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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 10th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, November 10th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for November 10th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: All right. I can see a couple people jumping on here. Welcome. If you guys can just let me know if you can see my screen ... not my screen. If you can see me, my video, and hear me speaking, audio, just let me know those are working, and then we'll get started here. I can see we've got Jennifer Lee on, Sharon, Berkeley Robinson, Jamie Stenhouse, Joshua Westover. Awesome. Thanks. Looks like sound and video are all good, we're good to get going. If it's your first time on one of these, welcome. How these livestreams go is I do them pretty much every single Saturday. I do the monthly three out of four Saturdays, so three a month out of four, sometimes all four. They happen on Saturday at 3 pm Eastern time. It's the time in New York, and we go for two hours, so 3 to 5 Eastern time. If you just put it in your calendar as a repeat thing, then you won't forget. How we do it is we, you just ask questions in the comments box, which is over there. Oops, actually, it's over there. Then I'll just go through in sequential order, one by one, and answer them in the order that they're asked. Let's go ahead and get started. Jennifer Lee says, "Samuel, sales process is very powerful. Thank you. Traffic, video, apps, strategy session. What is the most expensive offer you've seen that works well with this method? Also, I'm selling a ..." I'll just read the full thing. "Also, I'm selling a done-for-you service for a total price of over 100K monthly retainer plus large success fee at the end. How would or could you modify your strategy sessions focused sales process to address much higher price points where it's not an up-sell." That's a good question. I don't think it really, it doesn't change anything. People sell things for millions of dollars. People sell things for billions of dollars, hundreds of thousands of dollars. The process is still the same. What we're doing is we're just, we're trying to understand what their current situation is and what their desired situation is and then why they can't get there themselves. Then we're seeing if what we have can work as a solution to help them go to where they want to go. If that is true, then we tell them what we've got, how much it costs and whether they want to buy it or not. If they want to buy it, cool, solve it. If they don't, they don't. If it's not going to help them get to where they want to go, then we won't even try to sell it to them. That's as simple as it is. That's how you sell anything. Now, if it's just a high price point, like, let's say it's a hundred grand, the one thing that might change is just the actual payment method, because I don't know anyone with a credit card that could just do 100K with a strike, plus you probably wouldn't want to do 100K with a stripe. You'd probably want to do a bank wire or something because the fees. It's identical. The process is the same. The only thing that might change is the way that people are going to pay you. All right. Who else we got here? Berkeley Robinson says, "Got third paying clients, am ready to hit Facebook ads. All three are from different countries, US, Netherlands and the UK. Should I just target the US, or should I target all three?" Well, honestly, you can be international from day one. It doesn't really matter what country people are in provided they have the problem and they can speak the same language as you, then you're good. It's really all about the problem and the solution. If everyone has the same problem and the solution, then we shouldn't really discriminate by their country although sometimes we have to because if they can't speak the language that we speak, then it's very hard to consult them. Yeah, you can go international from day one. I only recommend to stick to one country when you only really only know one country and you establish a proof of concept in only one country, but it seems like with you, you're kind of international from day one. That's fine. Just continue in that fashion. Jason Winter says, "Can you talk about accepting split payments a bit? What percentage of your sales is split payments, and what portion of those do not complete the rest of the payments, and is the course completely shut off if they're not completed, and are the percentages different for your other courses like up level?" With us, 75 percent of our payments are full pay. That means 25 percent of the payments are split. Of the payments, the 25 percent of the payments that are split, we collect roughly 96 percent of them. We have really good processes there. If they fail to make any one of those payments, then, yes, the course is restricted until that is fixed. With up level we have a higher percentage of full pays, probably 80 percent, but the sum total of all of our things that we sell averages out to about 75 percent. Split payments are good because some people can't buy with the full pay, but split payments are also bad in that you want to try and collect as much money up front as possible, because you need cash-flow, you know? You need money yourself to live. You need money to pay contractors, pay for software, pay for advertising or whatever. You can't pay bills using accounts receivable. You can't eat using accounts receivable. It's always best to try and focus on getting as much cash as possible and then not ... There's some companies that only have a very small amount of cash and a huge accounts receivable. I try to have as much cash as possible and then a small piece of accounts receivable. [Jaw-wood 00:07:13] says, "There's a lot of monkey see, monkey do in recruitment and has become really distorted because of the extremely high demand on developers within the Tick space, and many in your recruitment businesses are started every day to supply this demand. This problem is pretty obvious to me, because I have already worked as a developer. Do I still have to conduct research to find out what the biggest pains for hiring companies are before starting on my own as a recruitment consultant? My niche are companies using a specific product or digital agencies implementing this product. This is because both are looking for developers who specialize in it to hire them. Is this too broad of a niche, or should I focus on one of these two segments? The product is an enterprise content management system like Adobe AE." Yeah, I think your best bet in recruitment for technology people, and I'm speaking about this from experience, because we've had to hire engineers and not just ordinary engineers. Not like a PHP developer or a WordPress developer or ... We're looking for unicorn engineers, ones that have 10 to 20 years experience, full stack, and they're like polymaths, they know everything and have worked on everything. Those people are so rare. We've tried everything, and it's very hard to find. In the end the only way we got any traction was by going, we basically found someone who is a recruiter, like a private recruiter, so they don't work for a company. It's just one individual person, and they are an engineer themselves, and they go in and they do the work. They use a laser targeting method. They'll just go into LinkedIn and search for people and then direct message them and set up calls and things. Then they'll go in and just search and dig for the right people based on specific requirements and then bring us candidates. That's the only thing that's really worked. If you want to really go into that space, it's best to really niche down, become just somebody who sources candidates for a particular Tick step, like you just find develop engineers for Adobe AE, or you just find Java developers, or you just find Golang developers or something. You just find the specific type of person, and then you can just master that. Then you'll out-compete all of the other generalists, because there's too many generalist Tick recruiters, and Tick's gotten too fragmented for generalists to know what's going on, so you need to really niche down if you want to succeed there. Lauren Alexander says, "Is it too broad to say that I help people overcome anxiety, or should I be more specific, such as, I help people overcome OCD or obsessive thinking? It seems like people identify themselves very specifically in this niche, although the issues can be handled similarly, in my experience. I have overcome OCD and anxiety and obsessive thinking myself, so I feel I could help others do the same, but I am not a therapist or certified in any way. Does this matter? I know people who have gone through this course and helped with addictions and such, and they don't seem to be doing well. I don't want to have problems down the line since mental issues can potentially be really intense, and OCD and anxiety can lead ..." Okay. Your first question was, is it too broad to say that you help people overcome anxiety, or should I be more specific, such as OCD or obsessive thinking. Honestly, obsessive thinking and OCD are kind of like the same thing as anxiety. I think you could just say you help people overcome anxiety. It sounds like a good thing to talk about, because a lot of people have it. It's definitely a problem, and you have also had it yourself and figured out how to remedy it, which is good. Then you also said, "I know people have gone through this course and helped with addictions and such, and they don't seem to be doing well." Well, I don't know how you determined that, because that's inaccurate. I know people who have gone through this and have focused on binge eating or porn addiction or video game addiction and different types of behaviors, and they are doing really well. That's a false observation. Then, "I just don't want to have problems down the line since mental issues can potentially ..." You can help people overcome anxiety. Are you going to guarantee them that you'll help them overcome their anxiety? No, you can't do that because you don't have any idea what's going on in their head. It's not a guarantee and you're not saying this is a replacement for taking medication or something like that. Even if you believe it is, you've just got to be careful by saying you can't really say things like that, because that's how you get yourself into trouble. Provided you just say you help people overcome anxiety, and you don't ever talk about the whole medical side and all of that, and you have some disclaimers about that, then you're good. I think that's a good niche. You should try it. Jaw-wood says, "In my niche recruitment, the industry standard is to work on contingency with clients, meaning you will only get paid when you help them find and hire the person. You only invoice them within two weeks of the candidate's start date. Do you think this is fair?" Yes, I do think it's fair. That's how we pay our guy. It works really well. We only have to pay when we get the result. Now, there's some industries where this doesn't make much sense, because the person has to build out a lot of things. If someone has to build out an entire funnel or set up all of these ads and test things, then it's different, because someone has to build a lot of things, but here a recruiter doesn't have to build anything. They just have to tap their network, see if they can get somebody, and if they can, they get paid. If they can't, they don't. It works really well in this specific use case. Jill Carlson says, "My situation: Thirty years ago or thirty years' experience working with high-performing CEOs who have severe health symptoms of close to be burnout, often 20 symptoms, I work with only natural solutions. I am a natural alternative to medical health professionals. Results, incredible, good, fast. Problem: They don't want to let me use them as testimonials because they instead want to keep me as a kind of family doctor to all of their family, and I got stuck with all of their family and lose my energy and focus to sell. They also want to deal with me about prices. Since I started your program, I realized that I have got success with so many different kinds of pains and desires. With my clients that's difficult for me to choose one of them. Can I use several kinds of pains to sell them? What do you think?" What should you do here? Yeah. This is simple. If you really helped these people change their life, then they owe you a testimonial. If they don't want to give you a testimonial, then you shouldn't work with them anymore. You have to have more control here. You helped them change their life. That doesn't mean that they control you. You have to be more firm, and you have to tell them, and you have to be willing to walk away if they won't play ball with you, because you deserve that if you've really helped them a lot. Yeah, you just have to be more firm. Get testimonials from them. Tell them that you're not their family doctor. You should really focus on going through the Accelerator program and coming up with specific types of offers, like maybe just one core offer that you give to people, which is like, what are you providing that ... and make it more uniform and consistent so that you're not doing all sorts of different stuff for these people and they're just controlling you. It sounds like you've let them mold you too much, like they've got their hands all over you and molded you into something that you didn't want to be, and you have to resist that, because you should be molding yourself, not the other way around. Mauricio says ... Actually, Roger says, "Is targeting small businesses too general of a niche?" Yes, it is. Mauricio says, "Week six on the Accelerator is very powerful." Awesome. Glad to hear that. Sharon says, "I help drug addicts. I however do not know where to get the content for training." Well, that's an issue, because why would you be helping them if you don't know how to help them? If you don't know where to get the content from, the content's supposed to come from your brain. How the content got into your brain in the first place is because you've done it. You know what to do. If you were an addict and now you're not an addict, then the content is in your brain about how to not be an addict. You just have to extract it out and put it into a training. But if it's not there, then you probably didn't do it, and if you didn't do it and it's not there, then you probably shouldn't be saying you can help them do it, because you can't. That's how it works. Lauren says, "Overcoming OCD and anxiety would have to be a one-on-one coaching situation to start. Does it make sense to have weekly calls with people to check up and discuss alternative ways of viewing the situation plus homework every week? I was thinking of having different price tiers, also example for 1,200 per month. We can have a 45-minute call." What would I do in this situation? I think you can start off by doing one-on-one. You can start off by offering one-on-one, and you can get them onto a Skype call and things like that. Then once you establish a proof of concept and you really know how to solve this thing, then that's when you can probably start to create a program and create a Facebook group and start doing weekly calls. On the weekly calls, you're not providing homework and you're also not providing content. What you're instead doing is answering people's questions. That's the most valuable purpose and use of the weekly Q&As. That way you've got a group, a content portal with the specific sequential information to be executed, and the Q&A mechanism, and that all works really well. But you have to first start with one-on-one to learn how to do the group. Jaw-wood says, "Corporate question: When does it make sense for the business to build in-house software development team instead of relying on external technical partners and agencies?" I think most companies should use other people's software. Most companies should use ClickFunnels and WordPress and all of these different tools, right? Because you don't need an engineer. You don't need to touch the code. You can just use the interface. They're very simple. They're very cheap, and they get updated by the company. That's what works best. Once you start to get into a situation where you're making a lot of money and you have a real need for a specific technology that does not exist in the market, and it makes sense for you to pay people to build it and maintain it and update it, which is very expensive, and most people have no idea, then and only then should you ever hire a team of engineers to build it. Taj says, "Hello, Sam. Thank you for taking the time to do these calls for us. My niche is helping former athletes transition into life after sports by finding their life's direction outside of athletics. My question ..." It just jumped right past me. Sorry. It does it sometimes on this system. Then I can't scroll up. If I miss your question, just ask it again. [Raff 00:21:14] says, "What's the perfect recipe to make an amazing offer for part 11 of the strategy session? How should I structure it, and what does it need to have in it? I'm doing online marketing for businesses in case I might need more detail." Well, if you want to know how to perfectly word your thing, you just need to do it. You need to take the time and just write it out. Then you're going to write a sentence, and it's probably going to be really bloated and really vague, and then you need to edit it down and create version two beneath it. Then edit it down again, and then edit it down again. You need to work on it. If you're asking me how to do it and you only gave me that much information, I have no idea. You just need to try harder. You probably haven't tried at all. Joshua Westover, "Is there an effective way we can gauge customer satisfaction when doing one-on-one, like offer a survey at the end of a program. I have three clients, and I'm wondering if I should give them a survey so I can know where I need to improve." Yes, exit surveys are great. At the end of it, if you can get them to complete a survey and provide feedback, that is a good idea, but not after every call. That's too much. At the end you can ask them. [Naylor 00:22:37] says, "What key books do you recommend to get on track to be a full-stack entrepreneur?" Well, let's have a look at something. I will look at how much of the content that you have consumed inside the Consulting Accelerator, and then we will see what you have done. You've done quite a bit, which is good to see, but nowhere near enough. If you want to become a full-stack entrepreneur, then you should probably watch the whole course, because I teach you the full stack of things here. I can see you haven't watched all of week one. You haven't watched all of week two, and you haven't watched all of any week really. If I was you, I would honestly, and I'm not joking, this isn't a joke sort of response to your question. If you want to be a full-stack entrepreneur, then watch every video in the course from start to finish without skipping anything, because I cover all sorts of different things in there, from mindset to picking a niche and finding out what the market wants, to creating a product, to marketing, to creating a website, to a funnel, to running Facebook ads, to direct response copy-writing, to choosing a good image, to looking at statistics, to sales, to accounting, to a little bit of legal stuff and how to structure your company. We cover the full stack inside Consulting Accelerator. If you want to become one of those, then go through the whole program. Watch all of the videos. You don't need to read a book, because you haven't finished this. If you had watched all of it, then I'll tell you what books you should read, but right now you just need to do that. Brad [Beeler 00:24:47] says, "Hi, Sam. Do you still do daily affirmations and visualization? If so, can you give us an example of how you do it exactly?" Yeah, it's exactly in the course. If you go to week two and you see how I do it, then that's exactly what you do. All you're trying to do is basically consistently look at what your goals are and what your characteristics are and what characteristics you need to change and improve and hone and refine in order to achieve your goal. I'll make it really simple for you. What most people do is they think of a goal and it's very vague, right? Then they think, "All right, I want this goal. I'm going to try to get this goal." Then they don't really try at all to get the goal, and they don't change them self at all, and they don't even think they need to change them self or look at them self, and they never even really look at what actions are required to achieve the goal. They just choose the goal, and it's vague. Then they don't do anything, and then they don't get their goal, and then they get disappointed. That's what most people do. What we're doing is we're thinking about the goal, and we're making it really precise, and then we write it down. Then we, instead of just trying to achieve the goal, as we are right now ... You can't achieve the goal as you are right now, because who you are doesn't have the goal. If you don't have the goal, then you aren't good enough to get the goal, and you're not stuck being not good enough. You can actually get better, so you have to change. You have to change yourself. If you're introverted and you never, ever want to talk to anyone ever, well, if you want to start a business and make a whole bunch of money, then you probably need to change that. You need to work on that. Then if you don't know how to sell, you need to change that. If you don't have any skills that are of value, you need to change that. You need to work on yourself, and the hack really is, is what we do is we define our goal and then we look at what sort of person could achieve that goal really easily. Then once we know what sort of person could get that goal with ease, then we just become that person, so we change our self. Then when we do that we automatically get the goal. That's the hack. Define the goal, who would achieve that goal, become that person, that's what we do. What we're doing every day by looking at this is we're remembering, because we're very forgetful. If you've ever watched that movie with Drew Barrymore and Adam Sandler, I think it is, and it's called 50 First Dates. This woman, she forgets who she is, and she forgets everything every night when she goes to sleep. She wakes up and she doesn't know who she is or what she's doing. The way to fix it is her husband creates a videotape that sees exactly who she is and who he is and all this, and every morning when she wakes up, the videotape is lying on her bed next to her, and she just picks it up, and it says, "Play this." She puts it in and it explains everything. Then she's like, "Ah, that's right" and then starts her day, right? That's an extreme example, but every human being and everyone on this call right now is very similar to that, more similar than you think. We tend to think that our memory is accurate and very good, but I can guarantee you that your memory sucks and is very inaccurate. We need to remind ourselves every single day. When you look at this, "Oh, that's what I was doing. That's what I'm trying to do. That's who I am. That's who I want to be. This is what I need to do to get there," and it's just drumming it in, every day, repetition. That's what we're doing. That's as simple as it is. It's not about the technique, about how you read them. It's about doing it every single day, just sheer repetition. Matt Tommy says, "What's your morning and evening routine? What have you found as your best strategy to change your self-image and improve your inner game?" Well, consistency. Define it, get clear on it, and then do it every day. Honestly, consistency over time is everything. It's not about miracle one-off if-its. It's about consistent daily efforts. That's the biggest thing. It takes time. My morning and evening routine, well, I wake up at 6:50 in the morning, and then I go to the gym at 7. Then at 8 am I have breakfast. Then 8:30 ... No, 8 am to 8:30 I have breakfast, which is a smoothie. Then I also have a shower and get ready. Then from 8:30 to 9 I do meditation. Then at 9 I start my day. Then I work all the way through till 9, 9:30, so about a 12-hour day, a 30-minute break in the middle of the day for lunch. At 9 I'll plan tomorrow today so I know exactly what I'm going to do tomorrow. Then at 9:30 I'll have a shower. Then just get into bed and read something or watch a movie or just relax with my wife. Then I'm asleep by 11. That's what I do six days a week. Then I take all of Sunday off. That's my routine. Mario Mason says, "Hi, Sam. I'm building an eLearning platform. Can you tell me if building it up from zero with a developer or if you're using an online service?" We built ours ourself. Unless you are a maniac, I would not really consider ... I would not really recommend doing that. There's a lot of good options out there that you can get for cheap. There's Kajabi. That's what I used before we built ours. There's also Teachable. Teachable's good. There's Thinkific. There's a number of them. The one that I would use if I was still using one would be Kajabi. That's what I recommend. If you build your own one, it's a big job. It's taken us more than a year, millions of dollars, and we have an engineering team of five people. It's a big job. You probably don't want to do it. I would just use the other one. Amos says, "How do you overcome a lack of belief in what you're offering to your niche? My niche is anorexia, and while I can sure explain how awesome it is to have a life without their eating disorder, the hard truth of overcoming this eating disorder can be very painful for them to accept and might put some of them off. Even me if it was in their situation." I'll just read this myself, because there's quite a lot of ticks here. Yeah. You've got a lack of belief in what you're doing, because what you're doing is hard. It's very hard. Like, helping people overcome anorexia, that's a really deep entrenched psychological thing. It's intense. Someone isn't really rational when they have it, right? You're trying to reason with somebody that you can't reason with, and so it's very difficult. It's natural, because you haven't cracked it, to feel not confident in what you're doing, because it would be wrong for you to be confident in what you're doing, because it isn't working. You're never confident in something you're doing that hasn't worked. That's normal. It means that when you do crack it, it will be awesome. There will be a way to crack it. You just haven't figured it out yet. You just have to stay in the fight and figure it out. Honestly, some of the best things to achieve are the ones that are so hard and that would scare everyone else away. Those are the good ones, but you have to stay in the fight, and you have to be thick-skinned and just keep chipping at it. Amos says, "What helps you stay motivated when things aren't working out for you?" This is a good question. Like a lot of people think motivation is a prerequisite to working. A lot of people think, "Oh, I'm not motivated today so I'm not going to do any work," or, "I'm not feeling that into it today. I'm not going to do anything. I'll just wait for that motivation to kick back in again." Anyone that behaves like this is going to get their ass kicked, because you can't rely on motivation. Motivation is wavy. Sometimes you've got it. Sometimes you don't, and it's all over the place. If you rely on it, then that's like relying on the weather in a place where the weather changes all the damn time, and so you can't rely on it. If you rely on it, you'll lose. Instead, what you have to rely on is discipline. I have really good discipline now. It's far from perfect. I could be way more disciplined, and I try to be more disciplined every day, but if I'm not motivated, it doesn't mean I don't do anything. I have to. I have to keep going, because that's discipline. I think what you should do is try to install discipline into your life instead of just waiting for motivation. That's what you do if you want to win. Berkeley says, "I remember hearing you say that you're usually an INTJ. Same here. How do you unjam from being too much of a T? I can flip between the other three, but I get locked up when trying to do ..." Yeah, so do I. I'm so far on the T side that it's extreme. That means that I'm not that great at the F side. Other people's perspectives can be good, like asking other people, F type people. I often ask my wife. My wife's a feeler. Generally, more women are feeler types, so their perspective often is very helpful and very valuable, because that's like half the world. You probably want to hear half the world's opinion, you know what I mean? I often ask her a lot, and she helps me balance it a bit more, but it's not really balanced. I'm not doing something which requires lots of F type. It requires more T than F, and so I'm naturally in an area where I can really do well. If I tried to enter an area that was F type, I probably wouldn't do very well. I'm not trying to fully balance it. I actually have an advantage by being more on the T side, but I try to soften it a bit by getting other people's perspectives and thinking about it from their point of view. Amos Lem says, "What's the hardest part of building a great team, and how do you solve that hard problem?" Well, what was the hardest part about building a great team? I would say it's hard to say what the hardest part is. There's so many hard parts to it, but finding really good people is key. Keeping really good people is key. But then in order to find them and in order to keep them, there are so many things you need to do. Really, what I've learned is you need to have a very powerful vision and a powerful mission. People, really good skilled people that work hard and are driven, they don't want to work on things that are shitty and don't really have a good meaning or goal. It doesn't matter how much you pay them. It doesn't matter how good the recruiters are you've got working for you. It doesn't matter what you do. If your vision and mission sucks, you won't get good people. If you do, it will be because you're paying way too much for them, and they're going to quit anyway, right? Having a good vision and mission is crucial. Then having good values. I think a lot of people think it's about how much money you pay someone, but it's not like that at all. It's like people care more about the kind of way people make decisions. How the leader makes decisions is crucial. For example, in my company, if I was just forcing my team to make really dumb decisions that they told me, "Hey, we don't want to do this. This is a bad idea," and I just kept telling them, "Listen to me. We have to do that," then everyone good would leave instantly. You have to have a good vision and a mission. Then that can attract good people. You also have to be able to pay them too, which requires already having something going. Then you have to have a good culture by making good decisions based on the vision and the mission. You should never contradict your vision and your mission. If you start doing stupid stuff that is destructive to what your vision and mission is, you're going to lose your people. You have to be really aligned and in total integrity with the mission. That consistency people really respect. If you stay just laser-focused on that and you make sure the people stay laser-focused on that and you display consistent rational behavior and you work hard, then good people are just like, they're just drawn to you like a magnet. That's not really one thing. That's a lot of things. That, together, as a whole, that is what you have to do, to hire and maintain a good team. Elaine Cohen says, "Hi, Sam. I watched your Quantum Mastermind on YouTube. You spend your time drilling down into get rid of distractions and optimizing their time. Am I accurate to conclude that the keys to winning big in consulting is to focus hard work, consistency and remove distractions? Thank you for taking the time." Not only is this insight which you've discovered here. It's not just the key to succeeding in consulting. It's not only the key to succeeding in business. It is the key to succeeding in absolutely anything in the world, but there is nothing else. How do you get good at something? Well, focus, hard work, consistency, removing distractions, and never giving up and staying relentlessly on task 24/7/365. That's it. That's all it is. That's everything. That's the key to everything. But people don't want to hear that, because they just want to, they want to have the overnight six-pack. They'll be drinking this new drink because they think it will get them the overnight six-pack, going to get the overnight six-pack. Really, what it is, I've noticed, there's always two decisions, or there's two paths. You can take the hill. There's always the hill, and that's the hard, narly task that, the hard way. Then you've got the electric wheelchair part, which is the lazy person's way. Pretty much every single time the success is up the hill. It's neither around on the electric wheelchair path. You have to get used to taking the hill. When it comes to the decisions that I make day to day, it's always hill, hill, hill, hill, hill, hill, hill, hill, always hill. I want to take the hill. It's fun. That's where the success is. It's never the easy path. People say, "Ah, but that's hard work. It's much easier just to do nothing." I don't think so. It is hard work, but I think what's harder is living with knowing that you didn't even try. That is hard. Living with regret, it's horrific to me. I think it's much easier to work hard and have known you've made a good effort. Ryan Lou Dick says, "What's a good book to learn more about quantum theory and how to use it practically to improve one's life? What books helped you understand quantum theory?" Honestly, I would not go down that rabbit hole if I was you. There is not really any good books that show you how to use quantum theory in a practical day-to-day way. Most of them are all books that people write that are theories, and they contradict each other, and I don't even really know if what they're saying is true or not. It's one of those very vague things that hasn't been perfectly understood and articulated and described. It's probably not the best thing to go looking into unless you're doing it for fun. I would instead just go through the program, go through this course, watch all the videos, execute it, work on your mindset. By doing that, you'll be improved. You'll be smarter. You'll be making more money. You'll have a successful business, and that's what I'd recommend. Simon Robert says, "The course is brilliant. Quick question: For organic outreach, what's the best advice you would give for the type of message you could write to the prospects? I've been writing this advise in the course, but I'm getting responses ... and am getting response. I'd just like a bit of advice on how best to transition the messaging and writing to jumping on a 15-minute survey call." You want to treat it more like a personal conversation. You want to be like, "Hey, Simon, just wondering if you have this problem," or, "Just wondering if you experience anything to do with X," X being problem, question mark. That's it. Just start the conversation that way. Then if they're interested, they'll reply. Then you can start telling them more, and you can start angling towards a call. I think what a lot of people do that's a mistake is they post a message that tries to do it all in one hit. People don't want that. Treat it as a normal conversation, like how you would have it with another person if you met them in person. You start that with just a small, little opener. Then they reply and then you take it from there. Alexander Manson says, "Will you upload more recordings of your Mastermind?" Maybe. I'm not sure yet. We'll see. But I definitely will never upload the whole Mastermind or entire days of the Mastermind, because that is for the Mastermind people. Sometimes I leak out a little bit of stuff just so people can see what it's like to be in there, but I'll never be leaking out the whole thing. Taj says, "Thanks for doing these calls. My niche is helping former athletes transition into life after sports by finding their life's direction outside of athletics. My question: I've managed to land two clients out of about 35 ..." Oh, I just missed your question. Sorry about that. You have to ask that again. These things just fly past really quick. Joshua Westover, "Do you think it's worth using scarcity in our organic marketing, like Facebook posts, to promote a program when it is technically evergreen. If so, do you have any tips on how to approach this side of our promotions?" You could if you're doing promotions that, there's one promotion and it's going, and then you're drawing it to an end, then having a bit of a break, then doing another promotion and drawing it to an end. You can use scarcity that way, but if you're constantly doing one promotion, you probably can't keep using scarcity like that. Amos says, "What is the best way to convince someone to accept you for a particular job role if you don't have impressive skills or background for that particular role, and how would that person convince you, for example, since you would be a tough example?" If you don't have the particular skills or experience in a particular field, and you're trying to get a job, your best bet is to just talk about how your ... is to just answer the questions honestly and talk about why you think you would be able to learn this quickly and be good at it. It's more about you as a person. I look for this too when I hire people. I look at their skills, but I'm more interested in people's personal values and their personal decision making and how they think. If I can find someone that's really good at thinking and really good at making decisions and is a hard worker and is very curious and interested ... Sorry. There's some tapping noise here. If someone's really interested and curious and hardworking and passionate and also is clean-thinking and rationale, then that person can pretty much learn how to do anything, and I'll probably trust them and hire them for that role. That's your best bet, to just talk about that stuff and answer the questions honestly. I can tell you that the worst people, the people that we never hire are the people that just lie and talk shit. We can see that so clearly, because you just ask detailed questions, right? Someone who's talking crap will always keep it high-level, very vague, very high-level. I'll keep going, boom, probe, probe, probe, really deep into the details. What I'll see happen is the person will look a bit uncomfortable, and then they will kind of talk about it a little bit and then change the topic. They will think that I'm not going to catch them change the topic, and I'm just waiting for it. I'm like, "Okay, jump, jump, jump, now jump, now they're putting it over here. I wonder when they're going to stop talking." Then they kind of talk themselves around in a couple of loops, and then they end. Then I ask the question again, and I just keep going back, back, back to the exact same question I asked them, because they're not answering the question. This makes people who are lying extremely uncomfortable. They just reveal themselves. If you're going to talk to anyone, the worst thing you can do is lie about your skills. You're best to just talk about your hunger and your passion and your curiosity to master this thing, because then the other person's like, "Wow, this person's, number one, being honest, and, number two, they don't have the skills, but they are really hungry to acquire them, all right? That's totally different. That's how I'd do it if I was you. Theo Jean says, "Hey, Sam. This is my week two in Consulting Accelerator. What may I do to make sure I reach my goal as long as I don't have any experience in my niche?" You just need to go through the program. Watch every video one at a time in sequential order, all over the entire six weeks, do the work, implement it, and you will achieve your goal. That's how it works. That's why I made the program. I didn't make it for a joke. Viola says, "I want to do live Q&A for my abuse group to encourage victims out of the shadows. What would be a good platform on which to do it? Facebook? How could I market it?" You could try Facebook. Yeah, if you've got a group on Facebook, then you could do a livestream like I'm doing right now, and that just goes to your group, and it's a good way to do it. [inaudible 00:51:24] Thanks. Brian [Ludick 00:51:30] says, "What books formed your understanding of quantum theory?" Honestly, there was no one thing. I just looked into so many different things and then noticed that all of them displayed properties in behavior that made sense with a quantum kind of understanding that didn't make sense with the traditional newtonian physics paradigm. I was like, "Huh, this makes kind of sense from what I've observed across all of these different things, whereas these things I've observed across this doesn't really make sense with this other theory." Then I just started tying all of these things together instead of just sitting down with one book, right? Most of my understanding of this stuff came from doing and observing and experimenting, not just sitting down and reading some text. Amos says, "Sam, about the quantum theory of observing particles and it stays there but disappears when you don't. I heard Neil deGrasse Tyson say that it's due to the light particle photons, which knocks the particle you're observing away when you reflect light on it after you stop observing them, which totally changes their position, not because of some woo-woo thing. I haven't fact-checked this yet, but if this is true, would you still remain in ... I haven't fact-checked this yet, but if this is true, would this fact still remain in your program?" Let me read exactly what you said. You're talking about observing particles and it stays here but disappears when you don't. Then Neil deGrasse Tyson says ... Okay, I get what you're saying. You're reading too far into the detail of it. When I said it disappears, I didn't really mean it disappears, because I don't know, because I'm not observing it, right? This is the thing. Nobody knows what it does. We are not observing it, because how can you know what it's doing if you're not observing it. Impossible. How does Neil deGrasse Tyson know what it's doing when we are not observing it? He doesn't. How can he prove it? Only through observation. At that moment, he's tainted the experiment. You can't know. This is the whole thing about it. It's like what is going on in areas of the universe that we cannot observe? We don't know. It's almost like everything's in kind of a ... It's in every possible state. It's like a possibility zone. Then as soon as it's observed, it falls and collapses into a specific thing. We don't know if that's true or not. It's very hard to find a way to understand it, but that's what my point was. I wasn't saying that the particle simply disappears and goes out into nowhere, because I wouldn't, no one would be able to know that, because we'd have to observe it. That is the point I was trying to make there. Berkeley Robinson says, "My niche is ecom business owners that want to get seven to eight figures. Two of my clients use Shopify. One uses WooCommerce. If I use Shopify as my bevel audience, I get tons of business interests like herbal medicine, HEM. It's huge, around four million in size. Should I stick to using Shopify as my bevel, or should I hit it indirectly and choose something else like an email software?" You have to just do an experiment. Shopify is the one audience you have the most conviction in. You should use it as your bevel. That's how it works, but if through experimentation it does not play out and it does not prove to work, only then would I consider trying something else. Lauren Alexander says, "I have a website already where I write blogs about personal development, non-duality, et cetera. Is it weird to use this existing site for my ..." Woops, this has moved. "Is it weird to use this existing site for my consulting since it is more general, or should the site be razor specific to OCD and anxiety?" I think it's fine. Honestly, you don't need to have these little, tiny, little niche-specific things. This is what you're interested in. Personal development has a lot to do with anxiety. Non-duality and stuff probably has a lot to do with anxiety too. All of this can be put into one kind of category. You don't need to break it out into all of these different specific things. You can achieve it on this thing, and you might just use categories. You might use tags or categories to group these different things into different ways, and you can help your audience filter through them in different ways. I would do that. Kyle Candice says, "I have a face-to-face with a prospect on Monday. I am planning to use your sales core script. If successful, how do I collect my first payment? I currently can accept payments on Skype, but I don't have the Stripe to count yet. Should I get a Stripe?" Yes, go with Stripe, definitely. Eric says, "Where do you see the future of eCommerce going?" Well, it depends how you define eCommerce. If you were defining it as selling physical products on the internet through a Shopify or something or an Amazon, where's the future of that going? This would be a guess, by the way, because I don't know. What would I think it's going? Yeah. Where I think it's going is it's going into a place where companies are owning their distribution from the top to the bottom. They're owning the whole stack, because if we look in the history, if we look in the past, you had a company that might produce a cereal, or you might have a company that produced a jar of jam and then another farm that produced potatoes or corn, right? You have these different producers that produce their different things. Then in order to sell these things to consumers, you have a middle tier, and this middle tier is the store. It's like the supermarket or the Walmart or all of these different distribution things. What we had is we had companies producing specific products whose things like this, then distribution channels bringing those products to the consumers. Now what's happened is Amazon has pretty much become the new ... Amazon's become like the new distribution thing, and a lot of people go there and list their stuff and then sell, but people are learning more and more that trusting someone else as that middle tier is really not a good idea, because they basically then control everything. You can really get screwed if you don't own this. If you list on there, you get screwed really bad. What I can see happening is the best companies, they produce their own products. They make them themselves, and then they market and sell their products directly to consumers themselves from the top to the bottom. They own the whole chain. That way they're way more, they're way stronger, way more resilient, and they just have way more power. Also, the feedback loop from the consumer to the company is way tighter, because they don't have to work through a middle man. Can you imagine if you sold your products through Walmart, then how are you going to get, if there's complaints, they're probably going to go to Walmart. If there's customer support stuff, it might go to Walmart. How are you going to know the type of people that are buying it? Walmart isn't going to feed that data back to you. You're not close enough to the customer to understand how to improve it and iterate it and troubleshoot it, and that's a disadvantage. You're also losing margin in the middle. They're kind of stripping the brand off your thing, and it's being sold like as a nameless thing. That's what I see happening in the future, and that's why as Amazon has gotten bigger, Shopify has also gotten bigger. It's not running like a zero sum game here. Usually what we'd think is that a lot of people were using Amazon, and it continued to grow. Then probably less people would be using Shopify, right? No, it's been going up. What that tells me is that people want to use Amazon as a channel, but they want to own their store on their site, and then they really want to not even have to use Amazon, have their own store and sell directly to the market. I think more and more and more people are going to go into that. All of the best companies do that. For example, with us, we make our own product, so we don't have to worry about someone else learning about our product and then sourcing it from Alibaba or AliExpress and then selling it. We don't have to worry about that, because we make our own product. Then we market it and sell it ourselves. We do our own marketing. We buy our own traffic. We have our own sales team, so we are end to end we own the whole chain, and that gives us huge advantages, not only with competition but with feedback and iteration cycles and also with control. It's a rare time in the world where someone can own their entire thing. Never before could you really do that, because distribution channels were physical, but now distribution channels are virtual, so it's way easier to achieve. That's what I think might be happening, but who knows? Let's see. Brandon says, "I help real estate agents get four to six listings a month, every month. My training program is a 12-month group coaching program. I currently have 54 students. What's your take on charging more up front versus some up front and then [inaudible 01:03:09] over a 12-month program. My program is currently 997 and 200 a month." I think you should just try to sell it as, you've got to understand that with monthly subscriptions, people cancel, seriously. There's this big delusion that if you charge people per month that they're going to continue forever. Some of them might, but when you get into a lot of them, it doesn't work that way. Instead, what you want to do is think how much do I think this is worth, and you should try charging that up front. Then if some people can't afford it, you should offer a payment plan so that there's an end to the payment, so that it's not going to just keep going on forever. That way you're collecting the money that you want for the product that you're selling. You're kind of doing a hybrid of one-off and subscription. It's a hybrid model. It works really well. Joshua Westover says, "This is a question on behalf of Sam Bragg. He can't make the call but wanted to ask the following: 'My niche keeps asking me to sign NDAs, submit proposals, do deliverables, take weekly calls and seeing reports. They are very traditional, and I don't want to play in an arena that works this way. As far as I can tell, it seems like I don't have much choice. How can I go against the grain of an entire industry while I'm just getting started and I'm inexperienced in this niche. I help save clinical trials from patient recruitment failure.'" Yeah, I can see why it's happening this way in this industry. Clinical trials, patient recruitment failure. Yeah. What's funny is that patient recruitment failure is probably failing because they're forcing all of these patients to sign NDAs, do all of this, jump through all of these loops, do all of this crap. That's probably why they're failing. Then when you're trying to help them not fail, they're telling you that you have to do the same thing that is making them fail. Their behavior, which has made them fail, is the behavior that they're displaying when you're trying to help them not fail. I would tell it to them like that, that's what they're doing. If they are relentless in upholding this behavior, then they will fail. Michael says, "How would you instill discipline in your life if motivation isn't the answer?" Very simple. I would define what I'm going to do. Really, all that needs to happen is you've just got to do the work. You've just got to show up and work. Michael Phelps, who's the world's best swimmer, his to-do list each day is very simple. It just is, "Wake up, get in the pool." That's it. He wakes up. What does he do? He gets in the pool. What does he do when he's in the pool? Just does whatever he wants, but then he'll start probably then doing some training, and it's just practice. Pretty much what I do every morning is I just wake up, go to desk, work until nighttime, go to sleep, and I do that every day except for Sunday. If that happens, if I just keep showing up, if I just keep working, and by working I don't mean watching Netflix, watching YouTube videos or going on social media. That isn't working. I mean staying on task. You're going to have some days where you don't get a ton of stuff done, right? But if you didn't get that much done and you at least showed up and you did the whole day's work and you just still showed up, then that's still good enough, all right? You're going to have days that you achieve insane amounts of stuff and some where you don't, but the key is is that every single day you've got to show up. Then if you just have that basic, simple discipline, then it happens. I used to have tons of anxiety, "Will I ever make any money? Will I ever be able to get out of my parent's garage? Will I ever be able to have a car?" I was pretty worried about everything, because I was just worried, "Man, it'd be good just to be able to have a car and move out of my garage at my parent's place," and just consistent work went into the day. I didn't know that I would end up making a lot of money or doing all of the stuff that I'm doing now, but it's just, you've just got to outwork everybody. You've just got to just show up every day, want it badly, keep going, and just keep going through the storms, because you're always going to have storms, and you've just got to keep getting through them. Then it gets better, better, better, and you get tougher. In the beginning you're very, very, very weak. The smallest little thing would set me off, and I'd be panicking, couldn't work, paralyzed. You're real weak when you get started. Then as you keep going, it's like just mental training or something. It's like you're just getting thicker skin and you're getting tougher and mentally you're getting tougher. I think mental toughness is something that you have nothing of when you get started. The smallest little thing happens, and you just get triggered, and you just lose the thought. With a lot of practice, you get pretty good, and you can handle a lot of stuff. The key is you've just got to keep showing up. Justin Adkins says, "The sales script has questions that almost seem rude to ask. Do you have successful ... or do you have strategies that ... Do you have strategy successful, strategy sessions, you can share with us from when you first started." I don't understand that wording. I think you got it wrong. The questions aren't rude to ask. They appear rude to you, because you don't reveal that level of information to people. That's what you do. You have probably displayed behavior where you don't talk about that sort of stuff. You kind of keep it up at the top. You keep it like, "Oh, how's the weather," and, "Ah, the weather's good. How's your kids?" "Oh, they're good." "Yep, good. Cool." That's where most people talk, but we're just going, bam, straight into these things, which people never talk about. We need this information so that we can actually conduct an accurate diagnosis. Doctors ask you to do rude things. If you go to the doctor, they might be like, "All right, take your pants off." That's not necessarily what you would talk about with your friends. Your friends don't just say to you, "Hey, take your pants off." But it's okay at the doctor's, because if it needs to be done to solve the problem that needs to be done, and you've just got to get over yourself. This is what's happening on our strategy session. It is not the same as having just a conversation with a friend over lunch. We're trying to diagnose and solve a problem. It's not a physical body health-related problem, but it's a business-related problem, and we need the details. I can tell you that it's not rude. It's rudely appearing to you, but it's not, and you just need to do it. Cody [Castless 01:11:52] ... That's just a, Cody is replying to Ryan. Amos says, "How do you extract more info from your prospects who give you very vague answers during strategy sessions?" Good question. Now, I've got a good way to actually explain this. Let me draw it. I explained this at the recent Mastermind, which seems to help a lot of people. I'll just draw it for you, because it's very hard to explain just with words, but what a strategy session is, is we've got someone ... Here, we've got something. Close. Over here we've got ... I'm just drawing it, and then I'll show you it in a second. Prospect. All right. See if you can understand this. You've got the start of the call. Then you've got the close, which happens at the end of the call. Wait. Where can I put my fingers? There you go. Then what happens is on one side of this line you have the prospect, and on the other side of that line, you have the seller, which is you if you're doing the strategy session. You start by asking a question, all right? That comes from your side. You asked the question. Now you're passing the ball over to the other side, to this person, and that person has to give you an answer. Their answer has to come back over to you. If we go like, this person provides answer and hands it back here. We start with the question, hand it over to them. After we ask a question, we shut up. We don't ask another question. We don't add a bit on. We ask a question. We shut up. The silence is getting them to submit back the information, the answer. If they submit back some information that is not an answer, then we do not proceed. This is the key thing that people don't understand. If I ask a question and the other person responds with a bunch of noise that is not equal to a valid answer, then what do you think we do? We don't go to the next damn question, which is what everybody does. We, instead, I think a lot of people believe a strategy session is you just have to ask those questions, and if you ask those questions, then it will end in a sale, but it's not that. You have to ask those questions and get accurate answers along that line. If you ask the question and you get an answer that isn't really an answer, then it won't work. You have to get the accurate one. This is the key thing that people don't understand, is if they submit back an answer and it's invalid, then what we instead do is we loop. What we would do is we'd go ... We don't proceed to the next step. We loop. How do you loop? You ask the question again. You pass it back to them. Then what they will do is they'll probably get a bit clearer in their answer. If they give me a vague answer again, I'll ask the question again. I will stay here until I get a damn answer. If they don't give me an answer, and we've been here for a long time, I'm probably going to be like, "Hey, look, why the hell aren't you just giving me a damn answer here? Why are we talking around the question here? Why aren't we just getting this?" Because it's someone trying to lie to you really. Either that or there's two things that can be going on here. One is, the person's mind is just so scattered that they're just going around everywhere and they spurt out a bunch of information, but they don't really understand what's going on, so if you repeat the question, you might get them to focus more and give you a better answer. But if it keeps happening again and again and the person will not get to the answer, then you know the person is lying to you, all right? In any of those instances, if the person can't bring their mind to the focused question or if the person is lying to you, they're not going to buy, so you may as well just end the call here. You need to go down this path and ask every question and have them answer it, and the answers need to be satisfactory. If they're satisfactory, you go to the next question. If they're not, you have to loop. This is a key distinction that I've noticed when watching other people do these calls. Is this helpful? Does this make sense? Just click that like button if that was useful. All right. Cool. Sterling [Colley 01:18:23] says, "Just found your old Mixergy interview, and you mention idea extraction process. I wish you would have done a deep dive on that early on. Is there a chance you might talk about the idea extraction call more?" Yeah, dude, this is what we do. This is at the heart of this entire Consulting Accelerator program is this thing called idea extraction. I just haven't called it idea extraction in this course. There was periods of time when I was getting started where I referred to this thing as idea extraction, but now I just refer to it as basically picking a niche, finding a problem, solving a problem and creating an offer. That is idea extraction. Idea extraction is picking a niche and finding what problems they have. The solution to the problem that people have is the idea. You don't go looking for ideas. You go looking for problems, the solution to which is the idea. The inverse of their problem is an idea. You don't go looking for an idea. You can't find an idea. You can only find problems. Problems exist, and then their inverse is an idea. That's how you do it. You can't find ideas. Have you ever seen an idea lying around on the street? You don't. They're problems, and solutions to problems are ideas. Shane Heinz says, "I'm working on a paid Facebook group as a done-with-you service along my done-for-you digital marketing service." I missed that. But I wouldn't do the paid Facebook group, honestly, if I was you. It's too much to manage. You're going to have subscriptions and some billing system. You're going to have Stripe. You're going to have some CRM or shopping cart software or ClickFunnels or subscriptions in Stripe. Then you're going to have a totally disconnected Facebook group, and there's no group API to connect these things together. You're going to have a hell of a situation on your hands, and all for what? A very small amount of money. Don't do it, seriously. Just find a problem. Solve it. Have one really good offer that's a high-value offer, and then just sell that relentlessly. Much better. If you want to get out of done-for-you and move to courses, because that might be what you're trying to tell me here. You might be saying, "I'm already doing really well with done-for-you. What else can I sell that might be more group-oriented or automated or productized. Seriously, if you want to evolve from done-for-you, then it's best to extract a proof of concept from here and then build out a program and then sell the program. If you want to learn how to do that, you can look at week seven in the Accelerator program. Grant Cooper says, "For the course do you recommend dripping out the content or just giving the customers full access right away?" It depends on the price point. If it's lower ticket, and by lower ticket I mean $2,000 or less, drip it. If it's sold with a strategy session over the phone to more advanced people, release. There isn't a one-size-fits-all kind of instance here. Lower ticket automated products, drip. Higher ticket phone sale products, release. Linda [Kington 01:22:29] says, "Thanks for the great program. Do we still get access to the live Q&A calls after the six weeks?" Yes, you do. You get access to them forever. As long as Q&A calls are still a thing, then you get access to them. Yeah, you're in this community forever. Lauren says, "Is there a way to combine the ClickFunnels website you provide with an existing side? I want to use the funnel specifically but I already have blogs, about page and contact page on my existing site." Yeah, keep your existing site. Keep your existing site, and if you want to change your site, then change your site. If you want to change your theme, then hire a custom theme designer. You can get them for very cheap. They will change it, then edit the content there, because trying to migrate all of your blog content and all of that over to ClickFunnels is a horrific idea that you do not want to do. I only suggest using the ClickFunnels website if you're brand new and you don't have a ton of content established on the internet. In that case, it's actually better than getting a WordPress install and then having to link everything up, then getting a theme, then editing it all, then dealing with all those plug-ins, then dealing with all of that crap and probably having to have a custom theme designer. Then you're also going to have to have some sort of special hosting provider. That's a lot of work. It's unnecessary in the beginning. You can start with the ClickFunnel site, and then later on you can build out a proper website. A ClickFunnels website is not a proper website. I've seen some people only really criticize me saying that you should use the ClickFunnels website. They have a point. If you have an existing blog with a ton of content and really good SCO and you've got all of this, do not ditch that to move to ClickFunnels as a website. That is a bad idea. But if you're starting brand new from scratch, it is a good idea, because your time and attention and focus and energy should be more on solving your market's problems and getting clients and making money than it should be on tweaking a damn WordPress site. That's why. Joshua Westover says, "I'm curious what you think about the development of AI technology. Do you think it's something that's going to be helpful or more dangerous and should be avoided, like what Elon Musk often talks about?" I think it's the same as everything, that AI ... Sorry. I think it's the same as every single technology that's ever happened. It's like a two-edged sword, right? It can do both. It can give you a lot of value. It can do a lot of harm. If we look at nuclear stuff, the nuclear power plants can be really good, but they can also cause a lot of harm, plus the nuclear technology can also be used to blow up the entire world. Generally, the more powerful the benefit the more powerful the negative is if used incorrectly. That's how the world works, because every action has an equal and opposite reaction. You don't find things that are all good that don't have any bad ever. They just don't exist. It can be used for both. I think people are freaking out because they've got a very faulty brain that can only see things as, "Oh, it's good," or, "Oh, it's bad." Then they choose their side and then they argue about it, kind of like people who choose Trump or Hillary. That's not how it works. Trump isn't all right, and Hillary isn't all right. None of them isn't all bad. It's not an on/off switch that you can choose with such a binary classification. It can be used for both. I think people have a good point about the benefits. Shit, it could do lots of good stuff for everyone, and people also have a good point about all the negatives, because, yeah, it could do really bad stuff. That's up to the humans, not the technology. The humans are the ones that do stuff, not the technology. That's what I think about it. Julia Nicholson says, "Hi, Sam. Can you suggest a good book about consciousness?" Did I even read a book about consciousness? Yes, there is a good one, actually, and it's not really about ... It is kind of about consciousness. It's called Creation by Steve Grand, Creation by Steve Grand. It's called Life and How to Make It, and it's good. Alejandro says, "Hi, Sam. I have decided to consult minorities on getting a job on a specific field, but unfortunately sometimes the customer finds it hard to pay $500, so then how to land [inaudible 01:28:05] job. Any advice?" The truth is it's hard to get anyone to pay money for anything, especially when you just start, right? The thing that you're experiencing, it is normal, and it happens to everyone. It's not just because it's your niche. If you change your niche, it doesn't mean that all of a sudden it's going to be easy to get people to pay you all of this money. You'll still have the same problem. You just haven't figured it out yet. You haven't cracked it. If you want to crack it, you have to keep trying. The thing is that these people will be spending money on other things. Anyone can get together $500, seriously. People that think no one in the world can pull together $500 have something wrong with their brain. Even in totally third-world countries, people can pull together $500. To render someone completely helpless and say they can't do anything, sure, okay, say someone's locked in a cage in the ground and they don't ever get let out, okay, that person can't. But if somebody is alive and in the world, then there is always a way. You just need to see where their money is going right now. How much money are they currently earning, and then where is it going, because no one earns zero money and spends zero money. That's pretty much impossible unless you're a kid and you live at home with your parents. You've still got to eat. You've still got to do things. I would look at that, where is their money going, how much are they getting. If you want to help them, they're going to have to change their view that money should be spent on this crap instead of on self-improvement, because I can't tell you how many people I've seen that say that they can't afford to buy a $2,000 program, and then I'll just look at their Facebook profile just to get some insight into what this person's like. They've got an iPhone, and they might have some Gucci Air Force One. Then they might have the big-ass watch that's got fake diamonds on it that's this big. Then they might have different expensive clothes. Then they might be drinking some bottle of some type of liquor, which probably costs a hundred bucks. I'm like, "Okay, this is obviously what this person values." It's not that they can't afford it. They just would rather spend their money on that than on this. That's what's always the case. When someone says, "I can't afford it," they just mean, "I'd rather spend my money on this other shit instead of on this." It doesn't mean that they can't. Unless you're asking them about something that is an extreme amount of money, like a hundred thousand dollars. Yeah, someone can't afford that right now, but we're talking about something different here. It's more of a choice of where you put funds than not having any funds. You've got to look at it differently and see what they're putting their money into. Carvey says, "Generally love your program. Joined back in April and got through weeks one, two and three. The place I got stuck at was week one, when you said that we needed to figure out what we are offering and learn the skills to be valuable to clients. I know it sounds generic, but I'm genuinely passionate about digital marketing. I ended up buying ..." That's awesome to hear. Great. Allyson says ... All right, she's replying to somebody else. Stephanie Roberts says, "I had a call where I could have closed. They said yes, and because I had easily closed another ..." Sorry. Someone just opened the door. "... person within 24 hours of the followup proposal. I did the same with this new person, taking time. I have faith they'll close eventually but wondering if you would reach out with a fast action bonus after the fact, like ..." I see what your problem is. When you're doing a sales call, the absence of a yes is a no. A maybe is not a yes. What is it? It's not a maybe. It's a no. If it's, "I want to think about it," what is that? Is it a yes? No. It's a no. You have to class these things properly. The absence of a yes is a no. What is a yes? Not even just saying yes and not paying. A yes is really buying, the transaction. Anything that isn't a transaction is a no. What you're letting people do is you're letting people to have an option. You're letting people not choose yes or no. You're letting them kind of just get away with it, and you can't do that. You then are going to be needy and want to follow up with these people and then create other products for these people and then come up with a bonus for these people and do all of this shit for these other people when you should not do anything for those people. The absence of a yes is a no, and if they're a no, forget about them and move on to the next prospect. It is much easier to close somebody who you haven't talked to before than it is to convert a maybe into a yes. Remember that. Jamie Stenhouse says, "We're in Adelaide. What do you say to people who decide to sleep in today instead of waking up at 5:30 am to watch your live Q&A with the rest of us?" It depends if they need to. If somebody doesn't need to and they don't want to, then that's up to them. But if somebody wanted to and they didn't, that's different. Then they need to be more disciplined. Julia Nicholson says, "Two years ago I started my own business and have built my own brand in ecom. I joined this course because I would love to help others on their journey of building their own brand. It's been a rocky road so far. We learned to [01:35:04], and I'm sure there will be plenty of challenges in learning it here. I got a bit lost on my path after week one of the course and questioned myself and threw myself into three different niches, completely away from what I knew. Now after week two I'm back on track again. What I am trying to do is figure out how I can define this niche. So far I help people grow their own brand." Yeah. Here's what you're doing wrong, which is very, very, very simple. Just think about it this way. Who wakes up in the morning and thinks, "Oh, man, what I really need in my life is to grow my brand." Who says that? Nobody. No one in the world, seriously. What that means is you've done something wrong, because you should have found something that people are waking up in the morning wanting. I would say you made this error because you engineered the solution from yourself instead of from your market. You looked at what you had done and you looked at how you had grown your business, and you thought that it was the brand. Then you thought therefore everybody else should build a brand, but then that doesn't seem quite right, does it? It's because you engineered it from you, and you can't engineer it from you. You have to start by defining the market. Who is the niche? What is the group of people, the humans? Who are they? We have to start there. From there we need to find out what problems they have. How do we find that out? We ask them. We talk to them. "Hey, human person, what problems do you face on a day-to-day basis," and they will tell you. Then you talk to lots of them. Then you start to see the pattern that is mutually existing among multiple participants. It's a common thread. Then once you find that common thread, now you know that you've found not a problem for one person but a problem for the industry, the whole market. Once you've found that, then you just need to invert that, and that's a solution. What could we provide that would solve this problem? Then if you can do that, then you have an offer. Now your offer talks to a problem, and the problem exists with the market, and now you have a business. That's what you do, but you didn't do that. Do it the right way. Honestly, it seems very simple, but it will work. That's how business works. Corrine says, "What do you think about the seven-minute workout?" I probably think that it's a load of shit. Generally, I dislike everything that sounds like a gimmick or the next workout or the next fad or the next trend or the next exercise wave or trend. You've got to look at what happens in the world all the time. People are always coming up with new fads and new trends. There's crossfit and then there's ketogenic diets, and then there's the paleo diet. Then there's juicing. Then there's ... There's all of this different stuff, all right? Really, you've just got to look at it at its core. All how it really is, is sleep, eight hours, and then exercise. Generally, how do we define exercise? We should be sweating, and it should be for a prolonged period of time, at least 30 minutes. It should be hard, and we should be sweating. Then also food, good food. What's that? It's mostly vegetables, all right. Then we've got some hydration. What's that? That's water. You don't need to have a Powerade or a Gatorade. You don't need to have the special type of drink. You don't need supplements that much. You don't need to do these different workout plans. You don't need to use a ketogenic diet or any of these different diets. You don't need to use crossfit only, or you don't need to use the seven-minute workout or the two-minute workout. You just need to stick to the basics and just do the fundamental. Imagine if someone told me, "What do you think about the seven-minute workday?" I would think that person's an idiot, pretty much like the four-hour workweek too. I know what Tim's saying in that book. Tim doesn't work four hours a week. No one successful works four hours a week. That's why the title of that book is very catchy, because people are like, "What if you could work four hours a week and be really successful?" It doesn't work that way. Success comes from insanely hard work, way more than four hours, more than four hours a day, right? The same with exercise. It comes from more than seven minutes. It comes from a lot. Look at all of the professional athletes. They won't work out for seven minutes. Look at all of the people that are in good shape. They will work out longer than seven minutes. You've just to ignore the fads and stick to the basics and make sure you do the basics, because I see a lot of people get trapped with this stuff. Sterling [Cooley 01:41:20] says, "Have you had the opportunity to raise venture capital money yet? Do you think there are any connected overlapping skill-sets in raising VC? I ask because I had to in 2005, and it took valuable time away from actually marketing and selling my product. Seems like a waste of time in the vast majority of cases." Yeah. Here's the thing. I've thought about it too. If it was really easy to do, then I'd probably do it, but if I want to raise money, it's like a full-time job. I'll need to focus very hard on preparing pitch decks, tweaking them, iterating them. I'll also need to talk to lots of different people. I'll need to get involved. I'll need to learn the landscape. I'll need to learn the strategies and the tactics. It's a full-blown thing, and it takes a huge amount of time. Then what I do is I think to myself, "Do we really need it?" We don't right now. We have enough money. We have enough cash flows, and we're not really restricted by capital. To that question, the answer is no. Then it's like, is that the best use of my time right now? Should I just spend all of my time raising money which I don't really need, or should I spend my time instead building great products and getting more customers and listening to their feedback and making better products? It's a no-brainer, that one. I just choose to work on the product. Just because you raise money doesn't mean you're going to be successful. The vast majority of people who raise money aren't successful. Some people get fooled there. They think, "Oh, if we've raised money, we're going to be successful." Not true. If you solve a problem better than anyone else, then you'll be successful. Raising money isn't solving a problem. It's kind of taking your eye off the ball, but I do admit that there are some times when you have to, right? If you were starting Netflix back when they started Netflix, they could not self-fund that thing. They had to buy DVDs, probably millions of them. Those are going to be expensive. Then they had to post them. Then they had to have logistics, and they had to have all of this stuff, and they had to also advertise and scale and fight off Blockbuster and all of this if they wanted to take the market. You can't do that with how much money I have in my bank account. We would be snookered in that position. If I had the funds I do right now and the cash flows I do right now and I wanted to build a Netflix back at the time when they did Netflix, I would have to raise money. Then would it be a good choice of my time to raise the money? Yes. Why? Because it is the only way to win. That's how you've got to think about it. You don't want to class this one as, raising money is for idiots, or raising money is for smart people, and people who don't raise money is an idiot. It's not like that. It depends on the situation. You've got to analyze it properly. You've got to weigh the upside and the downside. If the downside/upside relationship is asymmetric upwards, you do it. If it's asymmetric downwards, you don't do it. By asymmetric I mean is the upside way bigger than the down? If so, do it. Is the downside way bigger than the up? If so, don't do it. It's just a simple weighing kind of prioritization function. Alejandro says, "Hi, Sam. I have decided to consult ..." I've already answered this one. Simon Knight says, "I'm trying a similar daily routine to yours but have not used meditation before. Do you have any tips or books you would recommend to assist?" Yeah, all you need to learn, honestly, is what I'll tell you in about one sentence. Meditation is the practice of doing nothing and thinking about nothing. To do that, you don't need to learn anything, because, like buying a headset or buying some technology or downloading an app or reading books on it or subscribing to email lists on it is pretty much, it's the antithesis of doing meditation, because meditation is the practice of nothing. You don't add shit to it. All you need to do is you can just sit down on your chair or you can sit on the ground or whatever, and then you just close your eyes, and you just breathe through your nose and out your nose, and you want to focus on your breath, like right here, where it touches your skin, and you just want to think about nothing. I don't count. I don't do anything. I just focus on my breath, and I just do it for 20 to 30 minutes. I just use my iPhone as the timer. As soon as it goes off, I stop. That's it. You don't need to make it anymore complicated than that. What it really is, it's the practice of, what you'll find is that you will not be able to think about nothing because it's very hard. That's the whole purpose of it. You'll start focusing on your breath. Then you'll have a thought that takes you away. Then you have to catch it and then bring it back to the breath. Then you have another thought. Catch it, come back. What you'll notice at the start is you'll have a thought which leads to another thought, which leads to another thought, which leads to another thought and then another one and then another one and then another one. Then probably that's going to lead to an action, which will break you out of the meditation. Then you'll keep going down this chain until you realize halfway through the day, that, oh, shit, you were supposed to finish that meditation, right? That's what happens to people, because they're not very aware. You know you're getting better at meditation when you can catch the thought before it's gone too far and just return to your breath. You catch it, bring it back, catch it, bring it back. Then that way your focus improves in a huge way, because when you're working on something, say you want to finish your value video slide. That's a pretty decent project that's going to take you a couple of days to do. It's a lot of work, and it's cognitive, it has a high cognitive demand, right? It is quite a task for the average person. What will happen is, as you start focusing on it and doing it, your mind's just going to have this thought, "Oh, I should go do this. Oh, I should go do that. Oh, I should do that." You're just going to start thinking about stuff. You have to bring your focus back to the work instead of reacting to the thought you had and then clicking off onto YouTube and then watching six back-to-back three-hour videos and then realizing that you were supposed to do your value video. That's why you do meditation, so that you can stay focused and catch your thoughts and police things so you can stay focused on one thing. It's a very useful thing. It's free. It's cheap. It's easy to do. Anyone can do it anywhere. The results of it in business are huge. It will make you more money. If you're in business and you don't meditate, and you do meditate, you'll make more money, from the second order consequences, not the first order consequences. You won't meditate and then a stack of five-hundred-dollar bills will just hit you in the face. That's not what happens. What happens instead is you meditate and then you go do your work, and you are more focused so you do more work. Because the output of work is reward, you'll get more reward. You have to look further down the line. I think most people look at meditation, and they're like, "Oh, well, I don't get money in my bank account or a PayPal transaction come through if I meditate, but you're not looking at it properly. You have to look down the line as what's the first order, second order, third order consequences of this action. It's good. You could do it. Alison Delahunt says, "I'm offering a 30-day mindset program for healthcare professionals, and in this program I give three one-on-one coaching sessions online at the start, middle and end, daily mindset activities and also give them a four-weekly mindset training videos that I've created. So far I've good level of interest." Where is the question? "I've charged 200 to both and have another two clients lined up for 300. Do you think it is possible for me to charge between 300 and 500 for this 30-day program and do well? In other words, what if I just keep building my client base? My competitors are charging in or around this too. Would love your feedback." The answer is buried at the end of your statement. "My competitors are charging in or around this too." The basis of your price is your competitors. That doesn't make much sense. Mindset isn't a commodity. If I buy mindset from you and I buy mindset from somebody else, it's not like buying some rice or some barley or some hops or a piece of copper, right? I can't buy mindset on the London Metals Exchange. It's not available. It's not a homogenous physical resource on a commodities market. That is not what mindset is. It's stupid to have the exact same price as everyone else. Instead, you should look at the problem that your people have. You're not selling mindset. No one wakes up in the morning and thinks, "Oh, man, I need mindset." That's not what you do. Instead, people have problems. The root cause of this problem is probably most likely to do with themselves and their mind, which is their mindset, but people don't want to just get a mindset. They want to solve this problem, which root cause is mindset. You need to talk about the problem that they are aware of and then how you can solve it and then the value that that will bring to them when they solve it and also the anti-value they will receive if they don't solve it. Then you should price for your mindset training based off of that, not based off of mindset sold as a commodity and looking at your competitors. That's not a good thing to do. That would be my advice. Jessica Crane says, "Any recommendations for software to send vet invoices automatically from Stripe?" I don't know personally off by heart, but if you Google that or put it in the Facebook group, I would do both. I would Google it and then put it in the Facebook group. Someone will know. Someone from Europe will know, because all of Europe has to do that, so I'm sure someone will know. There's a lot of people in here from Europe. Megan [Selvey 01:53:28] says, "My partner and I are looking to expand our healing business from locals at small one-off prices." "Expand our healing business from locals at small one-off prices. Our niche is entrepreneurs with debilitating emotional issues like grief, where using sound, voice and energy healing to transform these issues within. Have you seen other people working in this field? Is there a good model that you have seen to be successful in this field?" It depends. It depends if you are doing, if you need to physically have them in your place and use your equipment and all of that or whether you can create a program and teach them how to do it, all right? I think you would really be able to scale this thing if you can think of a program where they purchase some very cheap equipment that still does the job, and then they follow your program to achieve the result themselves. You could take what you're doing ... I'm assuming ... I don't have the full piece of information here, but you said you wanted to expand from local to small one-off prices. I'm assuming that right now you are doing it with them in the flesh using this equipment and whatever, right? You want to expand. I would think what is the cheapest equipment that somebody could buy to do this and actually have it work. Then I'd come up with that list. Then how would you teach them how to do it? What program or system or sequential steps would they follow to achieve the output and the value from this thing? Then if you sold it as a program with the products like that, that could be pretty cool. Then that would be able to scale and expand. That's what I would focus on if I was you. People like self-service. People like to be able to do something themselves when they want to without traveling from the comfort of their own home, and instead of having to travel, schedule appointments, wait for the appointment, do it at specific times, people love self-service. I'd try and think, "How can I make my thing self-service?" All right. We're at the end of our session. Like I said, we do these pretty much every Saturday, and we go from 3 pm till 5 pm Eastern time. That's the time in New York. Thanks, everyone, for attending. If you enjoyed this and you got some value out of it, just click that like button and let me know, and I'll tell you if we're going to be doing one of these next week. I'm just looking at my calendar. Next week is the 17th of September. Oh, sorry, November. The 17th of November, and will we be doing one then? Yes. Next week one is happening, so you can put it in your calendar now, the 17th of November, Livestream Q&A, 3 pm till 5 pm New York time, Eastern time. Thanks, everyone, for attending. I hope you have a good weekend, and we'll speak to you next week.

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