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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 1st, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 1st, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for September 1st, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right. Can see a couple of people jumping on here. Can see [Nefers 00:00:31], and Ellen [Duvell 00:00:35], Kelly Smith, Dan. Before we get started, can you guys just let me know if you've got audio and video working correctly, if you can hear me talking, you can see my screen, just let me know. Jeremy says, "Welcome to California, Sam." Thanks, Jeremy. Yeah. All right thanks [Nefers 00:01:11] and Alexander. Looks like we've got audio and video working. Cool. How these calls work is I do one of them every Saturday and they happen every Saturday at 3:00 PM, Eastern time, which is the time in New York. And we go for two hours. We start at three and we go to 5:00 PM. And if you want to remember, just put it in your calendar now. Just set it to repeat every Saturday at 3:00 PM Eastern. And we do them pretty much every Saturday, unless I'm traveling or something like that. And how they work is you can ask me a question in that comments box to the right hand side. And then I go through the questions in the order that they're asked, and basically, we just do Q and A. Let's go ahead and get started here. [Nefers 00:02:14] says, "When running Facebook ads, do you remove any negative comments? I understand there will be hate, but do you think negative comments has a negative affect on influencing new people viewing the ads, reading negative comments? I do filter out bad words, of course, in settings also, but what is your mindset on keeping slash removing negative comments and ads?" It's best to just leave them. Honestly, what you should see forming is roughly 50% of the people have a negative opinion and then roughly 50% of the people have a positive opinion. And there's these two sides, which are just kind of fighting with each other. And that's normal. That's how the world works. There is always that. And it actually looks weird and suspicious when there isn't that. However, you'll know there is a problem with your ad when every single comment on it is negative, and there's no one seeing the other side of it. Then you know there some problem with the ad. But if it's roughly 50/50, then it's fine, and you should just leave it. And what we find is it actually helps the ads. It's like there's a healthy debate going on in the comments. Just because someone says something negative on an ad doesn't mean that the ad is bad or that anything like that. It's just what humans do. They debate things, take sides, and it actually helps that engagement. And that energy in the comment section, it really helps the ad grow. All right. Steve [Lorten 00:03:59] says, "With regards to establishing your proof of concept, I'm in the health and fitness niche. If I have proof that my service offering works by showing people my transformation pictures of losing fat and keeping it off long-term using my service, is that already an established proof of concept?" No, it's not because something can happen once, right? And one time can be a fluke. I'm not saying that what you did was a fluke, but in the minds of other people, one time can be a fluke. Plus it's quite easy to do something yourself compared to teaching somebody else how to do it. It's much harder to teach someone else how to do and get them to get the results than to do it yourself because you can police yourself. Trying to police other people is near impossible. So you can police other people. You actually have to figure out how to teach them how to police themselves. And that requires a lot more thinking, and architecture, and planning, and all of that. That's way harder to do that. And so a proof of concept exists when you've taught three other people how to do it, at least three. You did it yourself, then you helped three other people get results too. Now you know you have a really solid proof of concept. Don't try and take shortcuts by thinking oh, because I've done it myself, I can just shortcut all of this stuff. Don't take the shortcuts. You'll end up paying for it in years or decades of time later on. Ben Stark says, "Do you meditate? If so do you use an app?" Yes, I do meditate. No, I don't use an app because meditation is about doing and thinking about nothing. That's what it's about. And so if you start adding things to the practice of meditation, then you're defeating the entire purpose of meditation. Meditation is the practice of nothing. So if you add something to nothing, then you're kind of ruining the practice of nothing. Well, all I do is is I sit on a chair, close my eyes, and have a straight back. And then I just set a timer on my phone for 20 minutes. And I make sure that when I set my timer for 20 minutes that my phone is on airplane mode so I don't get calls or messages or anything like that while I'm doing the meditation. Timer for 20 minutes. And then I just close my eyes, think about nothing, which is hard to do, but you've got to practice. And then I just focus on breathing. And just breathe through my nose. And I try to focus on where the breath meets the skin on the tip of my nose, and just focus on that going in and out. And that's it. And then as soon as the timer goes, that 20 minutes is up, done. That's all it is. Simple. You don't need to buy anything. You don't need anything fancy. Definitely don't need an app. That's it. And I do that every single day. And if you're not meditating right now, you definitely should. It will make you more money literally because decisions create businesses. And good decisions create good businesses. And decisions require you to have a clear mine to make good ones. And to have a clear mind, meditation helps a lot. If you do meditate, then you make clearer decisions. Therefore, you build a better business, you make more money, you have a better life. So that's why you should do it. Rahim says, "Kelly House looking good." Thanks, dude. Rob [Lily 00:08:12] says, "I saw a great interview with you and Andrew Warner, part two. And you spoke about how your mind was in constant battle with itself early on in your business. You explained that you were making so many changes to yourself that you felt incongruent with who you had become. I also get this feeling when prospects become interested in my service. What helped you overcome this?" Yeah, change is always- There's always friction. If we get really used to something, for example, just imagine writing with your right hand with a pen. You're quite used to that. It just flows naturally. You go put that pen in your left hand, and try write, and it's painful, and it will make you frustrated. And it's because it's just change. And whenever you change anything, you feel that same friction. And it's normal. If why you're not an entrepreneur and then you become an entrepreneur, there's a pretty big change. Or if you're used to just being a solo business owner and then you start hiring employees, there's a big change. If you're used to offline brick and mortar style business and then you move to online stuff, big change. All of these changes, they bring a lot of friction and they also cause a bit of an identity crisis because you identify a lot with the old way of doing things like being an employee, working a nine to five, writing with your right hand, commuting to work, wearing a suit. That's who you started to think you were. So as soon as you change that, you're going to have a lot of friction, and you're going to feel like an imposter. And that's normal. It doesn't mean it's wrong. It just means that it's different. And the way to fix it is just time. You just need to keep doing it. And the trick to doing it is doing it every single day. What you do every day starts to really just form and shape who you are. If you're going to meditate, you don't do it randomly, you do it every day. If you're going to eat well, you eat well every day. You sleep well every day. You do all of these things every day. And if you try to do revenue generating activities, which is what I talk a lot about in the program, you want to do them every single day. Because the things you do every day will be the things that build your life and your business. And over time, the things you do every day start to build really big things. If you want to know how to overcome it, it's just daily repetition and consistency over time. AJ [Shanker 00:11:10] says, "How many days do you plan in advance normally?" I would say that I plan- I mean, my Warmap, which you've probably seen. If you haven't seen it, just search in the Facebook group for Warm app. W-A-R-M-A-P, that's what I use to plan my months, years, days, all that stuff. And I typically plot annual goals, which is just loose things that are just I want to achieve these things this year. And then I have 10, 20 year vision, which is very loose. That's a vision of what I want in the future. And then I have annual goals, which are more specific. And then I break those down into quarterly things. And then I break it into months. Months is where things start to get more specific like revenue target is this and projects we're going to deliver are this. People we're going to hire is this. But then actual tasks, that's per week and per day. And then once I get into the days, I plan tomorrow today every day. Last night at like 9:30 at night, I was planning all of today from the moment I woke up to the moment that I go to sleep, every single thing. And then that's really powerful to do. You always want to plan tomorrow today because then when you wake up in the morning, you don't have to spend nay cognitive power thinking what should I do today? And in what order should I do it? And it's just too hard. You just want to wake up in the morning, have a shower, have a coffee, look at that list, and just get to work. And that's basically how I plan things. But I would say, yeah, I plan quite far out, but it's loose. And then it gets tighter as the timeframe goes down. If that makes sense. Danielle Christine says, "How do you get over haters? I know you said you don't pay attention, but you also said you knew people who think you're a scam. So how do you deal with that?" Yeah. The best way to deal with them is to win, right? The way I think about it is these people, they don't want you to win. They want you to lose. And they want you to not succeed. And then the ultimate revenge is to win and then not even say anything about it because then you never acknowledge them, and then you won. And now they're powerless because you never acknowledge them anyway and you did what they most feared, which is winning when they wanted you to lose. So that's all you've got to do is just win. It's the best revenge and you don't even need to say anything. And then, yeah, of course there's always going to be people that think you're a scam, right? But the best thing to do is to know that you're not a scam. And the way you do that is what your customers say about you. If all your customers think that you're a scam and they say that you're a scam, then you probably are operating a scam. And you really need to fix that. You should not ignore that. If you ignore that, you'll get in a lot of trouble. What customers tell you is crucially important. And I absolutely listen to every single thing a customer says. But as for people who aren't customers, I don't care about what they say or think because what they're doing is they're looking at an ad. And in five second, they're thinking about what you must be doing, and then based on that five second analysis, they assume that you must be operating a scam. So they say, "Scam." Right? That's a five second analysis from an ad. However, you're running the business. You know what's actually going on. You know the results your customers are getting or aren't getting. You know how good your customer support is, and you know how good your operations are, and you know your products and your services. You know everything in your business. And if you're customers are getting results, and they're really happy, and if your customer support ratings are really good, and if you're company is going good, and then only people who think you're a scam are just outsiders, who have never purchased anything from you. Their opinion is irrelevant. That's how you deal with it. Rosita says, "Hi, are you going to keep your offices and people in at New York City?" I actually asked everyone at the company way before we were thinking about moving. And pretty much, actually all of them are moving. That was part of it. Yeah, they're all moving over here. It will take a while for people to move. It will probably take until the end of the year for everyone to move so we'll probably keep hold of that office until the end of the year. And then once everyone has migrated, then we'll get rid of that office, and then we'll just have an office over here in LA. Yeah, I wouldn't have moved over here if everyone on my team was like, "No, we don't want to go there." It was like a team decision. Peter says, "Hi Sam. You said to make a good testimonial, get results, then have the testimonial ask where was your situation and what is your situation now that you have had the results? How to do that when in a niche like helping women to find love. The results are random and not guaranteed because due to the work of the woman, they are happy, but not final result finding love." Yeah, if your promise is I help women find love and you don't have any customers who are women who have found love, then you have a bit of a problem. Because what you're saying you will do is not what you are doing. And the testimonials reveal that. So you need to either help them find love. Of course that is based on their work. You can't control them because you are not them. You have to make training or have services that are good enough to teach them how to get the results. I would focus on that. You need to fix it. That's a big problem. But you said they are happy. Well, yeah, I mean, that's fine. With Consulting Accelerator, we can have customers buy our course, and they might find it entertaining, and they might like the box set, and they might put it on their desk. And they might like the Facebook group, and they might make a couple of friends in the Facebook group. And they might contact customer support a few times and have a good experience there. So they might be happy, right? But that's not good enough. It's good that they're happy. I mean, that's better than them not being happy, right? But that's not good enough. People don't come to buy your things just to be happy and satisfied. They buy them to get a result. And so the way we judge our performance with our company is are people getting the result and are they happy? That's what needs to happen. You're missing that result piece. You need to help people get it. And that should be your sole focus right now because it's the most important thing. Every business has a promise that they make to people and you need to be able to deliver that promise. It doesn't mean that you're going to be able to deliver it to 100% of people. Companies that sell a treadmill, they can make a promise that this treadmill works and everything, and if you use it, you'll be fit. But that doesn't mean that 100% of people who buy the treadmill are going to use it and get fit. But it means that if someone does use it, it should work, and they should get fit. And there should be a lot of people using it, all right. That's how you need to gage the performance of your business. Danny Gibson said, "My niche is overcoming drug addiction. I've written an outline of my program, and going to feed it via one-on-one coaching, and use bits based on each client. How do I price my services?" I mean, we talk about how to do this is the training. And what you do is you want a price based on value. Now, that's hard to determine with something like this because what is the value of becoming free of a drug addiction? Its invaluable, really. How precious is a human life? How do we determine that in dollars? So it gets kind of hard. I think you should charge what you think is fair. And you can always start a bit lower and then work up. But I think it should be at least $1,000 because you've got to understand how much money these people are probably paying on drugs, right? So you've got a pretty good way to handle that objection, "Oh, I don't know if I have $1,000." Well, how are you buying all of these drugs? If someone is willing to spend the money on drugs, but they're not willing to spend the money on becoming free of the addition to the drugs, but yet they say they don't have the money because they're spending it on drugs, there is a problem there. That is some convoluted thinking. You need to help them solve that delusion. Peter says, "What to say during the strategy session at the end when the prospect says, "It's a lot of money and I don't know you. I don't know if it works, and I don't take decision directly like that." Then they say they have to think about it and disappear." This is very common when you're starting out. If you've done less than like 30 strategy sessions, then this is normal because what's helping is you're not very confident. And you don't have conviction in what you're saying, and the prospect on the other end of the phone, they can sense that. The way humans work is very complex in that they're not just listening to the words that we say, they're listening to how the words are being said, and the pauses, and all sorts of things. And based on all of this information, they're running a complex algorithm to determine whether they trust and believe you. And if you don't sound confident in yourself, then that's just going to reflect straight back at you and the other person. And they're not going to be that confident in you. And that's normal. And it's actually that's how it should be, right? If you're not confident, the other person probably won't be confident in you. First of all, you just need to understand that it's normal and that the only way to really fix it is practice. And the way to do practice is to just keep doing them. And honestly, once you get past 30, you'll get quite a lot better. Once you get past 100 strategy sessions, you'll get way better. And then once you get past 1,000, you'll be a machine. And you pretty much won't get that question ever again. [Nala Laya 00:24:41] says, "I'm in the body image, self-esteem and self-confidence niche among women between 30 to 60. I chose that niche based on my experience in transformation going through it. I have read other Facebook groups where women talk about that to know their langauge. I'm putting together one-on-one coaching program to help women have a more positive body image and dress for success. What's the most effective one-on-one coaching program structure do you recommend?" Okay. One-on-one coaching, I think the best way to do it is to have a call once a week. So a one-on-one call once a week. And that call should go for at least one hour, in between one and two hours. Sometimes with coaching it's hard to get into it in one hour so I would try and do a two hour coaching call once a week. And you could do that for six to eight weeks or something. And that's a pretty good structure. That's what I would do if I was you. Steve [Lorten 00:26:05], "Okay. So does that mean I have to work with people to get them results for a few weeks first, in order to start my online business." No, it means that in order to start your online business, you need to start helping people. You don't get people results and work with people so that you can start your business. Your only really starting your business when you're working with people and helping them get results. These two things aren't different. They're the same. Shawn Gordon says, "I love your work and the story you are creating for you and others. I bought the program last year and can no longer access the content. Can you or someone please help me with that?" Yes, we can. Just send an email to [email protected], [email protected] And someone will help you ASAP. You should be able to get a response today, tomorrow at the latest. Brent [Kins 00:27:12] says, "Hi Sam, third day into course. Absolutely loving it and going to make money. Thanks. My question is how did you learn Google AdWords and SEO? Do you have any recommendations?" It depends whether you absolutely need to know it or not. You don't want to get into the weeds and learn something like this unless you have to because it's quite a big thing to learn. And Google AdWords is one animal on its own, and then SEO is another thing. And they're both complicated and they both take a lot of effort to understand. First of all, I would ask you are you sure you need to know this? Why do you need to know this? And if you're absolutely sure, and you know that if you know these things, you can help your clients get the result that they want, and build a really good business out of it. Then what I would is I would start by just reading some basics about Google AdWords like buying a couple books on it and then buying a couple of books on SEO. And then what I would do is I would run your own AdWords and do your own SEO for your own website, right. That's the best way to learn. First of all, get the theory, and the concepts, and the definitions, and levels, and names. And the way the whole system works, understand that, in the theory and in concept. And then learn through application with your own business. And then once you've done that, then you should be good to start helping the businesses with it. And then you'll get really good once you've helped other businesses with it, and you've done it for yourself. That's what I'd do. [Leandro 00:29:10] says, "How do you do when no one respond from your Facebook groups about your offers?" It depends what you're doing. If you're posting offers in a Facebook group and people aren't responding, that's normal because people don't like people who post offers in Facebook groups. We ban them from our groups, the people that do that. If you're doing that, don't do it. And it's normal that no one is responding. However, if what you're doing is adding people as friends who are in your niche, getting them to accept you, and then starting a conversation via messenger organically, and then leading into something, and they're not responding there, then that's a different thing. And I'm guessing the one you're doing is the one where you're posting in a group so you shouldn't do that one. You should do the other one, the messenger. Joshua Westover says, "Hey Sam, I'm currently tracking where my clients came from, what messages I sent them, why they signed up etc. Do you think it's a good idea to ask them what made them sign up with me as well, so I can hear it from them?" Yeah, I think that's a good question to ask. It's an awesome question. Another awesome question is why did you sign up with me? What was the thing that really made you choose me over other people? Right. That's a golden question because there's a lot of people out there doing the same things as you all the time. That's normal. The people who buy from you are aware that there's other people. There must be a reason why they chose you and not the other people. That reason is pretty important, especially when you're trying to figure out how you can differentiate yourself from other people. So it's a really good question to ask. Sam: Good question to ask. [Locke 00:31:05] says, "How's Venice?" It's good, thanks. It's been, I've been here for seven days now. I got here last Saturday, and it's been, like the place is awesome. The house is awesome, it's right on the beach, the weather's awesome and all of that, but it's been difficult to be very productive because we just pretty much came to an empty house, and it's going to take four weeks or something for our furniture and everything in New York to come over here, and so we've just been doing a lot of setting up, like making sure the internet's fast and making sure that ... even some simple things, right, like knowing what your address is, and zip code is, off by heart, so that if you're ordering something online you can just enter it in quickly. All of these little things, because it's change and it's new, it really slows you down. Then having different internet and then also just having to think about everything. When you wake up in the morning and you've got to have a shower and then you've got to get dressed, and you get a coffee, then you have some food and things, once you get into a real pattern of things, it all becomes so automatic. Like back in New York I'd wake up, it was all automatic. I barely had to think about what I was doing. And then I had a chef and she would cook all the food and all that, so my environment was so well tuned to be extremely productive. Then as soon as I came over here, I had none of that, and so my productivity just plummeted. But that's normal, and it really taught me a good listen, that your environment and your routine is so important to your productivity. And you really should make sure that you've got the right environment, because you can think you're the most productive person in the world, but if you totally change your environment, you're going to be all out of sync. I think most people would never actually tune their environment, and they'd never actually get into sync. And it's a lot of small things, too. I'll give you an example. Let's say that, here's a simple one, right? Your internet is slow. I see a lot of people whose internet is slow and they just don't do anything about it. Can you imagine how many different pages you go on, on the internet every day to run your business? And then you imagine those load times. Every single one has a load time. Can you imagine how these really compound up over time? Then you've got to watch a video or download something or upload something, especially in the business that I run, we need to upload, download quite a bit of video, and that speed that it happens at is really important. If you're running an online business, it seems so simple and so elementary that you should have the fastest internet connection you can possibly have, because it will make a big difference, especially over time. What I did is I, you can probably see it here, I just use the hard wire. Not even wifi, so it's just ethernet. And this thing is so much faster. I think wifi is not that good. It's unstable, it drops, it's laggy, and if you just hard wire in, it goes way faster. That's just one simple thing that most people would need to think about. Another one is people who would have one laptop charger, and then they might have to charge it in their bedroom, and then they wake up in the morning and they go to their office and they sit down and they start working, and then they realize that their battery's dying and then they need a charger. And now it's not next to them. And now they're thinking about it, where is it? Now they go to their bedroom and get their charger, come back to their office and plug it in, and then get back to work. That doesn't bother most people. But something like that, it's painful because it's just broken my focus of what I was doing. I might be right into the zone of some work and then I get taken out of it to go and do something trivial like find a charger. The time I spend getting the charger might only be one, two minutes but the time it takes for me to get back into that head space might be half an hour. So the solution to that is just to have a charger in both rooms so you never have that. So it's all of these small things, and they all add up, massively. And they make you way more productive. Like if your phone ever runs out of battery in the middle of the day, then you should be charging it at night fully, so that it doesn't do that during the day. Then you should have your clothes that you're going to wear out the night before, you should have tomorrow planned today, so that when you wake up you know exactly what to do. And then food. You shouldn't have to think oh, what am I going to have for breakfast, what am I going to have for lunch, what am I going to have for dinner? It's too much thinking. You should just have prepared it all for the week, in advance. All of things, they start to add up and they start to make you way more productive. Then what you really want to do is, you want to ... Like what I've noticed about poor people is that they make the same decisions every single day as if it's the first time that they're making this decision. What am I going to have for breakfast, what am I going to wear today? It's actually a struggle for them, and yet by the time the next day comes around, they pretend like this never happened before, and so they go through it all over again. And then they go through it all over again. This happens to them every day, and so what happens is probably 90% of their energy gets spent on just trivial tasks. Then they're too exhausted to put any energy into building anything. And if you want to build something, you need to make sure that all of your energy can get channeled into building, and none of it gets channeled into just living and maintenance so that you can live. Living maintenance, which is basically what I call eating, sleeping, showering, dressing and all of these things, these are like living maintenance tasks. They don't build things. But building things is like working on your business and doing all of that, and you need to make sure that none of your energy is getting taken off onto this stuff, so you need to start putting systems in place, automating things and trying to create rules so that you don't have to think about these things. What I've noticed about really successful people is that they make one decision one time that solves all of those decisions for the rest of their life. One thing that I did is with food, I was always thinking oh, what am I going to have to eat, asking Ashley what does she want to have to eat, and it takes 30 minutes to find something to eat. This thing has happened two to three times a day. So I just got to shift. The thinking time it took to get a shift was probably the equivalent to what it took to order two meals, but then I never had to think about it ever again. That's an example. Or thinking what clothes am I going to wear today. Just by wearing the same clothes every day, I don't mean the exact same clothes, I just mean like a t-shirt. If you like a t-shirt, then you should just buy five or six of them. Then if you like a pair of shorts, you should just buy five or six of them. Then that way you can just wear the same thing every day without the clothes smelling or being anything like that. You never have to think about it again. So once you create all of these systems in place, or if you have a charger in every spot that you work from, and if you've got a hard wired connection to your computer from every spot that you work from, and if you put all of things in place, then you're just way more efficient and you'll move way faster. That is what I would recommend everyone do, really tune your environment that you're working and living in so that it's as automated and frictionless as possible. G.G. says, "Hi Sam. I'm a doctor and I'm calling to inspire patients to line up with their healing through spiritual and mind alignment. I have created a course for diabetes with the tagline of How to Turn a Life Changing Diagnosis Into a Life Giving Diagnosis. I intend to expand the course to other diagnoses in the future. My question is I love teaching about inspiring people to line up with health, not necessarily diabetes. How can you help me how best I can serve? Do I go general or continue with just focusing on one diagnosis?" I would focus on something specific first, right? I know that every person wants to have their business as big as possible, and they want to have their market as big as possible. And they want to help the whole world, right? That's fine, that's what you should do, but in order to do that you have to do it in steps, right, and you have to work your way to that point. You don't just start helping the whole world immediately. That's how you don't help anybody, right? So you want to focus on something very specific first, and you want to really master that thing, conquer it, and once you've done it then you can open up the market wider, wider, wider. That's what you want to do. Start specific. Mohammed says, "Since you've looked into the double slit experiment, quantum mechanics, speed of light, quantum entanglement, et cetera, do you believe that we live in a simulation?" It's hard. It depends on all of these definitions of these words that we're using here, right, because we're using words to explain something else and the thing we're trying to explain is much more complicated than the language system we have to explain it, so it's very hard for us. You might mean one thing when you say that, and the way I respond to it, I might be thinking about something totally different. So we can get confused here, but I do think that what, our life is basically like a simulation. What I mean by that is not like a computer simulation, but we're seeing atoms and particles and things, and we just see them as theses images that we see. What we see is not necessarily what's there, and because that's true then we have some form of simulation. Kelley Smith says, "I've only been part of your program for the past two weeks. I have three points/questions." I'm not going to answer all three of these, dude, because each one of them is like an essay. I'll answer one of them. Number one, "I've lost tens of thousands of dollars on other courses, some of which you definitely know. Your training is head and shoulders above these. Each model and training ..." All right, where's the question here? All right, the first one isn't a question, it's a complement, so thanks for that. The second one doesn't have a question either. All right, third one looks like it has a question here. "The business experience that I had ..." All right, I just lost your question, dude. It just slid past because there's like a hundred people on this call. If you can just ask that bottom one, the third one, that's where the actual question was, just make sure you ask me the specific question, because it will help me read it faster and answer it faster. So just post it again, and I'll get to it. For other people, if I missed your question, it's not that I purposely avoided it, it's just that it passed through my screen too quickly. So Shannon Jason ... Oh, that one's gone too. All right, they're moving quite fast. Joshua said, "Hey, Sam. There's a box that occasionally comes up when adding friends on Facebook that asks if I know the person personally, and it asks you to confirm. Do you think this is a warning from Facebook? Is there a chance it could lead to a ban of some sort if I always put confirm?" I think you're probably going to get a harsher warning than that before getting banned. You can Google it. I would Google it and read up more on it because I don't know about this exact thing you're talking about, but my guess is that they'll give you a more official warning before they ban you. Clara [Starling 00:32:37] says, "Hi Sam. There's a bunch of people in the market who say that with niches, it's better to give a lot of free value on Facebook in order to let the customer know us and trust us in the beginning. Facebook Live's free content, et cetera. As you often talked about not giving free value, and not being too social on the net, can I ask you what is, for you, the right approach to generate more strategies on Facebook if the niche is a bit introverted? My customer has an existential problem and I cannot find them easily. I'm struggling generating strategy decisions. Thanks for your advice." I don't know what your market is because you left that detail out, but I think that there's ... This is how I think about it. There's a lot of people who think that doing a lot of Facebook Lives and a lot of blog posts and all of this, they think that by doing all of this that they're adding value and helping lots of people, but quite often the people who are really famous and really social and doing all of that stuff, they're not actually helping their customers because that energy, if you've got customers then your energy can go on making a lot of noise on the internet or it can go to helping your customers. If someone's really making a lot of noise, then you know they're probably not helping their customers a lot. That's how it happens. I think the best thing to do is to help your customers, and then they get lots of results, and then they make a lot of noise for you on the internet. So we achieve the same goal, but through a different path. And one makes a lot more sense to me than the other. So I don't really care about being a big social, famous person on the internet because at the end of the day, when all is said and done, the most important thing is your customers getting results. And are the results that they're getting bigger than the results that other people are getting? And if that's true, then you'll win. That' all that really matters. Andrew [Hernon 00:47:56] said, "Hey Sam, what happened to [inaudible 00:47:59]?" I sold it. I sold that company ages ago. Nadine Tabler says, "When I connect with people on Facebook groups and genuinely offer my knowledge and help without offering up my work, they check out my profile and see that I'm selling a coaching program, and they are turned off immediately. How do I cope with that?" I'm just looking at your profile. I think it's just that your confidence, and you probably just haven't done it enough. If you're trying to help someone solve a problem and then they look at your profile, and then see that you actually have a whole life and a whole business built around helping people solve this problem, and that therefore makes them think that you're not trustworthy or worth talking to about them solving their problem that you know how to solve, if that is actually happening then something isn't right. Really, it should be more likely to be believable, and happen, if those things occur. So I would say that what you're finding is just initial results because your confidence isn't very high and you're new to this. Right? And the way to fix it is through repetition and consistency over time. Just practice, practice, practice. Keep doing it every day, relentlessly, and it'll fix itself. Peter says, "What do you say at the end of a strategy session when they agree on price and you say we can start now with either Visa or MasterCard and they answer I prefer to pay later when we will begin the session, and then they disappear forever?" Well, we're beginning the session immediately, so there shouldn't be a oh, I'll pay later when we start, because we're starting now. So that doesn't make sense. If you're actually saying we start later or something like that, then that might be causing that. You're creating a little escape route, an escape path for these people to take when the pressure gets hot. When the pressure mounts up really high, you're providing them a little trap door and they just go out there. You need to start sealing off those trap doors and you have to let that pressure get really high. This isn't like that sleazy sales pressure, where they're just shouting at you, right? This is just, they've got to make a damn decision. And they can say no. We're happy with no's. What we don't want is maybe, or I'll pay later, or anything that isn't yes or no. And I would say, remove that trap door that exists somewhere in the words that you are saying on the script. Find it, remove it, and then keep practicing. Practice will fix it. Diker says, "Hi Sam. What can I charge for digital marketing to get customers from Facebook? The minus price, gyms, restaurants, and the higher priced doctors and realtors?" I don't think you've done the course. If you had done the course, you wouldn't ask that question. So I would go through the course. Go through one week at a time, one module at a time, in sequential order, watch all the videos in full, do the action items, and it will solve all these questions that you're asking me. Chankari says. "I'm part of a networking company which have amazing natural products, which help in weight loss as well. How can I package this for the fitness industry as a consultant?" You're going the wrong way. You're part of this networking company that has health products, and now you're trying to find a place to put these products in the market. That's the wrong way. You've got to start with the market, find out what their problems are, and then go from the market to the solution. And whatever the best solution is for that market's problem, that is what you do. It is highly unlikely to be this thing that you're in. If it is, then that's fine, you can use it. But it's highly unlikely to be that thing. So you've got to go the other way around. You go market, problem, back to solution. You don't start at solution and then try to find a place to slot it in, in the market. So do that, and it will clear things up for you. Fernando says, "I have a site that has 35K organic unique visitors per month. Should I create a look alike audience and use just this single audience of Facebook or is it preferable to follow your method with 30 audiences, the 1% look alike results and 1.3 million people?" You should do the ads the way I tell you how to do it, like in the training. But one of those audiences you can test in your 30 audience interest, right? One of those can be that 1% look alike audience. That's fine. But you still want to try the other audience interest groups too. Sterling Cauley says, "Sam, I took action and found a goldmine by narrowing my niche down to sales coaches who do public speaking for a living, and my response rates are tripling overnight. Thank you for the guidance. And Q&A course with Nick Hauser." No problem, dude. Happy to help. Mohammed says, "What are your thoughts currently on circle of competence? To me, it sounds very self limiting and goes against what you say, e.g. being full stack, so can you expand on the circle of competence, e.g. I'm currently a full stack marketer, main focus Facebook ads and E-commerce, eight figures revenue, so I shouldn't do marketing [inaudible 00:54:29] if it's what I love." Circle of competence can be defined lots of different ways. It just means that there's a focus, and a focus can be on any different thing or combination of things. It just means you're not doing everything for everyone. If you're currently doing ... The best way I find to do a circle of competence is to focus on solving a problem. Don't focus on a technology. Don't focus on a market method. Don't even focus on an industry. Focus on a problem. Now that problem will probably exist among participants in a niche, but your main focus is solving that problem. Now if other people tend to have that problem and they're not who you originally designed this for, then it's fine. You can sell it to them because they still have this problem. So that's why you should just really have your circle of competence on solving a problem, which it sounds like you're helping businesses get customers with digital marketing, right? Really, if other businesses that are online also have the problem that they need customers through digital marketing, and it looks like they can still get results with you, then that's fine. I would start with E-com businesses and master that first before you widen the net and start working with lots of different things, but once you've really mastered it and you're comfortable to add on a little bit more of a challenge, then you can start widening that net. Nyla says, "I took the MBTI test and I'm at 49% extrovert and 51% introvert, so basically I'm like an ambivert. What are your thoughts on this? That might be true, but typically what happens when people's results are really in the middle like that is they just didn't answer honestly. So I would just figure out you're an introvert or an extrovert based on this one thing. Like do you prefer to be alone or do you prefer to be surrounded to lots of people? And do you prefer silence or do you prefer talking to a lot of people? If you prefer being alone and you prefer silence, then you're probably an introvert. If you prefer the other one, then you're an extrovert. It doesn't really matter which one you are at all, really. But if you're an introvert, you need to focus on being more of an extrovert because often introverts have the problem with not being able to do calls or put themselves out there. And if you're a really strong extrovert, then you need to try to become a little bit more of an introvert, because often extroverts are talking and socializing and doing that all the time, and not actually focusing on the details and executing all the time. So you just need to determine which side of the spectrum you're on, and what your blind spots are on either side. There isn't one best way to be. Introverts have massive advantages that extroverts don't have, but extroverts have massive advantages that introverts don't have. And one side isn't better than the other. You just need to learn how to be in whatever side, based on the thing that you're doing. All right. Seth Marcus says, "Hey, Sam. My niche is helping the people to be free from anorexia and other related eating disorders. So far I got banned from all of the Facebook groups for messaging people if they want to know more about what I do, and I'm currently using fake accounts to join the groups that I can add the member's URL, and add them on my main account. Is that a viable long term strategy?" Probably not, but it might be just enough to get you started. So I would keep trying it and it might be good enough to get you started and get your first one, two or three clients, but long term you're going to need something much cleaner and much less risky and sketchy than that. Fernando [Centro 00:59:21] says, "At what point should you decide to use Instagram as part of your marketing strategy?" Well, I only used Instagram starting this year, like January 2018. No kidding, you can look back at my first ever post, and you'll see it occurred on that date. And I didn't do it up until that point because there was more important things to be done. If I have to make a decision like hiring people, like building systems, creating a good product, like creating good customer support, and improving my final and my conversion rates, and driving more traffic through paid advertising, and tuning my business, if I have to choose between doing this or being on social media or being on Instagram, I choose this every single time. So I didn't touch Instagram until all of this was fully handled by other people and systems and processes and all of that. Then in January of this year, I hired quite a lot of people, and we had systems down and people covering all of those spaces, so it was okay to add on another thing. Then also, we were only really selling one product like Consulting Accelerator, and then I only started doing up level recently because I had to make sure we were fully covered on everything before we could add another piece. What I noticed that most people do is they try to do everything at the start. And you just can't. It's impossible. You can't post on your Facebook fan page or personal Facebook page. You can't have a blog and then also participate in groups and do Facebook Lives, and then be on Instagram doing Instagram posts and Instagram stories, replying to DM's, replying to Facebook messages, and then doing some Tweets, and then God forbid, if you have Snapchat or something, and then a podcast, and then a YouTube channel, that's not ... If you do those things, you're not going to have a business. You're just going to have a lot of social media stuff. I can tell you that working on the business is much more important than working on the social media stuff. What you'll notice is that, and this is a fascinating thing to look at, whenever you want to understand something, you look at the extremes and the people who have really taken the thing to the inth degree. Because those people have taken this method and just stretched the hell out of it. And you want to see what happens when they do that, and that's very telling of what will happen. Sam: [inaudible 01:02:00] when they do that, and that's very telling of what will happen. And so if you look at social media and you look at the people that have taken it to the extremes, like Kardashians or like Casey Neistat, that guy on YouTube, that Casey Neistat dude, he doesn't really have a business. His business really is just his social media. And I think even someone told me that he's tried to start some businesses and they haven't really worked. It's quite easy to think why that might occur because all of his time is spent managing this beast over here, not building things. And then if you look at the people who have built really big things, they didn't spend their time on social media. So it's very telling. People who build big things don't use social media. People who build big social media followings don't build things. So if you want to build a thing then you should build a thing instead of building a social media presence. That's how I figured that. And that's how I've built my business, by focusing on building the business, not the social media following. However, it's still important to have somewhat of a presence, just a tiny one, so that people can find out that you exist. But you should not even ... You should just delete the Instagram app off your phone, delete the Snapchat app, delete all the social media apps off your phone, and just focus on solving a problem for a market, getting them really good results. And if you do that, then that's all that really matters and the other stuff will fix itself. Italo says, "Hey Sam, how would you explain a gym owner in a vague way what you're going to be doing for them in less than two minutes if my offer is Facebook Ads? This is on the would you like me to tell you what I do part, having a hard time giving away too much detail and shortening my message." Well I would just tell them exactly what you're going to do for them. We're not trying to hide things. We're just trying to make it simple. So I would say ... Sorry, I'm just reading this question before it pops past. So what I would do, and I've actually just forgotten your question. Just ask that question again dude. I was busy reading the next question down and then yours popped past. So then Zack Marcus says, oh this is moving fast, "Hey Sam, I'm planning to write content for the [inaudible 01:05:08] on my Facebook profile based on what I do to get out of it, but it's very hard to extract exact all the information of my experience and how I did that from my head. I know how to do it". All right, your question's popped past now but I remember what it said. So, yeah, you're right, if you've done something yourself, like if you were [inaudible 01:05:33] and then you were able to fix it, then you know the information is in your head because you did it. It happened. So it's there. However, accessing that information and getting it out of your head and onto some paper or into some slides and into some words is very hard. And it's excruciatingly hard. And the reason why is because words don't accurately describe reality. And a perfect example is there's ... Damn, I used to know this off by heart. Colors in visible spectrum. How many colors are there? This is a cool example. How many colors in the visible spectrum? Yeah, so there's something like 400. There's some very basic ones, but there's something like 458 different colors because there's all of these different shades and all of these different things. So there's only like 458 colors ... Well there's that many colors in the visible spectrum, but then there's only like 48 words used to describe those colors. So the English language, and any language system is, it's poorly equipped to accurately describe reality. And what your brain dealt with was reality, and that is not stored in words. And so the hard part is taking it out of the brain and decoding it and putting it into words. You know how to do it. That's definitely true because you did it. So if that occurred, then it's there. It just doesn't mean that it's stored in your memory in words. It isn't. So trying to put into that words is a really hard thing to do. And I know that problem well because I deal with that problem every damn day. I create these training programs. And to take what I ... I know what to do a lot of the time and it isn't stored in words and step-by-step, numbered processes and screen recording videos of where to click. That is not how it's stored in there. And so I have to take it out of there and then break it down and put it into numbered steps, videos, modules, and then I have to put it into cheat sheets, and then I have to put it into slides, and then I have to record a video. That's hard. And you should always expect that to be hard. But you can do it. You just have to try harder. And also you need a lot of focus. If you're going to create good content, you cannot be in two minds. You can't be doing email, responding to instant messages. You can't be on Slack, you can't be looking at your phone and on social media, and then instantly trying to create really good content. Or it's totally impossible to be on all of these reactive things and to try to create good content at the same time. That just doesn't happen. So you need to block out entire days where you don't touch any of those things and you just sit down and focus for a long period of time, because it takes a lot of effort and energy to get your brain into that zone. And then you should be able to do it with a lot more ease. Nayla says, "Hi Sam, I'm excited to catch you live. I'm on week two of the program. I follow you on YouTube. And your book recommendations on "Psycho-Cybernetics" is awesome. I'm currently reading it. Which part of the book resonated with you?" I haven't read that book in a long time. It was one of the first ever books I read on the mindset side of things. And that would've happened back when I was 21. I'm 28 now, so that's seven years ago, six or seven years ago. So I don't remember the chapters and everything but I remember the basic principle of it. And it was that this guy, Maxwell Maltz, he was a plastic surgeon and he noticed that a lot of women would come in, or men would come in with something that they didn't like about themselves, like their nose was too big or their finger looked funny or something like that. And then he would fix that problem, he would change it. He's make the physical body part the way they wanted it. And then they would still think the same thing about themselves, that their finger still looks funny or their nose is too big. And that fascinated him and he thought that humans must hold some kind of self-image, like a mental picture of themself in their mind that they still continue to see themselves as, even after the physical transformation has occurred. And that was back ... If you look through history, you can see that over time the human race becomes less biased on physical things. So back in time if something wasn't physical it didn't exist. If someone talked about something that wasn't physical, it did not exist at all. And the industrial revolution was selling hard things like cars, stone, rocks. And then gradually over time we've become more focused on just solutions to things, regardless of what they are, physical or intangible. And I think more than 50%, it might be as high as 70%, of the S&P 500 is intangible. And most companies these days are holding more of their assets intangibly than they are physically. And the most valuable companies in the world are intangible assets, not tangible. And then that is basically what humans have in their mind too. And it's an intangible view of themselves. And that book really talked about how to fix the intangible view of themselves. And when they fix that it solved the tangible or the perceived tangible issue too. But if you're just focused on the tangible issue, it still didn't fix it. So that was quite fascinating. And the world still seems to be hitting along this trajectory towards understanding this stuff more. Teddy says, "Hey Sam, any advice for someone who is struggling to pick a niche? I've worked in online advertising for a few years and I'm overwhelmed by all the niches I could go into, both personal and business related. I can't seem to pick anything and commit to it. Yeah, so I've got a perfect solution to this. And it's called gun to your head. And you just got to imagine that I'm there next to you and I've got a gun. And I have it pointed at your head. And it's got bullets in it. And you have to pick a niche or you die. And then, I'm not even joking, whatever the first one that you pick, that's what you pick. You do it. And don't say, "Oh, I can't pick one," because you'll be dead. So you have to pick one. And you just have to do it. And it can be done pretty fast. And if that ends up not being the right one, it doesn't matter. I've watched people ... Back when I first started my business, which was seven years ago, which the business I started didn't even end up being the one I have today, I picked five wrong niches and started five wrong business and got to this point where I am today before a lot of people have even picked their first one. A lot of people I knew back at the starting line, they were waiting for that perfect niche to pick. And now, seven years later, they still haven't found that perfect niche. So it's not about finding the perfect niche. It's about getting started. And the way you do that is gun to your head. And then if you have to change it, you can change it. But you have to start to change. It's like a car. If a car is sitting stationary and you turn the steering wheel, it won't turn. It will sit still and do nothing. But once it's in motion, if you turn the will, it will start going. And so you have to get in motion first for turns to happen. And so that's why you got to just pick one, commit, get started. Then you can turn later on if you need to. Joshua Wistover says, "Is there a point where you can post too much on Facebook and your followers may get bored?". Yeah, of course there is. If someone posts a million times a day, that'd cause a problem. At what point that is, I don't know. But I would say that posting once a day is just a good frequency. Just simple one post a day. I like daily things. I like daily habits and daily consistency. And so I would just stick to that. Hans Loits says, "Hey Sam, what do you consider your biggest lesson learned or mistake made in the past year?". Biggest lesson learned? Yeah, I would say it is that it's more productive to hire good people and build a team and then have them do the work than it is for you just to do the work at an increased level of efficiency. So I think most entrepreneurs don't learn this until later on in the journey, because you have to start by doing it all yourself. Trying to hire everyone at the starting line is often a bad idea. And you got to just learn it yourself first. Master it and then bring on other people. But then the really hard point to cross, that most entrepreneurs don't cross and it's like a graveyard of them, is focusing their energy on building a great team and having them do the work to achieve the goal instead of them doing the work to achieve the goal. That's the big leap. And this past year I've been learning that leap. Kelly Smith asks this question again, which I missed before, "The business experience that I had can help any type of business deal with the challenge, the potential, the heartaches, et cetera, of adopting to new technology plus the stress and ethical dilemmas around working, family, working with family, dealing with international competition, specifically China, and having to lay off employees because of new technology. How can I narrow that down so I can get to my first stage goal of 20 grand a month? My long-term goal is one million per year and to develop a course to help me reach far beyond that. Do you see a way to do what I'm trying to reach? Yeah, so I just can see that you're confused right now. And instead of thinking about your goal and instead of thinking about you or anything about that, instead of thinking about any of those things you're thinking about right now, just answer this question: what is the niche? What is the group of people? Who are they? You start with that. And then once you've defined that, then you talk to them and you find out what is their problem. You don't know what it is. They have to tell you because you're not them. Then once you know what that is, then you find the best solution to that problem. And then you sell that to them, and that's what creates your business. What you're doing is not that. You're starting from your business experience. So you had a business experience and now you're thinking, "Oh, this business experience I have, who can this help?". Well it can help everybody. Literally everybody in the world. And then, "How is this going to give me a niche?". Well it can't because you've gone the wrong way. And then, "How is this lack of niche, lack of focus and backwardsly applied logic going to therefore help me achieve my goal?". That's what you're doing here. And you can see how, when it's expressed that way, it doesn't make any sense. And when it's expressed the other way it makes sense. So you need to start from the right place, which is who is the niche? What is the group of people you're helping? Define that. Then, what is their problem? They'll tell you that. Then, what is the solution to that? Whether that solution you end up offering has anything to do with your experience or not, it does not matter. We're not in business just to try to help people with what we already know. What we already know might be useless. I'm not even joking. I've got no attachments to what I already know. People always ask me, "Oh, what would you do if Facebook Ads stopped working?". I wouldn't care. I'd learn the new thing and then I'd get good at that and use that. The only thing I have an attachment to is solving the problem for the group of people that I'm trying to help and doing it better than anybody else. That's it. New technology comes along, I'll adopt it. New anything comes along, I'll change. If that means I have to let go of things that I've mastered and start fresh again, learning something new, I'll do it. Because my thinking is going the right way. And you need to make yours go the right way. Nathaniel says, "How long should your value video be?". As long as it needs to be to get the job done. There is no magical length. That's typically going to be in between 15 minutes and 30, 40 minutes. It's going to be somewhere roughly in between that. But if it has to go to an hour and you can't think of anything to cut, then make it go to an hour. Our webinar right now runs for three hours and 15 minutes. And I couldn't find anything to cut so it was that damn long. It still works really well. You don't try to create something based on a length. You try to create something to get a job done. And whatever it takes to get the job done determines the length. Sterling Coly says, "Do you think there is a risk of having others copy our niche offer statement if we write it out on these videos?" Yes, of course there is. This is a good thing. A lot of entrepreneurs have this fear. So what you're expressing here is what a lot of people think. And the truth is is that if somebody can actually copy you, then you have an issue. And you shouldn't just try to hide what you're doing so that other people don't copy you. You need to figure out how to always be better than everybody else. And that's what you have to do. No law is going to protect you. No hiding is going to protect you. No anything is going to protect you from competition. The only thing that can protect you is winning. That's it. So who cares about putting it out there? Put it out there and then just make sure you're the best at it. And this is a fascinating thing that you see pros do, professionals do. They don't have this sort of fear all the time. There's this famous basketball game where Michael Jordan was defending Kobe Bryant and Kobe tried to make a break past Jordan and he defended him and took the ball off him. And then on one of the next plays they were squatting down next to each other and Kobe asked Michael, "Hey, you know on that last play there, what did I do wrong? How did you know I was going to go that way?". And Michael just told him exactly. Even though they're still playing the game, even though they're still competitors, he told him exactly what he should do and how he can try to get past him and what mistakes he was making. Because he knows that, even if he knows what to do, he'll still win. That's the confidence that a winner has. And they know that hiding information isn't going to make them win. Just being the best will make them win. And so that's the way you got to think about it. And it goes to the extreme with Michael Jordan. He's funny to look at because he'd even start telling the opposition exactly what he was going to do. In the middle of an NBA game he would say, "Hey, I'm going to step left here, then I'm going to pass it over there, and then I'm going to come over here and run there, and then shoot it there". He'd just tell them the whole play, the person standing right next to him. And then he would do it exactly as he told them he was going to do it and still win. That's the kind of supreme confidence that you've got to have. And the way you get that is just with practice. You got to practice more than everyone else. You've got to want it more than everybody else. You've got to be obsessed about it more than everybody else. And you have to make sure that it stays that way. And then the byproduct of that is winning. And then it doesn't matter if you just put your I helped blank, blank by blank statement anywhere. Zina Jones says, "Hi Sam, just started your course. Could you recommend some books to read and listen to please? Would love to download and listen to your course on the move but I can't unless connected to the internet". So, yeah, I'd recommend doing the course instead of reading books, because you just started the course. However, if there is times when you're truly disconnected from the internet, you can't listen to the course, then I think a really good book to listen to would probably be "Psycho-Cybernetics". We were talking about it earlier on this call. So get that, read that. Italo says, ... I'll tell you another two books too, just in case you want more than one. So "Psycho-Cybernetics" by Maxwell Maltz, that's a good one. It's on mindset. And then another one would be "Principles" by Ray Dalio. That's a good one. And then another one would be "Made in America" by Sam Walton. Those are three good books. Italo says, "How would you explain a gym owner in a vague way to what ... Oh, I already explained, already answered this. Kimberly Dawn says, "Sam, I help women heal from anxiety, grief, loss, PTSD and who have trouble sleeping. I received a ton of testimonials from clients over the past five years of doing this. Most of my women are spiritual but not religious. Should I have Facebook target spiritual women with my ads or just the issues I solve?". I would try both because I honestly can't answer that. I don't know. If I told you one I'd be just making it up. I would try both. And whatever one works the best, keep doing that. If both work, do both. Adam Russo says, "What's your gym routine?". So I go to the gym five days a week. And this is the schedule. So every day I go it's at 7:00 AM in the morning. I wake up at 6:50. I literally wake up, put on my gear, which I put out the night before, and I go to the gym. And I'm at the gym by 7:00. So from when my alarm goes off to when I am changed and in the gym is 10 minutes. And it happens at the same time every day, the same schedule every day. So you know that. Then, it's five days a week, the days I do it are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and then on Thursday's day off, and then Friday and Saturday. And then Sunday is a day off. So three days on, one day off, two days on, one day off. On Monday I do chest and then on Tuesdays it's cardio, high intensity interval training on either a treadmill, a bike or a rowing machine or a circuit. High intensity. And so Monday is chest, Tuesday is high intensity, Wednesday is back and shoulders, the weights. And then Thursday is a day off. Friday is cardio again, which is high intensity training on one of those ones which I told you. And then Saturday is legs, weight session. That's it. Mostafa Curry says, "Hey Sam, I love your course. I help business owners obtain capital. I'm leaving the business banking world and going full-time entrepreneur. Any advice for the first 30 to 90 days? I'm switching from one-time payment to monthly. Good idea?" So there's a couple of questions in here. So any advice for the first 30 to 90 days? Yeah, it would just be do it. Do it consistently and do it intensely every single day. And don't stop doing it. And if you do that then the other stuff sorts it out. And then the other question is I'm switching from one-time payment to monthly. Is that a good idea? I have no idea. I don't even know what you're doing, how you're doing it. I don't even know if you know what you're doing or how you're going to do it. So I think don't even think about the switching from one-time to monthly. It's not important right now. What's important is just who is the niche, what is their problem, what is the best solution to their problem, how can you provide it to them and what is a price that makes sense for providing that solution to that niche to solve that problem that they have? That's what you want to do. Sterling Coly says, "So if we are doing coaching, should we just start our coaching session right after taking their card number?". You probably just want to schedule it. So it might be you're starting tomorrow. You don't need to start it right after the sales call because hopefully you've scheduled your whole ... You always plan tomorrow today and your day is scheduled. And probably tomorrow is already scheduled too. And so you want to say, "All right, well we can get started as soon as possible. When works for you?". Get a time. Get them to tell you when they're available. You choose a time that works for you that they told you that works for them. Agree on that time. Schedule it in. And then get it done. Get the payment done. And if that's a couple of days away or whatever, that's fine. But still payment needs to happen now even though we're scheduled to start in one, two, three, four days because it's already scheduled to start. Eddy Hanlan says, "I'm working with lawyers and the contract is delaying their final decision. I've been able to convert them to a $1,000 deposit. How can I get them to sign the contract quicker?". I don't think you need a contract really. You could just have your terms, your basic terms and privacy policy and stuff like that. And if they ask you for a contract, you can give them a contract. But, yeah, there's no need for that to be delaying the decision. Because when you pay Facebook to run Facebook Ads, they don't send you this contract through DocuSign and make you sign it and all this crap. You just agree to their terms and everything, and then you're using it. You can make it more frictionless than how you currently have it if you're delaying everything from starting, all payment from being collected until someone returns you a document. Just streamline it more. Joshua says, "Do you think it could be a good idea to say that you would prefer a yes or a no from the prospect when you're framing the [inaudible 01:32:57] from the start? Could this stop those let me think it about it objections coming up?". Yeah, ... Sam: There was, let me think about it, objections coming up. Yeah, we do. Not by saying it as explicitly as that, but by saying ... At the very beginning when we in that section called state the agenda, take the lead state agenda, we say, so how this call is going to go is, I've forgotten the exact little bits at the start, but we say how this call is going to go is dah, dah, dah. And then at the end, you can make a decision whether you want to get started with this or not. So we're already saying that at the end you can make a decision about whether you will get started with us or not. We're already pre framing it for a decision at the end, but not as explicitly as that because that's kind of a weird way to say it, the way you stated it there. And it's just going to take practice to get people to make decisions. Most people are so indecisive and then when they try to make other people be decisive, all they get back is a reflection of themselves. So people who are really indecisive and then they complain about their prospects being indecisive, that's going to happen. The only way you can really fix it is by personally being really decisive and then you expect it when you deal with others because that's just how you expect everything to be done. And then the way you speak and everything will expect that from them and then you will be more likely to get it. So you need to practice, practice, practice, and it will help as well. But you also need to be very decisive in everything that you do yourself. [inaudible 01:34:50] says ... I already answered your question. Ross says, "Sam, I had to cut a deal with the biggest real estate developer in China. They took just shy of three months to have a basic scope of work for me. So I walked away, good or bad decision? I head into contract sign and felt they were wasting my time." Whether it's a good decision or not, I don't know. I don't know the nature of what it was. So I can't really answer that, but I think that you will know best because you were closest to what was going on. And so if you think that it was wasting your time and it was pissing you off, then just cut it and move on. You know, there's so many opportunities in the world, there's infinite limitless opportunities and so there's no reason for you to get tangled down to one person and just choked out by one person. You don't need to do that. You don't have to put up with it. I hate moving slow and I definitely would not be keen to do anything that would have a three month just scoping thing with it. That's part of the reason why I don't sell to corporates and I don't like the corporate world just because it crawls, and I like things to be done fast. And if you're like that too, then you should focus on businesses and people that are going to make decisions fast. Ross says, "thanks for your help. Appreciate it." No problem, Ross. [inaudible 01:36:31] says "Following your footsteps, Sam, quit my corporate job and find my purpose and be financially dependent. Thank you." Awesome. Congrats on that. Cassandra [inaudible 01:36:52] says, "How do you overcome a very popular niche?" So this is another kind of delusion that people have when they're starting out. So when you're starting out, you think that, one, your idea is very valuable and if other people hear your idea and they're going to do it and steal it from you, which isn't true, because it's all about execution and not ideas. And then the other one is that you shouldn't go into a field where there's lots of competition. Because if there's a crowded marketplace, then you can't compete. But that's not true. Doesn't matter how crowded a marketplace is. It's still like survival of the fittest. So the strongest business will win and take everything. And then the strongest business is that way because they have the best offer and their offer's that way because it solves the problem for the market better than anybody else. And that logic there, which determines whether someone will win or not, it doesn't take into consideration whether there's anybody else in the market or not. Whether there's zero competitors or 1 billion. That person still wins, takes everything. So it doesn't matter. If you think you can climb to the top and have the best offer, then you will win. And that's really it. Whether there's competition or not, it shouldn't even be factored into your decision. Jessie Sawyer says, "Hi Sam, I'm in the woman with hair loss niche, particularly women who have hair that cannot regrow. I've done 15 research calls so far and the common thread is that these women struggle with self esteem and are depressed about their future. They don't know how to move on and be happy when they've lost something they can't have back. My question is, in constructing an offer, what does the result metric I can use that is actually miserable when the solution is based on shifting mindset, feelings and perception?" So it sounds like you're not helping these women grow their hair back, so that's not part of it at all. What it is is, so your niche is, women with hair loss, okay, and cannot regrow. And you've found out that the problem is self esteem and they're depressed ... Yeah. So what the result you're helping these people achieve is to be comfortable with having like no hair, like to be comfortable with who they are. That's what you're helping them achieve. And that level of comfort, I mean that's quite hard to measure but someone will know whether they are more comfortable than they were or not. Like you know, they won't be so sad. They won't be so depressed. They'll actually be having fun. Like it's quite hard to put a number on it or scale, but people will know when that has been achieved or not. And so that's all you really need to say is that you help women with irreversible hair loss become happy with who they are. Something along those lines. Ramon Eduardo says "Are you planning on Spanish courses?" Yeah, I think we'll definitely sell our courses in other languages. But right now I've got my work cut out for me just with the English language. So right now it's not even in the plan. Will it happen in sometime in the future? Probably. Luca Rosen ... I just said ... So we're good. Janet Thackeray said "It's harming our brain. Studies have shown that too much social media is definitely changing us and not for the good." Yeah, that is true. It really is just completely fucking with everyone's brains. And what it's doing is making people addicted to indistinct gratification. Because if you take an action and then there is feedback really fast from the action that you just took, then it makes you really addicted to taking that action. And like that's why drugs are addictive because you do a drug and bam, it just hits you. And then there is very noticeable feedback very quickly after taking that action. So it creates this behavioral loop where you're like, oh, do this, get that fast. And that's what social media is trying is like hooking people onto. It's like check this newsfeed and have some sort of entertainment or post this thing, get people to like it really quickly, and it's basically getting people hooked on instant gratification. But most things in life, most meaningful things, and not instant. They are long term. And so like for example, being healthy and fit, that is so not instant gratification. You have to take actions today that are quite painful and you don't get the reward for a long time. Years. That there is the opposite of instant gratification. Same with starting a business. You know, you've got to learn a lot of stuff. You've got to dedicate a lot of time, you've got to put a lot of effort in. And the feedback you get from those efforts is like later on in the future. And so like all of these things that are constructive and build things and make you better and help other people with all this stuff. They're all long term things. And you can't possibly do a longterm thing when you're addicted to short term instant gratification. And so that's why it's screwing with people. And that's why I don't have any of it on my phone at all. It's just deleted. And I rarely check social media at all. I only do it because the market wants me to do it. If they didn't, I wouldn't. So we've got, we're at 1:59 right now, just looking because the time zones have changed now that might [inaudible 01:44:28]. Yeah. So we go, like I said at the beginning, we do these calls every Saturday and we'd go from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM eastern time. That's New York time. And that means we've got about 10 minutes left on this call today. So I'll do more questions for the next 10 minutes and then we'll wrap up. So Naila says, "Hi Sam, I want to do up level consulting next, how do I apply for that and what is the price?" Sure. So you can go to week seven of the consulting accelerator program. But also I can see that Jen has tagged Nick Howser and commented too. So, Nick can follow up with you or you can message Nick about that too. Eric [inaudible 01:45:24] says "Will we be able to apply what we learned for Facebook only also to Google or Linkedin ads?" Yeah, I mean the principles are the same, right? The thing that you have to learn is the changes in the system. So, what labels do they assign to these different things? What is the interconnection between these different things and how do these different things come together to form this overall thing. And where all of those buttons, what is the logic behind all of these things, you have to learn all of that. That's just learning a system. It's like learning a new software or learning how to play a new video game, right? You have to learn that, there's a learning curve there, it's different, but the principles that you're applying within that system, they don't change. And so once you get really good at marketing on any one platform, you'll be good at marketing on every platform if you learn it, but I recommend not bothering with learning it unless you have to because it's just ... Understanding a platform isn't valuable, it's not a good use of your time unless you have to. It's best to understand one platform and spend all of your time executing in their platform, not learning lots of platforms and only weakly executing in them. Because it's the execution through the platform that gets results, not the understanding of the platform. So I would just focus on Facebook ads. That's the best one right now. It still is the best one. Most of our sales still come from that. They have for years. The moment that changes, I'll tell you. And create training on it. And then even my best students, all of them, their number one channel is Facebook took. [inaudible 01:47:22] is doing like a million a month. He just uses Facebook ads. So just focus on that one thing, master that. Josh Jag says "Based on what you said before about giving free content, should we limit it, maybe even forget it and just focus on outreach to get clients and then get them results?" Yes. I think you should do the bare minimum. Like what I tell you to do in the training, which is have a website with at least three articles or posts on it and then have at least a couple of posts on your Facebook page, change your about description on your Facebook and all of that. Have the bare minimum amount of information there. And then at least do one post on your page a week, right? That's the bare minimum. If you could get away with doing nothing, I'll tell you to do that. And I tried to get away with it and then people started thinking I was a robot or a lizard or an actor, no joking. And so I tried that one. It didn't work. So now I'm doing just above the bare minimum. Jen Thackery says "Exactly. I've been overwhelmed with Facebook. I'm getting like 30 friend requests a day, accepting most. It's crazy." Yeah. I don't even accept people anymore. I don't even look at it because it's ... I don't ever look at my notifications or anything. Because if I did I wouldn't be able to do anything else and I don't want to spend my life checking notifications. I'd rather build some stuff. [inaudible 01:49:14] says, "Do you think it's possible to give away too much of what you do and how you help people? Should there be some stuff you hold back in your marketing content [inaudible 01:49:25]" The thing is dude, the way I think about it is to fully give away everything I know would take years. And I don't think a person would want to sit down and listen for that long. And it's certainly impossible to do in any form of marketing because there's just not enough space. So it's like you can't do it. Even if you try to. You've got a pessimistic view right now that your value is held in like five minutes of conversation and maybe 700 words. That is not true. If your value is held in the knowing of 700 words, then it's not value. You can't truly give away what you know in an ad or in a [inaudible 01:50:28] video or anything like that. And if you can then what you have isn't of much value. [inaudible 01:50:35] Sterling says "What is the best outreaching strategy on Facebook for a niche like introvert people, help them to overcome panic attacks. How would you approach them?" I think I would just message them and say, "Hey, I noticed you were in this group about introverts or panic attacks, whatever. I personally struggled with this." If you did, I'm guessing you did. Otherwise, probably how you chose this one. And I'd just start a friendly conversation like that. You want to acknowledge what you know about them and then tell them why you're like them and why you should be talking to them. Judith, or Judy [inaudible 01:51:46] says "Two questions. One, is it okay to visit your new California office? I live in Palm Springs." No, it's not purely because we're just busy. So I got to do a lot of stuff. And so I can't really just stop work and be like, oh, hi, how are you going, [inaudible 01:52:11] or have a more meaningful conversation. I don't really have the time. And then if I did it with one person, I'd have to do with every person and then it would just get out of hand. So the answer is no. And the reason why is because I focus on doing things like this that can help lots of people and building training programs and content that can help lots of people and things like that instead. And I've got to be careful with where I put my time. Number two, "My niche is helping people who struggle with weight and chronic nagging illness, lose weight and get healthy effortlessly and permanently. I'm discovering that everyone I talk to talks about their physical and emotional pain. I show people what to and what not to eat. I realized that when people change what they eat and how they prepare foods, they lose weight, get healthy and their physical and mental pain goes away. Would it be wise to add 'live a pain free life' to my offer?" I don't think, I think that's the byproduct of losing weight to be honest. You know, being overweight is painful because it's a strain on the system and system aren't supposed to be strained for prolonged periods of time unnecessarily. So there's a reason for that pain. It's actually your nervous system warning you that something needs to happen. It's kinda like a red flashing button on a dashboard, but it happens through pain. And so fixing the problem often removes the pain, which is the warning sign. And then the warning sign goes away. So that's normal. That's just the byproduct of what you helped someone achieve. So you don't need to say that. You can just say, you know, I help people who are overweight, to fix it. And to lose weight and become healthy. And the byproduct of that is always going to be that they're happier, they're pain free, all of this stuff. So I don't think you need to add that extra piece on. Lillian says, "Week three, the therapist niche is ruled by a lot of legal stuff. What do we dare to put in a Facebook advertisement? I can help people with Parkinson's disease get better. But the world's opinion is that you must make a clinical study to claim that. So the offer gets very vague to avoid these problems. Maybe, believe in your mind and your body's power to change the future." Yeah. So you're not allowed to say some things, but you can absolutely say I help people with Parkinson's. You can say I help people with Parkinson's, but you can't promise a guaranteed outcome. Right? And you can't really promise a guaranteed outcome with anything because there's so many variables that come into it of which you can't control. This is like people trying to predict the weather, right? They can't guarantee it. And so you can say this, you can say I help people with Parkinson's. No one can stop you from saying that you just can't make a really explicit promise that you can cure them unless you could, if you documented it properly and proved it, then you could. But if it's not a 100 percent hit rate, then yeah, you'd have to say I help people with Parkinson's. You couldn't mention a cure. And then, who cares about what the world's opinion is, right? They will be people who are outraged because they think that some chemical is the solution to it. But those are just people with opinions and there are always going to be those people and you should never listen to them. So just do it. And you'll rustle some feathers, but you're not breaking the law. That's what I'd say. I'll do one more question here and then we'll wrap up. Zach Marcus says, "How do you diagnose if the message is the problem when it comes to direct outreach Facebook messages? I help people to be free from anorexia and other related eating disorders. Conversion in the past five days adds 28 percent, favorable message response 14 percent, [inaudible 01:57:08] strategy session. How do you diagnose if the message is the problem?" Oh, I understand your question now. So I would say that it's not so much the message, it's how the message is being communicated. You know, if all you're doing is adding people as a friend and then just messaging them that "I help people to be free from anorexia" and that's it. Then you're not going to get much of a hit rate with that because that's just not how two human beings talk to each other. All you're doing with marketing and everything is simulating how something would happen in the real world. You've got to just remember that. The fact that this communication channel is on the Internet does not change the fact that two humans are communicating. Most people just cannot understand this. You know, like I see this with emails too, people say like, "Hi Sam." And then they say like "kind regards" and they use all of this formal language. I'm like has this person forgotten what we're doing here? And same with Facebook messages and all of this, you're just having a conversation and a conversation does not start by saying something like that. I would just say like, "Hey, Zach, I noticed you were in the anorexic Facebook group that I'm in too. I used to struggle with this thing myself, just thought I'd reach out and and introduce myself." That's what you could say. And then they're much more likely to respond back to that. But by saying like your statement, it's just not the way people talk to each other. It certainly isn't the way people introduce themselves to each other. So just remember all the time with everything online, with all conversations and all marketing is you're just simulating what would happen in the real world between humans on the Internet. It's the same, it's just on the Internet. That's it. Alright. So we're at the end of our time now. We've gone for two hours. So thanks everyone for attending. And if I didn't get to your question, then you just need to show up earlier. These calls happen every Saturday and they go from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM. That's eastern time, New York time. And if you forget about this time, then put it in your calendar, go schedule it in, set it to repeat every Saturday, 3:00 PM til 5:00 PM eastern time. If you show up at 3:00 PM, you'll get the opportunity to ask me multiple questions. I'm pretty sure Joshua Westover asked me like at least eight questions. So show up earlier. You'll get your questions answered, multiple of them even. Now, if you enjoyed this, then just click that like button, click like if you enjoyed this, if you found it helpful, give me some feedback and then yeah, our next one's going to be 3:00 PM next Saturday. It will be happening on that date so you can schedule it in. And thanks everyone for attending. I hope you enjoyed it and have a good weekend.

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