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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, October 13th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, October 13th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for October 13th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right. I can see we've got a couple of people jumping on here. Just let me know if you've got audio and video working. If you can hear my voice, you can see me here. Just let me know before we get started, to make sure everything's working. I can see we've got Kion Black on, how's it going? Brendan Mulronan. Zack Marcus. Mike King. John Greek. Joshua Westover. Awesome. Can hear you. Perfect. Everything is working. Cool. Well, if it's your first time on one of these, first of all welcome. How these calls go is, I do one of them every Saturday from 3PM till 5PM eastern time, and that is the time in New York. So if you just Google time in New York, that's when it is. Sam: They happen every Saturday, so you can put it in your calender. I would say about three Saturdays out of four in a month, they happen, but about once every month I have to cancel it because I'm traveling or something like that. I usually tell people in advance, so you know when they're happening and when they're not happening. How they work is, you basically just ask me a question in that comment section over there. Then I go through them one by one, in the order that they're asked, and I just answer them live. That's pretty much how they go. Let's jump right into it. Sam: I can see Brandon Mulronan says, "How do you recommend I handle students that go dark, stop doing the work, and then the next payment they owe gets declined. Do you follow up with them or just let it go?" Yeah. First of all. These are two separate things. There's students that go dark, and by that I mean they, well you think that they're not doing the work. You think that they're not participating in the Facebook group. They're not getting on the Q&A calls. Things like this. It's important to just leave them. Just let them be. Because it's kind of like the same phenomenon we see with parenting. You don't want to over mother your students. I see some coaches and consultants, they sign up a client and immediately they're anxious. "Oh, is this person doing the work? What do they think of it? Have they done the section item? Are they gonna remember to do this thing? Are they gonna remember to get out of bed? Do I need to call them and follow up with them about everything?" You don't. You need to let them police themselves. Sam: Because the truth is, if they can't police themselves, they're never going to succeed anyway. No one ever succeeds in business because their coach just keeps nagging them to do the work. That's not how it works. A good coach will instill a new belief system in way of being within the students so that they police themselves. That is what I recommend doing to your students. If they go dark, don't worry about it. I tell my students in week one, video one, "If you don't do the work you won't get any results, and I can absolutely guarantee you that. It's a fact. If you don't do the work then it's nobody's fault but your own. So basically you just chose to fail. I'm not gonna follow up with you. I'm not gonna try and ring you and be like, "Hey, why aren't you doing the work?" It's not gonna happen, you'll just fail. You did it." All right? So I tell them that. Then that's the standard I recommend you set for your students too. Then they're like, "Oh wow, I've actually got to grow up and look after myself." Sam: That's the first part of your question. How do we handle students that go dark. That's what you do. The other one, which isn't really related, I don't think. Or if it is related it's very loosely coupled. It is in no way a direct reaction from this other thing. That one is, you're saying, "What do we do when their next payment gets declined? Do you follow up with them or just let it go?" Well yeah, you follow up with them, and you just say, "Hey, I noticed your payment declined. Is everything okay?" Most of the time they'll fix it. If they don't then you've got to come up with an arrangement with them and that's how you deal with that. But you absolutely follow up with them, because they were suppose to pay and the payment didn't go through. Think about what happens when you don't pay for a software. It doesn't go through, they send you emails and things and tell you, "Hey, your payment's not going through." That's what you do there. Sam: Mike King says, " Being in the mortgage industry for 15 years. Did my strengths and weaknesses survey. My strengths were hard working, great listener, wise. My unique abilities were making people feel valued and validated, and that they can trust me. I feel these strengths best lend themselves to coaching. I want to combine my knowledge of getting people approved for buying a home with coaching. Would it make sense for me to inquire about Up Level? I've researched other home buying courses and they all scratch the surface in terms of information on home buying, compared to what I feel I could teach them." Yeah so, the best way to find an opportunity, and the best way to pick your niche, is to look at your things you're interested in. It's not just things that you're good at, or have experience in, but things that you're interested or curious about. Then you look at the things that you have skills in, and have a background in. Then you look at the market. A group of people, a niche, and then you look at their problems. Sam: You're trying to match the market's needs with something you're curious about or interested in, or the market's needs with something that you already know how to do. Right? That's kind of what we're doing there. If you find a market need, and you don't have the skills or experience to solve that, it doesn't mean you can't do it. It means you've just got to acquire and learn those skills, which is easy. I see a lot of people get stuck a lot of the time, because they're trying to find a market opportunity which they can solve with the skills they already have, which severely limits them. I mean, if you've already got the skills, great, but most of the time you're not and you've always got to learn more skills. Now, in the case of your specific question here. It sounds like you're good at, you've got a lot of experience in the mortgage industry and you also like helping people, which is good. Then it sounds like there's a market that somehow you're interested in, it must mean something to you, and that is home buyers, people who want to buy a home. Sam: I'm guessing it's probably first home buyers too, just by the way you've worded this question. You probably have, I don't know why, you have some affinity to first home buyers, and helping them get approved with a mortgage. You like helping people. You also have the experience in the mortgage industry. This sort of lines up. It looks good, and I know there's a lot of people out there that wanna buy a home, because it's quite a common thing, so there's definitely aa market there. The problem is real, and you have experience in it and it must mean something to you. All of these things that are lining up well, and I think it sounds good. What I would do if I was you is, I would definitely look at Up Level. You can find more about it in week seven of Accelerator, and I'll also tag Red Boots in your question, who works with me, because he can answer some questions about it if you want. Sam: In the end, what you really wanna do is, you want to get your first three clients, so you wanna go out to the market, to these first time buyers. You'd wanna talk to them. Make sure they've really got this problem. Better understand this problem. Right now you're looking at it from a solutions point of view, but you wanna invert it and look at it from a problems point of view. From the participant's shoes within the market. Right now you're looking from this side, you wanna look at it from the other side too, and better understand their point of view. Then that'll make things clearer for you. Then you want to come up with an offer. Probably a one-on-one coaching offer. Let's say you do six one hour calls with them, once a week for six weeks, and you walk them through a process to get approved on their first home purchase. You'd wanna do it one-on-one first, because that will, first of all, help you validate that this is a real market opportunity. Second of all, it will help you sell it and actually get proof of concept. Sam: Third of all, you'll learn what exactly what it takes to help someone make this transformation and solve this problem. Then once you've done two or three clients like that, you'll know exactly what you need to put in a course, and then you'll be able to put a course together and start selling that. We show you how to do all this in Up Level Consulting. Like I said, you can learn more about that in week seven. Sam: Pietor says, "Hey Sam. You said you would have to get results in a 12 weeks maximum. My niche is women who want to find the right guy with the best method in the market. You can find him in six to 12 months, not in three months, and that's not 100% guaranteed. My prospects say that they want to be sure it works. I cannot give them the 100% guarantee of that, and it takes way too long. Question, do I have to pivot my niche to make it really at 90% chances achievable in 12 weeks, or what else do I have to do?" Yeah. Very good question. Now, first of all, nothing is absolutely guaranteed in the world, so don't ever think that you're gonna be able to 100% guarantee it's gonna happen within a timeframe. Well, the only thing that you could really, 100% guarantee is that you can't 100% guarantee that. That is normal. Don't think that it's ever gonna be certain. If you wanna lose weight, there's a lot of variables. You want to do anything, there's a lot of variables. No one can predict the future. So, that's okay. Sam: What I would recommend doing is, trying to find ... That's the end goal, to find your life partner or soulmate or whatever, right? People are going to be skeptical if you say you can do this in a really short timeframe anyway, because they know that, quite a lot of the time, they've got to date a couple of different people to just see, to find what they want. So, really what I think you should do is, you should establish a nearer term goal that feeds the longer term goal. So the long term goal is to find their soulmate, but a shorter term goal could be to get dates, or to meet people. To meet new people or something like that. I don't know how this industry works or how you do it, but there has to be something that comes before that, that feeds that. For example, in consulting Accelerator we get people to pick their niche, set their goals, come up with their offer and their pricing. Then we also get them to learn the sales script and then practice strategy sessions. Then do strategy session. Sam: There's all these things that lead up until the main goal of getting a client and having a success for business. It's important that these things go in sequential order like that. Obviously people just want to make money and get a client, but once they start achieving those things along the way, they're satisfied anyway, because they know they're building up until that point. While everyone might think, "Oh, we just want our soulmate now." They will all understand that that is what they want, but there are steps that must happen in order to achieve that. I would still talk about achieving the ultimate goal in your messaging, in your promise and all of that, but talk about some nearer term steps, which you can achieve faster that will feed that longer term thing. Sam: Now, Mohammed Abrahim says, "This is my nightmare. I've tried everything to find my niche. All I do is keep searching for it, then go to sleep, wake up and keep searching. Then go to sleep." Just skipped past your question but I've pretty much read it. You're just basically complaining that you can't find your niche. The thing is dude, I can tell from your attitude that you have let this thing defeat you. I remember this has happened a lot in this Q&A course, because I see the question. I see you ask it in different ways and shapes and forms. So you've let the thing get you, and you need to ... You can't let it get you like that. All you're doing is picking a niche, and it can be done in an instant. You're overthinking it and you've gone into panic mode with it. All you need to do is just choose something, and that's very easy to do. You can just choose anything. I'll give you an example, why don't you just start trying to help plumbers get clients. Why don't you help plumbers get clients with digital marketing? Sam: It might not be the best niche. It might not be that interesting to you, but choosing something, even if it isn't very interesting, is way better than choosing nothing and complaining about it. I think if you actually sat down and do the gun to your head situation, you'd be able to choose a niche, and I think that's what you should do. But if you can't do that in the next two minutes, then just do the digital marketing for plumbers. Just do that. Stop sitting paralyzed worrying about it. It's not gonna achieve anything. Sam: Peitor says, "When do you know you have to change and pivot your niche?" That's a good question. It's hard to answer that thing with just one answer. There's not this one thing that happens and then you know, but really what it is, is you've got to be honest with yourself that you have exhausted this thing, or that you're just not interested in it at all. If you really aren't interested in your niche, and I mean you just ... You spend all of your time being more interested in something else, and this thing is boring to you, then you should probably change your niche. Or if you're interested in it, and you really worked hard in it. You've talked to more than 20 people, you've learned about their problems and you've done at least 30 strategy sessions and pitched people on the phone more than 30 times, and if it doesn't look like anythings gonna work, then you might want to pivot your niche a bit. The key is that you've got to be interested in the thing, curious about the thing. That is most important really. Sam: A lot of people in the world think that skill, people are born with skill, or people are born intelligent or something. It's not true. People get skilled and intelligent at things they're interested about. It's interest that creates attention that focuses on that thing that then leads to experiencing that thing, testing it, practicing with it again, and again, and again. Hours accumulate and therefor the byproduct is skill and intelligence. It all really stems from interest. Interest isn't even a logical, rational thing. Interest is like a function of the limbic system which is emotional and it's the same system in your brain that creates love. You don't choose your wife or you husband for a purely rational reason. You don't look at their career and whether you could partner with then and do a JV, or do an affiliate promo, or maybe use the money that they've got to seed fund your start up. If we chose our partners with pure rational reason, we would look for those things, but we don't. Really what it is, is it's an emotional thing, and it's an attachment from your limbic system. Sam: You really need to watch that thing, because you will get good at things that you're interested in. If you're not interested in business, then the first thing you wanna try and do is get interested in business, because then you'll get really good at it. It's just like when I was watching the Michael Jordan documentary. There's lots of them, but this one was Michael Jordan to the Max. They asked him, "Michael, what's the secret to being the best basketball player in the world?" He said, "The secret is to fall in love with the game. If you do that, everything else happens." You need to learn to love working, and love using your computer and working at your desk and all of these. You also need to love your niche and what you do. That's why interest is so important. You want to be interested in the niche. Very key. The other things just kind of fall in place once you get that. Sam: Toby Kline says, "Sam, you really eliminated the Instagram stories, didn't you?" Yeah. I stopped doing them, if you've been following my Instagram then you would have noticed. The reason why, is because it was just ... I only have limited time, right? If I have to make a decision, do I want to put my time into these damn stories, or do I want to put my time into some other things, like building things? I'm gonna choose building things. In 40 years' time no one's gonna really care about those damn stories. I don't wanna be spending my time on something that really has a very short lifespan. I'd rather work on things that have longer tails and longer half life effects. Sam: Seth Marcus says, "I came across I&TJ on 16 personalities, and the brief description of it and its strengths ... Oh, I missed that. Dude, you'll have to ask that question again, I missed it. Sam: [inaudible 00:21:39] Singh says, "My niche is helping certain companies in my niche find specialist staff through digital advertising." Whoa, this one's interesting. Your niche is to find certain companies in your niche, but you didn't even define your niche. How do you find something within something that you don't know what it is? There is a thinking error in that one. You need to clear that one up and then ask the question again, because that's a definitely error. You have to define the object before you can derive and object from the object. You can't derive something from nothing. Sam: Danny Gibson says, "I help drug addicts overcome their addiction through one-on-one coaching. I'm struggling to find people who will actually pay for this." Shit. There's a lot of people on this call now, and there's a lot of people asking these questions. If I miss your question, just ask it again, and I will just go down a few questions and start answering from there so that I don't keep skipping them. Sam: David Baine says, "How do you know when a niche is too small? I was thinking of focusing on owners of climbing gyms, rock climbing, but I think it may be too small a niche." Yeah, that one is smaller, it really is, so it's very easy to find out how many rock climbing gyms there are in a country, for sure. Wherever you're based, try to find out how many rock climbing gyms there are in ... If english is your main language, I'd get the main english speaking ... I'd grab the top five english speaking languages, assuming your language is english, and then I'd find out how many rock climbing gyms exists in those countries that speak english in the top five. Total that up. Then think about how much money you might be able to charge these gyms and how much that is, even if you get 20% penetration out of all of those. Do the math, and if it doesn't make sense you need to think bigger. Maybe target rock climbers instead of rock climbing gyms. There's a lot of climbers, there's not so many gyms. Sam: Austin Broth says, "How do I get back into consulting when I've spent the last 10 months working a job?" Well, you just do it. Seriously. How you do it is, you wake up and then you have a shower, and you have something to eat, and then you walk to your computer. Then you just do it. Seriously. Don't think about it, because as soon as you start thinking about it you might think that you need to learn and know and maybe read a book or ask a question on how to do it. When really all you need to do is do it. Pietor says. Yeah, I've already answered this question. Sam: Nafes says, "Hey Sam. My sharp grade [inaudible 00:24:40] from Eds is about 50%. To increase the sharp grade would you ..." Oh man, now there's people asking these questions fast. All right. Give me a second here. All right. Max says, "Sam, do you think that asking about monthly earnings during 15 minute's chat before [inaudible 00:25:08] to better qualified prospects is a good idea?" Yes I do. Do it. Sam: Zack Marcus says, "What has helped you to stay clear headed and focused when things get chaotic or when you get emotional?" It's a good question. One thing I try to do is not to let things get too chaotic. What I've observed is that you can generally only experience and handle chaos on one of two sides. The sides are, here's the division, and then you have over your personal life. Then over here business. If you wanna handle chaos in business you can do that, but you need a very stable personal life. If you wanna handle chaos in your personal life, you can do it but don't expect to achieve anything in your business. I try to keep personal life just very simple, very very very ordered, structured and simple and low worry, low complexity, and it's not chaotic at all. That allows me to get into some chaos over in the business side. Keep everything in my mind, and be able to solve it and handle it all, because things are good over here. That's what I'd recommend. Sam: Joshua Westover says, " I've been using Facebook marketing. I've been using Facebook for organic marketing so far, and I'm currently able to generate around one to three per week, and I'm struggling to break out a bit. How many strategy sessions should you be able to generate organically per week? Mine niche is to help people with their fear of flying." Well, I think if you really worked hard at it, you could easily generate one a day, which would be five a week. I would just find out what works best and do more of that, and find out where the things that you're currently doing that are wasteful and eliminate those. Just keep optimizing. Do more of what works, less of what doesn't. Work harder, work longer, work more intensely, work with more focus, and keep optimizing and you'll get it. Sam: Moralie Sanker says, "My niche is SAS companies because of my previous experience, skills and passion. Even within that, within a certain size, there aren't many SAS companies. There are only 15k to 20k total SAS companies. That does not seem to be enough in terms of market size." Yeah that's fine. If you get 20,000 customers, that's a lot. We are only approaching that number now, 20,000 customers. I can tell you it's a lot. It took me a long time, a lot of effort. I've got a big team and things, and you can make a lot of money with that many customers. Not many SAS companies have that many customers by the way. That's fine. That market size is fine. Just start it. Sam: Adam Damborski says, "Do you have a particular process for mastering a niche?" Yeah, it's the one I teach in the consulting accelerator. It goes like this: Find something that you're interested in, and then find a niche that is related to that thing that you're interested in. Niche meaning a group of people with similar attributes. Find that niche, talk to those people. Find out what their problems are. You're looking for a widespread problem among participants of that niche that you're also interested in, and then you wanted to seek to solve that problem with a solution through advice that you may or may not know how to give. Then that is your offer. If you don't know how to solve it, figure it out. If you do, solve it, charge money for it. It'll create value, and then you'll make money. Then it's just practice and repetition that makes you good. Sam: Mark Carey says, "Why are you so cool Sam?" I don't know how to answer that. You'd have to define cool. What is cool? Sam: Audrey. Who's next? Justin Corderio. "Hey Sam. When you did local business ads, did you do it the same way that you teach in the Facebook ads course? [inaudible 00:29:32]. Yes, it's pretty much exactly the same. I mean, I probably wouldn't have gone into that much detail, because you can't, because you've got to work between different clients. We go into some pretty intense detail in this training. The basic principals are the same. The detail won't be as intense, but everything still remains the same. Moralie Sanker says, "Even within the SAS market there are a ton of people offering marketing and sales. It seems to be a crowded market." Yeah, so here's the thing. It doesn't matter if the market is crowded. The only thing that matters is whether people have the problem or not. I was talking to this woman the other day on one of our Up Level Q&A calls, and she said that she had this method and process for helping women with menopause. I said, "Well, why don't you teach that in a course?" She said, "Oh, there's just too many players in there. There's too many courses, there's too much information, and it's crowded and saturated." I said, "okay, but are there any women in the world that have menopause and struggle with it?" She was like, "Yeah, of course. Most of them." I was like, "Well then the courses aren't doing their job." It doesn't matter how many people are in a market, the only thing that matters is, are there people with problem- Sam: [inaudible 00:31:00] in the market. The only thing that matters is are there people with problems? Now I would consider a market to bet saturated when I can't find a person with a problem. That means the players in the market are providing a solution promptly. But if there's a lot of players in the market but all the people seem to have a problem then I don't consider that crowded. Sam: Joshua [Westover 00:31:29] says "Hey Sam, how many clients should you help before you consider creating a course? I've helped two so far, I'd love to jump into [Up People 00:31:35] and create a course when the time is right." Sam: Yeah so really it's gonna be at least three to four, to be honest. And it might be more, it might be slightly less, it depends. It's at that moment that you can see that there are universal principals and universal methods between all of these different clients. So you might take on all of these different clients, all have different markets, different niches, different personalities, different products or services and different prices. And then also they might be different geographic locations and they might be at different stages of growth. And so it all looks very complex and different and it might look like we need to provide [inaudible 00:32:22] solution to each one. Sam: But when you know you're getting good, when it all just looks the same to you. When you see all this stuff that everyone thinks is different and you're just like no it's the same thing, boom, boom, boom, done, that's when you know you've got the essence of or the [germ 00:32:40] to create a course. Sam: Jennifer Bishop says "You mention in the vlog about systems thinking it is important to think of the whole and you refer to the forest fires as being important to the ecosystem. Arguably taxation is a small fire which in the short term slows business but benefits the whole. When society has this equality surely business grows. Why do companies want the lowest tax to benefit them if it does not benefit the whole?" Sam: Good question. And so you're full argument or question here assumes that taxation is good and that taxation actually helps society and alleviates inequality. So if that assumption was true then you might have a good argument here. But I'm pretty sure that assumption aint true. And what you'll find is that most tax dollars go to war and killing other people, and into government and bureaucracy and stupid laws. And barely any of it trickles its way down and actually benefits the common people. So that's why. Sam: Whereas businesses, if they're left to grow ... if they're left to manage their money they want to, instead of funding a war, they want to just hire more people, provide jobs and prove their product and best in research in development and the whole premise of business in the first place is solving problems. So why wouldn't you unleash the people to solve the problems and hire more people? And so that's why. And I think it's not a binary solution, it's not like no tax and it's not lots of tax, it's somewhere in the middle. And that's where it's right. But if your assumption was true then the answer would just be to tax the hell out of everyone, but that wouldn't do any good. Neither does none at all. It's somewhere in the middle there. Sam: Donald [Daines 00:34:51] says "Yeah I picked 15 of the wrong niches before picking the right one." Yeah so that's what you have to do. Sometimes you don't know what the right thing is until you pick the wrong one. So the thing is that if you start now and pick the wrong niche you'll be able to start, make progress, find out you don't like that niche, pick another one and start and make progress and succeed in it before most other people have even picked any niche. I've seen this happen. Sam: I remember back at the starting line back when I first started in business there were people that were trying to pick what niche, what niche, and years went by and they were still trying to pick what niche, what niche, and I had already tried like four, gone through them and ended up on the right one before they had even chosen the first one. And so that's why you just start, it doesn't matter if it's the wrong path, just start. Sam: You can't really move until you have momentum going forward. It's kind of like a car, if you're sitting in a car stationary and you turn the wheel you aren't turning, you're just sitting. But as soon as you get some momentum the steering starts to actually be able to move you around. So get in motion. Sam: Brad [Bielas 00:36:13] says "Can you give some tips on how you do the most important things first each day? I'm stuck in a pattern of planning out my day and then at the end of the day realizing I've done something other than what I intended to do." Sam: Yeah so this is just you man, there's no like curse or spell on you. You just aren't very good at disciplining yourself. And it's alright because pretty much every single person in the world sucks at this, they're impulsive and neurotic, they're pretty much psychopaths. It's practice. The first time you write down what you want to do and then you wake up in the morning and you go to do it you won't do it. You'll want to do something else, so you'll do something else, you'll lie to yourself all day that you can keep putting it off, keep putting it off and then do it at the last minute, which then you get to the last minute and then you know I can't do it so you just do it tomorrow. Sam: And then the pattern repeats, repeats, repeats. That's what most people do, but the beauty of it is that you're writing it down and you're making yourself aware that this pattern exists, number one. And number two, your loading up the pain. So each time you let yourself down like that it's gonna eat at you. It's just gonna keep chipping at you until you can't handle it anymore and then that's probably when you're gonna make a change. Sam: And so even though you're writing it down and not doing it it's still better than not doing it and not writing it down because it's making you feel guilty and it's chipping at you. And eventually you will change but if you want to change instantly then you just have to wake up. You have to know that you're doing it to yourself, you wrote down those words, you have the choice to do those actions. No one else. But you're just choosing not to. So in a way you're choosing to fail. So why are you choosing to fail? You gotta ask yourself that question and then just make the right choice. Sam: So Donald [Daines 00:38:28] says "How do you find a balance between chasing shiny objects and finding things that you enjoy doing?" Sam: And that's a good question. And so really what it is is you want to choose something that you enjoy doing that is going to involve lots of different things. So at its essence, what I really enjoy doing, is building things and solving problems. If I come across a very hard problem and if I come across ... If I get to build something I really like it and if I come across a hard problem I really like it. Sam: That's why I like business because business is all about building things and solving problems and so it fits perfectly. So at the core of what I really enjoy doing is that and then a niche that I'm very interested in is helping people start businesses, consulting businesses, scale them up and then within that there's all sorts of problems. How do we solve the mindset problem? How do you solve self discipline, picking a niche, setting your price, strategy sessions, doing those, simulating, learning with others to get up the motivation to do it, the financial aspects, the ads aspect, the finance aspects, there's so many different things that are apart of this larger hole and that's what I really enjoy. Sam: It's like there are lots of different things I get to learn and play with in order to make this whole thing work and that's what you really want to do. I'm not saying you have to just focus on one task and only do that one task for the rest of your life, that's not what it's about. It's about choosing some core things that you will work on and be interested in your entire life, but within those things there are lots of other different things. Sam: The key is not to jump and have shiny object syndrome that takes you away from those core principles. Sam: Anthony Cohen says "I just launched a Facebook ad campaign for my first client in the accounting niche. My first judgment day after four days was outside of KPI, should I go straight to testing more ad angles, images, audiences, or try organically invite prospects to the funnel. I ask $600 for every four days of testing." Sam: So yeah you probably wanna find out why. Is it the ad, is that out of KPI? If something is out of KPI after four days, if nothing is within KPI after four days, you should really be turning that off because that's what we do. If something's out of KPI shut it off, if something's within leave it on, but nothing's within so everything is without, outside, so therefore we shut off everything. You don't keep it running, otherwise you're gonna run your losses. Sam: Danny [Petit 00:41:50] says "Hey Sam I don't know why we are supposed to use both pay funnels and stripe." Sam: That's a good question. And the answer to that is because Stripe is like the payment gateway and merchant processors. So they have the relationships with the major credit cards and banks and all that and they have the backend software. And then what you're supposed to do is hook on another service onto the front of Stripe and that kind of interfaces with Stripe and the users or you. You interact with this, your users interact with this and it passes the data through into Stripe. And then Stripe passes that data out to the banks and the credit card companies. Sam: And that's the way that it's supposed to work. Now what freaks Stripe out is when you log into it and you start manually entering credit cards in there and then you start trying to charge those credit cards in there. Stripe doesn't like that, it looks like fraud because most fraudsters do that. They might steal someone's credit card or a bunch of credit cards or find ... hack a bunch of credit card numbers and then just go onto Stripe and then you just start manually typing them in and dinging them. Sam: So it doesn't like that and you shouldn't do it. Yes you could log into Stripe and do that if you wanted to, but that doesn't mean that you should because you will get your account either flagged, locked, shut down or all of them. And so that's why we use pay funnels. Sam: [inaudible 00:43:34] says "Adopt and enlarge your climbing niche to climbing walls and also riding the bike uphill that you'll grab a lot of people." Sam: Yeah you might want to focus on ... there's probably something there. I can't image you just chose climbing gyms because you thought it would be a good niche or you thought it would make some good money. You probably enjoy climbing yourself and so that doesn't mean that you can't do it. Why not look at what problems climbers have? That's an interesting one. And then maybe you solve it for them because there's a lot of climbers, way more than there are gyms. Sam: All right here's [inaudible 00:44:29]. "My niche is helping transport companies find drivers through digital advertising and I've gone through direct outreach E-mails and literally can't get any more than 300 companies. I've sent through E-mails to all these companies and got about five responses. The problem is when I get on the sales call the CEO has usually delegated it to the HR rep. The HR rep can't make decisions over the phone, therefore I get stuck in a loop. I've now exhausted all direct outreach methods. Those companies that I did get responses from are still making up their minds." Sam: Yeah so here's the problem with this, it looks like you didn't talk to the market before deciding this is the niche that I'm gonna work in. Because if you did you would have experienced this. What I tell you to do is the only way to find out what Susie wants for lunch is to ask Susie. You can't guess. You can't look into a quantum computer and then just solve that problem, you have to talk to Susie and ask her. And Susie in this example being the transportation company. Sam: If you had tried you might have assumed they have a problem, which is finding drivers. Could be true, might not be, who knows. But you didn't talk to them. And if you did talk to them then you probably would have got routed through the HR person and you would have found out that this is an issue. And then you probably wouldn't have approached it the same way. Sam: And so this is why we do this thing first, before we do the other thing because it's a test. It's finding out how this all works. So what I recommend doing is going back to the drawing board, and you've got your niche, which is transportation companies, and then you need to find the problem they have. Right now you have assumed they have this problem, which may or may not be true, it's assumed. You need to talk to them. So instead of try to get in and sell them something, try to just talk to people in the company. Talk to the HR person and all of that, learn all about it, talk to the people who have hired the transportation drivers, talk to the CEOs if you can, talk to everyone in there. Find out what the problem is. Sam: And find out if you had a solution to this problem how it would get adopted and how the decisions would be made and how the purchase decision would be made. And then scope all that out first and then you'll know the ins and outs and then you'll be able to find out whether that is a problem and if it is how to best go about delivering the solution. And when you work on it that way it'll work itself out. But what you're now trying to do is go backwards and you haven't put the building blocks in place. So the [inaudible 00:47:22] are failing, it's not reaching the endpoint. So you need to go back and build it up properly in order. So [Demi Lola 00:47:36]. I'm sorry I have to miss your question because it's just popping up. You'll have to ask it again, sorry about that. Sam: Ronald Bacon says "You don't have young children, do you?" Sam: Nope. Not yet. I will but I don't yet. I'm twenty ... How old am I? I'm 29. So I think it will probably start becoming ... it'll probably start happening when I'm like 30 I think, but we'll see. Sam: [inaudible 00:48:10] says "My show up [inaudible 00:48:11] is 50%, should I get the homework video to watch to commit to the core more? And if so any ideas? I do fitness coaching." Sam: If your show up rate is 50%, first thing that comes to mind is you need to look at the ... you probably need to cancel more applications. Look at all the people ... go and pull a list of all the people that have no showed. Get them all in and look at all of the survey response. Then look at all the people that have showed up and look at all their survey responses. And then ... well actually [inaudible 00:48:43] no shows look at them, their responses in the survey, and then look at people who purchased. Look at their surveys and their responses. And then look at the similarities between buyers, who obviously showed up, and no shows. Sam: These are the best, these are the worst. What are the differences? How do these two things look different? What are the patterns in there? Once you know what that is then you'll be able to better disqualify people when they apply. The best way to lower the no show rate is to increase the cancellation rate and also make sure you're not allowing people to schedule a call anymore than three days out into the future. Make sure you've got SMS reminders as well as E-mail reminders, both SMS and E-mail, make sure they're getting enough reminders. Sam: And on the success page, after they've completed the survey, make sure that you have a video there that explains what to expect and all of that and I recommend probably having a video there too of you so that they can build a relationship with you where you tell them what to expect. And those things should increase that show up rate. Sam: Eli Richardson says "If I can only add 30 people each day on Facebook without coming under notice from Facebook, how can I do more organic outreach, more of what works?" Sam: Yeah so you probably have to do ... there's different things you could do. You could look within groups, Facebook groups where your niche is and just participate in the threads, in the posts, in the comment threads beneath the posts. That might be a way to start asking more questions and talking and discussing with more people even without adding them as a friend. And then they might add you as a friend and then you can accept them. Or tomorrow you know who to add as a friend, that's one way. Sam: Another way would be to use LinkedIn. So go onto another platform and start doing that over there. And then there's also E-mail. There's an infinite amount of things that you can do, you just have to think. Sam: So Chris [Gertz-Rumbach 00:51:02] says "Thanks for your video on why does your business exist other than for the purpose of making money." He thinks that video is very important and when he changed his business to giving away [inaudible 00:51:15] to charity that made a big difference. Sam: Yeah I think having some meaning and some reason why you're doing what you're doing it really helps motivation a lot. I think in the beginning though not a lot of people are gonna have a big deep purpose about why they're doing what they're doing. The main reason why a lot of people are gonna get into entrepreneurship and want clients and things, especially in the early stages is 'cause it's a survival thing. They just want to either quit their job or they want to be able to provide for their family, they want more income, or they want to move out of their parent's house. Sam: They want a bit more freedom, they want to improve their life a bit. And there's nothing wrong with that, that's a good reason to want to start. And the purpose then comes as you evolve a little bit more. 'Cause you can't really think about changing the world and having this massive purpose when you can't really put ... have shelter and food and things like that. Sam: Those survival things have to be solved first before you can start thinking about larger idealistic things. So Angie says "I have a prospect to try to get leads themselves and got zero. He contacted me to build a funnel and get leads for him, but he won't pay what I asked and has skipped [inaudible 00:52:47]. He knows these systems work internationally, but is unsure it will work here in [inaudible 00:52:54] at 400k plus people. Is this a good size advertising market on Facebook? His niche is private preschools or trades, small businesses, over one million turnover." Sam: Well 400,000 people is a lot of people. So Facebook is gonna be really good at reaching 400,000 people, it's pretty decent. And so I would say that [inaudible 00:53:23] should work, it's a large audience size. Those people are gonna be on Facebook, it should work. We can't say with absolute certainty it's going to work, but it looks like it should and it looks like he should try it. Sam: Donald Daines says that his client has multiple product types and ... oh I missed your question, sorry dude. Sam: [Carol 00:53:47] says "I have a hard time making my Facebook body texts very long, any tips?" Sam: I don't know why you would have a problem doing that, it's easy, you just make it long. If you can't think of what to write or how to ... or maybe it doesn't need to be long. If you really think it doesn't need to be any longer than it is then don't. But if it doesn't work then you might want to try to make it longer and deeper and more detailed. Sam: [Adomi Lola 00:54:14] says "What software do you use to record your student interviews for YouTube which splits the screen so we watch both you and the student? Do you have a PC option, not a mac?" Sam: Yeah so I use the Skype call recorder. And if you type into Google Skype call recorder you'll find it. I think another name for it is E-cam recorder. It's also the call recording software I recommend for the strategy sessions in the program. It works really well. It does both the audio, if you just want to record your strategy sessions, it also does the interviews really well. It's for a Mac. For a PC I'm sure there's an option. You just want to Google it. Google Skype call recorder for PC. But someone told me just the other day that Skype has recently rolled out the call recording thing natively in Skype. I haven't tried it at all, I have no idea how it works or if it even works. But someone said that that is in the features. Also try that. Maybe that solves your problem easy. Sam: [Bez Burk 00:55:21] says "Helping coaches and consultants close high ticket offers using a powerful client conversion methodology, any feedback on this, Sam? Or do you think it's [inaudible 00:55:31]?" Sam: I think that it sounds like a good start and it'll become clear to you once you start taking action. So stop worrying about getting it perfected now, this will do to get you started. Get started, generate strategy sessions, do the strategy sessions and iterate from there. The action will make this thing perfect, not just thinking about it. Sam: [Compstanton 00:56:01] says "How should I build my offer if my niche is not aware of the 80% of the problems?" Sam: It's kind of backwards. So your niche not being ... oh I see your niche not being aware of a problem. Well it's not so much if they're aware of the problem, it's just whether they have the problem or not. Because if it really is a problem, it doesn't matter how aware they are of it because when you tell them hey you got that problem they will notice. Sam: It's just like imagine if your house was on fire and you're not aware of it. It's not like you don't care because you're not aware. As soon as I'm like hey dude your house is on fire and you turn around and it is you're gonna want the solution. So that's why don't worry too much about awareness, just make sure that the problem really exists. So Demi Lola says that she's been struggling a bit the past couple days because "I'm starting to worry that my first client was a fluke. How do you overcome this? And yes I'm still doing outreach every day, I have one coaching client, nurse who wants to go into business and one client in my previous niche, nurse entrepreneur who wants help with digital marketing for an established business. I don't know why I'm feeling like this when I have proved I'm able to get to clients, albeit with two slightly different offers." Sam: Yeah so what you're experiencing is this thing called an emotion. And it happens. And so it's normal. And the best way to get rid of it is to not think about it and to just keep going because the only thing that will really solve this is by getting another client. And every time you do something one time you think it's a fluke, but I'd rather have done something once and think it's a fluke than have done something zero times because then my worry is maybe it's impossible. At zero you're thinking it's impossible, one it's a fluke, two maybe it's kind of a fluke and at three you're like oh this is so good I hope it doesn't end, and I wonder if I could scale this thing. Sam: There's always worries. They keep presenting themselves as you go along. But the best way to deal with them is just to put blinders on and then just keep working, keep working, keep working and the work solves the worry. The action drives away the thought. Carol says I'm in the training, in the worksheet offer analysis worksheet week six, there's a category fix versus prevent a problem, what is better fix or prevent the problem? Sam: It depends. Depends what you're doing. I would present both and then ... one is a prevention mechanism. Well actually you're selling the same solution and if someone doesn't have the problem then it's probably gonna act as a preventative measure. And if someone does have the problem then it's acting as a solution to that problem. Now your market is probably gonna be both, provided your solution can act as both things. Sam: Then you're gonna be ... if the person ... you want to talk to both sides of that market in your messaging and in your value video and all that. Then on the strategy sessions you adapt dynamically to the situation of your client, or your perspective client. If they have the problem you might talk about solving it. If they don't but they're worried about it talk about preventative measures. And then observe which one works better and if both work do both. Sam: David Lawrence says "At what point can you clearly determine your pricing is appropriate?" Sam: Pricing is a funny thing. I think your pricing is good when your happy with it, you think it's fair and it allows you to make a profit and run your business properly and your clients are happy with it and they think it's fair. And they get a lot of value from it. And also your competitor. So all of those things kind of tied into one, that's what makes the price good. And so ... yeah that's what it is. Sam: [Gosker 01:00:37] says "Sam, how do you fight low self esteem?" Sam: By practice. That's honestly how. I might sit there and worry oh I'm not good enough at this or I'm not good enough at this, or maybe I can't do that, maybe I can't do this, but what good is it gonna achieve if I'm just sitting there worrying about whether I'm good at something or not? I'd rather just get to work and start. And then before long you surprise yourself, oh shit I'm pretty good at this thing. So that's how I fight it, with practice. Sam: So Demi Lola says her niche is helping registers nurses to start a nursing and healthcare related business through one on one coaching. If I could get a couple of interviews with other already established successful entrepreneurs to post on my Facebook and YouTube should I do it? It could inspire more nurses interested in looking at other options to leave the stressful work environment and reach out to more. Sam: Sure. Go for it. It sounds like useful content and also you'll be able to learn more about the niche so it acts as kind of a market research thing, it acts also as a marketing thing and a content thing and a client attraction thing. So I think you should do it. You just don't want to lose sight of what the main thing is. The main thing ... Sam: ... lose sight of what the main thing is. The main thing is getting customers, solving their problem, and getting better and better and better at it because, ultimately, that is what will build your business long-term, not how many interviews you did with nurses. You've got to remember that. Sam: If all you did was just do interviews with nurses, you wouldn't really have a business. You'd just have a famous YouTube channel, and then if you did the other one, you might not be famous at all, but you would have a long-lasting business that provided value. I'd rather have that. It doesn't mean you can do any of this. You can do a little bit of this, but don't get lost in there. Stay focused on this. Sam: Olga [inaudible 01:02:46] says, "Hi, Sam. First, I want to say thank you for your incredible wisdom and the opportunity to start my own business. I'm on week one. My question relates to your advice on setting up the business in Ireland due to the [unfavorable 01:03:00] laws on internet-based businesses. I'm in the state of Florida. What are your thoughts regarding that? Sam: Yeah, don't do it. If you're starting your business, dude, you don't want to even go near that. It's too complicated and it's expensive, and you don't need it when you're just getting started, and Florida, actually, has very good ... What I would do is create a C corporation in Delaware and then get a license to practice in Florida, and then you're only going to have to pay federal corporate tax, which is like 21% or something. You've got no state tax in Florida. You're good. Just do that. C corporation in Delaware, license to do business in Florida, and you're good. It'd only pay corporate tax. Sam: Eli Richardson says, "Do your eyes hurt from looking at a computer all day." No. I hear all of these myths like people getting carpal tunnel and people getting ... their eyes getting sore and stuff. Man, I've looked at this damn screen and typed on this keyboard for like 14 hours a day, like six, seven days a week for like five years, and I don't have any of that. It's a concern by people who are looking for concerns. All right? Just do it. Sam: Jose says he's from Cancun, Mexico. "Sam, you're full of wisdom, and I'm learning so much from you. Still not done with the accelerated program but certainly excited about it." Awesome to hear, dude. Keep at it. Sam: [Esdee Har 01:04:42] says, "I found that my niche in Facebook has one problem that I help them with really well, but when I go to LinkedIn, it's a totally different message and problem. It's like I'm pulled in two different directions. I want to be doing both, but not crazy about it. How can I do it?" Sam: Yeah. That's an interesting one. The niche is still the same, right? The niche is the group of people. That isn't changing regardless of whether you're on Facebook or on LinkedIn. Those are platforms. They aren't niches, so the niche is the same. The platform is different. Now, it might mean that you get a slightly different archetype of individual on those platforms, but they still are members of the same niche, right? Niche isn't changing. Sam: Now, their problem isn't changing either because a platform doesn't change the nature of a problem, but it may change the archetype of the individual on it. So, really, it's not changing. Really, what is happening is that just slightly different people, like the people who hang out on Facebook are different than the people who hang out on LinkedIn, and they're different from the people who hang out on Instagram, right? They're all slightly different, but they're all members of the same niche, and they struggle with the same problem, and they will benefit from the same solution. Sam: The only thing you really have to change a little bit is just the way in which you do your messaging, right? You might message it differently. You might approach it at a slightly different angle with slightly different words. One might be more story-based, emotional with images, like that's a Facebook sort of thing, and one might be more professional and more targeted towards the LinkedIn population. Sam: I saw a perfect example of this when I posted on Instagram and on Facebook a little video. It was one minute long, and it said that certificates are worthless, and it was this video with me talking about why certificates and degrees are worthless. On Instagram it went really well, and lots of people loved it. All the comments were really good. Facebook, same again. Sam: Then I saw that [inaudible 01:06:54] had posted on LinkedIn, and it was our most popular post by a mile on LinkedIn. You can go back in my LinkedIn profile and find it, and not because people liked it. Everyone on LinkedIn was so pissed off. It was like I really just took an ax to their bruised knee. It was funny because right next to the names in LinkedIn were all of their credentials. So it was like Joe Blogs, MBA, like MBC, MBXY, like 10 damn credentials, and everyone who was getting pissed had all of these credentials, and I was like, "Wow. These people are coming out of the woodwork on this one." Sam: So it looks like LinkedIn's a place for proud, educated professionals to either stroke their ego about how many credentials they have, or to poke fun at people who aren't quite as qualified as them, and to basically ... It's basically a virtual power structure to make educated, qualified people feel good about themselves. That's kind of what it is, whereas Facebook is very different. Sam: Even though the same people in my niche, which are people who want to start businesses and get clients to make money, that's the niche. They still have the same problem, getting clients and picking a niche, all of that. It's the same niche, the same problem, the same solution, but different platforms. There are slightly different archetypes of people. We get customers from all three, but you just want to slightly adapt your messaging on each one. Sam: Zack Marcus says, "I came across INTJ on 16personalities.com, and the brief description of it and strengths and weaknesses accurately matches yours, Sam. Did you actually model after those traits from there, or it just a coincidence. Sam: Well, I didn't model it off of that. That's like what I've naturally become from my evolution, right? I don't know if I was born like that. You can't actually get anyone to do any test when they're born, so we don't know, but I'm an INTJ and I can also be an INTP. I go between those two. Sam: I typically spend most of my time in INTJ, though. I think if I wasn't in business I would be an INTP because that's more like free thinking and philosophical sort of stuff and open-ended, open-minded things, but with business, you really need to collapse the possibilities into implement and take action and execute, and so yeah, I would say I'm probably an INTP trained to be an INTJ. Yeah, but that's what I am on that thing. It's cool to architect. Sam: Jennifer Bishop says, " My niche is helping corporates develop staff engagement programs using their passion and creativity and community projects. This is effective. However, NGOs often lack the ability to receive pro bono services, so I'm thinking of developing a course to develop NGOs. This means I will do two things: helping corporate with Done With You, and helping NGOs through a course. What is your advice?" Sam: There's a lot of information in this statement. My niche is helping corporates develop staff engagement programs. Yeah. Here's how we're getting confused in this, then. It's really just lots of loops all overlapping each other. We need to pull it apart and unpack it and get the core objects here. It starts with a niche, and a niche is a group of people. Sam: So you said your niche is helping corporates to develop staff engagements. That's an activity, that's not a group of people, but you said helping "corporates," so corporates sounds like your niche. So if we define corporates like large businesses or enterprise corporations, all right, we get that. Then develop staff engagement programs. Sam: We want to define the problem next. First of all, we've got the niche. Corporates. Then we need to find their problem. What is their problem? You need to write that down. You need to clearly define that. Then what could the solution to that problem be? Maybe it's not doing these development things. Sam: It sounds like you might have jumped in and thrown in the solution that you think they need, but we need to play with it and we need to start by going from the niche to the problem, then look at all possible solutions to that problem, and then select the right one, pair it with that, and that might change everything, honestly. It looks like you've looped a lot of things on there from that statement you said, and I would get you to just go back and engineer it correctly. Make sure you build it the right way. Sam: Zack Marcus says, "When I receive a message from my prospect, I freeze up and I don't know what to say next, which results in overthinking the message and creating awkward moments in the chat that results in a hangup from the prospects and, i.e., not replying back to my message. This inevitably makes me even more self conscious about my messages when I chat with other prospects because I worry about the same hangup occurring again. I never experienced this problem a month back when I first started, but as I'm reaching out to more and more prospects, this problem has become a lot worse, and I'm not really sure about what to do about it. Can you give me any advice?" Sam: Yeah, so you're just overthinking it. I would put a little pinup, a little sticky note, right? I'd just write on it, and I'd say, "Don't think," and pin it on your damn screen so that you remember not to think because you're way overcooking this. You just need to just go, brrrp. Reply. Bam. Sent. You don't need to overthink it. Just let it flow naturally and then iterate and improve. You're not going to be perfect like the first time around. Nobody is, but with more practice, you'll get better. Practice and action drive out thought and make you better. Sam: [Shan 01:13:40] says, "Thanks for the course. Awesome content. Just got my first client. I'm a relationship coach. My email list is nearly zero. It's about five email addresses. Which is the fastest and best way to grow my list? The only way I collect email addresses is through my case study fragmentation funnel." Sam: Yeah, you don't need to worry about growing your list. You just want to get more customers. Who cares about the size of your list? You just want to get more clients, so take your eyes off the list, fixate your eyes on getting the customers and solving the problems. That's what you should do. Forget about the list. Sam: Nick Tomlin says, "My first offer is I help young grieving professionals overcome their loss of direction and find passion in their careers so that they can live like they did not think was possible through an eight-week coaching program, but I've yet to do this. First, do you think that's a good start, a good first offer to get out there with?" Sam: I help young, grieving professionals overcome their loss of direction and find passion in their careers so they can live life ... I'd just make it way more simple. I help people in grief overcome their loss so they can live life to the fullest. Boom, boom, boom. Sam: Who are the people? People who are grieving. Why are they grieving? Because they've had loss. What are you helping them do? Overcome their loss. What is the result of overcoming the loss? No more grieving and being happy. That is the solution. That's it. Just say it like that. It doesn't need to be any more crazy than that. Sam: Second, what do you think are the best way to attract those first three clients? Offer for a testimonial? I think this is the question, "Should you charge money right out of the gates, or should you do it for free in exchange for a testimonial?" Sam: Totally up to you. If you're confident to go and charge right away, do that. That's preferable. It's better to have a client paying you money than to have one not paying you money, so therefore, we should go for that one, but if you really can't do it, if you don't have the confidence to do it, then just do it for free in exchange for a testimonial and then work up to you're paying one next. Sam: Alison [Delahunt 01:16:06] says, "My niche is life coaching for nurses. Traditionally, life coaching was something reserved for executives or the wealthy. It is still viewed as a luxury for many. While so many nurses are interested and drawn to what I do, cost is coming up as an issue. My gut is steering me towards affordable, online coaching and then try to scale it out as much as possible. Would love your thoughts." Sam: Yeah, so what is happening is not ... What you're seeing is that you have nurses and then an offer about becoming a coach or doing coaching, and then their response to that offer which is, "Can't afford it." What you're thinking is that this is the way it is, and so I need to adjust my price. Sam: What you aren't factoring in is that it's more complicated than that. When you approach nurses and you make them an offer, there are infinite ways to make a nurse an offer about coaching, and the outcome of that is going to be people paying a lot of money, a small amount of money, or no money at all. So you don't need to change the price. You just need to change the way that you actually do ... You make the offer, and what your offer is and how confident you are. Sam: All of these things are more likely to change the output of the equation rather than the thing that just looks obvious to you, which is the price. It's more complicated than that. You just need to practice more. Sam: Ronald Bacon says, "Young children will teach you about personal life chaos. They're a joy and challenge all at once." Yeah, I'm sure it will. That's one of the reasons why I've been working so hard for so long, so that I don't have to approach that problem with limited resources because that looks like not much fun with limited resources. So yeah, it's going to be an interesting one to solve, but I'm kind of excited for it because, one, I'm in the business of learning and helping people learn, and so watching someone evolve will teach me a lot about that. Also, I get to kind of experiment with them and help them learn, which is kind of fun. Sam: Also, I get to optimize parenting so that ... I know that's a problem that's needed, too. I hear it on every Q&A call. It's like, "In order to grow my business, I really need to optimize the time I'm spending with my children so that ... and that is the best way to grow my business." It's not so much the tactics and things. It's just optimizing the parenting. You do that, you grow the business. This one's a good problem. Sam: What I've observed is most people define "parenting" as a broad spectrum of things, like driving, buying groceries, cooking, cleaning, doing the dishes, doing laundry, driving kids around to different things, and none of these things I would really define as parenting. I would define parenting differently. It would be focused quality time spent with your child. Sam: Right? That's it. Anything that isn't that, isn't parenting. Then I would seek to eliminate all of that or delegate it, automate it, systemize it, and then make sure I get that, and then I'm still good for business. So that's what I plan to do anyway. I've been thinking about it for a while, but it will be a good challenge. Sam: Nicoletta says, "Thanks for the clarity of your answers." No problem. Sam: Donald [Deng 01:20:27] says, "My client has multiple product types in his store. Hoodies, T's, sweaters, et cetera, with various designs. Would I create variation at the ad set level or at the ads themselves for each design?" Sam: Hmm. So this is probably a ... This is an interesting question. I don't know ... I could answer at what I would guess, but what I would do if I was in your situation is I would just go and look how other people are doing it. It's easy to do this now. Just find someone who's selling merchandise successfully using Facebook ads on the internet which is going to be a lot of people. Find out those people. Who are they? Write them down. Then go and look at their Facebook fan page, and then you can view the ads that they're actively running. You couldn't use to do this, but now you can. Sam: Go view the ads they're running and see how they do it. That's what I would do if I was you. I would probably have ... An ad set is a combination of the audience and the angle combining. That's that, and a conversion objective. Then at the ad level we have that, but we change the image. So what you could do is you could have different images ... Sam: You could do it at the ad level, but I would probably still want to reserve that ad level for images, because images are very powerful. You can have the same angle and everything, but a different image and get three times the output, so ... It's an interesting question, how you would structure it. I would try like four different angles. I'd try one just for T-shirts, one for hoodies, and one for sweaters, right? Three different angles. Then I'd try one angle for all of them together, talking about all of them. Sam: Then within each one of those angles, I would try just four images for the hoodies, four images for the T's at the ad level, four images for the sweaters at the ad level, and then I would try four different images for the combined three and maybe have some images of all three and then you just have four different images of all three laid out in different ways, in different shapes and colors and things. Sam: That's what I would do. I'd do that, and I'd also look at what other people are doing. Even if they weren't doing that, I'd still probably try that because that sounds architecturally like it would be the best structure. Sam: Sterling [Cooly 01:23:19] says, "I had a few encounters with other organic outreach experts who told me my method, yours, was a big turnoff, then tried to make me feel bad about it. How should I be thinking about this? Because my first reaction was to say, 'Fuck off,' or should I just move on?" Sure. Yeah, what option have you got? Like be sad, bet angry about it, or win? I know which one I'd go for. Winning. Winning is always the best revenge, and so I do that. Sam: People who try to make you feel bad about what you're doing and guilt you into buying their shit, like they're usually the people that aren't very good at what they do, right? So don't even worry about that. Like, the people who are good won't do that because they know that lots of different methods work, and there's no one best way and every other way is wrong. It's stupid to think like that. They will typically ... Sam: People who are good at it will typically be respectful and be like, "Well, show me your results," and then they'll be like, "Well, here are the results that I've got and you can just look at the numbers. If I was you, I'd probably do this, but that's up to you." You know? Just make a simple assessment like that. Sam: Joshua Westover said that Jessie recommended that you should reduce your Facebook friend request down to 10 per day. Would you recommend branching out to a platform like Instagram and expanding our reach for organic? I don't think LinkedIn is going to be possible for me as my niche is fear of flying. Sam: Yeah, so if I was you, I would ... If 30 still works for you, just keep doing 30, right? Like, I think that you ... If it still works, why change it? But if you start to get locked down by Facebook again and again and again, then okay, probably reduce it down a bit. I'd do that. Then, honestly, I think your one is quite interesting. Fear of flying. It's a cool one. I'd probably create like a free Facebook group and start adding people into it, and I would also probably just create a YouTube channel on it, too, just because I think this is quite an interesting niche, and I think quite a lot of people will search on Facebook or on YouTube for this sort of stuff, and they might stumble across this and find you that way. Sam: Now, with other niches, that's a very, very silly thing to do because the market has a lot of operators and a lot of content producers in it, and to stand out within that maze is hard, but in this niche, it's unique. So I'd try that, too, as well as maxing out your direct outreach. Sam: Elias says, "Hey, Sam. I know you're always making courses better. Are you doing that to Accelerator, too?" Yeah, so this year I've pretty much been working on UpLevel, so we launched a brand new version of UpLevel, and we've also done some things to make Accelerator better, like we do the livestream Q&As every Saturday. That's a new addition this year. We also do the customer interviews. We do like two to three of those a week, and that's a new thing that we do. Sam: What else have we added? We're also working on a software thing that will help you discover your niche, right? It's like an AI thing. We're working on that, and we are also working on ... There will be an update pushed to accelerator, too, which will probably be coming like ... It's pretty close to the end of the year. It'll probably be like very early next year. There'll be an update to it, which will talk more about new ways of getting clients organically, so kind of stepping away from lumpy mail and email direct outreach. Sam: Those methods still work, so you can be in a niche where that works really well. If you're in one of those, you should continue to do it, but on the large majority of instances, the social networks have gained popularity and effectiveness at the expense of the traditional methods. Sam: We'll be talking about a new way of doing organic direct outreach through social networks, and we'll also be releasing an update to the sale script. We've perfected it even more and refined it even more, and there's some key changes to that, that we'll push out, as well as that tool to help you pick a niche. That is pretty much it so far for Accelerator. Yeah. Sam: Then UpLevel has been the major release this year, which is a nine-week program that's way more ... It's been way hard for me to build UpLevel than Accelerator because UpLevel has three funnels, and there's like the value video one, the fragmentation funnel. Then there's the automated webinar funnel, Just In Time Webinar, and then there's the 2K automated funnel which is like the funnel I use to sell accelerator with the automated webinar and all that. Sam: The automated 2K accelerator funnel is about 100 times harder than the value video one. Then the JIT webinar one is like 10 times harder than the value video one. There's exponentially more work in providing three funnels than one. Then, to make things even more complicated, I provide you the funnels and click funnels and everything, so you can download them with a click, as well as the downloadable campaign templates, like the automation sequences for both active campaign and Infusionsoft. Sam: So three funnels with two softwares. That's six possible combinations, and it's about 10 times harder ... The funnels are 10 times harder than the value video one. Really, that's 60 times more work just in the funnels, all right? Literally, and not even joking. There's 60 times more work, but the result of that work is being ... It's the best product we've ever released. It's the best product in the market right now by a mile. Sam: That's an awesome thing we've released, and UpLevel shows you how to transition from Done For You in 101 to online courses and group coaching programs, so how to make that shift from doing the work to creating a product and a course that gets the clients to do the work, and also how to use more automation, how to hire some people, like higher sales reps, higher media bias to run the ads, how to scale up. Sam: Next level Mindset, so I had to go and make Mindset better, and that's what UpLevel has. It's a completely new week on Mindset that goes above and beyond what Accelerator did. That's been a lot of work, and it's nine weeks, too, so it's longer than Accelerator. If you're interested in that, you can go to week seven in Accelerator and it will tell you about UpLevel and what it's all about, how you can get involved in things. Sam: So [inaudible 01:31:19] says, "Thank you to your point about getting lost doing interviews. Am I A Nurse is even better in terms of market research because I'm work ..." Yeah. So the interviews are a good thing to do, but don't mistake them for the main thing. Keep the main thing the main thing. Never forget it. Sam: David Laurence says, "I live in Australia, but the majority of my clients are based in the United States. Are there any tax implications because of this?" No, because you're an entity in Australia, you're selling those services from Australia, and then you're delivering the services for those contracts in Australia. So where are you? In Australia? So where is the tax liability? Australia? Is there any goods and service taxes? No, because it's an export. Sam: You're exporting your services from Australia to the United States, therefore there's no sales tax in Australia, which is a good thing for you. No GST. Then they don't have to pay any sales tax on their end, and you don't owe any corporate or income tax in the United States, and it's just treated as an export that way. Your tax liability is here in Australia. Yeah. That's how it works. Sam: Sterling Cooly says, "When are you going to sport the man bun hairstyle? That hair is getting long." Yep. It is, and honestly, it's not because I like growing it long. I usually just let it grow long because I consider getting a haircut like almost- Sam: I consider getting a haircut almost a waste. One, it costs money and two, it's time that isn't doing work. So I try to space the gaps between getting a haircut as long as I possibly can. And I also get the hair dresser to come to me. So that's one thing I recommend, get a hair dresser to come to you. Otherwise, getting a haircut involves making an appointment, driving there, finding a park, getting a park, walking from the park to the hairdresser's, waiting until they're ready to cut your hair, getting your hair cut and then paying and then leaving, walking back to your car, getting in your car and then driving home. Too much. Sam: If you get them to come to you, you just book an appointment, they come to you, you only stop working when they're like, "Yeah, I want to cut your hair now." So there's no [inaudible 01:33:51] or delays and then when they're done, you just pay, bam they're out. Way better. Honestly it's about, it's got to be four or five times or efficient. So that's what I would do if I was you. Sam: When I first did it I was like, "Man, what have I been doing this whole time?" Same with doctor's visits. You can get them to come to you too. If it's just a minor thing you can get a doctor to do a house call. It saves a lot of time. If you're waiting in a waiting room you know you're wasting time and being an idiot. Sam: Viola says I'm trying to connect Schedule Once with my funnel structure. Schedule page, I've followed all the steps but the schedule isn't coming through to my funnel page. Yes, so you need to contact either ... I would contact both support channels, Schedule Once and Click Funnels. You will have made a mistake, I can tell you that. Because it does work. So you would have made a mistake but sometimes it can be hard to find the exact mistake you made. I mean you could go back through the training and watch it all in detail and make sure you didn't miss a single step, because you would have missed something. But the fast way to solve that problem is just to message both company's support channels, they'll look at it and then they'll just tell you what to fix. So that's what I would do. Sam: Joe Defrien says I would love to watch all these educated people get mad. Yeah well if you want to you can go look at that post I did on LinkedIn. That's a funny one. It's like they couldn't see that they were obviously triggered by it because they had lots of qualifications that were obviously listed right after their name. That never occurred to them. Sam: Lucy Carter said would you recommend offering after pay, or Zip Pay as an added payment option? Well I can honestly tell you that I don't know what either of those things are. No idea. And I don't think you need all of these payment options, to be honest. We offer, we just accept money and we do it with credit cards. Like when you try to buy accelerator and stuff, we don't even offer a PayPal option, we don't offer bitcoin or all of this crap, like Apple Pay and all this shit. We just offer credit card, we just make it simple, right? The key is if you add this other crap, you make it more complex for yourself. Now you've got to manage all of this crap. Your accounting's going to be harder, you're going to have all this extra upkeep and management and it's also just going to be kind of confusing and unnecessary for clients. You know? Just stick to the main thing and that's it. Sam: If your thing is good, people will pay with whatever means you accept. If one product's way better than another product but the shitty product accepts Zip Pay, it's not gonna be much of a competitive advantage. Focus on having a better product, not having more payment options. Sam: Jill Carlson says, "Hello, Sam and everyone from Jill in Gottenburg, Sweden." Welcome, Jill. Thanks for jumping on the call. Sterling says, "Did you move to Venice because you needed more sun? New York can get depressing in the winter." No, not really. I moved because mostly ... Well, lots of different reasons. But one of the main driving forces was just my wife. She didn't really like New York. She came from a country town in New Zealand so she's used to being in nature and all that. And New Zealand's a very nature place too. And so she didn't really like being in the city. She wanted to be able to go out and enjoy things. She also didn't like the winter. And she loved Venice, that was her most favorite place in all of America. And if she's happier, then that makes me happier because her happiness affects my happiness. Sam: And if she's got things to do then she's got things to do and she's not as prone to being bored and asking me if she wants to do something with me. Right? And also on the weekends when I spend time with her, I want to go and spend time with her outside and things because it's nice out there, whereas I didn't really like doing activities in New York, because there's nothing much really to do there on the weekend. Sam: And so that was a huge reason. Because happier wife, happier life, happier business. And so that was a big one. And then there was also just the talent. We hire a lot of engineers and data science people these days. And most of them are over on the West Coast. They've spawned from Silicon Valley, there's a lot in LA and they're all over this sort of side and it's disproportionate. There's 80% here, 20% on the east coast. So if I wanted more talent that was in that space, I got more of it over here. So there was that advantage, the wife advantage then there was also the advantage of health and a better environment and stuff. The weather directly affects your happiness. Your mood directly affects your work. So there was an environment [inaudible 01:39:52] to improve that. Also statistically you're more healthy over here if you look at any concentration map of common diseases and lifespans and things and depression. And also, I talked to my team and every member of my team wanted to move to. So given all of those factors, we moved. Sam: Natasha says I'm in the Optical program. Awesome, good call, good decision. Christian Arcan says good thing you didn't before your success, Sam. It sucks doing it at the same time. I've two under six years old. Sam: Yeah, I think it's different, definitely preferable. But who knows? There's people that start ... There's people that are broke and have a family and there's even people that are single parents that are broke with kids and they still work a job and find a way to start a business and then become massively successful, way more successful than me. So you can't say that it's actually an advantage or a disadvantage, it just depends what you make of it, really. You can let it break you and distract you or you can allow it to make you stronger. It's really just a choice. Sterling says, in Accelerator 1.0 you mentioned you went to an island with a New Zealand billionaire. He walked out of the room when some negative show was on TV. You got upset at him but he told you something wise. Can you share that story? Yes. So it was my girlfriend at the time, her best friend's dad was, I don't know if he was a billionaire, but he's almost a billionaire. You may as well consider him a billionaire because he pretty well is. And he had an island and helicopters and things. And I remember going over to his island and we were watching 60 minutes, just sitting around. I don't know why we were watching it but we were watching it. And then some sequence came on and it was about something negative and depressing about some sort of family that was suffering with some sort of thing. And he just stood up and just left the room. And I was trying to correlate those things. I was like, "Did that thing that just came on the TV signal him to do that?" Because I was like, those were very, very tightly correlated. I really wondered if it was that that did that or whether he just got up and left for another reason. So I went and asked him. And he said that yeah, he just left because he doesn't like watching negative things. And then I got kind of angry at him because I think most people are conditioned to think that they should feel for other people's like suffering and then just sit there on their couch and just feel their suffering. Like that's some sort of courtesy or something, which it absolutely isn't. Like you should care and want to help them, but you just sitting on your couch feeling sad doesn't help them and it doesn't help you. And it doesn't help anyone that you're responsible for looking after either. So it is zero value. It's actually negative value. Sam: Instead what's better is just to actually ignore it and look after your family and everything and be positive for them and also work on solving problems and adding value and all of that and then adding value that way. Instead of just sitting paralyzed in your chair feeling sadness for all these different people but not doing anything about it. It's action that fixes stuff, not just sitting there feeling sorry for people. And so that was a really interesting experience because I thought you were supposed to just sit there and feel like, "Oh that's so bad, oh that's so bad." But really, I was just like, well actually I'm more value to everyone in the world if I just ignore that, don't watch it and then just help people. That's how I'm going to knit-knit help more people than just sit there. And then I pretty much never watch the news, read any TV or listened to any crap from that moment forward. Sam: It's a good tip, you should do it too. You've got to protect what comes into your brain. It's garbage in, garbage out. You pollute your brain with useless shit, then useless shit is gonna come out of your mouth, useless shit is gonna come out of your hands and into your keyboard and you're just gonna be a vessel of useless shit. So the only way to fix that is to change the inputs, you know? You've got to have good inputs coming in for good outputs to come out. That goes for your diet, your exercise, your sleep, who you hang out with, the environment you're in and the information you input into your brain. And so you've got to watch these things and you've got to protect them. Like you shouldn't hang out with negative people, you should really be careful about the people you surround yourselves with. Be careful about what you surround yourself with in your environment, objects and things too. And the information sources. Like, don't watch the news. I can't think of anything more harmful to a human than watching the news. And then even reading the newspaper, any of that mass media crap is just pollution for your brain. Sam: Social media's pretty bad, too. I would limit using it. If you're using it to get clients or do research, good. Or if you're using it to talk to a friend, good. But most people are not using it for those functions. Noella says, "I am in week four and you say that it is very important to establish the proof of concept but my niche is helping another wedding/catering to get more clients through Facebook ads. Do you think I need to go first to learn Facebook ads in week five until establishing the group concept? I don't know how to use Facebook ads yet. Thank you." Sam: All right, your niche is helping wedding caterers to get more clients. All right, so you're helping wedding caterers, that's the niche. The problem, they don't have clients. I hope you've talked to them and they've told you that that is their problem. If you haven't, do that. Then let's say we've got wedding catering companies, the problem, need more clients, don't know how to so your solution is you're going to help them get there. But where this process breaks down is you've assumed that it should be done with Facebook ads, which may or may not be true. And you don't know how to do Facebook ads and you've never done them before. Which presents a problem and a lot of uncertainty. Sam: So first of all, I would look at, what are the most successful wedding catering companies that you know of? Find them, list them, find out how they're getting their clients.if they're getting their clients in ways that aren't Facebook, then maybe you don't even need to do Facebook. We don't do Facebook because we really want to do Facebook ads. We use Facebook because it's a good way to scale at a certain point, right? Organic is the best way to start because it's free and easy and much more simple and fast and then once we've maxed that out, then Facebook ads is a great way to scale. But there's a chance that these successful wedding catering businesses are scaling in a way that isn't Facebook. And if that is true, then we want to find that thing and apply it to your clients. Maybe you don't need to do Facebook. Don't assume you need to. Find out that answer. Sam: And then let's say you do find out that it is Facebook. This is a lot of assumptions here but it probably isn't, but let's just assume it is. Then you would have to learn how to do Facebook. So you'd go to week five, learn it from doing the course and then start testing it and testing it and then start helping your clients get ... helping your niche which is wedding catering companies, to get more clients with Facebook, applying my information and learning with experience. That's what I'd do in that order. Jeff Randy said your parenting course would be amazing. I don't have one yet, dude. And I don't even have any kids yet. So I'm a while away from that. Sterling says I would buy that course and I don't even have children. The funny thing is that might be true but the thing is, man, I'm thinking about it hypothetically in theory. And I know that theory pretty much never goes the way you think and practice. And I've had lots of theories that sounded great and then when I tried to execute them and practice they just completely collapsed and were stupid. Sam: And only the best theories, the theories I present to people in my programs and all of that, they're theories that have been battle tested and proven and practiced. That's what makes a good theory, because you know that that thing works and you know every in and out of it and it's been hammered and refined and chiseled to perfection with practice. And that's what the main theories I present in Accelerator and Optical and all of that. And so if I'm going to do a program on parenting and I've just cooked up some theories in my brain and haven't tested them in practice, I'm not comfortable talking about that. The practice is where you learn all the good stuff and so that's why I wouldn't do a course in that until I did it. Sam: Or, I mean, a way to shortcut that if I didn't want to have a family would be to go on work one on one with families and get in the trenches with them. But that's silly right now. My main focus is consulting.com, growing it, working on our team and our culture, making good programs, helping my students get results, getting more customers, that's my main focus. And so that's why I'm doing this. But if I do have kids then that might be a way to ... Which I will, then there may be a way to make it a profitable exercise. Sam: Just like I did with my wedding. I had a minimum viable wedding, which means I listed all the variables in a wedding and I found the ones that add value, this is from my perspective and my wife's perspective. And the ones that were a waste. And we found that the ring was important to her, the dress, the wedding photographer and the quality of the photos, the location where the event was and the food. These things were important. What wasn't important was having a ceremony and having all these people come there. So we just eloped and it was just my wife and I and a wedding photographer and a helicopter pilot in Queenstown in New Zealand. And we just went out for the day and just started flying up into these mountains and things, getting photos, hanging out. And it's just how we got married. Minimum viable wedding. I put all the focus on those things and zero focus on the others and also I was able to make it profitable because I used those images from the wedding to run on my Facebook ads. And so it was an hour away too. Sam: So not only was it very lean in terms of time and high value that it was profitable. Most people's weddings can't claim that. Julia Nicholson says six figure business with three kids. One six month old, one five year old, one eight year old, both homeschooled. The possibilities are endless, just saying. Yeah well I think what happens, again this is a theory, but what happens, I think it's actually wise to have three kids. Because as soon as there is three, the total number of possible connections goes up exponentially. Because you get network effects. And we notice this in business. When it's just one single member, it's just you, there's only one thing, there is no connections. Two people there's like one possible node between those things but as soon as you go to three, now you've got a team dynamic and multiple different connections. And this takes a lot of the strain off any one individual because they start to look after and entertain and teach and monitor and police each other. So I've thought about that one too. That's why I think I'm going to have three. Sam: It's interesting. I think having one is ... You might think one kid, that's less work. I think three might be less than one because of the fact that they can look after themselves and entertain themselves a lot. Not fully but a lot. Sam: All right so we're supposed to do this call from 3PM to 5PM. Right now it's pretty much at 5PM and so I'll just do one or two more questions here and then we'll wrap up. So Joshua says, "Thank you for your YouTube channel recommendation for my niche. It's actually a popular topic on that platform, how many videos would you recommend I release per week? I don't know, just one. Just test it out. You don't need to worry about going really intense about it. But it seems like this is a topic that would be very popular and searched for a lot on YouTube. That's why I got the idea. Not all things are like this. That is very rare. You're in a situation which is hard for direct outreach and generally when something is hard for direct outreach, it generally has the opposite effect. So it's hard here but it's better for something like YouTube. But the things that are good for direct outreach, which are most things, are then hard for YouTube. It's very nuanced but pretty much 95-98% of niches and things that people do, direct outreach is going to be the main channel. Sam: Sterling Coly says, "I have the ability to offer the cheaper option for my $3,000 coaching. Which is $300 for an FDA approved Vegas nerve stimulator, which is freaking awesome technology, also with the simple advice. I don't need to do one on coaching, what do you think?" Yeah so your one's interesting so your niche is helping people get over the fear of flying. And so you're thinking if we just get this nerve stimulator then they won't feel the nervousness and the anxiousness and therefore their problem is solved. But it's interesting. I know a guy, he's in my Master Mind, that has a fear of flying. So I was fascinated by it and I drilled him on it and started asking all sorts of questions. Sam: And it's really like just a form of post traumatic stress disorder, almost. And it's because he had two flights in one day where there was major issues. Like, people flying out of their seats and stuff and sketchy landings and bad weather. And so he has a very vivid memory of a traumatic event that actually happened and it was actually dangerous. And that's what's created his fear of all of this. And then you overlay that with also higher levels of anxiety than the average person and you get that. And you could present the facts to him logically, lay them all out and show him how it's actually safer than walking along on the footpath or probably using a vending machine. But it's still not going to change his mind. And then you could hook him up to a device that makes him not worry or not be nervous but it still doesn't change his imminent fear of death, right? He doesn't care about the nerves, he worries about the dying. Sam: And so you're making it too simple. I think that could be an awesome piece to put into your program, but to really solve that problem, you need to really dig deep into the trauma and the psychological issues that are in the person's mind that makes that problem. Instead of trying to solve it's symptoms, solve the root cause. That nerve stimulator machine, it's just solving symptoms. And there's other things that they could do other than that nerve stimulator system. I mean they could just take any form of what are those drugs called? Those pain killer ones? Like Benzos. The ones that people get addicted on when they want pain relief. If you took one of those or a Diazepam or something, that'll stop your nerves. Still doesn't mean that people who were afraid of flying are just going to do that and get on a plane. It's more complex than that. Sam: So I think you might be able to add some tools that people might be able to use. I think one that might be good to recommend would be that nerve stimulator thing, because it's way better than taking those drugs. And then also those CD things are popular now, those cannabinoid things. That's way better than taking the drugs, too. So these could be two tools that help, but still you're going to have to solve the underlying psychological issue. It's going to be a mindset thing and a practice thing. So I would include all of these threads into your program. They all tie into solving the same problem. But don't over simplify it by thinking you just give someone this device and it's done. It won't be like that. Sam: All right, so we're at the end of our session today. So like I said these calls happen every Saturday and they go from 3PM till 5PM eastern time. That's the time in New York and if you want to show up to these calls and remember when they're happening, just put it into your calendar now. Go into your Google calender, put in Accelerator live stream Q&A, make it repeat every Saturday, 3-5 eastern and then if you've asked a question on this call and I didn't answer it, then you need to show up on time. If you show up here on time, you will get to ask me like 10-15 questions. Multiple people here today have asked me like 10 questions and I answered them. So get here on time to get your questions answered. Sam: And now if you enjoyed this call, just click that like button. Just click like, let me know if you liked it and we will be doing another one of these next Saturday. So next Saturday it is happening, put it in your calendar. And I look forward to seeing you on the next one. So thanks everyone and have a good Saturday, have a good weekend.

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