanted to answer. [Toby Klein 00:41:50] says, you're getting started and you have to ... you're not drinking alcohol or wasting time on social media. What other things should you sacrifice? Or which of the following things [00:42:00] you are currently doing would you be willing to sacrifice and cut back on to have more time to build a successful business? Eight hours of sleep, work out five times per week, daily meditation, clean eating. This is a good question. Well, you can cut eight hours back to seven. Seven is ... You're good on seven. I mean eight's ideal but you can do seven. And [00:42:30] then working out, you don't need to do five times. If you're working out very intensely I would lower the intensity of your workouts because, you know, if your workouts are too intense you get too tired. And [Ret 00:42:44] didn't know what I meant about this. I kept telling him, dude, we can't go that hard because you're forgetting that I work like 12-13 hours a day and I get too fatigued in the afternoons. And he thought I was just talking shit. Until he started working like 12 hours a day. And then he [00:43:00] realized and he was like, I thought you were just talking smack the whole time. But it's true. You can't go really hard if you are planning to have energy for mental tasks. So you could probably lower the intensity of the workouts and you could probably cut it back to three a week. Meditation? That's fine, you should keep that. You only need to do 20 minutes of meditation a day. The clean eating probably is ... I don't know, the clean eating could probably be an area where a [00:43:30] lot of time's getting wasted if you're really going out, buying these groceries, preparing them and doing all of that. I would see if you could get like a meal delivery service online. Like since I've been in LA, I've been using this thing called Thistle. Thistle.co. I just linked you to it, Toby. And this thing here [00:44:00] is ... I've been using it and it's actually really good. Because I don't have my chef set up over here in LA yet. And they deliver healthy food, and it tastes good, and it's very reliable and everything. You don't need a chef. I would see if you could find an option like that. Yeah, that's what I would do, and I'd do the other things I said as well. Richard says, thanks for the link to the SnapInspect video. [00:44:30] Much appreciated, all the best. Cool. No problem. It's actually quite fun to make the prototype in that thing. I had a lot of fun, like playing in that Keynotopia thing for days. And then I actually ended up hanging out with the owner of Keynotopia, and he did a case study on how I did it with SnapInspect and everything. You can still find it. If you Google Sam Ovens Keynotopia ... [00:45:00] It's bringing back memories. You're in luck today. Not only do I give you the actual video, but here is the case study that the guy from Keynotopia did on me about how I use Keynotopia. So you can use that [00:45:30] too. [Naila 00:45:32] says, I'm in the midst of building my 12-week one-to-one coaching program and I have tested it on three women so far and they've given me awesome reviews. But I feel stuck with doing the live video. Any recommendations on how to overcome that? What do you mean by live video? I honestly don't know how to answer this question without knowing what you mean by live video. You'll have to articulate that. [00:46:00] So [Chris 00:46:03] says, how do you compensate sales team, commission only or salary only? So what we do is ... We're commission only at our company, but the answer to this question depends on whether a salesperson can come and work with you on commission only and quickly make enough money to live. Because [00:46:30] you can't have a sales person trying to sell for you and then not making any money from commission only, and now they're worried about paying their bills and things. Because then they're not going to be able to sell effectively ... And they shouldn't be able to concentrate on this when they've got real threats that exist. So commission only works if you've got a good product and a good system and you've got the process dialed in and a new sales rep can come on board with you and immediately start making money. That works. [00:47:00] However, if it isn't as refined and optimized as that, then you want to use something called a drawer. And a drawer is when you pay someone like three or four grand upfront for the ... per month. And then what happens is then, when they earn commissions, the draw gets deducted from their commissions. And so it works like that. And the benefit of having a drawer [00:47:30] is that somebody can get started with you and learn the ropes and get onboarded and get up to speed without stressing out about their survival. So based on those things, you'll be able to make the the decision. [Naila 00:47:54] says, can I add ClickFunnels to my website that I already have? I don't know what you mean [00:48:00] by that. You'll have to talk to ... ask ClickFunnels or post in the group and articulate your question with more detail. Because you're missing out too much detail for me to be able to answer that question properly. [Toby 00:48:14] says, what do you do from 7:00am to 8:00am on the days you don't work out? Is your schedule just slipping in an hour forward, so that after getting up you shower, meditate, and then start work? Yeah, so, typically I will use that extra [00:48:30] hour for sleep. So I will just sleep until 7:50 instead of 6:50. Typically because I'm pretty tired and I want to have a catch-up. Adrien Predesku says, hi, Sam, quick question for you. I plan to take my first client and work ... Oh, I've already answered this. [James Hemick 00:48:55] says I'm writing helpful and encouraging posts [00:49:00] on a group pages and I'm targeting and hoping that the individual enjoys and finds the posts useful and comes to my personal Facebook page. Is this the best strategy? No. It isn't. You should just have some information on your personal Facebook profile, on your timeline. Like you can do some posts there, then you should join groups where your niche hangs out. And then you should observe what happens in those groups. Then you should add people as friends who are in your niche from within those groups. They should accept your friend [00:49:30] request, and then they will probably look at your timeline and see your content and engage with it. But you should also direct-message them too and start a conversation that way. And that's what you should do. You shouldn't be posting content in groups and hoping that maybe someone sees it, clicks through, and then follows the chain all the way back. There's too much what-ifs and things [00:50:00] there. [Avelle 00:50:09] says ... Oh, I've already answered this. So Andrew says, I've joined Uplevel, and feel the same way you do about building things. My problem is that once it is built and starts to take off, I am on to the next project and struggle to stay [00:50:30] excited about the previous project. Yeah. This is true. And I think this happens to all people who like building things. However, you have to see it in a different way. If I built Accelerator, right, and then went to go and focus on building Uplevel, and neglected Accelerator, then Accelerator would fall back. And then what would happen is [00:51:00] the work I'd done there would have come undone, and also the money and everything we're generating through Accelerator would stop coming through. And so in order to keep building I need to keep getting more resources. And by resources I mean money ... To build bigger and bigger and bigger, I need more and more and more money. And I also need more and more customers and I need more and more data and more [00:51:30] and more talented employees and I need more and more of all of these different resources that I use as building blocks to build. And so I have to build something and then I have to put a team in charge of it to keep it running. And I've kind of started viewing the building of the team to manage the thing I just built as a building project in and of itself. So I don't just architect, [00:52:00] design, and build products. I architect and design and build teams that run systems to manage the products. So you can build other things, too, not just the things you're looking at. And then I like building a structure, like a company structure, and different teams and departments and systems that all connect together so that they run efficiently, even when I [00:52:30] turn my attention to building something else. So that's the hard part, honestly. It's like being able to take your eyes off one thing, put your focus on something else and start building here, and not have this thing just fall back. And so that's a different challenge. And you have to figure out how to do that because you need to get things in balance so you can keep building up bigger and bigger. So that's what I did. I just started viewing it as, if [00:53:00] I really want to build things, I need to solve this problem. So [Pieto 00:53:12] says, on the strategy session you said you should mix emotion and rational. My niche is women who want to find love. It's pure emotional. What would be rational incentive? There's a lot of rational ... There's a lot of rational logic in terms of finding [00:53:30] love. I mean, you've got your health, for one. You are healthier when you have a partner that you love. You also are happier. And then when you're happier you do better work. And when you do better work you make more money. And you're more satisfied and you achieve your goals and ... Also, some [00:54:00] women might not like living alone. They might find it lonely and they also might get scared. They might really want to live with someone. There's lots of logical reasons behind having a partner, other than just emotion. [Brandon Mulreden 00:54:31] [00:54:30] says, are you concerned at all about Facebook marketing being diluted and becoming less and less effective? No, not really. You know, if Facebook ads stops working, which it will do one day ... You know, everything has an end. Nothing lasts forever. And so if and when that happens, something else will have come along. Because [00:55:00] the only way that really Facebook could kind of fall apart and completely disintegrate and cease to exist, is in the presence of a new thing which takes people here. And so if this stops something else will emerge and I'll just learn the new thing. I'm not attached to Facebook at all. I don't really have any concerns about it. I will just learn, master, and do whatever works best. [00:55:30] And that will never change. [Steven Stomso 00:55:35] says, I conducted research in my niche last week by reaching out through Facebook groups, adding as a friend, and messaging. I told them ... damn. Missed that. [00:56:00] So [Naila 00:56:02] says, how do you implement the 20 percent to get 80 percent result in your business if you work six days a week for 12 hours a day? How do we implement the 80/20 rule when starting? Some people get this totally confused. Some people think, oh, if you know 80/20 then you only need to work 20 percent of the time that you usually worked to get the same outcome. And that's true. If [00:56:30] 80 percent of your time is wasted and you eliminate that 80 percent of waste, then you should only have to work 20 percent of the time that you were usually working, to achieve the same outcome. But I'm not trying to achieve the same outcome. I'm trying to continuously improve my outcome. So if I'm able to eliminate 80 percent of waste, it doesn't mean I'm just going to start working 12 hours a day, six days a week on that 20 percent [00:57:00] of value-creating stuff. And then I'm looking in that again, where's the 80 percent of the waste, where's the 80 percent of the waste, where's the 80 percent of the waste. And I'm constantly eliminating the waste and just intensely and consistently doing the most valuable thing I can all day, every day, 24/7/365. I'm just again, again, again, again, again, again. It never stops. And I'm still trying to burrow down in there and find more efficiency, more efficiency, more. [00:57:30] And that's when it gets really powerful, right? So that's how you use it. And what you really want to ask yourself is, you just want to do a review of where your time goes every week. So what you should do is track where your time goes 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If you're asleep from this time till this time, write sleep. And then if you're having a shower at this time, write shower. Lunch at this time. Track everywhere your time goes. If you're screwing around with an [00:58:00] Xbox or a PlayStation, write it down. Find out where the hell your time goes. Because it goes somewhere. And when you know where it goes, then you want to find the places that don't add value. That are waste. So any ... We can define waste as anything that doesn't contribute to our goal. So any action that we're taking that consumes time and doesn't contribute [00:58:30] to our goal, we should eliminate it. And you should just constantly be trying to find that 80 percent waste and eliminate it. GC [Brower 00:58:38] says, what would you say to the entrepreneurs who think that they're being more productive by sleeping only three hours a night? Yeah, dude, I don't know. I don't think they exist. I don't know anyone that sleeps three hours a night that is ... You can't function with three hours a night. Seriously. Try. Do it. You're delusional, and probably [00:59:00] poor. Most of the successful businessmen that I've learned and read about, they all sleep properly. [Justin Atkins 00:59:21] says, how do you remain CAN-SPAM compliant in direct email outreach? Do we [00:59:30] need to have an unsubscribe in our cold emails? No you don't need to have an unsubscribe link in a cold email, if you're personally sending it. If you're broadcasting it out, using a software like MailChimp or something, you do. But if I want to send somebody an email, I'm allowed to send somebody an email. It's a personal email. So that's how it works. You should only be worried about spamming if you're spamming. [Loelle 01:00:00] [01:00:00] says, Sam, does that mean that you should never discount your price until you do 30 calls? You should never really discount your price anyway. A discount has nothing to do with the number of calls you do. If you're not getting clients after 30 calls, then find out why. And then fix it. It doesn't mean that you then just don't know why but you just irrationally choose to discount your price. That's insane. [01:00:30] That's like seeing an airplane fly past, and then thinking, I'm going to discount my price. Those two things have no correlation. [Jackson Parrett 01:00:43] says, I'm in the health and fitness niche and I help people transform their mind and body. I'm currently planning on coaching clients while simultaneously putting them through my fully functional course. Proof of concept at 297. My question is if I should sell [01:01:00] both personal coaching an the course separately, or just do the coaching and the course separately. Or just do the coaching for now, while refining the course for there as clients to go through it. Yeah, I would just focus on the coaching, dude. How you get good at something is by doing it with someone. Practice. No one got good at anything by not doing it. [01:01:30] It's crazy. So you learn by practice and application and execution. So, how are you going to get really good at health and fitness? By having good health and fitness yourself, and helping your clients have good health and fitness in a one-on-one kind of environment. And then when you've really mastered that and you feel like you've honed it in to the point that this should be a course, because this is just mastery, then create the course, and then start selling [01:02:00] the course. Sam: ... course. Roheem says, "When doing the four day testing phase for a Facebook ad, do you count weekends or just the weekdays?" All days. Days are days. Zach Marcus says, "How do you know when to take a break from doing the work? Especially when you advocate pushing through the discomfort a lot. I realized I've been feeling depressed lately due to lack of progress in my niche and [01:02:30] not being able to figure out why. And I also can't think clear headedly." Yeah so, you just need to stop thinking about it and start doing it. Right. Like, there's two things that can happen. You're either burnt out or you're being weak. One of those two things. Now how you can figure out if you're burnt out or not is because, you know, to get burnt out of you kinda have to be working [01:03:00] 12 hours a day or more, for six days a week or more. Without every taking a break. And you have to be getting less than like six hours of sleep a night to get burnt out. So if any of those are true, then burn out probably is existing. And if you do have burn out, then willpower can't really overcome that. You need to actually rest a bit and recover a bit. But if you don't have burn out, then you know you're just being weak. [01:03:30] And then you just need to sit down, close the doors, turn your damn phone off. Get rid of your phone. Get rid of your TV. I honestly, one of the best things you can do is just get rid of your TV. If you've got three TVs in your house, get rid of them. As soon as I moved into this house in L.A. it had like five TVs in it. I was like, "What the hell is wrong with these people?" I went around the whole house and took every TV out. Just removed them. And I don't wanna have a TV in my house. It's pointless. And I don't wanna [01:04:00] have any distractions in my house. So get rid of all of those things. If you've got like an Xbox or a PlayStation, bin it. TVs, get rid of them. Like, get rid of all of the stuff. Get rid of your phone. Like get rid of all of these apps and things you've got all over the place. And then just close the doors and focus. Ellen says, "Hey, Sam, I'm finding it difficult to pick my niche. I'm good at restorative yoga and selling of vitamins. [01:04:30] Spirituality and meditation interests me a lot. I would love to do something that would change people's lives and bring joy into their lives. I'm in week three of the program and I will watch Niche 2.0 program again tomorrow. Any suggestions?" Yeah I mean, you know right now you're just looking at it from your point of view, which is fine, but you have to look at it from multiple point of views. So we've established that you like spirituality [01:05:00] and meditation, right. That's what you like. You also like yoga and vitamins, okay. This is what you're interested in and you like the stuff. Good. Now, we want to look at niches that are related to these things that you're interested in. So groups of people that share the common interest of these things that you're interested in. Right. Now until we find these different niches, we then look at those different niches and research to find out what problems they [01:05:30] have. And when we find out what problems they haven we ask ourselves, "Well could we solve this problem?" And if you don't have the skills to solve that problem then you think, "Well how can I get the skills to solve that problem?" And then you could acquire those skills and then solve that problem. Or if you already possess the skills, you could apply those skills to that problem and solve it and add value, right. And that is a business. And so the way you're getting confused now is you're just looking at what you [01:06:00] are interested in. But that's not a business. That's you and your interests. You need to find the niches that share your interests and then find the participants within that niche, you need to find their problems. And then solve that problem. That's how you find your niche. Nathan says, "Thanks, boss, we'll fact check." Good man. Shawn G. says, "I'm battled whether I should niche further down. I'm currently [01:06:30] helping e-commerce entrepreneurs scale their business through digital marketing and pay per click. Or I help Amazon sellers scale their business through digital marketing and pay per click. Do you think it even matters at this point? Because I know you say just start something." Yeah, it doesn't matter. Just start something. Dude, it's the same ... You're basically saying the same thing, you're just getting hung up on a word. Should I say e-commerce or should I say Amazon? Even though Amazon is e-commerce and e-commerce is Amazon. It's the same thing. Just do it. [01:07:00] Anthony McMalkin says, "Hello from Christchurch." Hi, Anthony. [Beogio 01:07:06] says, "I was just wondering what attraction methods you would recommend to really engage the HR talent acquisition roles when you have diverse industries approaching you? Example, job leads ... [01:07:30] Example job leads, how would you see that being impactful to gain top talent for key roles in companies? Right now change management is in huge demand in Canada, let alone other countries, what type of change strategies would you recommend for Facebook and other social media venues?" All right I have to unpack this because this is a very, very complicated, tangled question. [01:08:00] HR talent acquisition roles. HR talent acquisition roles. Dude, this question's crazy. You need to make it way more clearer. Like just state the problem. Like or state like a specific question. Like this is the person I'm trying to help, this is what I'm trying to do for them, and this [01:08:30] is ... How would you do that? Or like I'm thinking this, do you think that's right? Like just ... I could probably decipher that message, but it would probably take me like four minutes. So just try to and make it clearer. Hugo [Bruyarey 01:08:49] says, "Hi, Sam. What is exactly that Rhett is offering you in his services as a personal trainer? Training nutrition sleep optimization, I'm [01:09:00] curious about his work with you in Consulting.com because I'm also a PT and will probably try to get into that niche, helping CO's master their health." So, with Rhett we just treated it as an experiment, right. I said all right like you're gonna move into my house and you're just going to ... we're just gonna work on this and see what we can do with how fitness, sleep, and nutrition and all of this so that I can get more horsepower [01:09:30] to work better. All right. Because I was like let's play with these things. And you know about the training and gym and exercise and stuff, you know all about that and you should just read a lot of books about the stuff and find out all of these different things that we can play with and experiment with, with the intention to get more focus and more energy and more horsepower to achieve my business goals. Right. That's ... We set [01:10:00] it up as an experiment. We didn't know what Rhett was going to do. We just knew that we were going to test some stuff. And that's kinda how it started. And then we played with all sorts of things. So we played with sleep and sleep's big. Like we found that sleep is more important than diet and exercise. Right. So if you have to choose which one to cut back on, diet, exercise, sleep? I would cut exercise first, then [01:10:30] diet, and then sleep. That's the order of importance. If you just sleep really well and eat really well, you barely have to do any exercise. But if you sleep poorly and eat poorly, it doesn't matter how hard you're exercising, nothing's gonna happen. And so yeah that's the order that we found it in. Sleep number one, diet, and then exercise. And then we tested all sorts of things to get better sleep. So we tried chilling down the room, like getting the room really cold, [01:11:00] that works amazing. You know if you wanna have a really good sleep, get that room cold. So we put air conditioning and everything in that. You wanna get your room dark, cold, and quiet. And the temperature I found the optimal sleep at would be 60 degrees Fahrenheit, which I believe is like ... is that 15 degrees Celsius I think? And then that makes your heart rate drop right down. Your resting heart rate goes right down when the temperature's cold. And when your heart [01:11:30] rate's low you're getting better REM and deep sleep and your cells are regenerating faster. It's like ... It's way better. And, you know we played with all sorts of stuff, right. Like I would have the coffee at say 12 or 1 PM and I'd watch it just ruin my sleep. So then we came up with these simple rules. Like one coffee a day had at 9 AM in the morning, however, if you want to have two it must be consumed before 11 AM. [01:12:00] So we figured out all of these different rules to really optimize everything. We also played with diet, meal times, and then supplements, and different types of work outs. Like we treated it as an experiment. And we're still going. Like we're still testing stuff. And we're trying to just come up with the optimal like exercise, sleep, and nutrition kind of regime [01:12:30] for high performance in business. Because no one's really done that. And so that's why we don't know, Rhett doesn't have a defined role. We're just finding out what it is. Donald Dang says, "I find myself losing focus as I get later into the night when working. How do you maintain your energy later in the day when your concentration starts to deteriorate?" Yeah so first of all, I don't work very late into there evening, all right. Like I stop work at 9:30, 9 or 9:30. And I'm starting [01:13:00] to get pretty like tired then, right. So I don't go past then because I wouldn't be very good. So if you're trying to work really late at night or something it's probably not smart because you know you should just try and wake up earlier. Other than that you wanna make sure you've got lots of natural light coming into your room. Natural light gives you energy. You don't wanna have fluorescent lights. If you've got fluorescent lights get those things [01:13:30] the hell out of there. Those will ruin you. You wanna have incandescent light and you should have three sources of it. So like a desk lamp ... You should have a desk lamp, overhead ceiling lights, and maybe a floor lamp and all incandescent. Because that mixture of incandescent light, it's a broader spectrum and it will make you ... It'll be better for you and you'll have more energy. But nothing beats natural light. Natural [01:14:00] light coming in, like that is energy. It makes you energized. And then food. Like if you eat really bad food, or if you eat like bread and sugar and crap like that, then you're probably gonna get tired because you haven't got very good energy in your body. So healthy food will make you go longer. Same with working out in the morning, that'll make you go longer too. It's a combination of things. You gotta have discipline. You gotta have a good environment that's optimized. And you have to sleep well. And you have to have [01:14:30] a routine. And you have to exercise and have good food. You gotta kinda get these things all together so that you've got long lasting energy that's constant and you're not wavy all over the place. Zach Marcus says his niche is anorexia and is not responding to friend requests and he's been adding 40 people everyday for about six ... six average accepts. "I'm also ... the people who accepted [01:15:00] my friend requests aren't converting to strategy sessions." Oh man, we lost your question. Can you ask that question again, Zach? So Roheem says he's seen a bunch of my Facebook ads and he's wondering what ads work the best. Ads about my success story or ads showing my students' success. [01:15:30] It's been ads showing ... It's been ... If it's cold, right, if you're going out to a cold prospect, a story works best. A personal story of struggle to success, that works best and also a sprinkling in and a mention of other student's results within that main story. That works best for cold. For warm it can help to start bringing in some other stories, but when it's cold ... People get confused when it's cold and they're learning [01:16:00] something for the first time and having different stories is too hard to understand. So having one makes it easier. David Cavanaugh says, "Sam, you teasingly mentioned that you're launching a new part of your program called Marketing Furnace next year. As a pro marketer, I'm very interested in knowing more. Can you reveal any more info at this stage?" [01:16:30] I never said that. I never said that at all. Find me where I said that and tag me in it. And prove it because I'm very confident I never said those words. So Roheem says, "How many hours do you spend a day on building and implementing versus learning like reading, watching a course, [01:17:00] researching, et cetera?" So, this has changed. When I first got started in business, pretty much all I did was learning because I wasn't very busy. Like I wasn't getting lots of people trying to contact me, I didn't have a team to manage. No one really knew who I was so life was pretty quiet. And I also didn't really know what to do. So I wasn't ... I didn't even know what to do even if I did want to do something. [01:17:30] So when I first got started in business, I spent a huge amount of my time learning. Just reading, reading, reading. Like reading a lot of books. Doing courses and things, just learning. Soaking up as much information as I could. And then as I started to learn more, I started to implement more. And whenever I went to implement something and didn't know about it, I had to learn again. And so then I started to become like a symbiotic thing between learning and doing. [01:18:00] And then ... So it starts all with learning, then learning and doing, and then later on when you've accumulated quite a lot of knowledge, it's mostly doing. It's pretty much all doing and you still have to learn, but you're much faster at it. And it's 80% doing, probably 10, 20% learning. But you also are learning a lot from the doing. So, you know. Louis says, "What does the structure of your sales team look [01:18:30] like?" It's pretty simple. We just have like three sales reps and that's it. Three sales reps and they work like five, six days a week. And they do strategy sessions all day. That's it. Grace says, "I'm an affiliate partner for an organization's products and I have found out that they market to my leads for their core business. Is this normal? I have lost large referral clients because they disliked [01:19:00] being marketed to for products they didn't want nor they're in the market for." Yeah. Honestly, just start your own business. Don't be an affiliate for like for some company like that. Like you're guaranteed to get screwed over. So just don't give them the option. Like just solve a problem for people, provide them with a really good product, [01:19:30] add value, get paid, keep it simple. You don't need to be doing that stuff. Julia Nicholson says, "Hi, Sam, I'm a bit confused with the Truth Chart and when your niche comes back to the line of truth and then it dips. You're basically saying it is going away from the truth again and the observer stays on the line of truth at all time." So your question is, "You're basically [01:20:00] saying it's going away from the truth again." All right your question isn't really worded properly. So I'm not too clear ... I'm not too sure what you're actually asking me. But the Chart of Truth worksheet, it basically is to show you that the truth like it changes over time, right? Like you know ... A prime example would be that body building [01:20:30] niche. Like you know they ... It's all focused on supplements and really heavy weights and doing small limited movements and getting really big. And it goes on an extreme up like that and then it starts to come back down. And people are like actually it's more about doing crossfit and a range of exercises and not getting really big, but getting more like fit. And supplements aren't really that important. And it's more about diet. But then it might go too [01:21:00] far that way and then it starts to come back that other way. And also in the software world, that market's going like this all the time too. There's like one language is really popular ... I remember back when I built SnapInspect. Ruby on Rails was like the hot language at that time. It was like everyone wanted to build in it and it was like the best ever. And that was where it was distorted, very far distorted. And now people don't [01:21:30] like Ruby and it's gone the other way. And you know things are ... They're like ... There are changes in perceptions of truth like this is the best thing to do. And what's happening right now, which I've been trying to kick for a long time, is like the use of social media and being a ADD psychopath. Like you know there's been guru's and influencers who are like, You know post on social [01:22:00] media all the time. Just do Facebook Lives and Instagram Lives like six hours a day. That's how you start a business." And they took that one to the extreme. They thought that was the truth and they told the people in the market that that was the truth, and a lot of people believed it. And I sat there looking at it and I was like, "This is really messed up." And so I was like, "Well I'm pretty sure the truth is still to just solve problems for people, add value to them, create good products, make them happy, and make money. I'm pretty sure that's still the main [01:22:30] thing." Even though everyone else is talking about this other crap. And so I just stuck with that. And I kept saying, just again, again, again, again, again. And now it's funny because it's starting to tip, it's starting to tip back down now. And so that's another example about it. That's what I mean. Duncan Felix says, "In Module 6 you talk about the decentralized consulting model with defined processes [01:23:00] and help articles et cetera for customers. Are there any tips you have along these lines for onboarding new customers? For example I'm thinking of creating a video in automated email sequence for new clients." Yeah you might be overcooking it, to be honest. Like onboarding a new client is probably just like ... You probably just need to give them ... You probably just need to send them one templated email that says, "Thanks for signing, dadadada. Here's the things that you need to [01:23:30] complete so that we can start, work/start, like executing on your project." Give them a link to a survey which they have to complete with all of this information. Maybe give them access to a Google drive folder which they have to upload different assets and things into. Ask them for different passwords and things. And then you know you could probably have maybe like one follow up reminder or that follows up with them and says, "Hey you still haven't completed this. We still need it." And [01:24:00] then if they still don't reply to that one that it could probably email you and say, "Hey this person hasn't done this thing." That's as complicated as it needs to be. That's even pretty complicated. You know like, I would still just keep it that one email, just copy/paste it, send it. You know there's this saying that nothing ... like no code is faster ... No code is the fastest. Clearly I've messed that saying up, but nothing is faster [01:24:30] than no code. And it's from like the software world. And what I basically means is you know if you have an option not to write code for something, it's best not to. Because just creating systems is ... it adds complexity. And you shouldn't create systems and complexity if you don't have to. Because nothing is faster than like nothing. That's the key. And that's [01:25:00] why you always wanna try and be very minimal. Have systems where systems are needed, but if there's an option to not even have a system at all, don't have it. Nothing's better than just elimination. So, Eric is asking me what domain I prefer. I [01:25:30] would just choose ... Yeah you've said for 19 years or something you ran 9-11 shift like and you've got a YouTube channel and everything on that. Just use that. That's what you've used for the longest. That's what you've built the most reputation and credibility on. And that's the one that's attached to all your social channels. So just stick to that. Rosita says, "Wondering why you're not using the outdoor gym we have a Venice Beach. You mentioned that you're about to build [01:26:00] one in your house to eliminate commute." Yeah well exactly. Why would I wanna commute when I don't have to? Like you know I go out ... This will show you how far I take things. And so, when I go up to Venice, I said, "Rhett, can you research the gyms that are in close proximity to my house and find me the best options?" So I didn't even do that myself. And he went out and he found those, he came back, he said, "These are the top three gyms I recommend. These are the commute times for all three." [01:26:30] And all three were about 10 to 15 minutes commute each way. And I was like that's like 20, 30 minutes a day, five days a week. That's a long time. And then I was like so I have the option to not do that or do that, I'm gonna take the option to not to do that. There's less decision fatigue, less time wasting. And so instead I just said, "All right, well how much would it cost to assemble a gym in the garage?" [01:27:00] And he said it would cost like five grand. And I was like done, done. I value my time more than five grand for one hour. Like you know I wouldn't ... If someone was like I'll give you five grand for an hour, I'd say no. And so when I looked at the commute times there, you know let's say 30 minutes a day, five days a week, that's a two and a half hour commute a week. That's like ... That's more than 15 grand. And [01:27:30] so if I can assemble a gym for five grand in my garage, and never have to commute, then I'm making money every single week. You see how I did that? Different logic. And so that's why. Logan says, "Hi, Sam. What do you put in your breakfast smoothie? Do you still keep a sugar free diet? Any challenges with this?" So in my smoothie [01:28:00] I ... I can only tell you the things that I can remember. So I have like half a frozen banana, right that does in there. And then like one scope of protein powder. And then almond milk. And then I have like a teaspoon of like cocoa powder or cacao powder, whatever the hell that is. And there's some like ashwagandha, there's some [01:28:30] maca, M-A-C-A. And then there's some ... there's some other stuff. Like I think there's a bit of cinnamon and then we put in some blueberries and then ... Yeah, that's it. And if you post it in the Facebook group and you tag Rhett in it, he can probably tell you what the other ingredients are. But that's probably 93% of the ingredients in that smoothie. And going [01:29:00] sugar free is very good. First of all if you drink alcohol, nothing will change your life more than not drinking alcohol. And if you just knew what it did to you it would make you stop. And the way I know about it is because I ... We started tracking everything. Like I had this aura ring that goes on my finger and it tracks my heart rate, sleep, everything. And you know I had a glass of wine one night, one single one and you [01:29:30] should've seen what it did to my heart rate. It just jacked it right up. Ruined my sleep. And it plays havoc with you. And it ruins you really. And so nothing will change your life more than eliminating alcohol. But then once you've eliminated that and you're looking for some more bad stuff, get rid of sugar because that's just ... it's not as bad, but it's still pretty bad. It makes your emotions really wavy. And if you don't have [01:30:00] sugar you're way more calm and stable and you don't just have these weird anxiety emotions come out of nowhere. Nayla says, "I've just moved to France permanently and I feel a resistance to setting up my business here because of the 30% tax on revenue. Any advice?" Yeah. Well ... I mean you moved to France. So you kinda asked for that. Like France has some of the worst conditions for business owners. [01:30:30] It's because it's very like social driven. And I've known a couple of people who were in France and they actually left because of that. And so if you're in France and you're going to be living in France and running your business from France you don't really have any options. You just have to have your business in France and pay tax in France. But if you have the option to live somewhere else, then do that. Because yeah, [01:31:00] France isn't the best place for a company. I mean don't get me wrong, you can still make millions there, and if you have to be there and you love it, still just do it. Because it's ... You know you don't wanna just move somewhere because of the tax. Like you wanna be somewhere that you like, but if you don't really like France and you would rather live somewhere else anyway, then do that. Don Raj says, "I love your course," thanks. "I want to ask [01:31:30] how do you get back up from a day where your plans have not gone to the plan and time had to be spent away from my 30 day attack?" That's a good question. So it depends why. Why? That's the question. Because if I had to do something else, and I was being clearly ... I was thinking clearly about it and I really did have to do [01:32:00] something else, let me give you an example. Like let's say there was a family like emergency. Like somebody was in an ambulance and somebody called me from my family and said, "Something's going on. Someone's in an ambulance." Like ... And I'm like okay, well what am I gonna focus on here? Am I just gonna focus on creating slides for this new webinar? Or am I going to do this? I'm going to do that. And at the end of the day if I haven't achieved the slides [01:32:30] that I really wanted to achieve, I know why. Because I had to do that. And if I had to make that decision again I'd do that anyway. So that's okay and those things happen. Or if there's a complete crisis at your company, like let's say your merchant account goes down or something. And you know you're unable to process money or there's something is going on and it's serious, then you have to change tact. But if it's just because you got [01:33:00] distracted and it's because you know maybe you just- Sam: ... distracted. And it's because you know, maybe you just started watching a new series on Netflix, and then one episode turned into two, two turned into three, and then one season turned into three seasons, and you didn't do anything. Then, yeah, you should feel really fucking bad about that, because that's ... that's weak. And so, it depends. Like, did you have to change tact, or [01:33:30] were you being weak? If you were being weak, you should feel real bad ... because when you let that bad feeling brew in you, you don't want to do it again. Dillon Pan says, "Do you have any moonshots in mind when winning with the winnings you attained from consulting? It seems like a lot of rejectory for someone like you who loves building valuable things, pushing the needle forward, would love to hear about them and about how you plan to seat yourself up, most advantageous thing [01:34:00] pursuing them." Well yeah, I mean, you know me and what do you think? Do you think I'm building something or do you think I'm just chilling? Right? Of course I'm building something and you'll hear about it when it's built. I don't like to talk about things before they're built because there's ... you actually get kind of a satisfaction from talking about things [01:34:30] and it kind of gives you a satisfaction that is very similar in nature to achievement. So if you just talk about something all the time then you kind of feel like you're achieving something even though you haven't actually achieved it yet. And then you have that sense of achievement that it false and that makes you not ... execute. So I find it best to just keep quiet and then when it's done, it's done, and [01:35:00] I'm like, here it is. So Adam Nassum says, "So I work as a medical school admissions consultant and I'm also a medical student. Once I get to around five clients I don't know if I have the time to take on any more as it involves one on one coaching as well as other work I do with my clients. My idea is to bring on [01:35:30] other consultants who would come to me. I was wondering if this is a business model that makes sense and if so, should those consultants do ..." I missed the last piece of that question, but I can kind of get what you're saying. Right now you're worrying about the future and you shouldn't. You should just keep going so continue to just get more clients and serve those clients. And if the time comes where [01:36:00] you can't take on any more clients because you don't have any time, then that is it. Now you can either charge more money and just work with the same number clients but make more by charging money or you can systemize and optimize your methods of working with these people so that you can serve more people with the same amount of time or you might be able to figure out how to turn it into a course. And then you can create a course and let them use the course and scale that way or maybe you've seen such an opportunity here [01:36:30] that you don't want to do anything else but this so you decide to quit everything else that you're doing and just focus on this. Right? Tons of options. But don't worry about them right now because you just need to keep doing it and worry about it when it's an issue, not when it's a hypothetical issue. Sterling Colee says, "Can you share what Rhett's direct outreach messaging would look like if he were still active in getting new clients?" [01:37:00] And then Anthony Collins said beneath, "What if we go hear it?" That's probably what he would say and it would probably work. I have no idea, man. But maybe you should just ask him. Just message Rhett and say, "Hey." Anna Shein says, "Hi Sam. Where in the internet I can find the problems that my niche has? Quora, blogs, is there something else?" So you just need, like, [01:37:30] whoever your niche is, find out where they hang out. If your niche hangs out a lot on Quora or in different blogs then go there. Maybe it's Facebook groups, maybe ... I don't know. Like, wherever your niche hangs out, go there, and learn about them there. But ultimately you'll have to talk to somebody on the phone, on Skype, in person, because you know you can get clues and learn things from looking at the internet but to learn a lot it happens by talking to a person. [01:38:00] Danielle Lambert say, "In the week about ... finding what you dislike in some people, when those things are bad traits like dishonesty, what then? And also a lot of times when you dislike something in someone it can be projection. How is this correlated to what you need to adapt to into yourself? Are you supposed to find things that you dislike that are not so loaded?" Yes. [01:38:30] This is a good question. And people find this one kind of funny because like, let's say you're doing the, so you're talking about the binary poles worksheet right? And that's in the mindset training in accelerated week two. And in one of those work- in that worksheet we, I asked you the questions, "Who do you dislike?" "Who makes you angry?" And you write down like three people. What things do you dislike about these people? Then you write down these things, like, "This person's a scammer and they just care about money [01:39:00] and cars and all of this stuff." Right? And then it says well, do you see why ... do you see that the things that you dislike these people for are things you need to possess yourself to achieve what you want to achieve? Like that's kind of how it goes. Then you're probably thinking, what? Like, is Sam telling me to actually be dishonest and scam people? That's not what I'm saying. [01:39:30] What I'm saying is that you ... there's a high probability that you have misjudged these people. If you haven't misjudged them and they're actually like, you've got, like serious proof that these people are like really bad then that's fine and you shouldn't do those things. But most of the time, like I saw a perfect example with one guy in accelerator and he posted in the group and he said when he was doing that worksheet [01:40:00] he listed these people who he thought were egotistical and up themselves and cocky and he thought they were really egotistical, up themselves, and cocky because they would post all the time on social media about themselves and their successes and all of this stuff. Right? and he despised these people because they did these things. And then when he flipped it around and he saw that the reason why he dislikes these people is the same, like he needs some of [01:40:30] these traits to actually succeed because he was very good at what he did but he was too afraid to post about anything or talk about anything because he thought that if you post or talk about yourself in any way, shape, or form then you're a selfish, egotistical person. So he had like paralyzed himself in that position because of his judgment of those people. He couldn't do the action he knew he needed to take to get where he wanted to go because he didn't want to [01:41:00] put himself under that same judgment right? That's how it works. So you said you don't like these people because they're dishonest. I would really ask the question, like, are they actually dishonest? Like how do you know? Maybe it's a perception thing. Maybe you think they're very dishonest but maybe they're not lying. And so you gotta look at it a different way and maybe they are more out there and [01:41:30] more self promotional or something than what you are and maybe that's what you need to do a bit more in order to get to where you wanna go. That's kind of the intent of that exercise. Tom Long says, "Magnesium is amazing for improving your sleep." Thanks for that Tom. Juliette Nicholson, "Do you have a coaching vid for sleep? I need it." [01:42:00] We talk about sleep, diet, exercise, and all of that stuff in up level. In up level I actually give you my exact meal plan so I've got it so optimized. We have 28 recipes, 28 meals that are all refined, that I like them, they're tasty and we know the ingredients and the process to combine the ingredients to form the food and we also know [01:42:30] the nutritional info and everything like that. And the reason why we have 28 is because my wife, she doesn't like having the same thing too frequently. And I wanted to define where that point was where she said "too frequent." 'Cause if she says, "I don't mind having the same thing all the time." I'm like, "Well, define that." Like how am I gonna find that point? And I found that it existed at ... she can't have the same meal twice [01:43:00] in a 14 day period and if we've got two meals a day, lunch and dinner, then that means if we're gonna have a meal frequency of one every 14 days in a scattered random order every week then she'll never be able to detect a pattern because there's so many possible combinations there that should never be able to be detected by then. And she would have forgotten after 14 days that she had this 14 days ago and so that's perfect, right? So that's what do is we have 28 [01:43:30] meals and they're randomized every week across two meals a day, seven days a week and I also have training on how to hire a chef and like, exactly step by step. And then sleep. How to optimize for sleep, I can tell you right now that you wanna get your room dark, very dark. Like you want to have blackout curtains and you need to get rid of all the electronics that are in your room. If you have a TV in your room, you're just asking for it. [01:44:00] Right? Get that thing the hell out. Don't take your laptop into your room with you. And don't have your phone by your damn bed. You know, like when I go to sleep I turn my phone on airplane mode and I plug it into the charger and I set my alarm and I leave it like ... 10 meters away from my bed so that my alarm goes off in the morning and I can't just roll over and turn it off. I have to actually get up and walk quite a distance to go and get it and turn it [01:44:30] off and it's like that by design so that my probability of going back to sleep or snoozing is massively decreased. But also, my probability of waking up in the morning and then just grabbing my phone and looking at it is massively decreased as is my probability of looking at my phone when I'm lying in bed before going to sleep because I can't, because it's not there. So all of these things ... you wanna design everything so that you're most likely to default to good behavior instead of bad behavior. [01:45:00] If you design your life so that there's bad ... so that bad behavior is an easy option then you'll most likely default to bad behavior, right? So you wanna, it's just like having like, if you have a lot of alcohol in your house, you're probably more likely to drink it. If you don't have any in your house, you're well less likely to. Same with like chocolate and ice cream and stuff. If it's not in the house, then it's a real effort to go get it and then you probably will just ... can't be bothered. [01:45:30] So you gotta like design it like this. And then for sleep you wanna get the room very dark, very quiet so it should be dead quiet, completely pitch black and cold. Have air conditioning in your room or use a bed cooler, like it actually is air conditioning that goes under your sheets and you can find that on Amazon if you just search for bed cooler. And the one I have is called a [01:46:00] bed jet. B-E-D J-E-T. And you sleep better when you're colder. That's a fact. Also, you don't want to have caffeine after like 12 PM, no caffeine, no alcohol. Alcohol destroys the sleep, so does caffeine after 12. No food after 7:30. So have dinner at seven, 7:30, and then nothing. And then go to bed at the same time every single night because your hormones and chemicals all start to balance around those times, wake up at the same time [01:46:30] every morning and yeah, if you do that you'll honestly, you'll sleep four times better probably. And then buy an oura ring. O-U-R-A. Google that. Buy one of those. And if you want to know more info then check out Uplevel Consulting and you can do that by going to week seven in consulting accelerator it's called the next level and that will tell you all about Uplevel and how it works and there's lots of detail in there about how to optimize [01:47:00] and systemize your life. Frank Aragon says, "I'm in the lead generation business. I need leads for businesses. I generate leads for businesses. Is it better to just scale the lead [inaudible 01:47:13] by acquiring more clients or is it beneficial to create a product? I just want to automate the [inaudible 01:47:19] for clients and live wherever I want." Yeah. So if you want to ... [01:47:30] if you have ... it depends if you have a really good process. If you've got really good methods, systems, strategies, tactics, and if you have totally mastered this field and you have got a totally different philosophy about it and a different view on it and a different everything on it than the average person does, then you have a great opportunity to create a course. And people will buy your course [01:48:00] and learn how you do it 'cause they wanna do it themselves. So if you do have that then do a course and it will be ... and it will give you what you want. If you don't have that then you need to keep working at it until you do have that and to do that you just need to get more clients and practice more. Hugo says, "Thank Sam [01:48:30] for your insights." No problem, Hugo. No problem Julian. Alright. Here's Zach Marcus, so his niche is Anorexia. "The people who are accepting his friend requests aren't converting into [01:48:43] and don't reply to my direct messages. I've tried reiterating my message but still the same result. I no longer have access to the group so I'm using a fake account and adding members by copy and pasting the URL. Could that be the cause? Also, although my [01:49:00] niche desires to be free from the eating disorder they also don't think their life would be any better if they overcome their eating disorder because it requires them to gain weight and eat more which is what they don't want. Might that be a potential problem as well?" Yeah. So ... I think ... first of all, like if somebody has anorexia, like [01:49:30] they don't want to have anorexia. Now, they might want to have it in the moment. They might want to not eat food and things and that's like an impulse, kind of, like short term thinking. But really if they were rational they wouldn't want to have it. Right? 'Cause it kills people and it's not very fun for the person who has it or anyone around them. So I can see what you're saying here that they might want to actually have it but they really don't [01:50:00] and so you are solving a problem if you help somebody who has it, like better deal with it or not have it. The problem it looks like is it's hard to find these people 'cause it's a touchy subject and finding them in groups and messaging them and things like that might be hard. I would ... what would I [01:50:30] do if I was you? I mean, there's probably a reason why you chose this niche. It's very ... it sounds very personal. No one just chooses this because it sounds fun. So I'm guessing you have experienced this yourself, like you ... like something has to be exist like that in order for you to do this. So if that is true then you wanna look back over what you did and where you hung out in your life and all of those things and think of a [01:51:00] more strategic way to come into these people's awareness. Maybe there's different ways and you really need to think about it because this group of people doesn't behave as much like a typical group of people because there's a lot of, kind of secrecy or shame or sensitivities around the thing, the nature of the problem, [01:51:30] unlike just a business problem which people are willing to talk about more often. So you need to look at it closer and analyze it and think, "How can I get into these people's awareness without kind of such this blatant approach?" And also, retrace your own steps and think, "Where did I hang out? Where was I receiving info from? How can I come up with something a bit smarter here?" [01:52:00] Melvin Mohammed says, "Hey Sam. What books would you recommend for marketing?" I recommend doing the whole course. Like, watch every single video and you should, well let me just check to see if you have watched every single video. 'Cause if you have I'll be impressed and I'll actually tell you some books. But if you haven't, then I would just tell you to do the course ... so .... I'm [01:52:30] looking at your progress ... yep, so you have ... completed two modules of week one. Right? You've completed week one, module one, and week one, module two. That's a good start but [01:53:00] there's a lot more modules and a lot more weeks so I'm not gonna recommend you any books because you shouldn't read any books right now. You should just finish the course. Finish it. I made that course for a reason you know? And that will show you what you need to do and then at the time when you have reviewed everything, then I'll be happy to make you some recommendations. Adam Nassam, and this actually is a good point because [01:53:30] we can see, like I make sure that I can see how much of the videos people watch and how much percentage they complete. And you know what the biggest correlation to success is? Watching the videos. Like, it kind of seems really common sense and really simple but I can't tell you how many people claim they don't know what to do and they're not able to get clients and they're struggling and they're looking at podcasts and YouTube [01:54:00] videos and they're wanting to know what books to read and things and they haven't even finished one week of the course. It's like, do the damn course. It works. The main reason it doesn't work is because you haven't done it. So like I haven't really found anybody who's watched all the videos, completed all of the action items, take an action, and hasn't been successful. If you ever wanted to know why [01:54:30] maybe you don't know what to do, maybe you don't know what the next step is, maybe you're not quite sure of what to do or how to go to that next level, probably just do the course. And everything kind of flows from there. So do like one or two more questions here. 'Cause we're almost at the end of our time. So Adam Nassam says, "I work as a medical school admissions [01:55:00] consultant. I'm also currently a medical student. I got my first three clients but once ... I've already actually answered this question. Yeah I already answered this. Dan Raz says, "How do you ... " Oh. I've already actually answered that one too. Thanks Grace. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Thanks Louelle ... [01:55:30] okay so Darren Cavanaugh has said, "Regarding the marketing furnace, if memory serves you mentioned this when you were talking about your alchemy of self in your future manifesto. It was in there but you said you couldn't talk about it yet. It was when you also mentioned the retreat as in ... yeah." So I didn't say marketing furnace, I said marketing [01:56:00] fire storm and what I was talking about was doing a lot of marketing which is actually happening right now. So you know, I went through a period of doing a lot of building. So building a team, building an office, building the new version of accelerator, building the new funnel and the systems and all of that and then once I had that built then it was time to just turn on some serious marketing and so we lit up Facebook and YouTube and [01:56:30] display and all sorts of stuff. And we bought a ton of traffic. And we have like more than one and half million people coming, like in terms of traffic, every month right now. And that's what I just labeled the marketing fire storm and yeah, it's not a product, it's not a ... thing that I released it was just a new phase and a new milestone of like the journey. [01:57:00] Nigel Thomas says, "What is the furthest you've ever pushed your pain threshold and what was the activity?" Hmmm ... well, it's obviously just injuries right? Because those are really painful. Like I remember when I was younger I split my tailbone and that was pretty damn sore. That [01:57:30] wasn't fun. But I'm not sure if that's what you're talking about, or if you're talking about related to work ... relating to work ... I mean, I remember pushing my threshold pretty far when I was doing strategy sessions and I was just trying to do as many as I could. And I remember I would do like ... eight [01:58:00] or nine strategy sessions a day, right? For like six days a week and man I would get tired doing that. And I remember at some points I actually thought like, I might actually die right now. Like I was so tired and I was like trying to breathe and I was like this is definitely a new little zone that I'm exploring here. But what's funny is like you feel like you're gonna die or something but then ... then it fades and you're like, huh, this is nothing. [01:58:30] And then you kind of like it and then you kind of get used to it and then you've just found another level and then you push it again and you feel like you're gonna, like, collapse again and then you push it again and you know, it's amazing how far you can keep pushing. Like I couldn't used to concentrate for like five minutes. Because I was always wanting to look at social media or text my friends or I was like a ... just a, like a nutcase that, but I was like [01:59:00] a normal person, a social being because those people can't focus on anything. And it used to be painful to really just focus on the same thing for a long period of time. But now I can do it for like 12, 14 hours a day, weeks on end, for months on end and that's a different type of pain. It's not like physical pain but it's mental pain because you have all of these impulses that pop up. Like you wanna do this, or [01:59:30] you wanna go out and grab this or you wanna have a snack or you wanna like just watch this thing or ... you want to like kind of like give into your impulses and you have these different thoughts that pop into your mind and you're like, oh, I wonder what the definition of that is. Or oh I wonder if I should Google that, or look at that. And you just have to keep focused and just not listen to any of the thoughts and just keep throwing them out of your head being like, that's stupid. What's going on? And then just keep working [02:00:00] and then all of the impulses you just kind of have to feel them come over you and you're like, oh this one's strong. It's pulling me to do that. But no. Keep going. Alright. And that's a different type of pain. That's the pain that you gotta get good at to get good at business or get good at anything. you gotta just be able to stay disciplined, stay on task and never give into your impulses and never give into your stupid thoughts. Just create a plan and execute the plan [02:00:30] and don't waiver, don't deviate for a second. Just get it done. And honestly that's like very painful for people. And that's the one you wanna work on. It's not so much the split tailbone pain you wanna work, 'cause there's a reason why that's really painful 'cause it's not really good but the other one is the pain that you should work on. Alright, well, we're at the end of our time now. So thanks everyone for attending. [02:01:00] If you enjoyed this livestream just click that "like" button, let me know in the comments, give me some feedback and these calls, we do them pretty much every single Saturday. They go from three PM till five PM and that's eastern time which is the time in New York and next Saturday, which is the ... what is next Saturday? It is the ... [02:01:30] Saturday, October the sixth. I will not be doing a livestream that day because I'm holding my mastermind event in New York so I'm gonna be doing a full day presentation over those three days so next week, no livestream Q and A, but then we will resume on ... where is this? This is ... October the 13th. So no livestream on October the sixth, but resuming October 13th and we'll be back [02:02:00] to every week from then. So thanks everyone for attending and I look forward to speaking with you again soon.

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