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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 15th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, September 15th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for September 15th, 2018. 


Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right, I can see a couple people jumping on. Just let me know in the comments section to the right hand side, if you can see video, you can see me and you can hear me. Then, once we are confirmed, we'll get going here. I can see Zach Marcus is here, Joshua Westover, Mauricio, Janelle, Alach, Mauricio CT. How's it going? All right, audio and video is working good. Awesome. Sam: All right. Well, we'll go ahead and get started. So, how these Q&A calls go, or livestreams go, is I do one of them every Saturday and we go from three PM to five PM and that is in Eastern time, which is the time in New York. If you want to know what the time is in New York, just Google like "Time in New York." And it will tell you, and you can put it in your calendar for repeat every Saturday. Sam: And how they work is people just jump on and then you can ask your question in the comments section to the right hand side. Then, I just go through the questions and answer them pretty much in the order that they come in. So, let's jump in and get started with these questions. So, Nala says, "How do you think ..." Oh, sorry. "How you think is the mirrors reflection of what is happening inside of you? What we observe in the outside world is a reflection of what we hold in our mind. Can you talk more about that?" Yeah, so it's not necessarily like a 100% but it's, it taints the view of the world. Right? So if somebody is let's say, very pessimistic and very depressed, then no matter what they look at, they're going to think, "Oh, why are they doing that? That's a waste of time." Or, this thing over here, this is definitely going to fail or be careful of this. No matter what they look at, they're going to see it in a negative light and somebody else might look at it and see something totally different. Sam: So, that's really what it is. It's like the thoughts you have in your mind and your beliefs and everything in your mind, they basically create a lens that distorts your view of reality. Or if you go full blown insane, like you'll just see another reality by the way. So, you can actually just see a completely different reality and hear a different reality and not even be here, if you just go full blown insane. So, it's possible to take it to the extreme. But, someone isn't insane or not insane, this is a spectrum that is like insane's probably an extreme over here and what people consider normal is over here, which isn't even still really normal. People have all of these differences in between and it taints people's view of things. Sam: What you really want to try and work on is the thoughts in your mind, your beliefs and everything so that when you look at things, you can see clearly and you don't have a view that's distorted and twisted by all of these things that you've got in your mind. You want to be able to see things as objectively as possible. And it makes a huge difference by the way. Sam: Zach Marcus says, "When you mentioned being in a tranquil and unemotional state on a strategy decision, do you also portray that in your tonality as well when you're asking questions and stating your offer or answering your client's questions? Or does it depend on the niche? If you can demonstrate a short example, it looks like as in your customer interviews." Sam: Yeah, so this is a great thing that somebody picked up is that how I do those customer interviews is basically how I do the strategy sessions. It's very similar. I ask a lot of questions and I really have the intent of understanding and I'm not satisfied with answers that don't answer my question and it's mostly me asking a question and them talking and responding to that question. Then, I try to keep the conversation on the rails, like it doesn't go off on wild tangents. Yeah, the unemotional kind of state is the same. I'm trying my hardest to focus on the other person and what they're telling me and also, their facial expressions and gestures and eye movements and all of these things. So that I can understand and some people think it's kind of weird. Sam: It's funny when you read the comments on some of the interviews. People think I'm either being harsh or I have bad social skills or something. But really I'm just trying to understand what's going on and that's the state that I'm in when I do a strategy session too. So, you should, if you want to know how I do them, just watch that and also just notice how far I dig. If I get a question, if I ask a question and the answer I get isn't satisfactory, I'll just go again and I'll go again and I'll go again and I won't let the person take the conversation somewhere else to try to dodge that set. Sam: So, I will just keep going on it and also if I ask a question and then they reveal something that's interesting and that provokes another question, then they'll ask that question and keep going down that chain until I find exactly what it is that I'm looking for. It's really, this is really what you're doing on a strategy session too. A lot of people I think, they don't go deep enough on the strategy session calls. They ask a question and then the person responds and it's a surface level response. Then, the person doing the strategy session goes, "Okay, cool." And then like writes that down or whatever, and they actually believe and accept that what they were just told with that surface level response is actually what's going on. Sam: So, they're building up this collection of information that they believe is true, that at the end they're hoping is going to result in the action. But, the thing is, if you don't uncover the truth on a strategy session, then the person on the other end, they're going to get to the end and think, "Oh, this person doesn't actually understand my situation. I didn't really tell them my real situation. So, even though they think they can help me, they probably can't help me because they only think they can help me knowing what they know and what they know is different than what my life is actually like. Therefore, it's not going to work." So, they don't buy it. Sam: So, it's very important that you understand the actual truth of things and assess that, because then the person on the other end thinks, "All right, this guy or girl really knows everything and they still think they can help." It's very important. So, if you want to see how I do that, just look at those interviews. It's very telling. Sam: Brandon Mulrinnon says, "Hi, Sam, I'm back for round two of your mentorship. What would you advise someone who already has a business up and running at 20k per month, but wants to scale, that's not good with technology. Would you advise to still learn the track ..." Sorry. "Would you advise to still learn at the tech, or would you say it's okay to pay somebody to run tech and leverage at this point?" Sam: I would say you're going to have to learn that technology. I don't know if you've looked but this technology thing is kind of everywhere and it's becoming more and more important. It's doing so at an ever increasing rate and not knowing technology is pretty, pretty big disadvantage right now. It's only going to become more of a disadvantage in the future. It's kind of becoming as important as knowing English and it will just keep going. So, you need to learn it. Like you don't need to learn it to the level that you actually have to code and write software, but you need to know how to use an interface and you need to know how a system works, and you need to be confident in learning new systems, learning new interfaces and configuring things and optimizing things. That's absolutely crucial. Sam: So, I would fix that belief. It's not true. You just think that you're not good with technology. But, that's not true. I mean, you just think you're not, so just change that and practice and then you'll be good with it. Yeah, I always recommend don't outsource the important things. You've got to know some important stuff. You can outsource some things, but not the important stuff. Sam: So, Muhammad says, "I'm scared of getting sick, similar to how you used to be. I don't have a bad medical history and not at risk for anything for because I'm 16. I'm worried because I have a lot going for me. I don't want to lose all of my momentum and maybe have my life go to shit. I understand that my hypothesis affects my outcome and how everything connected. However, there is no denying that something terrible could happen to anyone. How do I get a healthy balance of being health conscious and not worrying/thinking about it? Maybe explain how you deal with this." Sure. So, you're always going to have a small fear there because that's natural and if you didn't have any fear there then you wouldn't have very good survival instincts and you'd probably do something stupid. So it's natural to have some there. But it's not natural to be terrified by it. I would say, you just need something to put your mind to, honestly. You need to get fully absorbed into something else. Like, a passion or a hobby or a business or just whatever, because when you get fully absorbed into something like that, you're whole sense of self kind of just disappears and you don't really think about things like that because you're so engrossed in the work. I would say that you should just do more of that. Then you won't have time to even think about this and it won't become a thought. Sam: Tony Kline says, "Hey Sam, you have tens of thousands of customers. You know many of your most successful students and what they do. On this basis, what would your number one piece of advice be for a new member who is starting with Consulting Accelerated today?" Sam: Sure. It'd be to do the work, which is what I say relentlessly throughout the whole thing. But, actually do it and by that I mean, watch the videos from start to finish, in full. Don't skip through them. Then, watch all of the videos and then do them in sequential order. So, start at week one, module one, and go through all the modules. Complete the actions items. Actually do the worksheets, do everything and then just keep going through, week two, week three, week four. Do that. If you do that, people who do that get results. The people who don't do that, don't and then they think there's something magical that I didn't include in the training that maybe they need to know in order to get the results. But, how do they even know because they didn't even do the training, so these people are delusional. The magic is actually just to do the work. Then, the other stuff happens. Sam: The only people who have trouble are the people who don't do it. The reason why they don't do it is because they think it might be something else. But I don't know how they think it might be something else when they don't even know what is in the course. It's quite fascinating. But, just don't fall for that trap. Do the work, everything will happen. Sam: Zach Marcus says, "I've been practicing meditation for three months, [inaudible 00:14:57] exactly like how you did it. It's still hard especially when you have a lot going, when you have a lot of things going on with your life, but I realized I'm slowly getting better at catching my thoughts each time I have the urge to do something. Is that the main thing that you benefit from or is there more to it?" Sam: So, there's all sorts of things you get from it. The big ones are self awareness. So, kind of when you do mediation things keep popping into your head. They keep trying to come in. And depending on the day you do it and what's going on in your life and all of this, like some things are way more stubborn and trying to come into your mind than others. It really makes you self aware of those things are. Because a lot of people, they never actually pause or have that time to even become aware of what these things are and they're just kind of out of control. So that's one big thing. Sam: The other thing is it gets you good at catching thoughts as they pop into your mind and then just reflecting them away, just that pinging them away. Right? A lot of normal people if we call them that, they will have a thought, and then they will just think that that thought is the truth and then they think that because this thought is the truth, that they must act on this thought. All right? And all of this happens so damn fast that they never ... They just become like reactive bodies to thoughts. So, thought it to go, thought might be, "Go get a coffee." So that person just goes, gets a coffee without a second notice about like, should I go get this coffee or not? It just kind of happens. Or they get angry at something, they get triggered, or they get emotional about things. They get triggered that way too. Basically they get triggered by all sorts of things, by the environment, by stimulus, by conversations, by other people and by their own thoughts. They trigger themselves. It's because they don't have the discipline to catch that thought as it's occurring and just get rid of it and just keep going on the thing that they're doing. They just react immediately. Sam: That's really the key to it, is it's learning to catch those things as they pop in. Because we have so many thoughts every day and most of them are useless and stupid. If you have the ability to just ignore all of those things, then you're life's going to be pretty chaotic. Ellen Duval says, "Favorite book on fractal penance?" I don't think I've read a book on fractal penance to be honest. I know about fractal penance from just all sorts of other things which I've studied which talked about those, but I've never read one directly on that topic. Sam: Haycon says, "Hi Sam. What video from the program would you recommend us watching when we're feeling down and doubting our ability to succeed as a consultant?" I would just go and watch the mindset one. Start with just week two, video one. Just the mindset, work through that. The mindset training is made so that you complete it more than one time. You want to do it again and again and again. If you're feeling down, it's mindsets that do that. Sam: Ollie Reynolds says, "I'm getting a lot of questions about people asking how long I am doing coaching for them. My course is set up the same as you, livestream twice a week and coach in the group, as well as the course. How would you describe this coaching format to your potential clients?" Sam: Well, I would say that Accelerator is a six week, online course and I would say Up Level is a nine week online course. That's basically what I'd say. I mean, then if they said, "Well can I complete in six weeks." I'd say, "Yes, but you don't have to and also, it might take you longer than that. It depends on your situation. But it could be completed in that amount of time." You stay in the group and you stay having the ability to ask questions and things for as long as you want. So, the limit on being in the course isn't six weeks. We don't kick you out and say goodbye after that. But that's just how long the course is. Sam: Because it helps people to ... It really helps people if they have a concept of time in their mind about the program. Because if you just talk about a training and it doesn't come with an attached timeframe, it's hard for the person to understand. They might think, "Oh it is just a few videos that I watch today and it's supposed to just change my life? Or is this something that's going to be massive and take me years, like going and getting an MBA or something and going back to university." So, you have to attach a timeframe to it, to help people conceptualize that. Sam: Josh Beardon says, "I've upped my outreach. Stopped using my message and switched to my VSL. Would you say VSL or direct outreach message with link to VSL or just 15 minute chat?" I would say if you're doing direct outreach, you want to go for the 15 minute chat. You don't want to send people to VSL. Sam: "Also, what do you do when everything seems to grind to a halt? Like I said, I've upped the outreach, upped the ante in connecting with people on LinkedIn, but I'm not getting anything back." I would just figure out why. I mean, I always ask why because once you know why, then you can change something or do something to fix it. So, I would ask why. Like if you're not getting anything back, then my first question would be, "How much have you done?" Because volume is important. If you haven't done a lot of volume, then you don't really, you shouldn't expect much. Also, time, time matters too. Really, it's just about volume which is the number of people you message and the number of conversations you have and then consistency, which is how frequently you do it. Every, single day or is it just in drips and drabs all over the place? And then time. It's really about intensity, consistency and time. Those things are what create improvement and results and everything. Sam: So, I would just keep at it and do it more intensely. Do it more consistently and do it for a longer period of time and look at what's going on and try to ask questions about why this is happening so that you can iterate and improve. Sam: Nala says, "I have a website which I bought for blogging, and now I'm doing coaching and I'm stuck with the name. How important is a website in a coaching and consulting business?" Not really that important to be honest. It's good to have one that just says what you do. That's really about it. I would just, if the name of it is totally irrelevant, that might cause an issue. For example if I have one that's on like, what's a good example? Let's say I have a course that teaches people how to ... I'm just thinking of a good example that will really illustrate this. Sam: Yeah, let's say that I teach people how to become like a chef or something. And that being a chef ... No, actually let's say I teach someone a course that shows people how to get a job and I say [inaudible 00:24:04] and I'm just a massive advocate and master of getting jobs and benefits of jobs. But then, and I have a website, it's LoveYour9to5.com or something. Then I also just decide to change all of that and just now start coaching people on how to quit their job and how to start their own business. Then, there's a conflict there right? Because these things don't align. That's an extreme example because one is the inverse of the other, but any sort of slight conflict or deviation from the thing can signal that you're not consistent and focused and dedicated and committed to the thing that you're saying you're committed to. Sam: You want to make sure that that doesn't happen. So, if the name of your blog is just a name that's like, doesn't mean anything in particular, then that's fine. You can just use that. Or if it's your own personal name or something, that's fine. You can just use that. But if it's something in conflict, then yeah, I would change it, use something that's not. Sam: Yeah, and Josh is right, he said, "VSL is far more important than a static website." Sam: Toby Kline says, "Sam, gun to your head ..." Oh, this is good. Someone's getting, someone's doing a gun to head on me. "If you were force to get rid of one of the things and routines you do on a daily basis, which would you eliminate?" Sam: What ... If you're forced to get rid of one of the things or routines that you do on a daily basis, which one do you eliminate? This is good question. It's hard because I ask this question of myself all the time, and I eliminate ruthlessly on this thing. So, let me think. Yeah, I got it. Sam: So, it would be sending ... These are the two things that pop up on my mind. So the first one is Instagram stories, right? These things I know take a bit of my attention and time away from me and I'm still questioning whether it's worth it. So that's probably the first one on my list that I would probably eliminate. The second one would be sending emails every day because I send an email broadcast out every day. Now, that is valuable, but the structure of how I'm doing it isn't as efficient as it could be. How it exists right now is I'm just doing it, like each day, I go to write one and I think of something. It takes me about 30 minutes to do. But, it would be much more efficient if I batched that task. So, for example, I should write five to ... I should really write seven emails at one time and get that done in one block of time and then schedule those out in one block of time. Then, that's it. So it's not a task that has to be repeated every day. Sam: Also, creating the blog content. That could also be batched, where I could create four, like I could create content for a month. So yeah, there's three things that are popping up into my mind. The first is Instagram stories and then, the emails and then the blog content too. Because these things are hard ones to bargain with because they do bring value. Like when I send an email, I make ten to 20 grand and it takes half an hour. So, it's very easily justifiable. Would you spend 30 minutes for ten, 20 grand? Probably yeah. And it helps the business. Sam: Also, the Instagram stories do too and so does the blog content. So, they're stubborn ones and I think I should continue to do them, but do them in a way that is more efficient using batches instead of dynamically creating it, just in time. So, that kind of answers your question, but you said if I was forced to get rid of one, so totally eliminate. The stories. That would go. Instagram stories. Sam: Brad Beland, "My niche is helping insurance agencies generate new business. Their target market is certain employees inside of companies, for example, HR managers, general managers etc. When I am setting up Facebook ads, should I be narrowing the target audience with certain filters, or should I just target the general population like you describe in week five?" Sam: So, are you asking me ... Yeah, so your question is kind of confusing because you tell me ... You don't tell me whether you mean in the context of doing Facebook ads for the insurance agencies to get then clients, or from the context of you doing Facebook ads to get insurance agencies as clients. So I'm a little confused there. But I can answer it from both perspectives anyway. Sam: If you're doing it, if you're doing ads, Brad is doing ads trying to get insurance agencies, then I would find ... I would do the process we do in the course. Find a ground zero audience, like a Tower of Babel audience, one audience that you know that these people are going to be in, and start with that. Derive 20 to 30 audiences from that using the Facebook audience insights tool and then test all of those audiences with some different angles. Find the ones that work, boil down your audiences to that and then use that. Sam: Then, the same is really true if you're doing ads for the insurance agencies and you're helping them get clients and their market is employees inside of companies, then yeah, pretty much everyone is an employee inside of a company. So you don't really need to narrow this down that far. You're just targeting the general population really. But you would find people who are probably more like, who have a higher probability of becoming and insurance client. For example, it might be age range. It might be different things and you might narrow it that way, and you might find that people who have more probability of buying insurance are more likely to be interested in these things. All right? Sam: If I was you, I'd try to find what things do people who buy insurance more than the average person like? There will be some. They might be differently, they might think differently politically, maybe they think differently ... Maybe people with families are more inclined to buy insurance or maybe people of a certain age are more inclined to buy insurance. It also depends on the type of insurance you're selling here because I don't even know what it is. Health, life, whatever. These all change things. You need to find what attributes to buyers of the insurance that these insurance agencies sell, have so that you can target them according to those attributes. Sam: The same is true about how you, Brad, would target insurance agencies. What attributes do people within insurance agencies that are likely to buy your services share? That signal them that you can use to target them, is what I'd do. Sam: Sherzod says, "I lose motivation. How do I get that fire back to keep going and kill it?" Yeah, so motivation, nobody has it all the time. Motivation is like a warm bath. It fades away. If you can only operate when you're motivated, then you ain't gonna go very far because you're going to spend a lot of time, probably more of your time, not being motivated. So, you instead need to build discipline. Because you can lose your motivation, but you can't lose your discipline and discipline is what keeps you going when you don't have the motivation and then, quite often because you're disciplined and you're still doing it despite not being motivated, that motivates you. Because you weren't motivated and you're doing it, and you're not motivated, but because you have the mental power to keep going, and when you keep going through those things and you notice things start happening, you're like, you get motivated again. Sam: So, discipline is really at the heart of it. You need to build better discipline. You need to do the things that you want to do, regardless. You have to. It's just non-negotiable. It has to get done. And you can't live with not doing it, regardless of your motivation. So stop looking for the motivation. Start looking for discipline. Sam: Tay says, "All blacks lost, Sam? South Africa [inaudible 00:35:07]" Yeah, I haven't followed rugby in a long time because I don't even have a TV in America. So, I honestly haven't followed it in a long time, but I saw my friends messaging about it, saying that they lost and they were talking about it. It's such a huge thing in New Zealand, but you never hear about it at all in America. It's quite interesting. Sam: Joe DeFriend says, "Hi Sam. On my strategy calls, when it's time to close, I get asked testimonials and previous results. The only result I have is with the only client I ever had, which I took his business from zero to 25k per month, but is it not in the same niche, so they are saying it's not the same and they ended up saying, I will think about it, thinking I won't be able to help them. How can I solve this issue?" Sam: Practice, you just need to keep going. You need to do more calls and you need more time, more frequency, more volume. Honestly, practice pretty much fixes everything. And it shows you what you need to change. Then, you change it and then it gives you the confidence. It gives you everything. So just keep going. And I know that might sound like a kind of lame answer, or not the answer you were hoping for, but that is the answer. Sam: Sean says, "Hi Sam. The niche I'm researching is artisans and makers and designers and I'm finding that they are wanting job where their creativity and expertise is more valued. This would translate into helping them locate the right clients. I'm wondering how I will know if my niche is too small? And also, I think I am not understanding how I would help one artisan find better clients without effecting the results I can give to my other clients, thinking that a potential customer for one of my clients would be in the same pool as a potential customer of another one of my clients. Hope this makes sense." Sam: Okay. So, there's a lot in here, right? So, I've got to unpack this thing which you gave me here. So, you said that how will I know if my niche is too small or not. Don't even worry about that because it's just, it's not a relevant thought. Artisans, makers and designers, I mean that covers a wide variety of humans on Earth. So, it's fine. So forget about that one. Then you also said, that you're finding that these people, they want jobs where their creativity and expertise is more valued and this would translate to helping them locate the right clients. Yes, that's kind of true. It also might translate to actually helping them create work that is of more value. Right? Because don't always assume that people's work will be valued, because sometimes people's work isn't of value. Sam: So make sure you don't assume that one. You might have to actually, in order to be perceived as value, sometimes you've got to give them value. So, don't rule that one out. Then, you also said that you have a fear about how ... You're saying that you won't be able to help one, without ... You won't be able to help two people because really they're competing in the same things. That's really an illogical fear. It doesn't make any sense. You know, like it's for example it's like, Facebook only taking on a couple of clients because they believe that it would be wrong or it'd be completely wrong or immoral to serve another client, because these people are competing with each other. So, it would be wrong to do this. Sam: But that's so messed up because if anything was wrong that would be it, because you want to create a fair environment for people to compete. Competition is a good thing. You want to just be fair to everybody. So, if you only worked with one artisan and you help them get really good, but all these other artisans wanted to work with you but you wouldn't work with them because you're already working with this one, that's unfair. What is fair is that you work with anyone who chooses to work with you and you help them get better. Then it's on them to win by being better than their competition. All right? So you just create a fair environment because that's the same with Facebook. They let anyone come an advertise on their platform and then it just becomes survival of the fittest. The best people, who have the best product and the best message, and make the most sense to the people they're targeting, that person wins. Not a person that Facebook chooses. All right? Sam: One is like a fair, free market, one is like totally not fair. So, that's how you've got to view it. You'll work with all of them. You're not going to share the information like, "Hey, here's how you beat this guy and here's ..." You don't share the information between these people. You help them all in equal ways and then it's left upon them to make better products and be better craftsmen than everybody else. That's how they win. So that is how I think about that, and how you should think about it too. It's being fair and creating a fair marketplace. Sam: Toby Kline says, "Sam, do you notice any differences in your mood, drive and creativity since moving to California?" It's honestly too hard to tell because there's too many variables. Right? Like, for one there's me not having my personal trainer, not having my chef, not having like an assistant here. So, there's all of my team, not having them here immediately that's a massive variable. Then there's also you know, I haven't ... I've got my routine established again but it isn't being established properly. But I think in order to notice any actual change in what you're asking, I would have to wait until things resume as they were in New York, in California, which will probably happen in the next like, 30 days. Once that happens, then I will be able to make an accurate comparison. But right now, it's too chaotic to give any sort of response to that other than I don't know. Giovanni says, "Hi Sam, I'm into the single men looking for dates niche and I need help looking for clients. I'm looking for men who want to get back to dating, but I'm not sure how to go about doing it. I do get reception in these social anxiety groups on Facebook, but I want to look elsewhere. What advice would you give to someone in this niche?" Sam: Yeah, so if you looking for dudes who want dates, you're basically looking for single men, but I would say people who are interested in dating and like pick up artistry and that sort of stuff. Those groups are prob-, they're full of dudes who want dates, literally. So, just because you're looking in social anxiety groups. I mean, that might be, sure, people who don't have dates might be socially anxious and that might be part of the reason why they don't have dates. But also, the pick up artistry groups, like all of those different groups too. And the dating groups. Go and join all of those different groups and look in there. That's where I would resort to and then you'll get lots of clues from those places. Sam: David Lawrence says, "What do you do when you have a prospect that seems interested in getting on a strategy session but suddenly goes cold? I have found several people that seem keen but then that don't respond once I ask if they would like to arrange a call." Sam: Yeah, so you might be just jumping too soon and from the sounds of it, it sounds like you're doing direct outreach. This person is responsive via chat or email or whatever, and then you try to get a strategy session booked. That's why the 15 minute chat can be good, because it's a little micro step towards the bigger step. Trying to go from just chat or email to strategy session, that's quite a big jump. That's why we have the 15 minute chat in between. So, I would try and put that as an interim step. Go to that, and then go to that, and then that way you should get a bit of response. Sam: Zach Marcus says, "What is the most important intangible that you're looking for in your employees?" That's a good question. I think the number one thing is passion and interest. If somebody is really passionate and driven and interested and curious about something, then I know that they ... Those are the people that get very good at something, regardless of whether they're good at it right now. So more than skills, because skills can be acquired and be learned quite easily. But, skills where someone isn't interested mean that those skills don't even get applied. So, you might end up with a really skilled person but they're not actually applying those skills because they're not interested, which is pretty much useless. Or you might end up with somebody who's really passionate and interested, who doesn't have the skills who quickly learns the skills, and then relentlessly applies those skills. Those people are what I look for. People who are very passionate, driven and interested and willing to learn, because those people can become great. Sam: Sean Vossler says, "Enjoying Southern California so far?" Yup, it's pretty good. It's nice just being able to walk outside and have the beach. But I don't think I've fully experienced it yet because it's been kind of chaotic, like trying to arrange all of these different things. Sam: Nala says, "My niche is helping women with low self-esteem and low self-confidence sky rocket their confidence, boost their body image and break through to success by a proven 12 week coaching program. What do you think of the offer hypothesis? Should I say the 12 week coaching program?" Yeah, so what's going on here is a lot of words but not much substance. So, you know, you said, "My niche is helping women with low self esteem and low confidence, sky rocket their confidence, boost their body image and break through to success." Who is the niche? That's the first question. And you said, "Women with low self esteem and low self confidence." Okay. Sam: And then, so that could work as categorizing the niche, but then, it's not clear what problem you help them solve because you talk about their body image, well actually you talk about their confidence, their body image and success. What is success? Is this financial success? Is this dating success? It's not clear ... It's clear who you are helping, but it's not clear what you're helping them to achieve. So I would get that ... The goal and the thing that you're helping these people achieve, I would get that much clearer. Then I would day, "I help these people, to achieve this thing." And then I think, you don't need to say anything about the 12 week coaching program. But you need to get that other thing clearer. Sam: Joshua says, "My biggest struggle lately is generating strategy sessions. I have two paying clients and both of these clients came to me after seeing my content [video scrambled 00:49:42] ... for tracking what's working and what's not when generating strategy sessions." Sam: Yes, I do. It's just you're learning naturally, as you do this. You're doing strategy sessions, right? These strategy sessions, you probably have a hunch about where they came from. Just the same way you have a hunch, or you might not have a hunch, you might actually know, where your clients came from. So, you already know these things and you just need to keep doing what you're doing and trying to optimize to do more of the things that are working and less of the things that aren't working. You just need to keep going and do more of it, more consistently for a longer period of time and just optimize along the way and that's how you do it. Sam: Nigel Thomas says, "With the new world view and being a non-binary human, if we cut all distractions and become focused to an extreme level, will there eventually be a paradox resulting in becoming less focused and more distracted? How to ensure the long term balance here." Sam: Yeah, so, the way that it works is balance can happen ... You're looking at things as if we become very focused for this period of our life and then later on, when we're older, we become very unfocused. It doesn't balance that way. What it is, is that we're basically becoming balanced in ... Like the average person is balanced in their attention and focus. Well let's call these two sides distraction and focus. All right? So those are the two sides. The average person is both of these things, multiple times in a minute. So, in one minute, they're focused on something, then they're distracted again and then ... Like a perfect example would be, they're on social media. They're distracted as they're scrolling through their Facebook feed and getting text messages. But then they see something that's interesting to them, so now they're focusing on it and now they're back into it again and they're focusing on it. Sam: So, they're going between these two states of distraction and focus many times within a single minute. So, they're kind of balancing within the minute, so they're minutes might be balanced, which means that then their hours are balanced and all of that is balanced. Right? But it's chaos still, really because it's all just mixed together. What we're trying to do with the focus and the training and what I try to teach you to do is to focus for like, at least six hours to 12 hours in a day and then, after that, you can be distracted and do whatever the hell you want. Sam: For example, if you look at the hours I work, nine AM to nine PM. That's 12. How many hours in a day? 24. What am I doing when I'm not working? Well, I'm resting, relaxing, I'm open to distractions, sleeping, things like this. So that is balanced. Then, you know, I also take a day off in the week and when I'm not working, I'm not still kind of working. I'm just not working. So, I won't be checking email. I won't be doing slides while also trying to watch a movie. I don't multitask, which means that I achieve balance in a different way. So, you don't need to think about it like, "Oh if we're just very focused, will this have an adverse affect on us in the future?" No, we're balancing it just in different ways because you can get so much more done when you're focused intently for like, six to 12 hours straight and then after that you're not. Compared to the average person, how they're just focused and distracted multiple times within a single minute. Because then the only things these people can really achieve is I don't even know what to call it. Professional social media surfing. That's basically the only thing these people can achieve. Sam: Chris Parson says, "Hey, Sam. I'm finding that frequently people ask me for proposals despite going over every detail over the phone. I've created an easy template to send out that can be quickly made to custom, but do you think that this can take away from the sale? Still testing this but I wanted to get your hypothesis." Sam: Yeah, so you don't need to do proposals. Right? A classic example is, for Facebook ads. Let's say a business wants to run Facebook ads. They don't go to Facebook and ask for a phone call and then say to the person on the phone ... First of all, they can't even go to Facebook and get at phone call. Then, but let's assume they did. Now, they're on the phone with a salesperson from Facebook and they're doing a strategy session, right? Now let's say that the person said, "Okay, Mr. Facebook person, why don't you just send me a proposal and I'll have a think about it?" They're not going to do that. You don't go looking at a Tesla or something and then ask them for a proposal. You don't go looking at an iPhone in a shop and be like, to the person, "Oh can you send me over a proposal?" Sam: I don't know what the hell this proposal thing is. But, it most certainly is not necessary. I mean, I get it. Sometimes it is necessary if you're a big corporation and you're assessing all of these different vendors, really it still isn't necessary, but corporates are great and they're masters of wasting time. So, I can see how they like those things. But, for most people, they don't need a proposal. They just need to know what they're getting, whether they want the thing, and then they need to buy it or not. So there's no need for this proposal thing. It's a waste. Sam: So, say just you don't do proposals. Say, "Well can't you ask me ... Well what information do you want in a proposal that I can't give you on the phone right now?" Why delay telling you what you need to know, when I can tell you now? And if the answer's no, you'll find that some of these people might just be looking for an easy out. They're too afraid to say no, or whatever. But don't give them that easy out. Get a no. No's are good remember. By sending them a proposal, you're just allowing them to have an option and a limbo decision instead of having a proper decision. Sam: Brad Beeler says, "Hi Sam. I heard you say that once the landing page is set up, we shouldn't be changing it unless it is really necessary. Does this apply to other pages on the website, or just the initial landing page?" It's just the landing page. It's just the main page that Facebook's sending traffic to, because it wants to make sure that it trusts that page and the contents on it. If there's a change in the content on that page, then it gets worried that maybe that you're trying to play tricks with it, and change it from something innocent to something not, after they've already run their approval process. So, yeah. Sam: Milo says, "Sam, I can't seem to quit my job even though your course could get me in the right path. Why is that?" I don't really understand that question. So, you're saying you can't seem to quit your job. Well, it's easy. You just say, "I quit." Or you send an email and just say, "Excuse me, I don't want to work here. Thanks." That's very easy to do. So, you can, you just choose not to. Then, that choice might be rational or irrational. Now, it might be rational if you don't have any clients, and you don't have any money and you don't have any savings or income and you have a lot of expenses and you have a lot of responsibilities. Therefore, your decision might be good, that you should keep your job in the meantime. Sam: Or, you might have applied this course, got clients, be making money and in that case, you don't really need the job but you just can't quite because you're just not strong enough. You just need to do it. If that's the case, I don't know what the case is here. I have nowhere near enough information, but it's you. You choose to do it and it might either be a good decision or not a good decision and that depends on the circumstances. Yeah, it's simple. Sean says, "One more question. Would you say that it is beneficial to help my first client for free if it is someone that I already know, to try to learn a workable system before charging? Apologies if this is in the course, I'm still working on week one." So, I recommend trying to charge initially because that's preferable to not charging. It makes the client more serious and committed. It also gets you some money. It also gives you a lot of confidence that you can do it again. All of these things are good. They're preferable over no money and not as much confidence and not having as much client commitment. So if you were given a choice between the two options, you'd choose the paying client one, and I recommend that you actually get a paying client. Sam: But, if you don't have the confidence to do that and you're really uncertain and you feel like that's just not going to happen, then, fine. Go with the free client. That will help you get the confidence to do the paid one. There isn't ... One option isn't better than the other. It depends on you and so you've got to just choose between those things. Sam: Constantine says, "I have three clients from my previous consulting activity, but after your course, I changed my niche because I thought I'll get better results, but I'm not sure. I'm not sure what to do, I don't have any clients from the new niche. What should I do?" I don't really have enough information here. I don't know what your old niche was. I don't know what your new niche is and I don't know how long you've been trying to do the new niche, how long you were doing the old niche. I also don't know what actions you took or how much time, or how passionate you are about this one and the old one. There's all sorts of things I don't know. Sam: But I would tell you that to focus on the niche that you're most in love with and passionate about, and curious about and interested in. Because if you do that, then the other things just follow. So that's, I would just get you to assess that, like look at the old niche you were in, look at the new one you're in. There must be a reason why you changed. Or if there wasn't really a reason, then you might want to change back. But if there was a reason and you're really passionate and interested about this new thing, then stay there and don't worry about the feedback that you haven't had any clients yet. Whenever you do something new, there's a little warm up period there before it starts flowing again and don't worry about that. It'll happen. You just need to keep at it. Sam: Jasper says, "I picked the niche help people to their dream with a defined plan." So I think you mean help people to achieve their dream with a defined plan. I think. "I met an organic ... I'm at organic attraction method and I'm having doubts in the payment and I just feel down pushed like I live in a small town and they don't have money." Okay. So, it sounds like here, this is classic case of not starting with a niche market. You haven't defined the niche, and then you haven't found out what problem that niche faces by talking to them and hearing from them. And then, you haven't created your offer and your business as a solution to that problem for that niche. These things don't seem to be present in what I'm seeing here, because you're saying, "I help people to achieve their dream with a defined plan." But, so well who's the niche? Is it people? Probably, and that's like a lot of people. Sam: So then what relevance is it that you live in a small town if you help people? Because there's people not just in your small town. So I can see here that things aren't ... things don't add up. So these things haven't been place properly and correctly. So, that is the reason why you have doubts, because you've kind of built this thing upon assumptions, upon assumptions, upon assumptions that's ended up in one massive assumption, that you have a very realistic fear that people might not want. So, this is normal. It's part of the process. You need to do it correctly and define who is the niche, specifically? Like what is this group of people that you want to help? Define that, then ... Sam: Sorry, it just said that there was a connection issue and then it came back. So, define the niche. Who is the group of people that you want to help? And then, what, like talk to them. Find out what problems [video scrambled 01:04:55] ... And then, to solve that problem and create your offer. And whatever your offer is, it should be trying to solve that problem for those people. That's what you should be doing. And when you do things that way, you won't have these issues. Sam: Bernadette Stevenson says, "Love it. Regular people have 90,000 thoughts a day and 90% of those are the same thoughts every day. Mediation helps you remove those repetitive thoughts from your psychology." Yeah, and also I would say that it's not necessarily about the removal of them.

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