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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 17th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 17th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for November 17th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: All right. I can see Sterling Coley is on, Jennifer Lee. If you guys can just let me know if you can see me on the screen. If you've got video working and audio, then we'll jump in and get started. Thanks, Sterling. You can see me. Awesome. Well, let's go ahead and get started right away. So, if it's your first time on one of these calls, how we go is we do one of them every Saturday from 3:00 PM till 5:00 PM Eastern time, and that's the time in New York. We go for two hours, 3:00 to 5:00. Basically, all you do is you just questions in that ... Which way is it? That comment box right there, and then I'll go through and answer the questions one-by-one in the order that they're asked. So, let's go ahead and get started. Jennifer Lee says, "In regards to paid advertising, when would you use Google AdWords versus Facebook Ads? It would be great if you could summarize the best used scenarios for both options." Yes. This is a good question. The truth, honestly, for most people, Facebook Ads is going to be the one to go with. Why? Because it is a lot easier to use. It's way more intuitive. If you log in there, it's very visual. It involves images and things like that. It's very easy to select audiences, and do all of that. It's also fairly forgiving for new users. AdWords, on the other hand, is a lot different. AdWords requires people to be searching for what you've got using keywords, but with Facebook, you can just target the people you want. You don't have to wait for them to search for something. So, nine times out of 10, Facebook is going to be the best place to start for most businesses. There are some instances, though, where Google AdWords is better suited. That is when the market you're advertising to is aware. They're very aware of the fact that they've got this problem, and they're actively seeking a solution to the point that they're actually going to Google and inputting keywords relating to that problem and in search of a solution. If they're doing that, that means that AdWords can be good. Let me give you an example. The best ones for AdWords are just typical businesses like plumbing and electricians and locksmiths and dentists. These things, they're so well-established that people are aware, and if they need one, they will search for one, and then it works well to use AdWords. For a lot of other businesses, we're not selling people where people are searching for them, specifically. Then the downside of AdWords is, is that because you're putting in front of people who are searching for a keyword, then it can get very competitive. Now, it's fine with plumbing and electricians, and things like that because they're bound by regional constraints. However, in some markets like let's say, I'll give you a very competitive market, the legal market or CRM software market or something where people are advertising nationwide for specific keywords. Then it's going to be very expensive and cutthroat and very hard. Insurance is one. Insurance is extremely hard to compete in that space. So, there's a lot different things in there. The answer isn't really black and white. It's not like, "Oh, AdWords is better," "Facebook is better." It depends on the used case. I can tell you that nine times out of 10, most businesses that come through Consulting Accelerator, Facebook is the best fit for them. Where have I got more customers from? Facebook. If I was to start again from scratch, what would I do? Facebook Ads. How have all of my students got to seven figures and eight figures? Facebook Ads. So, that's why I teach Facebook Ads. I'm not saying that Google AdWords doesn't work. It obviously works. It's just that you need to focus on one thing. I've never met someone who can successfully run Facebook Ads and Google AdWords at the same time. Nobody. The people who think they're doing that, they're not. They're just doing a shitty job of Facebook Ads and a shitty job of Google AdWords. It's best to just focus on one thing. Ryan Raymond says, "Here's a list of questions I've wondered and created over time. Bear with me here. I truly value your advice on these, and I think others will enjoy hearing these as well." Well, there's a lot of questions here. So, let's see how detailed they are. "Where did you learn most of your valuable knowledge from?" There isn't one place. It's all over the place. Honestly, where did I learn most of my stuff from? From doing it. I didn't just sit down and read a book, and then just learned all of this stuff. That's not how it works. Books teach you things, and courses teach you things, but the ultimate knowledge comes from doing it. I've done a lot of doing, and that's probably been my biggest teacher. "Does anyone mentor you?" Not directly. So, I don't have a direct mentor. What happens is when you're starting out, it's very easy to keep finding mentors, who have a mastermind or a coaching program or something, and you can learn from them. Those are very helpful. I've been through lots of those. I've had many mentors like that. Then you get to a point where the people who are above you, who you want to learn from, they're not offering masterminds or coaching programs or things. Sometimes they write books, but they're not readily available. So, I would say who's mentoring me now, it's people like Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk, and people like that. They don't actually think they mentor me. They probably don't know who I am, but I learn a lot from just studying them. So, that's what I've had to do now is start to reverse engineer other people and apply it. Dude, Ryan, your questions have gone away now. So, if you want to ask them again, I'll get to it when I can. Michael Bohan says that he sells to ... Oops! Your question just moved. Sorry about that, dude. I missed your question, so you'll have to ask that one again. I'm going to have to jump down a couple of questions here, so I can keep up. Naila says, "How important is doing the VSL? I'm focusing on improving my product right now." Well, this is an interesting question because you really need to make sure that you're really good at what you do. So, if you're selling a product, it should be exceptional. If you're selling a service, your service should be really good. The catch to that is the way you get really good is by actually working with lots of customers, right? So, to actively get good, you've still got to get customers and work with them. You can't just lock yourself in a room and just learn, learn, learn, learn, learn. You've got to learn and get customers, and work with those customers, and combine all three of those, and that's how you get better, better, better. So, that's what you should do. Now, if you need your VSL to get customers, then it's very important, and you should do it. However, if you've got a means to get customers right now that is working for you and it doesn't involve the VSL, then you don't need it. That's how it works. Eddie Hanlan says, "I'm working with lawyers and retainer digital marketing. I'm struggling with getting some of them results. Do I have to just accept that they will be churned and not everyone will get results?" Yes. It's not just you, but that doesn't mean that you should just think, "Oh, it's their fault," right? When you're working with a client, it's a combination of you and them. It's a team effort. It's like you guys when you joined my Consulting Accelerator program. It's not my responsibility to get you guys results. However, if you join the program, learn what I teach you, and then execute it properly, and you don't get results, then that's my problem, right? So, you've got to carefully analyze, "Whose fault was it that no results were achieved here? Is it these guys' businesses because they're really sloppy or is it me because there's other things I could have done to make it better?" Right? You want to analyze it properly, but you're never going to get everyone results. Never ever, ever. That just doesn't happen because some people don't do anything. Some people don't even want results. So, never think you're going to have 100% success rate. Joward says, "Do you have any case studies of late bloomers, people who were late to achieve high levels of success with your course? I'm in week four. You stressed a lot of the first 30 days of action and how it sets the precedent for the rest of their activities. Does this mean that those who don't get great results in the first ...?" No. Look, the first 30 days is a great way to set a habit and to go out of the gates full guns blazing. Just go at it really hard and set a good standard from the get-go. However, that does not mean that if you don't do that, that you're doomed forever. That's not true at all. There are lots of people who take a year to get their first client, and then succeed afterwards. Take me, for example. It took me one year before I made a single dollar in business. One whole year, full-time before I got a single client. So, it took me ages. It still didn't really hurt my trajectory. You just got to keep at it. Ana Alwing says that ... Oh, man! There's a lot of questions coming through. Sorry, Ana. Missed your question. You'll have to ask again. Joward says, "If we're already Consulting Accelerator students, do you recommend we still subscribe to your content, YouTube videos, mastermind, snippet or blog posts or should we just focus and do the work?" That's a good question. I think that you should focus and do the work, and if it's entertainment once a week, if it's outside of workout, go ahead and watch one of those videos, but you don't need to keep up with every single thing on there. I only release one blog video a week, and that's usually about 30 minutes on average. So, that's 30 minutes of video once a week. If you do that outside of your workout, I mean, that's fine. I think you'll learn some stuff from there, but by far, the best content I have is in the course. So, do the course, and focus on taking action. That's more important than just following a YouTube channel or something. Joseph Newton says, "Would you still recommend cold calling to get digital marketing clients or is there a better way?" So, I think there's a way better way than cold calling. My course shows you how to do that. So, go ahead and watch the course. You wouldn't ask that question if you had watched the course. Joward says, "I'm in the recruitment niche. My clients' problem is that they are looking for candidates they want to hire. If I establish that they have this problem from a direct outreach engagement and they are prepared to talk to me, can I give them my terms and how much I charge on the first conversation?" I missed your question. It just jumped past. Sorry about that. Leonardo says, "How do you manage when people tell you no after hearing the price?" Well, that's fine. I would just say, "All right. Cool. Well, see you later. Bye. Hang up. Next." There's no need to do anything more than that. David Laurence says, "I've made ..." These questions are flying really fast. Yeah, Joward. I can see you've posted a lot of questions. I keep seeing your name. So, if there's anyone that's spamming the chat, don't do that. Otherwise, I'll kick you off it. All right? Because I can't follow these questions thread properly because it just keeps racing forward. Joseph Newton says, "Would you still ..." I've already answered that question. Tony Peacock says when is my birthday. It's on August, August 10th. George Ambrose says, "How to do Facebook Ads?" That's in the course, man. That's week five. I'm pretty sure. JD Danfee says, "Where can I find the 80/20 grid to print?" I'll just Google it, Sam Ovens Power Grid, and I can see they're right here, 80/20 Power Grid Tool. Yeah. So, here's the link to it. I'll reply to your comment. It's on that blog post there. So, if you just go to that blog post, it's in the resources. Sterling Coley says, "How would it be possible to successfully do Facebook Ads for a plumbing company? It seems like high-paid consultants have priced out everyone else from the market. Partly, your fault." "How would it be possible to successfully do Facebook Ads for a plumbing company?" Well, if I was doing a plumbing company, I would probably do AdWords because of that example I told you before. That's in one of those niches where AdWords can work very well. I'd probably do that, and then just set up retargeting on Facebook, and that's it. I wouldn't cold traffic on Facebook at all. I'll just set up a simple retargeting thing that will run really easy, and then use AdWords for the main search traffic. David Martin says, "I'm having a hard time. Doubting my niche, DM for home improvement. It's hard to generate a strategy session in this industry, and my first client turned into someone that just wanted me to work for free, showed no respect and wasted time. Sometimes I surprise myself thinking like, 'Whoa! It looks like I chose a bad niche.' Any advice on how to avoid niche-jumping and prevent the negative feedback and overthinking, too?" Yeah. I mean, just don't niche-jump. It's not the niche. It's because you're just starting. Imagine getting on a bike for the first time. Imagine you're five years old, and you get a bike for your birthday present. You get on it, and you try to ride it, and you just fall off, and graze your knee. You're not going to think, "Oh, wow! I chose a bad bike." No. It's you. You fix it with practice. It's almost never the niche. It's always the person. So, it's just normal. Expect it. If you get your first ever client in this niche, which is your brand new to, you're going to have some turbulence. It's normal. It's totally fine. Just move on to the next one, and learn the lesson. Each time you make a mistake, you learn a lesson. Vincent says, "Do you ever try native traffic? What do you think about this traffic?" I have no idea what native traffic is. What on earth is that? I'm just going to Google it, and see if it ... Native advertising is the use of paid ads that match the look, feel and function of the media format in which they appear. Well, oh, so it's like Outbrain. Yeah. I don't really know what you mean. Can you clarify your question better? Because I don't really know what you mean by that. It could mean so many different things. Marina says, "Do you advise to learn by heart the sales script?" No, not really. What I advise is to do sales calls, and then if you do them again and again and again and again and again and again, by accident, you will have learned it off by heart, but you don't sit down in your room, in your bedroom just reading it and trying to memorize it. You learn it by practicing. Shawn Sam says, "How are you pricing your DM for local businesses back when you were doing that?" I'm pretty sure I charged $1,500 or $2,000 per month for recurring monthly digital marketing services. So, Ryan's questions, "Do you have health insurance or do you self-insure?" Yeah. Our company has a benefits plan because we give all of our employees benefits. So, it's with that. "Do you rent your home in California or do you own it?" I rent it. I've covered this lots of times in lots of the other Q&As, but the reason why I rent is because I like living in a nice place, and it's not a smart idea to own a nice place. The best houses to own are the ones that are priced around ... In LA, it's going to be 800 to 1.2 million. That range is where it's going to be a good house to own and sell because there's a huge demand for it. It's not going to get too disturbed by any market changes. When you get into luxury houses, you don't want to own those things. No way. It's a liability. So, that's why I rent here. It makes more economic sense to do that. However, if I lived in an area where it made more economic sense to buy a place, I would do that. It just depends on the numbers. There's not a case where renting is the only thing you should do ever, and there's not a case where owning is the only thing you should do ever. It depends on all of the other factors. You've just got to do the math. So, Michael Bohan says that, "The most frequent reaction during the strategy session I hear is, 'I really like it. I'll just run this past the CEO and co-founder and get in touch again in two weeks' time,' and then invariably, this enthusiasm dies. Do you have any advice on what I'm doing wrong here? I cannot close a 20K product on the call itself. Can I especially as there's no taking credit card details on B2B?" Yeah. Well, what you've done is you've thought like, "I'm in B2B," and B2B is different. In B2B, no one buys on the call, and everyone needs lots of time to think about it. Right? No one definitely gives credit card over the phone, but that's not true. I sell B2B with Uplevel Consulting and Quantum Mastermind. Who do you think is buying Uplevel? It's businesses, and the Mastermind is businesses. So, they do credit cards on the phone? Yes. So, you can. What's happening with these guys is it sounds like they're just too afraid to tell you no, but they're not actually interested because if someone is interested, they don't need two weeks. They will go now. If someone isn't interested and they're too afraid to tell you no, then they'll say something like what they're telling you. You need to change your perception of how sales can be done because I'm telling you, you definitely can do single call closes in B2B. It's no different. You're still talking to humans. Loren Alexander says, "What do you think about this message? I help people with chronic anxiety and obsessive racing minds transcend their condition by offering a fresh and concrete understanding of the human mind, as well as practical solutions to allow them to heal themselves." Man, that's a lot. That's huge. That's too much information. I would just say, "I help people with anxiety to ..." What's the opposite of anxiety? Anxiety antonym, calmness, serenity. All right. So, I would say, "I help people with anxiety to find calmness." That's all it needs to be. You help people that have this problem to achieve this result. That's all you need to say. The details can be discussed in conversation, but that is your basic message. Julia says, "How do grow your business when your offer relies on your artistic talent, and your clients are coming to you for who you are, and how you do things? I'm finding myself with no time to take more clients because I don't have the time to deliver." Yeah. So, it depends on what you're actually doing. I'm just looking at your profile now to see if I can see what you do. So, it looks like you do branding, and you're probably doing actual branding work like designing stuff. So, I get what you mean. This is a classic situation to find yourself in when you're doing done-for-you services. So, I'm guessing this right now. Correct me if I'm wrong in the comments, but doing like graphic design or branding or whatever for these clients and you're doing the work, and they want to hire you because you'll do the work and you'll do good work, and they know you do good work, right? So, it's heavily tied to you. Now, if you want to scale, there's only so much you can do, and then you're stuck because you run out of time, right? This is normal. This happens to everyone. At that point, you have a few ... There's only a few ways you can really grow. One of them is to hire other people and form an agency and do it like that, so that you can delegate some of the work and take on more clients. That's one way, but it's hard to quality control and it's complicated. The other way is that you could create a ... or you can just increase your prices, honestly. There are still some people out there that do design. Think about architects, right? They don't take on massive amounts of clients. They just increase their price to design a house. That's probably the best way to do it if you want to stay doing the work, and focus on creating good quality work, but make more money. It's just to increase your prices. The other way is the agency, which I just talked about. Then the other way would be to create some kind of course for other designers, so like how you can start your own design business or how designers can get clients or how designers can do better work. Then you can fork off away from the work to creating information, to solve problems for people that have affinity to the work that you're doing. So, you've got those options there. I'll just choose one, and that's how you can scale, but you can't scale by doing what you're doing right now, and not doing any one of those things I just mentioned. Joseph Newton says, "Would you still recommend ..." I've already answered that question. Khalid says, "I'm facing challenges in managing business efficiently. When I outsource Facebook Ad campaigns of my clients to contractors, they are not delivering as well as I do, but when I do it myself, my clients get good results, but it's taking time from me doing strategy sessions. What do you recommend?" Yeah. This is classic. Man, this is what happens when you hire people in the beginning. So, what you have to do is train them, work with them. When you see them making error, you have to correct them and provide them with feedback, and you have to keep going like this until they learn. That's what you have to do. It's a long process, but it's the only way. Joshua says, "I'd be interested to know what it is about ..." I missed that question. Sorry, guys. There's a lot of questions that's flying past on this thing today. Sterling says, "I've been researching private security, and I deal with raising the margins for security guards. I'm wondering if you think private security companies could make use of Facebook lead ads or is the target market not large enough?" I don't know. Who's the client for ... I would, honestly, do an experiment, right? If I answer this right now, I'm giving you a guess. I wouldn't want you to make a decision based on a guess. So, I would just do an experiment, honestly. Just try it and see what happens. Amy says, "I'm an artist. How can I create a monthly package, so my income is more predictable at the moment it works off commissions and on one-off purchases?" Yeah. So, what you can do is you could create a course for artists that want to be able to sell their work or for people that want to become better artists. You can do something that's still relating to art, but not the actual creating of art and selling of art because information about art has value, too. So, that's a way to stay on the topic that you love, keep it related, and create other revenue as well. James Hammock says that he helps men overcome porn addiction, and he's going into 20 groups and posting and scrolling through the comments to generate conversations, and adding friends, and this takes a huge amount of time and is distracting. "This is my second week in the 30-day attack, and I feel like I'm making this too complicated or something. I am down in 15 friends. What I'm doing and posting something ..." Hmm. If you're only two weeks, then I would keep at it, but I think what a good idea for you would be is to create a YouTube channel and also look on something like Reddit because Facebook is a strange place to discuss something like that. However, people will search for YouTube videos like that, and also, people will discuss that on Reddit because it's more of an anonymous platform. So, I would take a look on those platforms, too. You might be able to start doing direct outreach there, and then you might be able to post a few videos on YouTube to generate some inbound traffic, too. Now, I wouldn't suggest that for everyone, but just because you're in a different, unique kind of niche that those things would be where I would go if I was you. Vicky says, "Do you have any suggestions for programs or templates doing one-on-one coaching to keep each client's information organizes, tracking progress from one call to another as they all vary?" Yeah. So, honestly, you don't need to track too much stuff. If I was you, I would just have a Google Doc for each one of your clients. Then I would just type in the date and then take a few notes. Then on the next call, pull up that thing and just look at it, and see if they did the things they said they were going to do, and take notes again. That's all it needs to be. You don't need to do anything more complicated than that. Google Docs is free, and you can just use that. Mark Ty says, "What's the best work environment?" I have no idea what you mean? You are going to have to make your question clearer than that. Mohammad says, "Why don't you do a customer interview to everyone? Wouldn't that benefit everybody?" Yeah, maybe. We've got 20,000 customers, right? Those interviews roughly take about an hour. So, that's 20,000 hours. I think that's the amount of time that I've actually been working since I started. So, it's a time thing, man. You can't do that. It's not feasible. Leonardo says, "Hey, Sam. How do you get more committed to things?" That's an interesting one. "How do you get more committed to things?" Well, the easiest way I've found is just to take an audit of yourself and what your priorities are. So, what things are you doing? What things take up your time? List them all out. Then try to order them in terms of importance to you. What is the one thing that is most important to you out of everything? When you know what that is, then the best way to get committed is to eliminate everything that isn't that. The biggest thing that I noticed that harms commitment is distraction, and the way to get rid of distraction is to just eliminate. So, I would look at everything you're doing, and then just get rid of everything that isn't your main thing. Then just focus on that, and it will start to grow. Shawn Sam, I've already answered that question. Sterling says, "In your market research, should you ever have a look at private security guards companies, I'm interested in it and doing more research, but I'm curious if you had spent any time on that group." No, I haven't. Ana says, "Thanks for this brilliant training. I help high-performing women to increase their influence through the power of voice. I came into CA, Consulting Accelerator, with an already running online program with very good results, but poor profit to no scaling. Thanks for this training. I've closed 13 new deals out of my first 40 calls for 1100 bucks each using the list-farming webinar. My intent is now to do another list-farming webinar, doubling the pricing, and get proof of concept before proceeding to Facebook Ads. Do you think this is a good direction for me to go to scale my business?" Yeah. Go for it. I think that sounds like a good idea. Jessica says, "I'm on week two and you explained, 'Be the clients that you would like to have.' Recently, I bought a service from a marketer that is currently not delivering the service as he should. I would like to ask him for a refund, as not all of the conditions of the service have been met. Do you believe that this is something that can damage my mindset? I hope this question doesn't sound stupid." Yeah. This is a good question. I understand what you're trying to say. I do this, too, because I'm trying to be the client that I want to attract. The only way to really do anything is to set an example or to set a standard yourself. That's the only way that your mindset really changes, and it's the only way you can really lead a company or anything like that. So, what I tend to do is I will always give them a goal first. So, if I hire a company, and they say they're going to do this thing, and then they don't do it, before getting all angry or anything like that, I just get in touch with them and I'm like, "Hey, what's going on? You said you're going to do this." Give them another goal, and then probably give them one last warning, and then if they still can't do it, then I've given them enough. Now, they've just failed. So, that's what I would do. I would make sure you don't jump too immediately to being like, "Hey." Give them a chance to fix it, and communicate with them clearly. If they still don't do it, then you can request that. That way, that's the standard and example you're setting for yourself. Chris Beloc says, "Do you find that you get better KPIs from Sam Ovens branding versus Consulting.com branding? I know the major focus will be on iterating audience message image and ad funnel script. Been relying on word of mouth, online marketing leads for years before I got your course. Hired my first employee, have my angles, images ..." Yeah. So, what we do is on Facebook Ads, we typically use the Sam Ovens identity like the Sam Ovens fan page. When we're doing our ads, they're typically me. It's a photo of me, and the ad is written from me, Sam, as a person instead of having Consulting.com and having some texts written there as a company because Facebook is a platform where people interact, and there's people on it. So, the people on Facebook works better than a company on Facebook. We still have a Consulting.com fan page, but we use Facebook for the most part, but then the domain we use for our funnels, our website and everything is just all Consulting.com. So, that's what we do. Joseph Newton says, "I'm still in high school, and in week two. You say how you do one thing is how you do everything, but I found it really hard to pay any attention to it. Do you think this could affect other areas of my life if I'm letting it slip?" Okay. So, I'm just going to unpack this question to see what you mean. "But I found it really hard to pay any attention to it." So, I guess what you mean by it is high school. If I'm wrong, then correct me in the comments, but it sounds like you're in high school, and you find it very hard to pay attention at high school. Then you watch the training, and the training said, "How you do one thing is how you do everything," and then you identified that how you are doing one thing, high school, is not paying attention, and you're thinking, "Oh, no. This is going to do me and everything I do." That isn't the case. I sucked at high school. What that means, "How I do one thing is how I do everything," yeah, how that role applies is I suck at things that I don't want to be doing, and I cannot see any good reason to do, right? That is still true for me today. How I saw school was it was just useless stuff like, "Why do I need to learn this? What will this do for me in the real world? Nothing. There's no point in doing this thing. It's boring. I don't want to be doing these things." So, I'm not going to be interested in doing it or paying attention to it, right? That's still the same for me today, and there's nothing wrong with that. I think it's actually strange to be having interests in things that are useless, and have no actual impact in your life. So, don't worry about it at all. Honestly, a lot of the best entrepreneurs in the world didn't do well at school. David Groom says, "I'm most likely going to buy Uplevel in the next three weeks." Awesome. Looking forward to working with you. Mike McCormick says, "When you get your first clients in digital marketing, would you suggest stop direct outreach for a little while to focus on getting the first client the best results possible?" Yeah. I wouldn't completely stop, but I would probably, if it's taking up too much of your time, I'd probably tame it down a little bit, but try not to fully stop because it's hard to get the wheels in motion again and build up momentum again if you completely ground things to a halt. David Groom says, "I charged a client 9K over the phone, never met, one conversation." Yup. Do that all the time. Sterling says, "Have you ever been told you are enlightened? Would you ever hire an enlightenment coach? Why or why not?" I don't think I've ever been told that I am enlightened. "Would you ever hire an enlightenment coach?" Probably not. "Why or why not?" Because it's not what I'm trying to do. So, it's not what I'm interested in. It's not what my goal is. Yeah. So, that's why. Tarter says, "How did you deal with your partner when she is ever on a low mood and that needs your attention? My partner requires me a lot, which distracts me from my goals." Yeah. This is a funny one. This is a real thing for entrepreneurs, by the way. It's a huge thing. I notice it a lot. The truth is when I first became an entrepreneur, I had a different girlfriend than I have right now. Well, I've got a wife now, but when I first got into entrepreneurship, I had this girlfriend. I used to give her a lot of attention and everything, and then as soon as I started getting into entrepreneurship, I didn't give her as much attention, but she was super needy, insanely needy. In the end, that relationship didn't work out, and that was fine. Then the next girlfriend I had, who's my wife now, actually, she was a lot less needy. I don't think I could have ever ... That relationship, if I had had that relationship and if I would have had to sacrifice my business for her or I would have had to sacrifice her for my business, you can't win with that. You want to find ... I would have just a conversation with your partner and I would say, "Hey, look. I really need to focus on doing this thing. This is really important to me. Currently, you're being too needy, and I can't focus properly, and I can't continue doing this. So, can we please work something out?" Then try to work out something that's going to work for you guys, and give it a go, and try to work on it for a bit, but ultimately, if you can't figure it out, then you've got to move on because you don't want to have a partner that won't let you do what you want to do because that's messed up. Paul Easton says, "I have a prospect that has completed a survey and checked all the boxes. However, they said they want to start in January. These are Amazon sellers and I got told from another seller that they are holding cash for stock for Christmas. I'm wondering if I am better to have a call now or in January." I would just have a call with them now, man. It's just one person, one phone call. Just call them now. Then if they join in January, that's fine. If they join now, that's fine. Either way, you can just close the loop on this thing and move on to the next one. Brad Biller says, "You've mentioned before that you eat gluten-free, dairy-free, no refined sugar, et cetera. Do you mind telling us why you keep a restrictive diet? Is it for performance reasons?" Yeah. So, I work long hours. I work from 9:00 AM in the morning through till about 9:30-10:00 at night, six days a week. That's a lot of hours. Also, I need a lot of cognitive function to do the stuff that I do. I have to keep track of so many things in my head, and I have to be really sharp. That requires good energy. I need to be able to burn food and stuff that's going to provide good energy. Having a good diet really helps with that, seriously. It makes a big difference. If I went and got some burger and some fries and a BF for lunch, man, I'd be done for the rest of the day because my stomach would ... All my blood would just rush to my stomach to try and process that food. I'd be so drained. I'd have no cognitive function available. I'd probably want to have a sleep, and it would just put me into a lethargic stage. So, I need to have a good diet, so that I can focus properly. If you try it, if you sleep properly, exercise, keep hydrated, and you don't eat sugar, and you don't eat bad foods, and you don't drink alcohol, man, you'll notice that you get really clear. You can see really clearly. However, if you start putting that crap into your body, you can't see very clearly at all. It's like your eyes are just fogged over or glazed over, and you're just sleepwalking. I talk to people all the time, and it's like I'm just talking to a zombie. It's because of what they eat and drink, and then it's because they spend all of their time on social media, in YouTube. So, they're basically just fucked up their brain, and their body, and they're just like a zombie. That's why I control the things that I do. I control the things that I consume both mentally and information, and also food and things like that because the inputs create the outputs. David says, "Is Sam live only on Facebook or somewhere else as well?" It's just Facebook. Shawn Sam says, "Did you ever work a sales job for another company starting out?" No, I did not. I had to learn sales working for myself, and started out doing sales for myself. Leonardo says, "How do you deal when you have offers that are not from your ideal avatars and still in your niche?" I just take them. If you're getting started, take them. When you've got a ton of offers to choose from or a ton of prospects to choose from, you can start getting more picky and selective, and you can just pick the people you want to work with. If you're trying to just get more clients, get more money, get more experience, just take these ones. Georgie says, "I'm in the dental niche, and I've sent out about 400 direct messages 85%, 15% email and Linked messages. After I've connected with them, I have a 40%-60% open rate on the emails, and not even one call. I have followed to the T your course, and I think I have a very strong niche offers or hypothesis. What do you think is the issue? What do I miss? What strategy should I use for the followup emails, and in general, to get prospects on call? Should I start following up with them on the phone?" All right. So, dental niche, sent out 400 direct messages, and that is 85% email, 15% LinkedIn. Okay. So, 15% of that. Okay. So, what you should do is ... I think the reason, the cause of this is that 85% of yours are email. Email is not a very good method, especially in the dental niche because you can imagine how hammered dentists get with cold email, right? People are trying to sell them marketing stuff. It would be chaos. I interviewed a guy, and I'm just looking this up right now. There's a guy in the Consulting Accelerator, who I interviewed, who's in the dental niche, and I'll send you a link to his interview because he explains how he does it. It will probably be very helpful for you. Customer interviews, where is this one? Sorry. I'm just trying to find it for you. All right. Here we go. Now, I will reply to your thing. There you go. Watch that. Mike McCormick says, "Out of the following, which book is your favorite? Ray Dalio Principles, Sam Walton: Made in America or Ogilvy on Advertising? I do digital marketing." Well, you're asking me what my favorite is? So, I don't know why you put in, "I do digital marketing." Out of those three books, I'd say my favorite is Ray Dalio Principles, followed by Sam Walton: Made in America, and Ogilvy on Advertising, that's a book, but it's far from my favorite. The Ray Dalio Principles and Made in America are in a different category of their own. Sterling says, "Is it really important to be better than average at copywriting when doing Google Ads for a niche like plumbing? It seems like it wouldn't be essential to know, 'Well, no hot water? Call us now.'" Yeah. So, you will learn. You don't need to be a copywriting expert. I've never really bought copywriting courses. I've never really obsessed about copywriting. I just naturally got better at it by running ads and create, writing copy. That's how I got better at it. So, I don't think you need to overthink it. You just need to do it, and you'll get better with practice. Joshua says he met up with his main friendship group the other day, "... who I've known since high school, and this time around, it hit me just how different my views are to theirs because of the path I'm on, and they often gang up against me about it, which is making it harder to be around them. When you were starting out, did you have issues like this with friendship groups? Do you have any recommendations on how I could approach this?" Yeah. That's a good question. You just don't worry about it. You, obviously, will stop talking to your friends as much as you used to, and you will stop hanging out with them as much as you used to. That doesn't mean that you'll never talk to them ever again or not be friends with them ever again. It just means you're obviously going to be pulling back a bit because you need more time to do your own things. You're obviously going to form different views because they're not doing what you do, and your views contradict their views. So, when I hang out with my friends, I, typically ... When I say my friends, I mean my friends from back in New Zealand, and the ones who know me from when we were growing up, before I was in entrepreneurship. I don't talk about business because I know that if I do, they're either going to get bored, think I'm a dick or we're just going to have an argument. So, it's best just not to talk about it. I mean, if they ask me a question about it, I'll answer it, but for the most part, I'm just talking about other things. I don't feel the need to constantly talk about business even with people who aren't interested in business. David Lawrence says, "How do you maintain moment after making sales? I've recently reflected and realized that I grew complacent after achieving my initial wall map objective last month. There's a strategy session, have slumped as well. Any advice?" Yeah. You need better discipline. You need to set, use the wall map calendar, set goals, and never ever, ever stop. So, the day ... Let's say you have a massive day. I'm pretty sure one day this week, this year, we made 300 grand in a day. The next day, that night, I didn't do anything special. I just went to bed on time as per usual. The next day, got up as per usual, and went back to work, just as hard as ever. It never stops. Just because you make money doesn't mean you stop. You keep going. You need to have discipline to keep going every single day regardless of your results. Your results are low, who cares? Keep working. Your results are high, who cares? Keep working. Divina says, "I need help on pricing. I have a 12-month group coaching program, weekly teleclasses on how to unblock and monetize the creative talent, 4997 for 12 months or 497 a month. Any suggestions? Higher or lower price, three payments?" Yeah. I would not do the 12-month payment plan. That sounds like it's a disaster. I would either do the full pay or I'd break it up into max four payments. So, one pay or four. That way, you'll collect more cash upfront than accounts receivable. You'll have less admin issues. You'll have more float in terms of cashflow to run ads and do other things. That's what I would do. Lauren Alexander says, "Do you constantly think about business and ways to improve the business? If so, how do you ever actually relax? For example ..." Oh, I missed that question. I wanted to answer that one. It sounded fun. Ask that question again. Brandon says, "You post a lot of your students paid content like Q&As, recorded trainings, live trainings. I do two live training sessions for my students in addition to the training program they go through online. Do you recommend it that I post some of my trainings to the public as well or do students get weird about posting paid content to the general public?" That's a good question. What I do is in Consulting Accelerator, we have a Q&A call that happens on Monday and Friday. I'm pretty sure that's the schedule. Then Jesse and Nick Hauser run those, right? Those calls, they're just private. They stay in the content portal. The only people that can access them and the recordings are the customers. The bulk of our training, there's 120 hours of the program content in the portal. There is one hour that's leaked out there to give people a taste of what it's like. So, that's less than 1% of the paid content is out in the public, and all of the Q&As are private. The only Q&A recording that I share with the public is this one because it's a livestream and people don't share as much intimate business detail as they would on a proper conversation. So, this is a way for me to add value to the Accelerator members, and also share it with the public, so they can see what it's like to be a student in the program. I think if you look at how much of my stuff that's paid is out there for free, it's not very much at all. It's very small, and it's just enough to give people a taste, but nowhere near enough for anyone to think, "Oh, this is just available for free." It is nowhere near it. It's less than 1%. Mathia says, "Do your six weeks of training disappear after six weeks from buying the program? Do you have access anytime?" Yes, you have access for life. After the six weeks, you still have access to all of the six weeks, and you still have access to the community, and these calls. That's pretty ridiculous, but that's what you get. Georgie Petrov says, "What do you think about the following message, 'I help dentists to grow their practices and get more high-value implant root canals restoration patients constantly and predictably in 30 days or less by using proven marketing strategies that is specific to the industry'?" Too long. I'll just say, "I help dentists get high-value clients." That's all you need to say. Then if they ask how, then you include the detail. Thanks, Rodrigo, for the compliment. James Hammock says, "I help men overcome porn addiction. I have a group page with two likes, and developing a small following. Should I stop the page and create a public figure page, both or continue to build the group?" Honestly, if I was you, I would try and look at Reddit, and I would also look at ... What is it? Creating a YouTube channel just because of this specific niche. Facebook, people are going to to hit ... There's a low chance of people joining a public group or liking a page that talks about porn addiction because their friends ... They probably got their colleagues and their boss on Facebook, their parents, and everyone they know is on Facebook. I would look out on those channels and see what's going on over there. That's typically where people talk about more private information. Amy Campbell says, "I'm just starting out, though. Only sold a few pieces of art. So, how do I build authority to sell courses to artists when I'm not successful yet?" Okay. That's a good question. So, yeah. What you need to do is you need to find out how you can be more successful, how you can be a better artist, and how you can sell more art, and make more money selling your art. That should be your number one priority. There's a lot of artists out there who make good art, and sell a lot of art, and make a lot of money by creating and selling art. You should study them. Find out what they're doing. Reverse engineer everything. Become their student. Figure it out. Apply it for yourself. Achieve it for yourself. Be successful yourself with it. Then you will not only be successful, but now, you've also got a proof of concept and a recipe to teach other people, and make more money. Mathia says ... I've already answered that question. Johnny Cameron says, "I'm early in the Accelerator, almost done at week two, and I'm looking to help students become powerful leaders and standout in future interviews by helping them launch and grow their first profitable business." Oh, man! I missed that question. Sorry. Ask again. Todd Warren says, "What's the big shift in generating 50K a month versus 100K a month?" Honestly, not that much. It's just scale. It's volume. So, if you're making 50K a month, the you're just going to have to go twice as hard or you're going to have to be twice as efficient to get to 100K. The biggest thing I've noticed with people that make a lot of money with this program and people that don't make as much is they're just not that committed. Your commitment is everything. You've got to work hard. You've got to care about it, and you've got to be obsessed with it. Thinking you're going to be successful with something without caring about it, without doing much, and without really being committed, that's craziness. It doesn't happen. Donald Dang says, "How do you prevent yourself from buying dumb shit? I find myself getting pulled by materialistic things all the time. What kind of statement should I put in my affirmations to counteract this?" Yeah. Well, you don't need to really put something in your ... I mean, you could put in, "I am frugal and I only buy things that I need and that add value to myself or my business." That would be an affirmation, but then you just need some discipline. People who have compulsive shopping habits, it's compulsive behavior. It's an addiction. It's an instant gratification thing. It's a short feedback cycle with dopamine, which is the same thing you get from social media, right? So, unhooking from social media will create ... That will help you with the same thing as being a compulsive shopper because social media and compulsive shopping, really at their core, psychologically and chemically in your brain, are the same thing. They're just short dopamine feedback loops. So, you just need to get yourself unhooked from that, and start focusing on longer term goals, and things where your actions are going to take a while before they give you reactions. You need to get yourself trained on the longer term cycles. It's very hard for people to do, but it's one of the best skills in the world. Mohammad says, "What I'm aiming at is that you only do interviews with the successful ones. It would just be fair to everyone that that's what I would do. Give successful and new customers a chance because everybody has their story and it will benefit everyone in your community." Yeah. I mean, we could try it, but generally, what happens is the people who share their story and have achieved a result, they've got, they've learned something, right? They're able to share their result and people can follow suit. If there was interviews of people that haven't got clients, then it would be, sure, there might be some learnings in there, but it would be demotivating. If I want to be successful in business, what information should I consume? I should consume information from sources that are successful in business. I should not consume information from people who aren't successful in business, right? So, the logic behind it is pretty simple. Naila says, "I love your video on nine inconvenient truths about the online business market." Thanks. Glad you liked it. Georgie Petrov says he helps dentists ... All right. I already answered your one. Pristine Dimensions, that's not a name, that's a business name, says, "I'm in week one, and doing the characteristics research on my niche. Would you know any platform that is easier to get young celebs to invite as a panel and interview them as this is my niche?" Young celebs? Man, I'm the last person you should ask about celebs and people like that because I don't follow any of that stuff. So, I don't know. I have no idea. What I would do is I would think who is my niche. If it's young celebs, then how can I find out what problems they have. You can research online, but like I said on the training, the best way is to talk to them. Honestly, you need to figure that out. If you can't find a way to talk to them or learn anything about them, then it's probably not a good niche because you're going to have that same problem when you go to sell it. You're not going to know how to get in touch with them. So, this is a good acid test of this idea because right now, you've got to figure out, "How do I find these people? How do I get in touch with them?" Johnny Cameron says, "Why do you have your face on all of the pinups? Now, I have eight photos of you in my bedroom. That would be nice." Yeah. So, the reason ... At first, I only had one pinup, right? It was just in week one, video one, and it was the only four things you need to be successful. So, it made sense just with that one. Then as I started going through the training, I started making more of them because I was like, "Oh, this would be a good pinup. Oh, this would be a good pinup." I just used the same one. I didn't want to change the style. We're halfway through. That's why. If you get freaked out with too many of my faces, then just write the same message on your own keynote thing. It's about the message. It's not about my face. Flo Monopoly says, "I'm in week one into the training, and I love it. Sadly, my box set with the books is stuck at the German customs. They say they need to see some paper stuff, so they can calculate texts for that. Can you please help me to get to my books? My real name is Florian Collage." Sure thing. So, you just need to send an email ... All right. Cool. Someone's already said it. You just need to send an email to [email protected], and they'll be able to sort it out. Yeah. There's some customs that are real strict. I know Portugal and Germany, these ones, quite a few people had that where they get stuck there. If you email support, we'll be able to give you something, and you should get your box set easily. Sterling Coley says, "How many niches should be researching at one time? I'm emailing two niches. Should I do three?" No. One. Brainstorm different niches. Prioritize them. Be like, "Which one do I want to go with first?" Pick that one, and stick to that one. Don't do two things at the same time. Joe Ring says, "I'm publishing Facebook Ads for a client right now, and just tested my two ad sets. They were approved, but now, I can't delete the second one. I'm trying to troubleshoot and work out what I've done wrong. The delete option isn't clickable. Any ideas?" It will be. There will be a way. You just need to take a screenshot of the thing and post it in the Facebook group. Take a screenshot of the page that you're looking at where you can't find the delete button and post it in the Consulting Accelerator group saying, "I can't find the delete button." Someone will see what you're doing wrong. Tony Peacock says, "Although I have not gotten through Consulting Accelerator on week one, I really wanted to buy Uplevel." All right. If Uplevel seems like it's a good fit for you, then you should just reach out to Red Kutz, and I just tagged him on your ... I just commented on your post and tagged him. If you just message him, then we can see if it's a good fit. There's some people who buy Accelerator, find out that Uplevel is a better fit for them, and then they just immediately jump up to that without completing the whole course. We have some people joining our mastermind immediately and they haven't gone through and consumed everything because that's a better fit for them, right? If someone's starting from scratch, Accelerator is the best thing to start with. Go through that first before thinking about Uplevel. If Uplevel is a good fit for you immediately, then by no means, you have to consumer all of Accelerator first. Monica says, "Could you please post the date of this Facebook calls on the page events? I missed some because I didn't know they were on Friday. Thanks." Yeah. I can make a note to do that. I'll tell Nick Hauser to put it somewhere. We also have the Q&A calls section in our content portal. So, if you log in to the content portal, Consulting.com, then if you go community, Q&A calls, we should be able to add it there, as well as the Facebook group events, so people can remember. I will make a note to do that because that would be helpful. Mike McCormick says, "I'm currently reading one of your suggested books, Psycho-Cybernetics. I'm loving it. I'm thinking about which book to read next from others you have suggested. What is your favorite out of the following?" I already answered this one. Principles. Joward says, "Asking my question again since it got shut off and saw it streaming before. I'm in the recruitment niche. My clients' problem is that they are looking for candidates they want to hire. If I establish that they have this problem from a direct outreach engagement and they are prepared to talk to me, can I give them my terms and how much I charge on the first conversation or is it better to wait to have a strategy session with them?" You can just go straight into it on your call because the service you're selling, which is recruitment, they pay you a fee if you find them someone. So, they can sign up on that first call. There's not much friction to them doing that. So, I'd just go for it on the first call. Tarter says, "Have you started using other platforms like Instagram or Twitter or is it just Facebook and YouTube?" Yeah. In terms of advertising, it's just Facebook and YouTube. For the most part, I grew my company to 80 million a year just on Facebook Ads. Instagram Ads don't work that well. Then Twitter, I'd never go on that thing. That thing is useless. Yeah. Simon Robert says, "I help women lose weight and gain energy safely, easily, and effectively by following a proven eight-week process. I've joined some keto groups, weight loss and yoga groups to gain organic outreach, and it's going okay, but zero calls so far. What would you say about my target focus for the groups I have joined? Would you advise other groups as being beneficial for mothers who wish to lose weight?" Yeah. You didn't really include any information about what actions you're taking because you told me what you do, and then you told me you joined some groups, and it's going okay, but zero calls. So, I need to know what you did. You should join these groups. You should look at what's being posted and things, and you should write comments and add value to people, and then you should add some friends, and then start some DMs that way, and just go through it that way. If you've just joined groups and you haven't done any of that, then it's normal that nothing's really happened. I'm just going to turn this light up a bit. All right. Rodney Durant says, "I'm a project manager implementing finance systems for mainly large corporate CFOs net suite. I found your course when researching more about CRM and sales and marketing automation, as I find that finance types are way behind the times with front end business automation. I want to learn more about digital marketing to see if I can switch from a time-sucking backend finance systems to front end systems for smaller companies. Since I used to be a CPA, I want to help small chartered accountants, firms here in Oakland with growing their business through sales and marketing automation. I've just studied your course, and now I'm on week three. Great course. The challenge is that I can't do strategy sessions and deliver a service because what I want to offer is in week seven, digital marketing. What should I do? It seems like I have the cart before the horse in the scenario." Yeah. So, if you want to learn digital marketing, so that you can be able to offer digital marketing to people, then I would just go through the course and still complete the exercises each week. So, in week one, you're going to define your niche, do research on the niche, see what other people are offering to the niche in the market, see what the problems are, see why the solutions aren't solving the problems. That's a key one because there's a lot of people in Oakland that help businesses with digital marketing, but there's a lot of businesses in Oakland that need help with digital marketing even though they're getting with digital marketing. So, what that tells us is that the solutions aren't really solutions. If I was you, in week one I'd really dig in to that and dissect it and understand it. You don't need to go and learn digital marketing to do that. Then week one, it's the mindset stuff. Week three, you're getting into some of the organic stuff. I think you're fine to just progress through the course week-by-week, and you'll be learning digital marketing before week six and seven and all of that. You're learning it throughout the whole course, not just in week seven because I'll be teaching you funnels, the website stuff, the conversions. You'll learn a lot about digital marketing before week seven. Khalid says, "You said I have to train my people until they become good in Facebook Ads. These are contractors. It's not my staff. Should I still train them and teach them everything and even if they are contractors and working with many people other than me?" Yeah. So, what you probably want to do here is I would someone who isn't working with lots of people, and get them to just work with you and become your guy. It's still going to be like a contractor role, but you can scale together instead of that contractor looking for other clients all the time. That way, as you make them better, you'll build a strong partnership and relationship. That's what I would do if I was you because, yeah, I wouldn't be educating and training people to be really good if I knew that they weren't going to be a longterm asset. Jessica says, "I'm in the education sector in the UK. I provide free consultations to potential students and I get paid only when the students get in the university. This provides me with huge cashflow issue. That's why I'm still in my nine-to-five job while understanding all of my current students. Unfortunately, in the sector in the UK, every agency provides a free service even though most of them do not really understand the student needs or how to explain the funding available for them, et cetera. I think that my consultancy should be paid by students no matter if they get into the unis. Do you agree? Looking to your videos in week one, you explained that we should charge our client based on the value and results they are going to get. So, I let them get into a course that costs 10K. I should charge them 1K." Yeah. So, this is a good question. You can do, though. You can charge people upfront for your service even though they're not guaranteed that they're going to get into a university, right? I've got a friend from New Zealand who owns this company called Crimson Education, Crimson Education. You can Google it. They basically help people get into Ivy League universities. They charge upfront, and they tell you what your chances are of getting in, but people still pay upfront. That's very, very, very common. People work with them because they're really good at it. Sure, they could work with another company for free, but if their chances are better with the company that costs money, they don't really want to take a chance on that one, right? So, they pay it, anyway. That's the way it works. So, if you can do a better job and prove the chances, then people will buy it from you regardless if there's a free option because what they really care about is getting into the university, not the price of the fee for helping someone get into the university. Sterling says, "Those who know don't talk. Those who talk don't know." Yup. That is true. Lionel says, "I noticed you mentioned your friends back in New Zealand. Do you still stay connected with them and see them from time-to-time." Yeah, barely. I've been in America for three years. During those years, I've been back to New Zealand twice. The two times I went back to New Zealand, I saw my friends. Then my friends have come over once since in those three years. So, in three years, I've met my friends in person three times. On average, one time per year. So, yes, we still stay in touch, and yeah, every now and then, they'll send me a text or whatever, but it's nowhere near the same level of connection we had when I was in New Zealand. We'd hang out every weekend. They're still my friends, though. Jill Couson says, "You told me last time to find my core value on my service to my high-performance health coaching program. How does this sound? I help high-performance leaders who lost their self-control of health and happiness to regain their inner strength and finally feel in just 30 days how to master their own health and life with my 30 years proven successful ..." Yeah. There's too many words in here. What you do is you help high-performance leaders. We need to get clear on this definition. What is a high-performance leader? If you help leaders, of what? Sports teams? What? We need to get specific. If you help ... Let's say you help C-suite executives or let's say you help managers. Managers, there's a lot of managers, and they have to manage teams. Let's say you help managers and leaders or no. You could just say, "I help managers to ..." What's their problem? All right? So, we always need to start by defining the niche, and yours doesn't sound that well-defined. The next thing we need to do is see what problem the niche has. It looks like you've defined it here as losing their self-control. I bet you they don't wake up in the morning and think, "Oh, man! I've lost all of my self-control." They're going to think of it in another way like, "Oh, my team is falling apart. My team isn't respecting what I'm saying. My team isn't performing." So, you could say, "I help managers with low-performing teams and ..." "I help managers of low-performing teams turn into high-performance teams," or something like that, right? You could get better words in there, but you're just talking about the niche clearly, then the problem clearly, and then the outcome clearly. Those three things, boom, boom, boom. Naila says, "When you work, do you include reading about materials to improve your product and self-development in that?" So, when I work ... Typically, I don't read books or things in the middle of my workday, if that's what you mean. Reading happens outside of my workday. The workday is 12 to 13 hours for me, and it's pure execution on things, right? There's no reading, no social media. None of that shit anywhere in that, not even working out, going to the gym or anything. It's pure. Just imagine 13 hours of relentless doing. That's what happens in there. Then my working out and everything happens before that, and then my reading typically happens after that, but sometimes to do a task, I have to quickly Google something, right? That happens all the time, but it's just a quick fetch of information. It isn't a consumption of content. So, I hope that answers your question. Joshua Westover says, "I'd be interested to know what it is about Elon Musk that inspires you." Sure. Well, just look at what he's done. You just need to look at what someone's done and it's pretty indicator of whether they know something or not. That dude, he started PayPal. Before PayPal, he started another company. I forgot what it was. He started basically the first Yellow Pages on the internet, and then scaled that successfully, sold it. Then went to start PayPal, and then scaled that successful, and IPO'd it. Then he went and started ... What was next? I'm pretty sure it was SpaceX. He started that, and he ... No. He started a rocket company, and actually makes rockets. That's pretty hard. He's better at it than NASA. That's pretty impressive. Then he started an electronic car company. Well, he didn't really start it, but he found it, gained control of it, and then he's massively influenced it and funded it, and turned it into what it is today. So, those are pretty impressive things to achieve. You don't achieve those things without knowing some things. He must be smart. He must be hardworking, and he must be good at leading people, hiring people, solving problems. So, that's why, obviously, I've got a lot to learn from him. Simple as that. Leandro says, "What is the best social media channel as a hypnotist?" That's a good question. I think it would probably be YouTube. I know YouTube has a lot of hypnotist people on it because they can share their videos and all of that stuff. Yeah. If you mean for producing content or if you mean for ads, for ads, I mean, Facebook could probably be the best, but for an organic place where you're going to post content and engage with people, probably YouTube. Lisa Marie says, "I'm in the fitness industry, and I work online with busy and stressed out moms. Recently, I put together a free 28-day challenge, run on Facebook with the intention to sell them into my full program afterwards." Well, that's cool, but there's no question. You just gave me a statement. So, if there's a question, what's the question. Rod Jefferson says, "Enjoying the course. Is there any way to refer a friend without an email? I have over 3,000 Facebook friends, but really do they list their emails. Is it possible to get an affiliate link to refer a friend?" Yeah, maybe in the future, but for now, typically, if you've got a friend, you're going to know your friend's email. So, then you should be able to input it. It's supposed to be more of a personal thing than spamming it out on your newsfeed and everything. What you could do, though, is post on Facebook and talk about your experience and say, "If you're interested, comment or DM me." So, you can still post on your Facebook and you can still find out who's interested and then ask them for their email, and then refer them or you can make an unboxing video. You can make a review video, put it on YouTube. The people that do really well with refer a friend, they take the time to do an honest review of it, a long review where they talk about their experience with the program from start to finish, the Q&A calls, the customer support, the box set, the video. They review everything in detail. Those people, they make a lot of money with refer a friend. Stephan says, "Possible solution for keeping up with the questions. Not sure where you are reading out questions. However, if you're reading them through your laptop, it may help to screenshot the question that you are reading, so that you don't have to rush and worry about missing it." Yeah, that could work. Although, typically, the problem is, is that once you get behind on one, you're behind on all of them. So, I'd be screenshotting every single question, and it would be out of control. So, typically, if you get out of sync, the best thing you can do is skip a gap, scroll down about this far, and start here because now, you've got this much lag time before it catches up with you again. If I just screenshot it, I still have the same issue. Lisa says, "What do you think about giving free coaching to try first in this situation?" I think that you should try to charge immediately because, obviously, it's better. If you have two options, one, not charging, the other charging, which one is better? Obviously, charging. You get money. Your clients are probably going to be more committed. So, try to charge first. However, if you absolutely cannot find the courage to charge, then you can do it for free because doing it for free is better than not doing anything at all, but it's not as good as charging. Joseph Newton says, "How long did it take you to have your first 10K month?" Two years from the very beginning, two whole years. The first year I was business, I made zero. The second year I was in business, I made about 100 grand. Now, 100 grand a year is almost 10 grand a month. So, yeah, about two years, but that might sound long. Truthfully, if you buy this course, you can massively shortcut that, but it took me two years to get to 100 grand a year, but it took me five years to get to 30 million a year. So, you can move pretty quick. Armagan says, "Hey, Sam. I made my first million, and after, I got really lazy. Cannot start a new project. What can I do to beat the laziness?" Yeah. Well, it seems like ... What's interesting is in this statement you told me or in your question without a question mark, you said you've felt the need to put the fact that you made your first million, and then afterwards you got really lazy, right? So, obviously, why you were in business and working was to make money. Obviously, the number that was important to you was $1 million. That was your goal, and that was your objective, and you were motivated by that. Now that you've got that, you're not motivated. So, this is a simple one. You need to find a goal that is bigger than that. You should try to attack a big problem. Try to focus on something that isn't just the money. If we look at Elon Musk, for example, since we seem to be using him throughout this Q&A, he wanted to build an electric car, right? Not only an electric car, he wanted to make one that was safer than all the other cars in the world, and faster than all the other cars in the world, and that was available for everyone. So, that was his mission. Then he also wanted to occupy Mars or make the human race a multi-planetary species, right? So, he's aiming at those things. That's what's getting him out of bed in the morning. That's what he's focusing on. He's not just trying to make a billion dollars or $10 billion. He's actually not trying to make the money. That's why he's motivated all the time, and that's why he makes a lot of money by not aiming at the money. However, you aimed at the money, and then you hit a plateau. So, I did that, too, by the way. You've just got to find a more meaningful goal that isn't money, and then you'll find the fire again. Amy Campbell says, "Thanks so much. Cheers from N. Zed." No problem, Amy. Dave Mar, "For the niche-picking, my niche is high school students who don't know what to do after school, but they are not the ones paying." I was going to say, of course, because I was thinking, "Man, if I was a kid afterschool, I would never think, 'Hmm, I don't know what to do after school. This is a problem that I am going to pay money for to solve.'" "The payers will be their parents. Is my niche rather the parents than the students?" Hmm. Yeah. I would say that something's going wrong in here. Your niche is a group of people, right? So, you've got to find the group of people. Then you've got to find their problem. So, you chose high school students, and then you thought that their problem was they don't know what to do after school. Are you sure that's their problem? Did they tell you that? Because usually, kids do know what they want to do. They want to go play a video game, play a sport, talk to their friends, go on social media, watch TV. The problem has to come from them, not the parents. If the parents tell you what their problem is, then your niche isn't really the kids. Your niche is the parents, right? So, you've got to reconstruct this and engineer it the right way because something's failing in this sequence right here. It doesn't make sense. You need to go through and clearly define each point, who's the niche, what's the problem, what's the solution. Debbie says, "I heard poor people buy things, rich people invest." Yes, but, yeah, I guess that's true. Poor people buy stupid things. I think that's more accurate. For example, I see a lot of poor people who buy video games, and then big screen TVs and McDonald's and fast food, and then alcohol, and then door charges to get into clubs, and then Ubers to and from clubs. All of these things are pretty wasteful, right? Someone more successful would probably buy healthier food, a gym membership, and then self-education, online courses, books, things like that. That's investing in themselves, in their health, and everything. Then they would invest in things for their business, too. They would rather hire talented people than buy a Lamborghini, right? I would much rather hire really smart people and then buy a car. What am I going to do with a car? What am I going to with some smart people? That's way more exciting. We can build some cool shit. With a car, just drive around. Gavin says, "What role was your first hire and why?" Well, it depends on what business you're talking about here. If it was back when I was doing the digital marketing for local businesses, then my first hire was someone to do the AdWords. I was using contractors, and then once I got a certain number of clients, it just got unmanageable, so I wanted to bring a full-time employee in-house to do that, and that was my first real hire for that business. Julie Vignet says, "How do you charge for a service that lasts two months? Clients are happy to pay the first month in full and advance on the call, but I often get asked to split 50 at the beginning and 50 at the end for the second month. Is it lack of trust? How do you approach this?" Yeah. I would just say ... You just need to have a policy. Maybe you do a full payment, which is ... Let's say your program costs ... I'll make this up. Let's say it costs two grand, right? So, you could say I costs $2,000 and they can pay $2,000 and get it. If they ask you, "Hey, can I pay it over two months or two payments?" Then you can say, "Yup, you could if you want, but it's $1,100 now," or no. You could go a bit higher. $1,200 now, and then $1,200 in 30 days' time. So, that's a total of $2,400. That's a 20% finance charge. So, that way, you are collecting the second payment at the start of the second month, not at the end. So, if they don't pay, you can cut them out of the course, right? You're also making it more expensive, so that you get more people choosing it upfront. Johnny Cameron says, "My question again, I'm looking to help students become more powerful leaders and standout in the future interviews by helping them launch and grow their first profitable business, which is residential window cleaning." So, two questions around that one. "What are your thoughts on my statement? Two, you say everyone thinks their niche has no money or can't afford it. What are your thoughts on ...?" All right. So, you said that your message is to help students become powerful leaders and standout in future interviews. So, the niche is students, all right? Let's say it's high school students. Now, their problem is what? You're talking about helping them standout in future interviews. That isn't their problem because their problem isn't going to be no high school student. It's going to be anxious everyday thinking, "Man, I'm so anxious about standing out in future interviews." I guarantee you no one has ever said that as a high school student. So, I don't know how you engineered that problem, but I can pretty much guarantee you it didn't come from the students because they wouldn't have said that. So, the whole thing is breaking down right there. That's where it's failing. Your niche is high school students. Good. That's the group of people. Now, we need to define their problem. How do we do that? We talk to them. We ask them, "Hey, students. What is your problem?" They will talk. They'll tell you. Now, you're like, "Okay. Cool. Now, I've got a niche, students. Now, I've got the problem. Now, how am I going to solve this problem?" Right? Simple. You've made this a bit convoluted because you think they want to stand out in future interviews, and then the best way to do that is to help them launch a business. That's a hell of a thing to do just to stand out in a future interview. In fact, if someone started a business that was successful, why would they need to do any interviews in the future? You know what I mean? This just doesn't work. Then of all things, you're saying that they should start a residential window cleaning business. You need to wipe the slate clean with this. This one is not going to fly. You need to work through the process again. You need to be niche, problem, solution. Honestly, when you do it that way, you won't end up with a mutation like you've got here. Whenever something's all twisted around like this, I know that it hasn't been engineered the right way. Diana Martini says, "I'm starting over in a new niche now, home care agencies. How do you recommend that I get to know my niche better? Do you have any tips on how to hop on a call with my niche to get to know them and their pain points better?" Home care agencies. "How do you recommend that I get to know my niche better? Do you have any ..." Home care agencies. Yeah. So, I think what you need to do is you can just Google it and start reading online, and then you need to find some people who work at home care agencies. Find some home care agencies. List some companies in your local area. Then once you've found them, go to LinkedIn and see who works there. Then once you find the people that work there, see if you can message them or connect with them and start building a relationship with them, then asking them questions over LinkedIn messages or maybe you can move it to email. Then if you build a bit of a relationship with them, then you can probably meet in person and buy them lunch, and ask them all questions. That's what I would do if I was you. Gerardo Perez says, "What's your recommendation on approaching potential customers on a trade show? I will be exposed with over 200 customers. Should I just learn from them or go aggressive and try to close them on the spot?" I think what you should do is you should just ... You're never going to be able to close every single person at a trade show, especially if you've just got a booth or if you're just an attendee of the trade show. I would just meet people, make friends with them and ask questions, be curious. I bet you that the byproduct of that will be a lot of learning, a lot of good connections, and probably some clients, too. Go in with the intention to just be curious and learn, and you will probably come out with more sales than the person who goes in there with the intent to sell. Karen says, "I'm just moving into week two. My niche is helping people with chronic pain skills, hypnotherapy, and mindfulness education. My question, is this a good niche because it is a lot of one-on-one work?" Yeah. So, I mean, if your niche is people with chronic pain, right? So, there's the niche. There's the group of people, human beings with chronic pain. Then your solution to that is you are going to help them with hypnotherapy and mindfulness. That can work. Then you're saying ... So, that is a good niche, but then you're saying, "Is this a good niche because it has a lot of one-on-one work?" Well, good niche is always going to have one-on-one work in the beginning because you've got to ... The only way you can really add value is by doing the work yourself and learning, and being in the trenches. Look at what I did. I started out with helping plumbers with digital marketing. I met them in person. I drove to their offices, and I talked to them on the phone. I did all of their ads for them. I did everything. I was fully in the trenches doing everything, and it was a lot of manual labor. That's how I learned. Then as I got better and better and better, I was able to hire other people to help me, and then I was able to create trainings that people could do on their own. The same will be true for you. If you get really good at helping these people, then as you get way better, you can create a training program, and then there'll be less one-on-one work. It always starts this way, though. So, it's a good niche, and you've just got to suck it up and do the work. Ben McNeil says, "What are your thoughts on providing AI services without having a master's degree or a PhD in AI?" Well, I don't think a master's degree or a PhD has anything to do with AI, really, to be honest. You should trust someone to talk about AI if they show that they know a lot about AI. It's got nothing to do with the PhD, right? We interview a lot of people because we have computer or software engineers that work at our company. We've interviewed a lot of people with Stanford PhDs in computer science and master's in computer science and things. A lot of them aren't that good. People without master's degrees and PhDs sometimes are a lot better because they've got more practical experience. So, it's got nothing to do with it, honestly. It's all about what you've done, what you can prove that you've done, and how much you know about the topic, not a piece of paper. Roy Anwar says, "I have realized that I'm not really passionate about digital marketing for life coaches that I'm doing now. I chose this niche because I just wanted to pick a niche and not procrastinate. What I'm really passionate about is personal development, public speaking, mindset, paradigm, and stuff like that. Can you advise me what to do now, please?" Yeah. Well, really, if you look at it, that's what you're doing. You say what you're passionate about. It's personal development, public speaking, mindset, paradigm. Look at what you're doing. You're doing digital marketing for life coaches. So, you're still working with this personal development space, just indirectly. So, I would continue to do that until ... Then you need to think personal development, it's not really a niche because some people might show you how to lose weight. Some people might show you how to meditate. Some people might show you how to have a better diet, how to do all sorts of things. There's so many facets to personal development. Personal development isn't the same thing as public speaking. Mindset is pretty much the same thing as personal development. Paradigm is irrelevant from this completely. So, really, you're confused about this. What do you want to do, personal development or public speaking? The two aren't the same. Choose one. I bet you it's personal development because that's what you're doing with the life coaches. Then you need to ask yourself, "Well, what do I mean by that?" Because personal development is too vague. Who is the niche? What is the group of people? What is their problem? Then how are you going to help them solve their problem? You need to define these things. Right now, your message is too vague. Well, your thinking here is far too vague for you to take any meaningful action. I would stick to doing what you're doing right now until you can clearly articulate the group of people, and their problem, and the solution to their problem. That's when I would then start taking action on that. Joward says, "In the alchemy workbook, is it better to add your next milestones and goals or just put in who you eventually want to be? Sometimes I feel the goals that I have in my vision board are not ..." Sorry. "Sometimes I feel the goals I have in my vision board are a long shot and want to pick ones that are more possible or easier to reach. Is that the right mindset?" I think your goal should always be seeming impossible, right? Those are your longterm goals. Then in terms of what you're going to do this month, this week, today and all of that, make it more action-oriented, "So, I'm going to do this action." Those should be what your goals are in the month and things. Then your annual goals should be believable, but still to a stretch, but your longterm goals should be unbelievable because they're longterm goals. That's how it works. Donald Dang says, "Would Uplevel Consulting be more a fit for my needs in looking for more advanced scanning tactics and what not?" Maybe. You would have to talk to Red and explain your situation, and he'd tell you if he thinks it's a good fit for you or not. I just tagged him on your message. So, you can just reply to him, and he will tell you. All right. Well, we're at the end of our session now. So, like I said, these calls, they happen every Saturday, almost every Saturday. Some Saturdays, I'm traveling or I have to do something else. So, it's pretty much three out of four Saturdays. We go from 3:00 PM till 5:00 PM Eastern time. That's the time in New York. Now, if you enjoyed this, if you enjoyed this session, just click that like button. Let me know what you think, what you thought. Then I'm going to see if we're going to have a call next week. I'm just looking at my calendar right now. What's happening next weekend? So, the next one is there will be a call on the 24th of November, which is next Saturday. Then there won't be a call the next Saturday, which is the 1st of December. Yeah, 1st of December, I'm going to be at a friend's wedding. So, won't be doing one then, but next week, you can put it in your calendar right now. Saturday, November 24th, 3:00 PM till 5:00 PM Eastern time. We are doing a livestream Q&A. So, thanks, everyone, for attending. Have a good weekend. We'll speak again soon.

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