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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 24th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 24th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for November 24th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: (Silence). All right, can see a couple of people jumping on line here. Can see Jennifer Lee, Jessica [Ganino 00:00:30]. Welcome. Can someone just, awesome, somebody's learned how to do it quickly now. Thanks [inaudible 00:00:38], audio and video is good. So we're good to go. Welcome everyone. If it's your first time on one of these calls how they go is I do one of them pretty much every Saturday. And we go from 3:00 p.m. til 5:00 p.m. and that's Eastern time. The time in New York. And how they go is you just ask a question in that comment box over there. And then I got through the comments one by one, and I just answer the questions. Let's jump right into it. Jennifer Lee says, can you summarize what your mediation routine is in the morning, including your thoughts on best practices and what you don't think makes sense to do also any other mindfulness tips would be appreciated. Sure, the morning routine that I use is I wake up at 6:50 in the morning, then at 7:00 a.m. I'm working out at the gym and that goes for about an hour and then at 8:00 a.m. I have breakfast, which is just like a smoothie and then I have a shower and get ready and then at 8:30, I do my mediation, and I just mediate for 20 minutes and that brings me through pretty much to 9:00 a.m. and at 9:00 a.m. I start my work day. That's my morning routine. And when it comes to the mediation, all I do is sit on the edge of a chair, and you just want to make sure you've got a straight back, and you're not leaning back into the chair, so you sit on the edge of the chair, and you just put your hands on your knees, and you close your eyes, and I just use my iPhone and start a 20 minute timer and then you just focus on your breathing. You try to feel the spot where the ear touches the front of your nostril, and you just focus on your breath, and you just breathe in and then breathe out, and you try to think about nothing. That's it. That's all it is. And you just practice it. And it's just the art of thinking about nothing. There's no real best practices other than doing it and keeping it simple. Jessica Ganino says, as a small business owner I spent a lot of time to create content, and my creativity is running out [inaudible 00:03:11], consideration [inaudible 00:03:13] platform would you suggest to me to get a good freelance to create my social media posts. I have already used FiVerr and PeoplePerHour, but I'm not very happy with them. Yeah, you just don't need to do social media posts. It's not necessary, if you just go through the course, it'll show you what to do. You don't need to go out and post on every social media platform and then create all of this content and do all of the stuff, it's just not necessary. You just need to pick a niche, solve a problem, be good at solving it and then get clients and then make money and that's it really. And then if you want to create a few pieces of content you can do that, but remember we're trying to run a business with clients where we help them in exchange for money, we're not really trying to create an information media outlet, we're just trying to run a business. Can see Elisa says hi. Joe says hi, how's it going. [Patricisio 00:04:32] says I would like your opinion on my minimum viable offer. I want to help the members in my niche to get more clients through digital marketing, my idea is to offer them what has worked best for my business when it comes to client attraction, which is direct outreach on Facebook. I began working with a couple of better clients and it's been working well, however, speaking with potential leads on behalf of my clients through their Facebook messenger profile has proven to be the most [inaudible 00:05:03] of my offer, I'm considering removing that specific element and offer to just find potential prospects on Facebook on their behalf, send their friend requests and let them, this would turn my service into more of a done with you than a done for you, do you think that this is simpler. Okay, I'm just reading through this. There's a couple of thoughts on this, first of all, it looks like you've engineered this wrong. And so, you said I want to help members in my niche to get more clients through digital marketing. Instead of you're just doing what you want. You haven't analyzed your market, any problems, and then seek to provide a solution. You're just offering people in your market what you want to offer people in your market, which isn't the best idea. And then, yeah, I would probably go back to the drawing board and re-engineer this thing from the beginning, because you'll probably find something different, and it'll probably work a lot better. However, if you want to just stick with this, I think that the part of your offer where you tell them to direct outreach people on their Facebook profiles, that's not very complicated. You're saying it's the most complicated part, but it's actually very simple. You're telling these people to reach out to people on Facebook. That's so simple. If you think like digital market, Facebook ads and funnels and things like that are so much more complex than that. I wouldn't call it complex, and I wouldn't feel any need to try and do that for them. You're just babysitting them at that point and then that's, it's gonna be a downward spiral from there. And I would say that the root cause of this issue that you're experiencing is actually because you engineered the entire business the wrong way, and you should go back to the drawing board and do it the right way. Amos [Lim 00:07:24] says, about having monk like disciple and delaying a lot of instant gratification what is the one thing preceding this sort of extreme behavior that would even make you attempt to do such a sort of thing. I know that you like Michael Jordan, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Usain Bolt, Jeff Bezos, and other goats, didn't start off the gates having such sort of disciple and mentality until at some point of their career, what is the one thing preceding this sort of extreme discipline that would even make you feel driven to do such a sort of thing. And what is the best way to develop that sort of drive. That's a good question. The thing is, is you just realize that there's no other way. You think that these people like Michael Jordan, or Kobe Bryant, or Elon Musk, or Bill Gates, or Jeff Bezos, people think that you can actually get to that level by just chilling out and just going with the flow and hanging out with your friends all the time, and watching Netflix and stuff. But it's just that's not true. It is impossible to achieve if you do that. You have to. So it depends whether you really want to get to that level or not. If you really want to get to that level, that's the only way. And so you just, you realize okay this is the only way to get there, I'm either gonna do it or I'm gonna give up. And it's just a realization. And usually it takes awhile of failing and improving your discipline and stuff to realize that it's a powerful tool and that it works, and then okay we may as well take to the extreme then. But it depends how bad you want it. There's some people who don't want it that bad, and they're not willing to go to those extremes. [Tas Deshawn 00:09:40] says, the majority of my prospects on strategy sessions express wanting, oh, I missed dual questions, so about that. [Naila 00:09:51] says, do stick to your regime and no sugar diet even during the Christmas holidays? Yes, for the most part. Obviously on Christmas day, if there's a nice lunch that and a dessert, yeah, I'll have some ice cream and stuff, but for the most part it's very hard to pull it back into line if you totally go off the rails. So, I never go totally off, but I relax a little bit, and I'm not as strict, but I don't go too far. [Jawa 00:10:27] says in recruitment, decision makers often refer you the consultant to HR to discuss terms with them and agree on working together. Should I still have a strategy session with the HR person and ask them those detailed questions in the strategy session script. Yes, sure go for it. Just try it. See how it goes. Berkley Robinson says, how much do you switch off from work when you go on vacation. Yeah, so if I go on vacation, a proper vacation, I don't do any work. Because it's hard to be on vacation and work at the same time. People kind of think they're doing that, but they're just fooling themselves. And I just take about four weeks off each year, every 90 days, I go on a seven day break, that adds up to about four weeks of vacation every year. And on those seven days, I'm not doing anything. No emails, nothing. Lauren Alexander says, do you constantly think about business and ways to improve the business, if so do you ever actually relax. For example, when you're hanging out with your wife or doing things that aren't work related are you still thinking about work in the background. How does one find the balance when there's so much. Sure, yeah I'm thinking about it all the time. It's always in the back of my mind, but it's like I take one day off each week to ... On a Sunday, I take that day off and hang out with my wife, and it's kind of in the back of my mind, but I'm not actually doing any work or checking anything or doing anything like that. I'm pretty much relaxing. And then the four weeks per year that I take off, I'm not doing any work then, and then I still make sure I get enough sleep, and I exercise, and I do things like that, but yeah, that's about it. And it's not like work to me isn't work. Work is ... I love doing it. I would rather be working than be on vacation. Seriously. Amos Lim says do you look up to Steve Jobs, if so what traits do you admire from him. Yeah, I think he's a pretty special person. If you look at what he's achieved, Apple at one point was a trillion dollar company, and I mean, look at how many people use those products. The iPhone was a real invention. The Mac is a pretty impressive [inaudible 00:13:11]. He's definitively one of the best entrepreneurs ever. I think what makes him special, what traits would ... He's very obsessed, which is what that's a common trait among anyone who's great. They're totally obsessed and then he really cares about the product. He doesn't want to sell things that suck, and he couldn't. He couldn't sell something that sucked. He's a perfectionist, and he cares about the product that's an important trait. He's also not afraid to be different, think different, and yeah, those are some traits about him. He's also a very clean thinker. If you hear him in his interviews and stuff, he's very, he has a very clean well thought through philosophy. Toby Kline says do you have a system for managing and tracking your personal finances, to track every expense, what do you think makes sense to know your numbers on the side but not get lost in the details. Yeah, sure. If it's your personal stuff, what I do is I try to keep it super simple. I have one bank account, I use Chase bank, and then I have one account within that bank just a checking account, and then attached to that one account, I just have one debit card. And that's it. I don't have any credit cards, I don't have multiple banks, that's just it. All of my incoming expenses just in that one account and I can't spend money I don't have because I don't have any credit and so it's pretty simple. And then I can just look through there at the expenses or export them to a CSV or something. I keep it simple. I see some people and it's out of control what they're doing. They've got like five credit cards with five banks and then within those five banks, they've got two accounts. So now we've got five banks that's five log ins and then we've got two accounts, right. This is getting insane and then attached to those two accounts we've got five credit cards. This is an exponential problem. And then they probably have three PayPal's. Right. Someone who does that is seriously mentally ill. I have no idea why someone would do that. It's totally stupid. You've got to make it simple. Some people think that credit card points are so valuable that I actually think that simplicity is more valuable than those shitty credit card points. I'd rather not get credit card points and just have a debit card and then have one account. That's way more simple than having to manage and juggle all of these things just to get some shitty points. Nayla says, what advice can you give regarding prospects who have an issue with coaching via Skype and they prefer classroom based coaching? Well, I would just say look, I don't do that. There's nothing you can do about it. You've got to understand that the person who wants to get coaching, they're the one with the problem. You're there trying to help them, they've got a problem. And now they're trying to tell you that no actually I want my problem solved in a setting that I chose. Come on. This person just needs their problem solved. And they're not in a position to dictate terms. They're the one that needs help. If you don't help them then their life just continues to suck and suck more. You want to just tell them that. Will Dunford says, have you noticed a difference in your self and your financial situation since moving to sunny California, if yes what was it. Honestly, it's not like a huge difference. I think I'm more relaxed here for the most part, and I think I'm probably healthier here. My wife definitely likes it more here as well. But I think, I haven't ... I don't even know how I would do that experiment to correlate that with financial performance. I think it's a good decision, we just like it better, the environment here. But I have no sort of information to tell you what that's done for financial things. And if I did, I'd be totally making it up. Allison [Deluhunts 00:18:15], she's a former nurse and she works with nurses as a mindset and life coach. She's enrolled four clients through the direct outreach. Thinking of setting up online program, automated one, do you think it's way too early for that. Would appreciate your feedback. If you've found a proof of concept and by proof of concept, I mean if you've worked with those four people, you've helped them, given they've taken the help, implemented it and actually made a change in their life and you can see some sort of pattern between all four clients, then yeah, you can go and do a program. [Jayward 00:18:59] says do you think recruiting is a distorting niche or is going back to the truth and how long do you think this span will take to flip like what's happening in consulting. I don't know. I think recruiting is always a problem, mostly because there's just not that many talented people, to be honest. And there's companies that there's a big demand, there's not that much supply and really talented people are scarce. Recruitment is always gonna have a roll. Toby Kline says, he listened to an interview I did about a year ago, I talked about mindset and mentioned Freudian slips and how you can read the dark side of people, for example, by only looking at their Facebook profile. On week two, you talk about how to see a person and ... Ah, I couldn't read that fast enough. Sorry dude, you'll have to ask that again. Constantan says, ah, I'm going to have to skip that question too, because I've got to catch up here. Sorry, if I missed your question, just ask it again. Nayla says, would you mind sharing what is your vision that drives you everyday. Sure. It's to, what's the best way to put it, well, if I look at the world, the biggest problem I see is really just education. I mean, pretty much everybody is not self aware. Pretty much everybody is delusional and pretty much everyday doesn't know what's going on. And just some good self awareness, discipline, and understanding and cognition, and problem solving abilities would be pretty good. And so, my big plan is to educate planet Earth. The whole Earth. But the first step to that is to educate one billion people. And that's what I'm trying to do. Tas Deshawn says, my niche is helping college athletes transition into life after sports by finding their skills, talents, and interests outside of athletics. Question, the majority of my prospects on strategy sessions express wanting to work with me and desperately needing guidance, but can't afford my pricing because they're unemployed or working low paying jobs. Most of them are recently graduated student athletes who are just starting out in their careers, any advice. Sure. I think you've just got to keep trying. Honestly. People might tell you I can't afford this, and they will. And what you've got to be careful is that you don't read too much into it. Just because someone says I can't afford it, doesn't mean that everybody can't afford it and it also doesn't mean that the people who said they can't afford it, actually can't afford it. You've got to be careful with this. People say I can't afford it when they're just too afraid to say no. Right. And so, I would just keep going. Do more strategy sessions, keep going, keep practicing, and then if you've done a 100 of them and all the 100 said they can't afford it, then come back and ask me that question again. Peter [Wekstrum 00:22:45] says, sorry that looked like a good question. Can you ask that again. Matt Tommy says, what makes someone successful in high ticket selling. Practice. Seriously, that's it. There's no ... People think that charisma or extroversion or [inaudible 00:23:15] interesting person, or being really aggressive or loud, none of these things have anything to do with sales, at all, zero. The person who's the best at selling, is just the person who's done the most practice. That's it. Why do you think you guys are in a course learning from me. It's not because I'm superior or am born more intelligent than anybody else, that's not at all the case. It's just that I've done this more. I've spent more time on this and I've done it more times and I've practiced it more and I've thought about it more, and that's it really. And if you want to get good at anything, it's just a volume thing. You just need to do more volume. If you want to get good at sales, do more strategy sessions. I've noticed that generally people get to seven figures when they've done more than 1,000 strategy sessions. It's kind of a very correlated thing. It doesn't mean that if you do 1,000 strategy sessions that you will make a million dollars. Right, because the correlation doesn't imply the causation, but it's very ... There's definitely, it's a good kind of bar to be aiming towards. If you do a thousand strategy sessions, you're going to be very good at strategy sessions. You're going to know a lot about your market, you're going to have a lot of clients, and chances are you're going to be making more than $86,000 a month. And that's how you get good. And the people who are really good, get done more than 1,000. They might have done 2,000, 3,000. [Indra 00:25:08] says, I'm changing my niche from corporate woman to corporate woman in recovery. I was a corporate woman and I'm 10 years clean and sober, how do I research questionnaire all on this niche, since they want to become ... Oh shit I missed that question. Sorry, please ask it again. Sometimes these questions just go flying really fast. [Tresio 00:25:29] says, to clarify I surveyed about 100 people in my niche, life coaches over the last two months and to the number one desire they told me is to generate more leads and get more clients. Where do you think I should ... Okay, so I get what you're saying. I think that you should look at other, there might be more solutions ... You've identified a problem, right in something they think is a problem. But you also want to look at all possible solutions. You've locked on to a solution that you think is best for them. But you want to look at all possible solutions, and maybe try out some different things. See what other people are doing. Identify the person in your niche that is doing the best. Or identify the top three people in your niche that are doing the best and then look at what they're doing. Allison Delahunt says, I'm a former nurse and now work with nurses as a mindset and life coach, I have enrolled four clients already through direct outreach, LinkedIn, I told them, I took them on for less than recommended but I still made a few hundred euros from each, there seems to be good interest and the more outreach I do the more engagement. Not earning enough for paid ads, thinking of setting up an online program, automated one, do you think it's way too early for that, would appreciate your feedback. Yeah, if you can't afford to do ads, then I would say that you should just keep getting more clients. Yeah, just keep getting more clients. Roman [Cavell 00:27:40] says, your thoughts on partnering with someone who's trying to do the same thing or do this on my own. That's a good question. It depends if whether you see them as an equal. And what I mean is that business partnership can work very well if both of you are equal in terms of your input and your motivation and your drive and your passion and your hunger. Right. When they don't work is when someone lifts all the weight and someone else doesn't. Those things always break and then they cause drama. You want to make sure you really trust the other person and you really think that they're going to be, they want this just as much as you. It's about how committed they are. Ralph Goldberg says, are you familiar with Jordan Belfort's sales methods, if so what do you think. Yes, I've had a look at it. And I think it's, there's some elements in it, I like, but for the most part I don't like it. Because you just have to look at the context. He was selling scamming pink slip stocks in the '80s in a boiler room over the telephone. That's very different. We're selling solutions to people in 2018 and we're trying not to fleece them of all of their money. And we're actually not trying to sell them if we can't help them. It's very different. I would say if you want to sell something to people that they probably shouldn't buy, and if you want to fleece a lot of people of their money, then that method's probably real good. But I don't really like it. Sterling Cooley says, I had a friend who could only talk about credit card points, it got so annoying I had to basically end that relationship. He became so one dimensional but at least he knew about all the points. Yeah, the credit card companies suck you in with those points. It's like Facebook and Instagram and their likes. You know, gotta get those likes. Gotta get those points. What are some helpful ways to become more tough and thick skinned when it comes to doing business. Sure, it's just practice. You've just got to keep doing it again and again, and again, and again. And then you get kicked in the face a lot of the time. I probably get kicked in the face at least couple times a day, things always break, things always don't go to plan, and things pretty much always end up being harder than I thought, and pretty much everything always goes that way. But I wake up expecting it to be that way. That way when it's a good way to think about it, I wake up expecting things to be hard and then when I do them if they're not hard, I'm like oh sweet. This was good, but if they are hard, then I'm not phased by it at all, because that's what I was- PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:31:04] Sam Ovens: ... they are hard, but they are not phased by it all, because that's what I was expecting. I think where people screw themselves, is they expect everything to be easy and effortless, and then it's not, and then they give up. Practice ... there's no way to sit in a chair, and meditate, and read books to the point that you're going to develop tough skin. The only way to develop tough skin is to practice, and keep going. Over time, it'll start to build up. Simon Knight says, "Do you think helping business owners save hours through software automation is a silly niche?" I think it's a bit too broad. You probably want to start with a specific type of business owner, like an industry, and a specific type of software automation. Find an industry that is pretty much everyone in their industry is doing things in a slow, stupid way, and then help that industry move to a more automated software solution. That would be much more direct. [Jarwood 00:32:12] says, "How much would a good recruiter need to know about the company in order to efficiently help them hire and develop as engineers? I ask because you mentioned you've worked with a recruiter for your company, so it'd be great to hear about your experience." Yeah, we still work with one. We've got a guy who works with us. He's a machine. He sources people for us. Whenever I need to hire someone, I'm like, "This person," and he's on it. It took me a long time to find that person. I worked with other people that couldn't deliver. I eventually found someone who's very good. I think what makes him good, is he's unorthodox. He doesn't just do things the normal way. Like he doesn't just go to the typical job boards sites, or the typical places, he looks in the places where no one else looks. He finds people ... I call them diamonds in the rough, because we've identified that there's [inaudible 00:33:13] fake diamonds with people who have big egos, and they create impressive resumes, and their usually good charismatic talkers, who can talk their way into stuff, but they suck, and they want a lot of income. Those are fake diamonds. You never, ever, ever want to hire one of those people. If you ever see one of them, run away. The second class of people would be a real diamond, which means that they're actually good, they're talented and everything, but the problem is, is that they know it, and so does everyone else. So they're getting a lot of offers, and they typically already have a really good job, and they know that they're really good too, so they're quite hard to recruit, and even if you do recruit them, you're going to have pay a lot of money for them. Even when you do get them, there's a chance that they're going to want to move on again, all right? Then, there's third class of people, which are the ones that I like, and those are diamonds in the rough. They are diamonds. They're as much of a diamond as the real diamonds, but they're not aware of it themselves, and the way they present themselves makes no one else aware that they're a diamond either. They're overlooked. These people are out there. There's a lot of them, but you've got to get skilled at finding them. With these people, you find people that are extraordinarily talented, hard-working, they work harder than the real diamonds, and in a lot of cases they're more intelligent than the real diamonds, but you can get them at least at half the price of the real diamond. We like those people. We have a recruitment process now where we know how to source those people. It's very unorthodox. [Amar 00:35:13] says, "How do you learn how to enjoy what ..." oh, sorry, I missed your question dude. Alesandro says, "Do you think helping people to increase their closing ratio would be a good niche?" I think it needs to be more specific. Like, I think it definitely needs to be more specific. All right, there's a lot of questions flying through here. I'm just going to wait until calms down a little bit. Please people, don't post your ... don't spam your question, because I can see someone has spammed their question in here, then it's just made my whole feed just fly past. It was [Indracalutuous 00:36:10], or however you say that, don't do that. If people do spam this, I'll just ignore your question on this Q&A and every Q&A for eternity. Don't do it. Indra, you're about to get kicked out. One more. All right, Jeff Berry says, "My niche is helping men aged 21 to 29 years old in the Silicon Valley area get a better job. Higher pay, less commute, better benefits, company with a future, etc, with my eight-week program. How can I use Facebook organically to reach these guys join job-seeker groups, join programmer groups, how do I find and friend prospective clients consulting, calling people, great, but they're not my clients?" Sure, well, this one's easy, because what's going on here is you obviously haven't done your research. How this process works is we start by picking a niche, which is a group of people, and then what we do is we find a problem that these people have. We find that by asking them, and then they tell us. Then what we do is we create a solution that solves that problem, and then we sell it to those people. Now you're saying that you've got the group of people, people like young professional people in the Silicon Valley area, okay, and you want to help them get a better job, how do we know they need a better job, right? How do we know this is a problem? Then, the fact that you say you don't know how to reach them tells me that you didn't talk to them, because if you did talk to them, you would know how to reach them, 'cause there's no other way to ask them questions without reaching them. Now you've come back round to sell the solution, but you don't know how to reach them. That's why in the early process we talk to them, because we have to reach them to talk to them. I can tell that you haven't the process in the right order. I would go back and do it in the right order. Carla Smith says, "My niche is in senior leadership development for corporate fortune 500 companies. I design solutions to help leaders adapt to the digital age. So changes in mindset, behavior, capabilities et cetera, I'm in week one, so I have a lot more to do, but I am concerned Facebook ads won't be the best method of reaching this target group. Have you experienced hits from execs, et cetera from corporate companies? What other methods would you suggest?" Sure, so I would try it. Honestly it'll probably work. There's 2.2 billion monthly active users on Facebook. The chances of somebody being in a sample size of 2.2 billion is extremely high. I would say try it. The numbers are definitely on your side, and then see what happens. 'Cause I could give you my opinion and say, "Oh yes, it would work," or, "no it won't," but I don't know. The only way we can actually know is by doing a test. I have confidence it would work, but I won't know that it does until I see it. It's what I recommend. Joshua [Wistovisis 00:40:05], "How long do you think it should take to build momentum organically for a brand new YouTube channel, so I can use it to get strategy sessions? I'm building one for my niche, fear of flying, since your recommendation to me." Yeah, so I think what you've got to do is just do it anyway. It's going to be helpful, because for one, you're going to have to think through what you do, and create videos on it, which is going to help you get more clarity on what it is that you do. Also, if you're using organic methods, or whatever, this is creating content that if you reach out to someone organically, and then they search for you on Google on whatever, they might stumble across this content. It's helping you indirectly, but as for like just trying to grow the channel, I wouldn't worry too much about that. My channel only has like 30,000 subscribers or something, and it's pretty funny, because if you think about it, I've got a ... My company makes 30 million a year, and I've got 30,000 subscribers. It's got ... The two things aren't correlated. There's a lot of people out there with a million subscribers that are poor. You don't need to worry about trying to get lots of view, and trying to get lots of subscribers. It's a bullshit metric that real business owners don't look at. It's just like Facebook likes, and Instagram followers. It's not a real metric. So don't worry about it. Just keep creating the content, and let time do its thing. You can do your immediate short term client acquisition thing by direct outreach. Indra says, "How can I reach corporate woman in recovery for research since they want to remain anonymous?" Well, you have to reach them somehow. I mean, you can allow them to stay anonymous. You don't have to publish their information everywhere, but you want to ... You've got to talk to them somehow. I think that people would be willing to talk about it, but they just want to make sure that you don't publish their information somewhere, because it's a private topic. Rodney Durant says that he's received a copy of Principles by Ray Dalio for Christmas reading it next month, "While I travel. Would you say it's the number one reason why this ... What would you say is the number one reason why this book is your top book? How would you recommend reading this book in the context of starting a consulting business in 2019?" I just read the book man. You don't need to think about how to read it. You just read it. Then you'll just underline some stuff that you think's good. The reason why the book's good is one, because it's written by someone who's done it. Any book by a billionaire, is generally pretty good. [inaudible 00:43:14] become a millionaire by accident, but you can't become a billionaire by accident. If someone's done that, and they took the time to sit down and write a book, there's probably going to be pretty good shit in there. That simple method of finding good books seems to work pretty well. Some of my favorite books are Made in America by Sam Walton, billionaire, the book about Elon Musk, billionaire, the Everything Store about Jeff Bezos, billionaire, and then Principles by Ray Dalio, billionaire, Peter Thiel, Zero to One, billionaire, Bill Gates book, billionaire, it's generally a pretty good rule. Steve Jobs book, billionaire. Antony says, "Hi from Spain. Just enrolled in the program, and to find my first message/hypotheses, and would like to know your opinion. I help millennials who are uncertain, and feel anxious about their future to design the life of their dreams through entrepreneurship by enrolling in online program that will get them life-long results, and their first high-paying client in less than six weeks." Yeah, I think the general thing you're doing here sounds good. Millennials and they're uncertain about their future, and that's their problem. You're helping them get certainty and clarity on their future. I think the rest of this stuff you don't really need to mention in there. You can keep it simple like, "I help millennials who are uncertain about their future to gain clarity, and focus about what they should be doing," something like that. Just make it simple. Jessica [Guneeno 00:45:32] says, "Sam I am defining my niche. I am in week one, and you explain to be specialist rather than a generalist, so as I am an educational consultant, what do you think the following ... do you think that the following could work?" And then I can't see the following. I can't see the following, so ... 'cause it's not here. I can't really answer that question. Monica says, "I'm doing one-to-one coaching, and I'm planning to create my own online coaching course, I'm a musician, and what I really like is to play music with other musicians. My dream idea of business is being able to create and run a viable, profitable orchestra, and then coach others to do the same. However, I don't know how to do it, because running an orchestra is very expensive, and usually they have public funds, and sponsors, do you have any idea?" Yeah, so this is ... if you read what you said here, "I'm doing one-on-one coaching, and I plan to create my own online coaching course, and I'm a musician, and what I really like to play music with my dream," ... Look at how many instances of the word, "I," and "me," and "my," exist in this block of text, right? It's all I, me, and my. It's got a heavy concentration of those words. I can tell that this is a really important lesson in business, because it's just not about you. You want to find a niche, and then find what their problem is, and then help them solve their problem. You should be passionate about helping them solve their problem. You should want to help them solve their problem. But business is not a place where you just do what you want to do, and it's just about you. I mean, you can start a business that way, but it'll fail. I think you're confused because you're just in your own head. You need to talk to the market and see what their problems are. Business is about solving problems for other people, not just what you want. Go and do that. Karen Snowflake says, "What would you say is the average number of direct outreach to switch over from Lumpy Mail to followup via email?" I think there's no number. You can do it from the first ... you can do it whenever you want. Try direct outreach via Facebook, LinkedIn, and email, and see if it works. If doesn't work, then maybe try Lumpy Mail, and followup by email. Just experiment and see what works. Phillip says, "I chose the restaurant niche, and after doing lots of research, I am not sure if it's a good niche. In my area, restaurant owners only make about 4% profit. I am not sure if they have the money to pay me one-and-a-half thousand a month." Yeah, you're looking at the wrong thing. You're looking at a profit margin number that you probably pulled off a government web statistics website. First of all, you're assuming that the government actually knows what's going on, and so did the statistics websites, which they don't. Then you're assuming that that number is true for everybody, which it is not. Then you're assuming that this false statistic from this government entity on this website, that is normally distributed among an entire population, which it's not, is therefore a reason why people wouldn't people pay you some money, not true. You have imagined this. Do it. If you did 100 strategy sessions, and all of them told you they can't afford it, because they have 4% profit margins, okay, I'd listen then, but what you've done here, is not very scientific. Just go out and do it, and stop looking for reasons why it won't work. Start looking for reasons why it will. Amar says, "What is the most important and tangible trait to develop as a starting entrepreneur so that you can get to the next level and achieve six figures?" I'll tell you what it is, and it is just work ethic. That's it. How do you get good at something? You just do it lots. Do it consistently, and do it intensely. If you just get into the habit of working 12 hours a day, six days a week, and you never stop, you will ... forget six figures, you're going to be making seven, and then you'll be making eight. Then if you keep going, shit, you'll make nine. That's just all you have to do, just start working hard. Indra says, "Is corporate woman in recovery a good niche? Or is it better to do just woman in recovery? How can I reach corporate woman in recovery for research since ...?" So I already said, you're going to have to reach them somehow. This is the niche you want to do. I'm guessing you want to do it because you were one of these corporate woman, right? Now, I'm guessing that, but I'd almost bet, I'd probably bet 1000 bucks on it that that is the case. You should know other people who are like you, or you should know how to see them, because you used to be one. When you are something, you can easily see the other people that are. You should be able to spot them out, and then approach them and talk to them. [Patrizio 00:52:19] says, "Do you think that to help my niche with the organic outreach, can be considered as valuable idea if an enviable offer at all?" No it doesn't. You've just got to look at what the most successful people in your niche are doing, and model them. That's the best place to start. Meghan [Salby 00:52:45] says that her niche is successful entrepreneurs who want to overcome the deliberating grief and love of life again, and, "What do you suggest we do in terms of looking for a model to follow? Should we forge ahead with creating a six-week program with what we believe is the right way, and then use market feedback? You mentioned creating a six-week online course for people to follow, but we feel to do [inaudible 00:53:14]." Yes, you're 100% right. Start the one-on-one stuff. If you don't know what to put in a course, and if you don't have such conviction on the things that you're going to put in the course, then you're not ready to make a course. I make a course on something when I'm like, "Yeah this is the best thing that someone could possibly do." Not my opinion, but I've got so much evidence about this that it could be taken ... it could be forensically analyzed and taken before a high court judge, and be proven true. When you have that much conviction in it, then you should put it into a course. Sterling says, "How would you deal with projects where the price isn't exactly known upfront? In scientific lab equipment work, everything is custom, so how would you go about getting some money upfront, but also giving yourself breathing room for unexpected costs?" Yeah, the thing is, is the price should always be known upfront. If you're going to do scientific lab equipment, every piece of equipment should have a price. If someone's telling you that every piece of equipment doesn't have a price, then they're lying to you, and they're trying to extort you. Whenever someone says that something is a bespoke solution, or, it's a bespoke thing and the price is, we've got to determine what the price is, yeah, probably someone trying to fleece you for your money. There's a price for something. If someone won't show me what the damn price is, and they keep trying to say it's custom and all of this, then I just won't buy it from them. What you can do is you could ask them for how much, like, "Give me a list of all the scientific lab equipment and its price as an individual component." Then figure out what the price is going to be for any custom combination of components. That makes sense to me. If they don't know what the total price is going to be, because they don't what components you need, fine, just give me a list of all the components. Then I'll figure out what it will cost, and how I can make it cost less. Carla says, "What advice can you give me to get started?" Do the work, watch the course, seriously. Let me see if you have done the work. Just looking you up in our system, and I will see. Usage, 0%, so you haven't watched a single video for a single minute, but that's fine because I guess you just got started, when did you join? Okay, so you joined a while ago. Honestly, that's how you start. You go into the course, you log into it, and you go to week-one, and you go to video-one, and then you sit down and you press play, and you just stay in the seat. The key is you got to just stay in your seat, and not move. Like you've just got to watch it. Jeff Berry says ... Oh this is the Silicon Valley thing, all right, I've already answered the question, it's the same exact question. Alesandro says, "Do you think helping consultants and coaches to increase their closing ratio is a painful problem?" I think that if you don't know the answer to that, then you probably shouldn't be doing it, and you should probably go and follow the process. Pick a niche, and then find a problem, and then solve the problem. Nyla says, "Do you read consistently every night from 9:00 pm to 10:30?" No. Sometimes I might have to work till 10:00 or 10:30 or something, and sometimes I just am too tired to read something. It's definitely not every single night. Matt Graves says, "I'm struggling to decide between coaching program that will help others start their own window cleaning business, who are starting their own home service business. I encourage them to choose what service to offer like you do in Accelerator, I launched, scaled, and sold my own window cleaning business within three years. Afterwards I coached another on it doing the same with a mobile car detailing business, so I think I could do either successfully. What are your thoughts on how I can best make this decision?" Sure, just do the gun to your head exercise. Just imagine someone's got a gun to your head, and you got to choose immediately, or if you don't choose, you'll just get shot in the brain and die, so don't tell me you can't choose. You have to choose something, whatever that is, do that. Antony says, "Hello from Spain. Just enrolled in the program." I have already answered this question. All right, Jessica Ganeeno's added more information now, "I'm an educational consultant, so I should be a specialist within this industry as for example, become a master in the business related course as I have a degree on this topic, and then expand. Should I be more precise, like education consultant specialized in business related course only for undergraduate, is this too specific?" Yeah, so you're just thinking too much about your degree, and what you have experience in. You got to just forget about all of that. You have to think about like what niche, pick a niche, just a group of people. Pick a group of people, find them, talk to them, find out what they're problem is. When you know what their problem is, see how you can solve that problem. Then solve their problem in exchange for money. There you have a business. Forget about ... Your degree has nothing to do with it. Your experience has nothing to do with it. None of that stuff has anything to do with anything. It's totally ... it should be forgotten about, because it just distracts you from what you should be looking at. Megan Selby says, "Our niche is successful ..." I think, all right, I don't think I answered this question fully. "Our difficulty is defining who our competitors are and models to follow as we haven't seen anyone else in this niche. What do you suggest we do in terms of looking for a model?" Oh yeah, so I did answer this. I recommended start with one-on-one first, and then once you've really got conviction, create a course. Elsa says, "I know that you're a big proponent of laser focus, what's your advice for someone who's torn between two different business ideas to pursue? Both ideas are directed at the same ideal client [inaudible 01:01:27]." You just have to choose one and do it, because then you can do the other one afterwards. But you can't do both at the same time. Just choose the one that's most important to you. Do it, complete it, then do the other one. I'm not saying you have to get rid of the other thing forever in eternity, you just have to start with one. Peter [Wickstrom 01:01:48] says, "How do I go from a lose/win mindset where I think I always need to be nice to people, and they sometimes take advantage of me to win. How do I toughen up, because I see this is needed in business?" PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [01:02:04] Sam Ovens: ... because I see this is needed in business. Yes, I kind of get what you're saying. I think what you mean is that you're just always nice to people, and if you do that sometimes people will just like ... if you give people a little bit, they'll just take everything, and so you need to, a lot of the time, to help people, you actually have to say no to people a lot. Through my business, I help a lot of people start their own business and live better lives, but to do that, I have to say no to tons of people who want just to pick my brain for free. And there's a lot of people who would like to get my attention and get me to partner with them, or write a book with them, or just meet up for coffee, or go do a speaking thing. And I just say no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, and then people think, "But how can you do that? Because you're depriving my audience of this," or, "You're not helping me." And the way you got to think about it is, imagine if you're a surgeon in emergency room, and there's just been an earthquake, and a major highway has collapsed, and the ER queue, the emergency room queue is just backed up out the door, and it's just blood and screaming, and if you just stand there and look at everybody, and think about helping everybody, you won't help anyone, and everyone will die. But what you have to do is you just have to focus on the person right in front of you and fix them, move them along, next, fix them, move them along, next, and that's the best thing you can do. That is the way you help the most people, by actually focusing, and then keeping your blinders on. And so I kind of get what you're saying. Some people feel like they have to help everyone all the time, always, about everything, and by doing that, you actually don't really help anybody, just the same way the ER surgeon couldn't do that. So you have to get more ... I wouldn't even consider it being mean. I would consider it just what you have to do to help anyone. [Cas Bower 01:04:46] says, "They're both real diamonds, but some are polished and the others are still rough." Don't know what that means. I think it's in relation to what I said but it's kind of out of context here. [Armor 01:04:59] says, "How do you learn how to enjoy what you do every day? My niche is anorexia. I don't have any clients or strategy sessions yet, but I find myself not liking doing direct outreach, creating content about this niche, or even studying more about it. In fact, it feels more like a chore than a daily decision. I initially felt passion and excitement about it when I was personally working on this problem myself so that I can live up to what I teach to my future clients. Now that I've already arrived and I fully recovered from this eating disorder, I don't feel passionate or interested in it anymore." Well, them don't do it. I can see why this would be kind of depressing to do because you have to deal with a pretty traumatizing thing every day, and if you really don't like it, and you feel like you're over it, then don't do it because it's going to be a massive part of your life for a long time. [inaudible 01:06:03]. So Ralph Goldberg says, "Would you recommend LinkedIn sales navigator and what do you think of just getting on the call, and after qualifying the prospect to just continue gathering intelligence and doing the sales presentations all in one call instead of giving them a second call? Because I notice sometimes it's hard to get someone on the phone twice." So I'm actually not aware of what LinkedIn sales navigator does or how it works, so I can't really comment on that, and I think that you should just do what I've outlined in the course, which is reach out to people. Search for people on LinkedIn who are in your niche, add them as a connection, publish some content to your profile, and then also once they accept your requests, direct message them, and do as much of that as you possibly can every day consistently, and over time, things will happen. That's what I would recommend doing. So Robert [Aneole 01:07:33] says, "Can you talk a little bit about finding an overlooked diamond in the rough in terms of finding a digital marketing contractor?" Yeah, you just have to get in and loo. It's hard. When I was recently hiring for a ... we were looking for a senior full stack software engineer, and our standards are extremely high. We were basically looking for a unicorn, someone that could code front end and back end, and do everything, and had at least 10 to 20 years experience, and could code in multiple different languages, was a very good architect, and was just hungry and passionate. These people are so rare, and it took me four months to find one of them, four months, and I probably spent a few hundred hours I probably spoke to on the phone, 100, 200 people, and I probably looked through about 3,500 resumes. Yeah, that's how you find a diamond in the rough, hard work. But then once you figure it out, and you find out the recipe and the pattern, then you can repeat it again, and again, and again. But I had to go and figure this out for the first time, so it was pretty hard. That's what it takes to find these people, and sometimes I see people and they're like, "Oh, my God, I can't find any good people to hire." And I'm like, "Well, what have you done?" And they did like a post on their Facebook page, and that's it. I'm like, "Of course you can't find somebody. You didn't do anything." If you want to find someone real good, expect to look at at least 1,000 resumes and interview 100 people. If you haven't done that, then chances are you're not hiring someone good. Sterling says, "I got chewed out by someone on the phone regarding asking, 'What's your biggest pain point in your work?' over an email. They said my question wasn't posed properly. What should I take from that?" You should take from that, nothing. You should just move on. [Armagen 01:09:53] says, "My question was, 'How do you deal with people who tries to sell your course for $50? I have this problem and don't know how to deal with them." Yeah, we've got a person who works for us, and we just find these people, and we block them on social media. So you should block them, and then when you find them, you should also just take down their thing and report them. If you find their PayPal, you should shut it down and freeze their funds. And we have a person who does that just again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and that's about all you can really do, but I think for the most part, people worry about it more than they should. It doesn't really harm you that much. It's more of an emotional concern to you than a real concern. And your best bet is just to focus on making good products, helping your clients, getting more clients, that's it, and then you don't really need to worry about that too much. Chris [Belote 01:10:55] says that he's been a DM for 12 years and was a generalist marketer before taking your course. "Once I took your course, I focused on DM for home service companies, specifically roofers. I'm at the $13,000 to $15,000 per month level, and even with in-house staff, I'm worried about the glass ceiling you speak of for Done4U. My expertise is with local SEO and Google ads, plus landing pages, plus conversion rate optimization for almost any local business. When I was first a generalist, I was getting results from one of the local businesses of higher value. After watching week seven, I'm wondering if I should focus my efforts on Uplevel in an online course for all local businesses with a high value per customer now or continue with Done4U digital marketing for roofers and home service. Yeah, I would join Uplevel and do that. Seriously, it sounds like you have reached the ceiling. I bet you reached it a while ago, so I would join Uplevel and I'll tag [Rhett Hooks 01:11:57] in this so you can talk to him about it. He can answer any questions you've got about it. So Sean Sims says, "Was the guy who built SnapInspect the same guy who was doing your digital marketing outsourcing?" No, completely different. [Amen Peter 01:12:23] says, "I live in a small country, 1.5 million Facebook users at 18 to 45 years old, already sold over 400 courses at 397 euro ... or is that pounds? No, that's a euro, I'm pretty sure. I'm selling at a low price because the average person here makes 700 euro a month. Do you think it's worth scaling locally or should I go global? I bought Uplevel consulting and I love it." Oh, good. That's what I was going to recommend doing. Join Uplevel. You've already done the right thing by joining Uplevel and you should increase your price, seriously. We sell a ton of our courses into Europe and what country are you from specifically? It doesn't say where you're from, but we sell a ton of courses into Europe, and we do it at $2000, and we sell Uplevel, and even Quantum Mastermind into Europe, so you can absolutely increase your prices, 100%. It's just a limiting belief that you have that you can't. Joshua Westover says, "Do you think it's important ..." Sorry, there's some glare in my eye. Now it's fixed. "Do you think it's important to purposefully put time into dating as well as a business, or should you just trust that it will happen naturally? If you think putting time into it is important, do you have any tips on how best to find people whoa re on the same wavelength and willing to understand what it is you're pursuing?" Yeah, so if I was to do it again, I definitely wouldn't do dating, and going out to nightclubs and bars, and things like that because it's best to just focus on yourself and improve yourself, and also focus on ... this is the philosophy that I have. It's like the whole pickup artist niche is about not really improving yourself and just using some slick one liners and some psychological hacks to try and get girls, and that can work but there's a way better way to do it, and that's to just have a good product. And the product is you, and so I do the same thing in business. Instead of just trying to come up with one liners, and marketing gimmicks, and psychological hacks to sell the product, I just want to make a really goo product because then, people just want the product, and then yous till have to do a little bit of marketing, but the product's good. And so I would improve your product, which is you, because then that will actually attract people because people like people that have their shit together, and have a passion that they're pursuing, and they aren't needy, and they aren't out in bars looking for girls like it's some sort of poaching, hunting sort of thing. You know what I mean? Generally, girls like people who aren't [inaudible 01:16:05] all the time. They like people that are interested in their own thing and they don't need them. So that's what you should do. Just focus on yourself, improving your life, and building your business, and all of that, and along that journey, you'll naturally run into different people, and meet different people, and I would do it that way. I didn't do it that way so I can't claim that that is what I did because I definitely didn't do that, but if I could go back and do it again knowing what I know now, that's what I'd do. Sam says, "My business helps two sides of a market, the elderly, and the care workers that actually pay us. Should I have two fan pages or just one?" Just one. Toby Klein says, "In an interview you did about a year ago, you talked about mind state. You mentioned Freudian slips and how you can read the dark side of people, for example, by only looking at their Facebook profile. In week two, you talk about how a person is afraid to be judged by others if they are judging others themselves. Can you give a few more examples of how you are able to read people and what it is in part that you can see that the person itself does not seem to recognize?" Sure. Well, generally what I can judge is people ... they leave clues all over the place, so if you look at somebody's pictures, and if there's a recurring theme in the pictures, then you can kind of tell what they're interested in. Sometimes, they just outright post about it, and it just shows you. And then you can also look at what their interests are, but the best thing to do is to really when you talk to somebody, and you leave the silence there, they generally fill in that void with something that's a massive giveaway. That's where you learn the most by just letting it be silent, and then letting them fill that void with whatever's going on. But you can also ... like I never actually fully judge someone by looking at their profile or anything like that because it's not 100% accurate. I could be totally wrong, and I've been totally wrong lots of times. So for example, if we're not sure about someone by looking at their resume or their profile, we'll still interview them on the phone. And sometimes the people we've hired have looked terrible on their profile and their resume, and sometimes people that look amazing on their profile and their resume end up being terrible, so we always make it a point to talk to them, but you can also see, people give away a lot of hints about themselves on their profiles and things like that, what they're interested in. If you know what someone's interested in, then you can learn quite a lot about them. John [Jean 01:19:42] says, "Curious of your business model. You talk about consulting. However, your first product is a digital project, not consulting." Yeah, well that is in your opinion, but if you look at the definition of the word, "consulting," it basically means helping somebody in a specific field through the vehicle of advice. So we have three main components, helping someone in a specific field, component one. You're helping someone ... that's component one ... in a specific field, component two, through the vehicle of advice, component three. So we've got helping people, and then specific field, and then advice. What is my course? It's helping people in a specific field through the vehicle of advice. The only difference is that the advice is in the video, and it is traveling through a conduit that is in bits instead of atoms. So you're just thinking about consulting in terms of a human advising with their mouth, but my course is basically doing the exact same thing, just with a video, so it's still consulting. It just depends on if you look at what consulting really is or if you look at what your opinion of it is, because some people think, "Oh, consulting is only like corporate consulting," or only when you meet the person in person, but it's not. Those are just perceptions of it. Andrew Kelly says, "Your opinion on my offer please, Sam. I help wedding venues stay contemporary and in demand with creative direction and digital marketing, or I help wedding venues make emotional connections with couples using creative direction in digital marketing to stay booked." So it depends what their problem is. If wedding venues, their problem is being booked, so you help wedding venues stay fully booked through digital marketing. You can just do that. Help wedding venues stay fully booked through digital marketing. That's all you need to do, and if there's other ways to help them stay fully booked that aren't though digital marketing, you can do that too. The only thing that really matters is helping them stay fully booked, and any way you can do that, that's fine. [Alma 01:22:44] says, "What are the frequent thoughts that keep popping into your mind each day or when you do meditation, and does the content you consume every day also effect this? I realize that if I watch a movie and I really like it, I'd have lots of thoughts about it." Yep, that's true. So I don't have recurring thoughts that keep popping into my mind all the time. They change, and it changes based on what I'm doing, and what the problems and different projects I'm working on are at the time. Hey might be similar recurring thoughts that pop into my mind over the period of a week, or two weeks, or something, but never just consistently for years. If that's happening for longer than a couple of weeks, then you're not addressing your problems and you need to be addressing those things. If something keeps popping in, you need to deal with it now, and you're right about the content you consume. Also, the people you talk to, the content you consume, all of that, that massively influences you. That's why you want to watch what you put into your brain. Watch the people you talk to. Watch the things you consume. So Melissa says she has a fashion company, and she's growing her business through Facebook and Instagram. "What's the best time to start helping other people with it?" It depends. If you want to, I would try to scale your company as high as you possibly can first, and then once you've done that, then I would look at creating a program that helps people in your industry or in a similar industry solve a major problem that they have. That's what I would do. Olaf says, "What were the biggest mistakes you made when you were starting out to teach consultants, and what were the valuable lessons you learned? I'd appreciate if you share that." So I didn't start by teaching consultants because how could I do that? I was an unsuccessful consultant when I started, so if I was an unsuccessful consultant with no clients, trying to help people become successful consultants with clients, there is a major flaw there, a serious problem that will never fly. So I started out by helping local businesses get customers with digital marketing, and I worked with trades businesses, like plumbers and electricians, and rug stores, and locksmiths, and things like this. And I felt confident about helping them because they knew nothing about it, and they were doing nothing, and I was by no means an expert, but I knew what I [inaudible 01:26:02], to work on it a hell of a lot more than them. They couldn't work on it at all because they were out doing jobs all the time. So that's why I thought this was a good thing to do, and that's how I learned how to do it, and then once I learned how to deliver good results to my clients, manage my clients, make a profit, run a solid business, and get new clients predictably, that's when I was able to start helping other people who weren't able to do that do that. So that's how I actually got started, but you can't get started teaching people how to do something that you don't know what to do. Like I didn't know exactly how to help those builders but the gap was way smaller. It's way smaller, and they knew too that this was my first go, and I told them that. But if you're hungry and you're willing to keep going, then you'll figure it out. Ralph Goldberg says, "What do you think of the niche of helping men who are addicted to escorts break their addiction and get real women in their real life situations? Or do you think this is too taboo of a niche?" I think this is a really good niche. This is awesome because this is definitely a problem. The way we know that people do this is because there's a lot of escort businesses, and generally the people that use them are pretty miserable, and I think they definitely don't want to use them, and it causes a lot of problems, and it's definitely a big probably, and it's a cool one to solve. I think you should do it. My brain is scanning all of these things you could od to get clients in this industry. There's some really cool things you could do here. You could even use the escorts as sales reps, which would be kind of interesting because I was thinking they wouldn't want to ... because we know that they meet clients. And plus, that's kind of like an insider coming in. It's like infiltrating the system, but they wouldn't want to tell their clients to stop using escorts because they make money doing that. But if you can give them commission, then they have an incentive to do that, and I'm pretty sure they'd probably prefer to make their money that way than the way they're currently doing it, and so that could be kind of interesting. This one's really interesting. I would do it. It sounds cool. Tom [Tigwow 01:29:39] says, "Is the Facebook module on consulting accelerator still relevant today?" Yes. "If so, do you still think you can launch with $500 or do you have to invest $1,000 to break through the algorithm and get necessary exposure?" You can do it with $500. It's just harder, but you can still easily do it. Omar says, "About sharpening your senses and controlling instant gratification, does this also apply to the music you listen to, and the videos and content you watch also, as those things can be very stimulating?" Yes, and you'll probably notice that if you watch my videos, they're generally pretty detailed, and they don't really have any cuts in them. They don't go cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, cut, and they're not made to stimulate you in a way like that, and that's kind of how you can get a sense of what my mind is like. I'll just choose a topic that is relevant and I'll focus on solving the problem, and adding value, and I will just stay on it, and cover it in all of its detail until it's done, and that's kind of what I do with everything. And so the people who constantly watch short videos, like I see people, they say to me on YouTube and stuff, they're like, "Please Sam, make some shorter videos." And it's funny because these people are obviously addicted to these short videos with 1,000 cuts in them. If you watch different YouTube people, they make short videos, like 10 minutes, and then they have tons of cuts, different scene changing all the time, and that's ... also watch a movie trailer. It'll just be full of cuts. And the reason why people do that is because their attention spans are so small, that of you keep cutting it, it's like a strobe light going. It's like a rat looking at a strobe light. It's going to hypnotize it, but I prefer just to not do that, and the people who can't handle that, well, they should adapt. And I don't watch any videos like that. Like if I see a video like that that's cutting and doing all of this stuff, I'm going to immediately stop watching that thing because it's going to mess with my brain, and so I never do any of that stuff. And I don't use social media either because social media is full of that crap. You scroll through the feed, and there's just gifs, there's videos that are auto playing. There's these things flashing at you. There's ads everywhere. It's horrific. It's a really good way to fuck your brain up, and fast, and for sure. It's not just a half job. If you use social media and watch those videos, you will fully fuck it up, and people just don't seem to understand that. They're like, "Oh, no I can just ... PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:33:04] Sam Ovens: People just don't seem to understand that. They're like, "Oh, no, I can just keep looking at all of this stuff. Nothing will happen," and then they're gone. Thomas Janek says, "Does it make sense to use Facebook ads for services of a lower price than about 2000? If yes, how to go about it?" Yes, it can make sense, provided you acquire a customer at a price that's profitable. The way to go about it is to do it. Follow the same method that I've set up in Consulting Accelerator, come up with some ad angles. Come up with four to five angles, find four images each for those, and then find ground zero, like Tower of Bale audience, derive 30 audiences from Babel. Then, combine the five angles with four images each, with the 30 audiences. That gives you 600 possible variations. Find your conversation objective, set it all up, load it, launch it. Find the winners. Cowl the ones that aren't winners, and optimize from there, and see what happens. You're just making sure that your cost per acquisition is less than or equal to the price of the product. Ideally, it should be less than by a margin of at least 20%. If that is true, then it works, and you should do more of it. Monica says, "Thanks for your answer, maybe I did not express it well. I'm already solving one problem, helping violin players play without pain the nerves using my skills as a musician. At the same time, I guess, you do, do you listen to music? Yes, I do, why? Playing music solves the problem of people who want to relax or get pleasure from music. I should say my business is, I help people get pleasure, or a special communication and understanding from music through digital ... Through my music activity. Does it make more sense? That is what I meant with what I do, what I want to do those things. How do I make it profitable?" All right, so you're still looking at it ... You're looking at it slightly less from your point of view, but still massively from your point of view. I get it, you like music, and sure, music adds value to people, right? But, to make a profitable business you need to either be phenomenal at playing music, so that you are like Mozart and people will pay you for your music, or you can have concerts, or you can do busking, or something like that, right? Or, you can find other violin players who have a problem, play violin better or something. Maybe they've got other problems, I don't know. You'd have to ... If you help them solve their problem, then you can charge money for that. That's what I would look at if I was you. Just look at violin players, talk to them, and ask them what their problems are. Just get out of your head for a moment, and then ask them, and hear what comes from their mouth. I swear, the best thing to do in business is just to go and talk to your market. Whenever I get stuck with anything, I will just go and talk to the market every time. Then I'm like, "Oh, okay, now it's obvious what I should do." Then I do it, and it generally works if I listen to the market. When it doesn't work, it's when I've just cooked up some idea in my own head. Robert Timon says, "Many people I speak to want to use low ad spend, for example, 250 to $500, and have centralized reach of maybe 90,000 to 150,000 people. Is Facebook good for this? Can we utilize the 30 audience strategy well in this case?" Well, honestly, if you're gonna be doing Facebook ads for somebody, they should be spending at least a grand a month. Because, your fee is gonna be like 1000 to $3000 a month for your fee. If someone was paying you one to 3K, why would they then only spend 250 to 500 on ads? It doesn't make much sense. Also, you don't have much to work with. I would just focus on finding the people who spend more, and there are plenty of them. Deborah Ashley says, "I told my father about the gun to the head method, because when I'm resisting or procrastinating I do that exercise." Yeah, some people just get angry at me, because they're like, "No, that's just too simple to use as a decision making tool," and it is. But, generally when we're pulling out that method, it's when the person cannot decide, and they tell me that they've done all of the research, and all of the pro and con analysis, and that they still can't decide, right? I do agree that you should go through and do some thorough research and think it through, and consider all of the pros and cons, and the upsides and the downsides. But, if you do that and you still can't make a decision, gun to your head is what you should do. Tupack says, "I'm thinking of offering consulting for cashflow problems for small business owners in a particular niche. Someone in this niche does the same thing. He is an outsourced CFO, and told me you need to have a lot of accounting background, and is an area that has a strong prerequisite. I have been reading up on some cashflow strategies, and I think it can be learned. Should it stop me that I don't have a CFO background?" No. He's just scared. Just use this as fuel. If someone said that to me, I'd be like, "All right, you're going on my shit list, and in six months I'm gonna beat you." I would tell them that, but I would do that silently, and then I would beat them. If people tell you stuff like that, just use it as energy to beat them. Don't listen to them. Indra says, "I just started, do you think it's critical to have a website when I am in the beginning stage, or is a landing page enough?" A landing page is enough. Patrizo says, "Thanks for your advice." No problem. Sterling Caulley says, "What's the most extreme thing anyone has done to try and get your attention? Maybe like showing up at your house to talk or something." Yeah, that happened, that's happened a few times. But, in New York it was good, because in New York you have to, I was on the 28th floor, and the elevators are locked, and there's a doorman. There's a doorman and then there's a concierge area, and then the elevators are locked unless you're a resident and have swipe key. Then, even if you go up all the way somehow, and then you get out there, then it's still locked. It's pretty hard to infiltrate that place. But, there's been some funny stories about that. Like, we had one person, no, we've had multiple people turn up at the ... They've turned up at the building. Somehow they found the building, and then they went in and they all said that they were here to see me or something. Then, the concierge desk, the front door, sorry what's it called? The doorman will call me and say, "Hi, I've got this person here." I'll be like, "Well, I don't know who that person is," and then they'll just send them away. We've had that happen lots of time. But, the funny thing is we've had one guy showed up, and apparently he was from Australia and he booked a flight here just to see me. This is apparently, I have no idea whether this is true or not, because I didn't go and meet the guy. But, the concierge was like, "This guy said he just flew from Australia especially to meet you," and I was like, "Well, he really should have checked before doing that," and then we sent him away. Then, another time Rit left the building, and then some guy spotted him and was like, "Hey, Rit." Apparently this dude, he's in the consulting Accelerator course, he's probably on this call. He had been sitting in his car outside the building for a day waiting for me to come out. Then, he spotted Rit, and so then we had that happen. But, there's been only one successful infiltration, which is actually the funniest story. What happened is it was early in the morning, I was just waking up. I was semi awake, and my wife told me, "Hey, the cleaners, I'm going out of the house," so she was leaving. She goes, "I'm going out of the house, and the cleaners are gonna be here in the next 10 minutes, so when the front desk calls and they say the cleaners are here, you have to let them in," because we have to say, "Yep, send them up," right. I was like, "Okay." Then within the next five minutes, the front desk called me and I was like, "Hello," and they said, "We've got so-and-so here," and I was like, oh, it must be the cleaners. "Yep, send them up," and so they did send them up, and then there was a knock on the door, and I don't even think I was wearing a shirt. I was just wearing shorts, no shoes and no shirt, and I answered the door, and there was this dude who was like 16-years-old with his notepad, and his laptop and everything. He was just like ... It was a pretty awkward moment, because I thought it was the cleaners. Turned out to be this dude, and I had no clothes on, basically. That's the only time that happened, and then sure enough, then the front desk called and said, "The cleaners are here," and I was like, shit. That's the only time someone got through. But, that was just a glitch in the system, right? Because, I was anticipating that call, and I didn't fact check it properly. That just shows you how sometimes when you've got a preconceived idea of something, it ruins it. Because, I didn't check properly or think about it properly. Andrew Newman says, "What is the best practice to focus on sales, and not delivery of clients already on the books?" What? I don't understand this one. "What is the best practice to focus on sales, and not delivery of clients already in the books?" That's not what I recommend. That's the opposite strategy that I recommend. The most important thing to do is help your clients and deliver them good results. The truth is, is if you do that to a high level, you'll never really have to worry about getting clients. They will just come, and people will say good things about you. I actually recommend focusing more on your skills, your service delivery, your products, and the results you get your clients, then you should focus on sales. I spend, honestly, this is not even any exaggeration. I spend 80% of the time making my products better, or the systems in my company that touch customers better, and only 20% of my time doing things that relate to sales and marketing. It's the opposite way. Most people I meet spend 99% of their time in sales and marketing, and 1% on their product. That's not a good thing to do. I recommend you do it the other way. [inaudible 01:46:37] says, "Have you read the Obstacle is the Way by Ron Holiday before? If so, what is the best take of it?" I actually have that book. I've heard it's good. I haven't read it yet, and I think the reason I haven't read it is, because the message is in the title. The Obstacle is the Way, that's true, and I talk about that, I say take the hill. That's what I generally tell myself. There's always two paths you can take. There's the electronic wheelchair path, which is the lazy way, to go around the obstacle on a motorized wheelchair, or you can just take the hill and climb over it, conquer it, and complete it. Pretty much in ever single instance, all the time, it's better to take the hill. That's what you want to ... You want to develop a philosophy where you always take the hill. Because, that's how you build a good business. Sam Gilbert says, "When creating a course, how much time do you dedicate to looking at other courses in your niche to get a sense of how good yours is in comparison? Also, would you suggest creating mindset training first before getting into specific technical training for your niche?" I honestly don't look at any other courses, and I never compare mine to theirs. There's only one thing that you need to know, and if it's true, your course will be better than everybody else's. That is, that you are better at the thing that everyone else. If that is true, then if you put effort into a course, it'll be better. Because, it's not about looking at other courses and just trying to outdo them on things. That's a dumb way to do it. It's about just being better at the actual practice of the thing than everyone else. Then, you know what to do better than everyone else, and then you just translate that into a course. That's what I focus on. I focus on actually being able to do it really well, to high a level in reality. If I can do that, then I know that I've already created a course that's better. It just hasn't been created yet. Allison [inaudible 01:49:14] says, "Do you mind sharing more specifics about your work day? Excluding your mindset warm up and exercise in the AM, I'm curious within your daily time table, how do you weigh up your tasks? For example, let's say you are creating a training module, you have clients to check in with, and then your other stuff. How do you go about organizing that into your daily diary? What are your principles when actually allocating your hours to what's important? Hope that makes sense. I am disciplined and organized, but looking for ways to fully optimize my day, and wonder how you balance your multiple tasks." Sure, so honestly, if I'm gonna be creating training, that's all I'll do the whole day. That's it. I don't do multiple things throughout a day, unless I'm doing small tasks. Let's say for the whole day I'll be creating a training, or for the whole day I'll be creating a funnel. I like to do things just intensely for 12 hours straight, because that's how I get the most done. Then, I don't look at my email, no one calls me, I have Slack turned off, nothing. I'm in isolation. Then, what will happen is, once I've been in isolation for a day or two, then I'll come back and then I'll spend a day or two just doing tasks, like catching up with the people, or fixing these little problems, or admin things, replying to emails, doing that stuff. But, what people, what you can't do is have these small little tasks get mixed in with these other things, like these big tasks. Never ever mix these two. They don't mix, and if you try to mix them, you'll fuck it up, guaranteed. No one creates anything good when they're doing admin stuff and they're reactive. If you're deep in thought, and you're fully in the zone, it's probably taken you three hours of uninterrupted focus to get there. Now, if you reply to a DM on Facebook, it's gone, forget it. Now, you've got three hours to get back into that zone where you were, right? That's just one DM. I see people trying to get into the zone while having their phone out, there's calls happening, Slacks open, Skype is open, Facebook is open, WhatsApp is open, their email is open and it's dinging, they've probably got 45 tabs open, and probably four books sitting on their desk that they think they're also reading at the same time. This sort of person should be locked up, and put in a straight jacket in one of the most severe mental hospitals there is. Because, that person has totally lost the plot. You cannot do any ... No human being can operate like that. The ones that think they can, that's dangerous, because you can't. That is like a schizophrenic person, and you need to just focus on one thing at a time. If you're going to be replying to chats, and doing emails, and doing calls, and being interrupted, that's fine. That whole, when I do that interruption work, I'm interrupted for the whole day and it doesn't really bother me, because that's the day that I'm doing all of that stuff, and it has to be done. But, then on the days that I'm just completing focused work, I don't have any interruptions. That's what you want to do. Sterling Caulley says, "I asked a high level CEO, what's the biggest pain point, what his biggest pain point was, and he got upset at me for not asking a well formed question. Is there anything to learn from this?" You should just move on. I think I already answered that. Link Brown says, "I'm picking between two niches. Would you start with the one that is easiest to start and get clients, or the one that creates the most value for a company?" That's a good question. I don't know if you've analyzed that one right. Because, typically the one that creates the most value for a company is going to be the one that's easiest to get the clients in. I'm interested to see how you've analyzed and thought that one through. Because, I don't know how, what would be the case. I guess, you could have something like during the bitcoin boom. That was a funny time to watch, because anybody, regardless of how stupid they were, could basically come in and write posts on Facebook and then run ads saying, "Bitcoin is the future. If you need help with bitcoin, DM me," and all of these people would be DMing them, and then paying them money to coach them on bitcoin. It was like, I understand that. Sometimes it can be that sort of mania, and during those times it was definitely more profitable to do bitcoin than it was to add real value to people. Because, people were being stupid. But, it's always short lived. People don't remain delusional for a long period of time. Then what happened is the collapse, and then all of those bitcoin people were left with their pants down. Then, it's back to value again. Generally, I would always focus on value, every single ... Forget about if there's other opportunities that arise where you can make a quick buck, forget about it. Stay focused on value. I bet you if I created a bitcoin course during that time, dude, I could have made millions of dollars, because we know how to do ads well, we know how to do funnels well, we have a big email list of like a million people, and we could have easily done a bitcoin course and made millions of dollars. But, I just state that's ... The way I think about it is, it's like if I recommend this thing to people and it collapses, which it's most likely to do, then how do I look, and I've really harmed a lot of people. Then, they're not gonna trust me again in the future if I come out and I have another product, they're gonna be like, "Screw that guy." I thought it through, and I was like, this is not the right thing to do. Let's just stay focused on the main thing, which is helping people start businesses [inaudible 01:56:06] I always focus on the value, always. Never, ever, ever deviate from that. You want to focus on the things that won't change in business. For example, like Jeff Bezos uses this as a way to think, and he always thinks to himself, what things won't change in the business that I'm in, and one of them is that people are never ... He can't imagine a time when people would say, "I like it when products take a long time to get delivered to me," right? Not likely, people aren't gonna say that. Focusing on having fast shipping should be one of his main goals. He also can't imagine a time when people will say, "I wish I could pay more money to get products shipped to me." Not gonna happen, so they make it free and fast, and they're the freest and the fastest at delivering stuff to people. He can't imagine a time where people are like, "I wish my delivery was unreliable," so they make sure they're very reliable. Then he can't imagine a time when people say, "Thank you Jeff Bezos for making prices on Amazon more expensive," so he focuses on low prices. He can't imagine a time where people will say, "Thank you Jeff Bezos for having less things on your site," and so he focuses on having selection. That's pretty much his strategy. The widest selection, the lowest prices, and the fastest shipping for the lowest possible price, which is free. If he wins on these four axis, he wins, and that's what you should do. Then I'll answer one last question here. That strategy I was talking about, find the things that won't change, and the things that won't change is value. I can't imagine a time when people says, "Thanks Sam for increasing your prices," so that's why I don't increase them, even though the product gets better. I can't imagine a time when people will say, "Thanks Sam for taking a long time to reply to my support ticket," so that's why our customer support works seven days a way, and our response time is less than two hours. I can't imagine a time when people will say, "Thanks Sam for leaving out the details in the course," so we do that. You just want to focus on those things. But, I can't, think about how easy it is to imagine someone not caring about whether you post on Instagram, right? Someone ain't really gonna care that much if I stop posting on Instagram, but someone would care a lot if I did the other things. That's a good way to find the things that won't change. Luke [inaudible 01:59:23] says, "How long did it take you to create the nine inconvenient truths about the online business market video? I'm curious how long it takes you to produce these amazing content videos." That video probably took me about an hour to set up, I would say. Because, I had to draw the nine things on the whiteboard, and that was actually quite a mission, because I had to make sure that they were aligned properly, because there's no lines on the whiteboard. Then, I had to set up the camera, which was an iPhone, so it wasn't that hard. About an hour to set up, and then I recorded it in one take, which the video was an hour, so about two hours total. All right, well, we're at the end of our Q&A session. Like I said, we do one of these very Saturday, or almost every Saturday, and if you enjoyed this, just click that like button. Let me know what you thought, click like if you had fun, you enjoyed this, or you got value from it. Then, next week I'm just gonna look at my war map. We're not doing a Q&A next week, so next week is the 1st of December, and there will not be a Q&A on Saturday the 1st of December. But, there will be a Q&A, they will be resuming on the 8th of December. Thanks everyone for attending this call. I hope you enjoyed it, and I will speak with you again soon. PART 4 OF 4 ENDS [02:01:12]

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