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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, May 26th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, May 26th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for May 26th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: (silence). Sam Ovens: All right. I can see a couple of people jumping on here. Welcome, if you're just jumping on. Can someone just write in the comments box and confirm if you can see my video and you can hear me speaking? I just wanna make sure we got audio and video working. Sam Ovens: I can see we've got Rosita on. How's it going, Rosita? Sam Ovens: Abernash said, "Hey, Sam. All good. Audio and video's working." Thanks, Abernash. Awesome. Sam Ovens: So, if it's your first time on one of these, then I'm gonna explain just real quick how these work. So, I do these live stream Q&A course pretty much every Saturday. And they happen at 3:00 p.m. til 5:00 p.m. Eastern time. That's New York time. And I basically stay on for two hours here and answer questions. Sam Ovens: So if you've got any questions, just type them in that questions box, and I'll get to them in the order that they are asked. It's first come, first served. And, yeah, we're just gonna go through all of these. Sam Ovens: And they don't happen every single Saturday. I try to do them every Saturday I can, but sometimes, you know, I'm away and things like that. So that's just a quick explanation if you're brand new to this community, and it's your first time on one of these calls. Sam Ovens: Now let's dive into some of those Q&A. So Victus Thomas has a question. He says, "I own a website design business that made 550 grand in revenue in 2017." Congrats, dude. Sam Ovens: "I work about 70 hours a week, and I'm pretty burned out with the business, but have two small kids so I need every dollar I make. Sam Ovens: My question is that I'm torn between doing the following: Sam Ovens: Just sticking with my existing business and refining my processes to hopefully make it more scalable, requiring less of my time. Sam Ovens: Focus on a specific niche within my business. I currently work with a pretty wide range of clients, but have great ECO traffic, searching for a broad range of clients. Sam Ovens: Expand service offerings to include ECR and PVC management, like you did back in the day, or teaching other people how to start and grow their own website design business, which I would love to do but I'm scared about just jumping ship on my existing business. Sam Ovens: Basically, what I'm asking is should I continue growing and refining the business I've been working for the last eight years or start an entirely separate side business? Your insight would be greatly appreciated." Sam Ovens: This is a good question. And you're asking the right person because I went through exactly what you're going through right now. And really you've gotta think ... You have to be rational when your decision because, you know, you never want to ... You know, you never want to factor in like sunk costs. And what I mean by that is just because you've been doing it for eight years, and just because you've built it up to this point, doesn't mean that you should stick with it forever. Right? Whenever there's a better alternative, truly better, and not just a shining object, then we should choose the better alternative. And that's the way I did it. You know, I started off with doing websites, but then I noticed digital marketing was better because I could make more money, and I could influence my clients' results more with digital marketing than I could with a website. Sam Ovens: You know, if you drive traffic to someone like AdWords and Facebook, that's gonna make more of an impact on your life and business than a website. And with that impact came more money and more respect and everything. So it was a no-brainer for me. Plus it was more fun. You know, I got to ... I like the game of paid traffic and all of that stuff more than websites. Websites, there's only so many places you can put, you know, a button and an image and that before it gets tedious and a bit boring. So that natural progression was a no-brainer for me. And that would be the next thing I would do if I was you. Otherwise, it depends how, you know, you see teaching other people how to start and grow their own website design business, which I would love to do. It depends how much you would love to do that. Sam Ovens: Either one of these could be a good option. Like you could move into, you know, PPC and NCO. That could get you to a million dollars, but it's still gonna be very time intensive, because it's gonna be an agency model where you're doing the work. But it could double your revenue. Sam Ovens: And then the teaching one, that could go to seven figures easy. But not only that, it would just require less manual labor because, you know, it's a product and the product is doing the work instead of you personally doing the work, or contractors or employees that are doing the work. Sam Ovens: I would choose either one of those options, like PPC and ECO, or the teaching. And I would choose whatever one that you're most passionate about, 'cause both of them can do the job. And you just wanna choose the one that you're most passionate about. And don't even think about, "Oh, but I'm walking away from my other business." Who cares about that? You can't think about the past, you just have to think about the future. And don't factor in sunk costs. And what I mean by sunk costs is money and time. So, you know, always take the better path. And that's what I would do there. Sam Ovens: And I've got a student in Quantum MasterMind, which is my MasterMind Program, and his name is Joe Kashurba. And he did what you are doing. He was doing ... So his name is Joe Kashurba, J-O-E K-A-S-H-U-R-B-A, I think. And you'll probably be able to find him in the Accelerator Facebook group or Google him. But he started out doing what you're doing. Like he was a freelancer website designer, and he was making decent money but he could only build so many websites a month. And through going through up-level consulting and Quantum MasterMind, he's been able to ... He's now teaching agencies and freelancers, freelance website designers, how to get clients and charge higher prices. And he's doing well with that. And, you know, he's making good money. More than what you are with the building the websites. I don't know if he'd want me to tell you exactly how much, but it's more than that anyway. And he seems to love teaching that more than doing the sites. So, hopefully, that answers it. Sam Ovens: Thanks, Matthew. Can see Rosita. Amanda Baker thinks ... Sam Ovens: So Vanita ... All right. Vanita is definitely the number one question asker on these calls. I swear Vanita is averaging probably, I'd say, 14 questions a call, which is a lot of questions. But there's nothing wrong with that. First come, first served. Sam Ovens: So Vanita says, "How do you help local businesses to get more clients with the Facebook, as your training is more national?" Good question. Sam Ovens: So what I would do is I would still use the same methods, but I would drop a location radius around it. So let me give you an example. Let's say you're targeting ... What's a good example here? Let's say you're working with like a ... What's a local business? Man, I haven't worked with a local business in so long. What's a good one? Let's say you're working with like a massage company, right? Where they go out and they deliver massages to you. I know that one because I order those myself. I like to get them coming to my house. And it's bound by location and geography. So if they're running PPC ads for that, then they know the types of audiences on a nation-wide scale, or on a global scale, that they'll probably enter getting massages. You know, they probably make a higher income. They probably live in higher income areas, and they are probably like interested in wellbeing and health and things like that. So they can probably find the audiences and the markers that show the demographic of people. And so we can identify them as a whole on a nation-wide scale, or even a global scale. And then all we need to overlay over the top of that is the geography. So you can put into Facebook like the zip code and then how many miles from that zip code, the maximum distances you want to target. Sam Ovens: So I would ask the local business, "How many miles from your zip code do you service?" And get that, and then you can drop that into Facebook, overlay it over top of the demographic data. It's the same thing I teach you, but just overlaying a location. Sam Ovens: Ray [Nauci 00:10:22] says, "Hey, Sam." Sam Ovens: Chris Wilks says, "Hey, man. Super pumped for next weekend. Prepping to leave on Wednesday." Awesome. So what Chris Wilks is talking about there is Chris just enrolled in our Quantum MasterMind, which is a good decision. So we've got our next live event happening next weekend. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, next weekend. So next Saturday I won't be doing one of these live calls 'cause I'm gonna be hosting that MasterMind. Sam Ovens: Lee [Forest 00:10:49] says, "Good morning, everyone." Sam Ovens: Mauricio, "How's it going?" Sam Ovens: Elsa says, "Hi, Sam. For a company based in Europe, but with clients worldwide, would you advise charging in Euro or USD?" Sam Ovens: Good question. I would charge ... I would figure out where the bulk of your business is gonna come from. And if the bulk of it's gonna come from Europe, then I would charge in euros. But if the bulk of it's gonna come from America or countries outside of Europe, then I would charge USD. Because, for countries that, like I know this 'cause, living in New Zealand, you get very used to just USD. You can calculate it in your head immediately, because you have to pay for everything in USD. All your software, you have to pay for, you know, all the products and things you wanna buy, and all of that. So like people from other countries can always figure out what USD is. And they're not even put off by the fact that it's in USD because they're so used to it. It's a good uniform standard currency that people can ... are happy to go with. And so if you're gonna have like the majority of your clients outside of Europe, use USD. If most of them are gonna be in Europe, use euros. Sam Ovens: Matt Rosenblum says, "Sam, how can you build credibility as a consultant?" Good question. Sam Ovens: So it's practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. It's just sticking to it, doing it every day, all day, every day. And just committing to it. And by doing that, it's repetition and practice, and time, and consistency. And those things build skill. And once you have skill, you get confidence. And then once you have skill and confidence, you can get people results. And then once you get people results, you have credibility. Right? So that's how it happens. Sam Ovens: The root cause of ... You know, if we track the evolution of, you know, what are the derivatives of credibility? Well it traces back to practice. 'Cause if you do practice, then you get good. If you get good, you get confident. If you're confident and good, you can help people get results. When you get results, you get credibility. Simple as that. Sam Ovens: Millie [Sencks 00:13:20]. "How's it going?" Sam Ovens: Austin Fontin. "Why should I buy an Oura ring?" That's a good question. Sam Ovens: Well, I love it. Because ... Well, here's a good ... a quick answer why is that what gets measured gets, like done. You know, whenever we measure something, then we always do better at it, right? Because we're aware of it and we're trying to game it, and we're trying to get that number down or we're trying to get that number up. So like people who run Facebook ads and don't track it, and don't have metrics in a spreadsheet, they're gonna be losing money, and they're gonna suck. And they're gonna have no idea what they're doing. Sam Ovens: People who run their business without having good financials, they're gonna go bankrupt. They have no idea what they're doing. And like most people have no idea what their sleep's like. They kind of think, "Oh, that sleep might have been good. That sleep might have been bad." But they've no data. And as soon as you have data on it, you start optimizing everything. You're like, "Oh, maybe it was ... Maybe I had a coffee too late in the day." Sam Ovens: Like I've learned a lot of things about me. One is that I'm so much like ... I sleep way better, and I feel way better, and I'm way more productive when I exercise first thing in the morning. And food makes a huge difference. You know, I don't wanna eat any food after 7:00 p.m. at night. If I do, then my heart rate spikes up when I'm asleep. And when my heart rate's up when I'm asleep, my sleep isn't as good. When my sleep isn't as good, my productivity isn't as good. When my productivity isn't as good, my performance isn't as good, my happiness isn't as good, my results aren't as good. You know, it can all be traced back to just eating food after 7:00 p.m. Right? Sam Ovens: And so you start to like shuffle all of these variables around so that you've become more efficient. So I know what time to wake up, what time to go to sleep. I know not to have any caffeine after 1:00 p.m. And I know when to have my meals, what foods I like, what foods I don't like. I mean, you're able to optimize because you ... now you have a metric. And a good way to put it is, you know, imagine running Facebook ads without like a conversion pixel. You know, you'd be just flying blind. You wouldn't know what ad's working best. You'd be guessing. And really, sleeping without an Oura ring is like not having a Facebook conversion pixel. You're just guessing. Sam Ovens: Elsa says, "Hey again, Sam. In the Myers-Briggs test, most of my scores were pretty even, almost 50/50. How would you advise me to work on my binary poles, if at all? Sam Ovens: Well, you know, it's never ... This is the cool thing about Myers-Briggs. It's never actually 50/50. So you can't get a IN ... You can't get an IENS TFPJ. You can't get that. It gives you one or the other. And so, you know, you'll be like an INTP or a ESTJ. Like you'll be one of those things. And the opposite one of those things, if we invert each letter, then we have your binary poles. So what did you get? What was your Myers-Briggs? 'Cause it wouldn't have been 50/50. You would have got four letters. Sam Ovens: I'm just gonna turn this light off up here, because it's got ... This has got yellow light, and then this light here, I've got this white light. And it kind of makes the video a bit weird. Sam Ovens: That should be better. Sam Ovens: So Angie says, "Hey, Sam. Can you please outline the exact process when doing Facebook ads for a client? I created the ad, which links to a landing page in my Click Funnel account. Do Value Video offer linked to my case studies URL for their site? How can I find the terms for my website in NZ, or are not US on the template?" Sam Ovens: So, if you were doing Facebook ads for your client, then you want them to create a Facebook Ads account, share it with you. And then you want them to share their fan page with you. You want them to put their credit card on the account, so that theirs ... credit card is gonna be getting charged. They're paying you a fee for management, which gets paid directly to you, before you start doing the work. And then you can host their pages, their landing pages in your Click Funnels account. I would just offer to do that for them. Sam Ovens: You don't wanna do all the ads and stuff, though, on yours. You want them to share it with you. You don't wanna use your credit card for ads spend. Click Funnels is fine. You know, you'll have to create ... Yeah, the Value Video. I mean, the offer that's gonna be theirs. The offer is what they're selling. I mean, you're not creating someone an offer. If you're creating someone an offer and in the funnel, and in the ads, and the Value Video. I mean, you pretty much have their business. Sam Ovens: So, you know, they're gonna have to give you a lot of input to create the Value Video, the content on the pages, and all of that. The offer, they should tell you what that is, and you might hone it and refine it a bit. And then, in terms of finding the terms and conditions for your website, 'cause you're in New Zealand? It's real simple. Just go through the template I gave you in Consulting Accelerator, and just go Apple-F, or CTRL F on a PC. I don't even know if that's what it is. But whatever the search or find tool is, and just search for all words that US or United States, or State, or whatever it is, and just change them. Sam Ovens: And, if you wanna know what to change those words to, just look at another New Zealand website. I mean, you know, when you're getting started and you're just small? Like you can pretty much like hack together your own privacy policy and terms and conditions, because it's stupid to go out and spend a whole bunch of money when you're not making any money. I mean, you can ... once you're making money, you can get them cleaned up. But in the beginning, you can adapt the template I gave you, and get clues from looking at other sites. It's really easy to do. I wouldn't worry about it at all. Sam Ovens: So Vanita says, "When are you giving us GDPR privacy policy updates? I joined a Facebook group by a privacy lawyer, and she said recording calls is not allowed unless you get permission, and there's so much more we need to be aware of. Her legal document pack is 200 bucks." Sam Ovens: Yeah. So I mean, first of all, you've gotta understand that this GDPR thing is like a ... it's like bitcoin right now. You know, like everyone's bloody talking about this thing, and it's just everywhere, kind of like it's like a little bubble hype there. I mean, it is very real with it's an actual law, and it has changed, but I think it's been really hyped up, and a lot of people are freaking out more than they should be about it. Sam Ovens: For most businesses, like for most of you guys, all you need to do is just Google like a GDPR compliance checklist. And you should be able to find a free checklist, GDPR one, that you can go through, and just make sure you're compliant with those things. You don't have to do anything super crazy. And, in terms of recording the calls, yeah. I mean, you know, your ... This is a tough one because you are supposed to tell someone that you're recording a call if you're gonna record a call, right? But most of the time that's when that information is being shared with other people, and it's being used internally. Sam Ovens: So, for example, I remember when I worked at my first corporate job, Vodafone. When they notified everyone that the calls were being recorded, because what they would do is, when they were training other people, they would play them their calls. And people would like do training listening to other people's calls. And it was all shared around and all of that. So that's why it's more of a big deal for them. Sam Ovens: I think, you know, I'm not giving legal advice with this. It's just you've gotta make the decision yourself. Like if you record the calls and you don't upload them on the internet, you don't share them with other people, and you know, you make sure you just keep those calls safe, and that data safe, I mean, that's your decision. Sam Ovens: The other option is not to record them, which the downside of that is that you don't get to learn from them. And the other option is to notify people that you're recording them, which I think is not really an option because then it's gonna make the sales call really weird in the beginning, or maybe it won't. I don't know. But this is one of those judgment calls that you have to make, you know? Sam Ovens: But, you know, even though it's illegal to record things? I mean, people do do it, like all the time, because, you know, it's ... Like I remember watching that ... What was it called? The Cambridge Analytica, like their whole scandal. And when the journalists, the way they really blew this thing up is the journalists went in pretending to be clients, and they weren't only recording the call audio, they had a video camera too. And that's totally illegal, but they did it. And, you know, and then they ended up publishing it and everything. Sam Ovens: But, like people do do it, and it's your decision. Like, you know, whether you want ... whether you think it's more valuable to learn from the call recording data, or whether you wanna be 100% compliant, and not learn from any of the data. I don't ... I can't tell you what to do. It's your call. Sam Ovens: But it's not just GDPR that changed this, right? Like this was the case even before GDPR. Like you were never supposed to like legally record the calls. But it's up to you. Sam Ovens: MD says, "How did you come across LaCroix? What are the benefits that made you make this the official elixir of Consulting.com?" Sam Ovens: Well, I used to drink a lot of like Diet Coke, and coffee. And I also used to drink alcohol. 'Cause back in New Zealand, like people drink beers all the time. It's like as soon as it gets to 5:00, 6:00, someone's just like, "Do you wanna beer? Wanna beer?" And the next thing you know, you're having some beers. And then, during the day, I'd drink like coffee or have Diet Cokes. And, you know, it became kind of like a little bit of a addiction to have caffeine, or sodas, or beers, or things like that. And I remember like Googling through forums and stuff, trying to find like ways that people got off like soda cravings and soda addictions, and alcohol, and all of that. And LaCroix is honestly like recommended. If you go dig into this information, LaCroix is recommended as like the number one way to get ... to cure yourself of soda addiction. And so I first learned about it there, and then I think my wife brought home a pack. And then I tried it, and I loved it. And then I remember looking at the can and I was like, "Man, this thing's got no sugar, it's got no preservatives, or any like bad additives in it. And it's got no carbs, no fat. It's got no nothing in it. It's just literally sparkling water and some natural like flavors." Sam Ovens: And why I like it is it's cheap, and you know, I love things that are high quality and cheap, because that's just the ultimate. And also, you can binge drink it. Like I drink probably 10 a day, and it's not bad for you. It's not like you're drinking tea and Cokes, 'cause it's just like water. And also it's suppresses your appetite, which is good for fitness, weight loss, and all of that. And I enjoy it. It's tasty too. And then it just caught on. Like, you know, everyone who ever came to my house, and I would offer them one, after they had one, they would all, they would tell me like, "You know, we've been drinking this stuff ever since you gave me that LaCroix." Sam Ovens: And then, at my office, when I introduced people to them, like now it's become just part of the culture. So it's become of our company culture, and now it's spread into our customer community too, which is pretty funny. Sam Ovens: But it is like, you know, it is actually a good drink to drink if you're currently drinking things that have sugar in them or caffeine in them, or if you're drinking like coffees, then ... Or if you're drinking alcohol, then LaCroix will actually make you a better businessman. Like no jokes because, you know, putting sugar into your system is bad. It makes your brain malfunction. And too much caffeine is bad too. Like the max coffees you wanna have a day is like one. You should have one in the morning, and then you don't really need any more, because your brain gets chaotic with too much caffeine. Sam Ovens: And then, you know, sugar is bad, artificial flavors is bad. That's gonna affect your productivity. And when your productivity's affected, your income and performance is affected, and your health is also affected. And your teeth, and all of that stuff. Sam Ovens: So, all jokes aside, I mean, I think it's a really good thing for people to be drinking. Sam Ovens: and Joshua Westover says, "I'm curious about how you created your sales script. Was it from reading books, mentors, or just trying lots of things until you found what worked?" Sam Ovens: So I created the sales script the way I create anything in my entire life, and in the training. And what it typically is is I will, first of all, figure out what I need to accomplish. Like what's the goal? All right? If I'm going to be getting customers, what's the best way to get customers? And then I start looking at who's the best at getting customers. I start talking to people and trying to find out who's the best at it. And then when I identify the people who are the best, I then learn from them. Sam Ovens: So I went to like seminars, I bought books, I went on my courses and trainings. I did all that stuff. I also scouted the internet for information. And then I learned from all of these people. And then I took their information and then started implementing it myself. And I found that, you know, someone might have a really good method for this particular piece, but somebody else has a really good method for this piece. And somebody else has a good method for this piece. And then, nobody has a method for these pieces. Sam Ovens: And so what I would do is I just merged it altogether and then filled in the dots, and shuffled the variables around until I found the optimum formula. And then, by doing that, I ... And that can only come with practice, right? So just reading books won't make you a good salesman. Just buying seminars and buying courses won't make you a good salesman. But doing like learning information and implementing it, and iterating, and tweaking, and practicing. That's what makes you really good. Sam Ovens: And, typically, what I like to do is I will just keep iterating and testing something until it works better than anything else I can find that anybody on earth is doing. So I will try, I'll tweak it and I'll adapt it until it's better than anything I can possible find. Even the best of the best that I learned from. And if I can hold it at that level for like more than two, three months, then I know I've got something good. And if I can do that, then I know it's great training. Sam Ovens: So that's basically my method. Trying to learn from the best, then be the best consistently, and then turn it into a process. Sam Ovens: Cam Rollin says, "Sam, in your training modules do you read a script or are you speaking the content of each lesson from memory?" Sam Ovens: Man, if I was using script for that, like I'd probably be 60 years old or something. Like there is so much content in that. Like there's no way you'd want a script there. If you just look at one of the transcripts for any one of those videos, look how many words is in there. Like I know these single modules that have 18,000 words in there. And there is no way you'd want to script that out. And what I do is I create the slides, and the slides have bullets on them, and diagrams, and concepts. And what basically happens is all of the information is in my head. And I know it's in my head because I'm doing it. Right? Sam Ovens: The whole process wouldn't work if I wasn't doing it. Like you can't teach something that you don't know how to do. That's when most people fail. Because they try and create a course and they haven't done it, so that's a recipe for disaster. Sam Ovens: So if you know how to do it yourself, then you know the information is in your brain. Then what you need to do is extract that information out of your brain and into slides. And I've got a process I use to do that, and that's quite a painful thing to do, to be honest, because you've gotta ... It forces you to get your thinking really clean and really clear. Because I know how to do everything like off by heart, by instinct, and training, and practice because I've done it in real life. And I just zoom through it, and I don't have a step-by-step process that I follow. Sam Ovens: But when I have to turn it into training, I have to put it into a step-by-step process. So it forces me to think what I do naturally, and then step-by-step put it out so that anybody can follow it. And that takes a lot of energy, and a lot of time, and a lot of effort and focus to do that. Sam Ovens: And like I teach you how to do this, this exact method in up-level consulting. So in up-level we show people how to go from Done for You in 101 to online courses in group-coaching programs, and how to create your own course, and all of that. And I share the process I use there. But that's just a little bit of a summary of how I do it. Sam Ovens: And I'm not fully ... When I record the video, I'm not fully doing it from memory because the slides are guiding me. Right? If I just stood in front of the camera and then just press, Record, and just winged it, sure, I would know what to say. But it would be too messy. It would be all over the place, and people would then have to listen to me, and that'd be like, "All right. He knows what he's talking about, but now I've gotta decipher this shit, and somehow turn it into an implementable plan." And there will be details missing, right? Sam Ovens: And the devil is always in those details, man. That's where most courses break down. They're like, "Oh, yeah. If you wanna start a business just, you know, you gotta put a funnel up, and then you gotta run some ads and, you know, Facebook ads are good. Yeah. And then, you know, you wanna have an offer." And it's like, "Yeah, great. But how the hell do I do any of that?" And they don't even know, so they just stay at this level up here. It's correct at the high level, but they don't know the detail. And the real mastery in courses is when you can do the big picture and the forensic detail. Every click of the mouse, every ... Like there is not any little step missing. And to do that takes a lot of time, and quite a lot of pain to just sit and really clean your thinking up to put it into words. Sam Ovens: And it's not fully from memory, because the slides are guiding me. You know, the slides have bullets that guides my train of thought so I don't hang off and go into different places. Sam Ovens: Brian [Tillo 00:35:19] says, "Sam, you rock. Lacroix is the bomb." Sam Ovens: I agree, Brian. You know there's nothing better that I really like products that are understated, so like, you know, they're not all hyped up. But they're really good, and they don't do any of the hypey things but they just make ... they get the main thing right. So like Amazon, for example, you know, they don't have celebrity endorses. They don't have Jay-Z rapping about it on TV, and they don't, you know, they're not hyping it up or anything like that. Their website isn't all fancy with all of these things on it. It's pretty simple. But what they do get right is the main things. Like they have the lowest prices, the fastest shipping, and it's free. And so they don't care about anything else, but they get those things nailed. And Lacroix gets the drink nailed, but they don't really care about anything else. Sam Ovens: You know, they put their ... Their product placement is at the back of the mall, while Coke and Monster Energy and stuff is in these fancy cabinets at the front. And they don't run any advertising. Like I've looked at Lacroix. The parent company of it is called National Beverage Corporation, and the ticker for that is called Fizz, F-I-Z-Z. And it's in Florida, and it's a multi-billion-dollar company. And they've actually got like 16 products, and all of them are dogs except for Lacroix, which is the one diamond that they've got. And like if you look at their P&L and balance sheet, they spend like zero dollars on advertising. And so, you know, they don't do any of the stuff other drinks do, but they get the one thing right, the one main thing that's important. And that's what I like. That's why I like companies like Amazon, and I like companies like Lacroix, because they just get the main thing nailed, and they forget about all the other noise. Sam Ovens: And that's how you become good at anything. And that's what I try and teach people in the Consulting Accelerator Program too. It's like if you are really good at solving your client's problem, and if you can get them results, then it doesn't matter how fancy your competitors' websites are. It doesn't matter if your competitor's got a Harvard MBA or if he's got, you know, if he's been in the Wall Street Journal or The New York Times, or if he's got an Amazon bestseller, or if he's got a podcast that's had Tim Ferriss on it, or if he's been on Oprah. All of that crap is noise, right? And so, like I reckon the best businesses are the ones where they don't do any of that, but they just are the best at the only thing that matters, which is getting the client results. And they just forget about all the other crap. And it's kind of what I ... That's what I do, and it's what I teach you guys to do too. Sam Ovens: So you can probably notice a trend with all the things that I like. They're all like this. They get the main thing right. Everything else, they don't care about. Sam Ovens: So Brian Tillo says, "I just started week one, and last week, and found that my niche is with military veterans. I'm a vet myself, and starting a business after going out was a huge challenge. I might help military veterans that are in the civilian world start a business. I've been direct messaging contacts, via LinkedIn, and frustrations. It's weird to start. It's a frustration because military people are used to being told what to do." Sam Ovens: Yeah. So, this is a great vision. Like, it's a great idea. But one problem you might face is like how are you gonna teach them how to start a business if you don't know how to start a business? And I don't know if you've started a business or not. If you've started a successful business, and you're a military veteran, then you know what to do, and you can just ... You'll nail it. And you can just start teaching it. Sam Ovens: But if you have never started a business, and you're a military veteran, you're missing one piece there. The whole starting the business thing. And that will be the crux. That will ... You know, the people you talk to will smell that on you and they will drill you on that detail that's missing. Your confidence will be lacking because that detail was in the back of your mind. And then if you do sign them up, and you do sell them, then that detail's gonna like cause issues when you're trying to create the training, 'cause you don't know how to create it. Sam Ovens: So that is the first thing I'd recommend. What I would recommend ... Like I'm not saying don't ... you can't achieve this vision and this dream. You can, but you need to start one stepping stone before that. And that would be you starting your own business, right? And what I'd recommend doing is doing that first. And you can follow the training, Consulting Accelerated, and it'll show you how to do that. Sam Ovens: And if you can start your own business, get clients, start making money, and it might be doing Done for You, or something like that. Done for You Digital Marketing, or maybe it's helping them with sales. I don't know what it is. You could talk to some ... or you can talk to some veterans that own businesses and see what their problems are, and then see if you can solve those problems for them. Sam Ovens: And then once you've built your own successful business, which you'll be able to do, then you can go around and start teaching other veterans how to start a successful business. You get me? You've gotta just get that detail there done first. Then you can jump over and do that other bit. Because otherwise you got, you know, you're putting the cart before the horse. Sam Ovens: I see people make that mistake all the time. That's why I tell people, you know, start with Done for You. Don't worry about scaling because, you know, when you're getting started, scaling is not your concern. Getting your first few clients is your concern. So forget about scaling. You're just trying to get some clients. And then once you've got a few clients, like five or ten or something, then you'll be feeling the pain, and you wont' be able to scale past there. And, at that point, it's a perfect time to transition to selling, you know, training and online courses. And you will make a way better course if you have done Done for You in 101 before. I would never have been able to create these courses unless I started with Done for You in 101. Every single one of my successful case studies started with Done for You in 101. And even people outside of my area, they all started with Done for You in 101. There's no better place to learn. So don't shortcut that step. Sam Ovens: Joshua Westover says, "In direct outreach, can sending people to a Value Video ever work better than asking people for a 15-minute chat? I'm considering testing this method for my niche, people with the fear of flying." Sam Ovens: It's not recommended. Quite honestly, the 15-minute chat is the Value Video in the New Age attraction method. When people are coming to us from Facebook ads and things, and they're going through the Value Video, it's different. But when we're going to them, and we are getting their attention, and then we're saying, "Oh, actually, go and watch this funnel," they're less likely to do it. And that's why we, instead, do the call with them, because we went to them instead of them coming to us. And, I mean, you're most welcome to test it, but from what I have seen, in my experience, it won't work as well. Sam Ovens: So Cam Rollin says, "What are your costs to acquire a client through Facebook?" And then your question jumped up, so I couldn't see that last part. But you could ask me what the last part was again if you want to. Sam Ovens: Our cost per acquisition is in between $500 and like $700. All right? So, you know, if we give Facebook, like 500 bucks, we make 2,000. So we get like a 4 to 1 return. Sometimes it's 3 to 1. And some people might think, "Oh, that's not that good. I see guys posting on Facebook all the time that they're getting like 32,000% returns." Yeah, but not at scale. You know, if all the numbers change when you're spending millions of dollars, no one's getting a 32,000% ROI with spending a million dollars. If they are, then we would know about them because they'd be like Warren Buffet stats, right? Sam Ovens: So when you get into the higher numbers, the ROI is not the same. But I mean, the main thing is, you know, I was spending like a million bucks on ads, and I'll make back two million. One of those million is like the ads coming back. So, you know, I kind of get like a 2 to 1 ROI. Put a million in, make a million. Like it's pretty much how it works. It took a long time to get to that level though. Sam Ovens: But when I was doing, you know, strategy sessions and that? I could get 5 to 1 ROI, 500% ROI. And, in the best days, I could get a 10 to 1 ROI. So that's 1,000%. But, you know, the costs have gone up a little bit since then. But if you can get ... even if you can get 2 to 1 ROI, 3 to 1 ROI, that's awesome. You know, you're gonna be rich if you can get that. Sam Ovens: And, I'm sorry, a couple of people's questions have shot up, because there's a lot of people asking them. So if I miss your question, just please ask it again. I'm not purposefully dodging it. They're just flying up here. Sam Ovens: So Vanita says, "If you have to give someone a refund, will Stripe refund you their charges? Or do you lose that?" Sam Ovens: No, I'm pretty sure the Stripe charges you get refunded back. Yeah. Sam Ovens: Julien Wageman says, "Why do we doubt ourselves so much? And how can we overcome this habit? I feel self-doubt is the number one thing holding me back." Sam Ovens: So, we doubt ourselves, plain and simple, because we should. Like we haven't done it before. You know, quite often people are doubting themselves because they're thinking about doing something that they've never done before, and it's a challenge. So they should be doubting themselves. The key is, is to understand that the doubt is normal, and to just do it. And drive through it, and stop thinking on the sidelines and getting paralyzed by thought. Sam Ovens: I don't wanna sit. This dishwasher's going off. Sam Ovens: So, you know, like I have doubt all the time. Like I'll invest money into something, or I'll try something new. And I'm not sure if it's gonna work. And, of course, I'm not sure. Because I'm not sure of anything until it's happened and I've seen it. It's the only way anyone can be sure. Otherwise, if someone's sure of something when it hasn't happened, that's dangerous territory. Sam Ovens: So you just need to understand that it's normal, but you ... There's only so long that you should be standing on the sidelines thinking about it. You know, you just need to assess it, be like, "All right. I'm deciding to do this." And then you need to do it. And just, you know, departmentalize yourself. You have to put away the doubt and just commit and do it. And then, when it happens, then the doubt disappears. It fades away, because you've done it. And that's ... This is just how it works. Sam Ovens: But where you're probably getting yourself into a thinking trap. You're probably sitting on the sidelines thinking about doing something, and then you're thinking, "Oh, I'm not sure if I'll be able to achieve it." And that's an accurate assessment. But just sitting there still thinking about doing it, it's not gonna achieve anything. It's only gonna make you more doubtful. So you just need to commit to do it. You're just getting paralyzed on the sidelines. You have to act. Sam Ovens: Thanks, Elsa. She said, "Thanks for the amazing training." Sam Ovens: Vanita says, "Will you ever host MasterMinds in the UK?" Sam Ovens: I'm not sure yet. I think we're gonna do our first ever live event, like next year. Like a Consulting.com summit or a ... Yeah, something like that. Like a consulting summit, and it'll be in America 'cause that's where like, you know, most of our customers are, and that's where we are. But, you know, I'm looking forward to doing that. It'll be like a three-day event thing, and I will still wanna be able to give out like actual prizes to people. Like who gets six figures, seven figures, eight figures, all of that. And then we can have the other students speak and share what's working for them too. And kind of treat it like those Apple events. You know, like the Apple ones with Steve Jobs used to speak at each year and talk about the new products? I wanna do like one of those once a year, like a big meet-up where everyone comes together. So we should be doing our first one next year. Sam Ovens: Chris says, "Hey, Sam. Thoughts on bringing VAs in. I love the idea of bringing someone inside because they will only work for me, and then I can train them in person, but obviously it's more money than using VAs. Is there a certain threshold or monthly revenue you would recommend for switching from VAs' lower costs to paid employees?" Sam Ovens: Yeah. I would go as far as you possibly can on contractors and virtual assistants, right? I went to ... I attained a million dollars a year on contractors and virtual assistants. And that wasn't smart, like I pushed it to its absolute limits, and it ended up crippling me because then the whole business kind of blew up because, you know, there ... At a certain stage, it's just inefficient to have VAs and contractors. You need people that are all in and fully committed, and this is all they do all day, every day, and managers and teams, and structures, and things like that. Sam Ovens: So I would push it as far as you can, using contractors and VAs. But the moment you've got excess profits that you can easily hire someone in-house, hire someone in-house. 'Cause, honestly, a lot of the time, you get a better value for money like bringing someone in-house than you do using contractors. And a prime example for that is, we used to pay this company, this like agency company to handle our website live chat, and our webinar live chat. So we ... 'Cause we have people managing that 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. So it doesn't matter when you message that thing, you'll always get a response back within like 15, 20 seconds, right? Sam Ovens: And so, in order to cover all of that, you need quite a lot of staff. I think it was like 16 staff or something. And I was thinking like, "Man, hiring 16 staff, training them, managing them," I was like, "This is crazy." So I used a company in the UK to do that. And they were actually pretty good 'cause they could get started immediately, and they handled all of that. But then, later on, I thought, "You know, we'd probably get better results if we had our own in-house team doing this." Because they'd just be doing this all day, every day, and we could work with them internally. And then I ran the numbers on it, and it actually turned out to be cheaper. And so we did. We hired like 16 people internally to do it. And our results went up like double, and our costs went down by like 50%. So we saved half the price and made twice as much. Sam Ovens: So, you know, there's a time and a place for contractors. Like sometimes it can save you a lot of time or it can save you a headache, or it can save you costs. Use them first. I always use them as a bridge to the full-timers. Like usually we'll have someone in a contract role first, and then we'll bring it in-house. Sam Ovens: Like I used to do my Facebook ads myself, and then I hired a contractor to do it, like an agency. And then I stopped using the agency, and I hired people in-house and trained them. So there's kind of a flow of how we do everything. Like I'll do it myself first, figure it out, then get a contractor, and then, when we max out that contractor? Well, actually, how it works is I'll do it myself, and then when I get maxed out and I can't do it any more, I'll hire a contractor. Then when we start maxing out the contractor, and it's becoming inefficient with them, then we know we need someone in-house to do it full time. That is the flow that we go through. De, de, de. Sam Ovens: And also, you have more confidence hiring a full-time employee when you've seen the performance that a contractor can do. So if you've got a contractor doing a job and it's profitable where you know it's making you money, then you're not really ... There's not as much risk hiring the full-time employee because you know that it makes money. So, you know, you get to avoid that risk too. So that's just the way I do it. Sam Ovens: Vanita says, "When will you let us hear your strategy session course from the past?" Sam Ovens: So I'm gonna actually do, like in the next update of Consulting Accelerator, when I update all of our organic attraction methods to move away from direct mail and cold email and stuff, and move more towards social networks and Facebook groups, and things like that. I'm gonna update some other things. Like I'm gonna do some real-life examples. Like I'm gonna pick a niche out of a hat, and just at random, and then research it and try and find a problem. Just so I can show you off the cuff how to do it. And you know that I hadn't premeditated it because it's truly random. Sam Ovens: And then, you know, I'll do some sales calls too. And create some real-life scenarios and real-life things to supplement the training with as well. Yeah, if you ... I've got some really awesome stuff coming up in the new versions of the training. We're looking at some pretty cool things. Sam Ovens: So [Isdaha Demilles 00:55:34] ... Sorry if I said your name wrong. "I help moms take control of their financial life in 10 weeks, using simple, manageable, and proven solutions in 10 weeks. When moms share about their financial life it can get very emotional. How can I stay grounded, focused, and unaffected about their emotions so they can quickly diagnose their problems?" Sam Ovens: So, practice. Like, you know, it's two things. I mean, first of all, like your personality is already going to have some shape and form. So like do the Myers-Briggs test, and see what you are. If you get an F instead of a T, that means you're more of a feeler and you're more into feeling than thinking and rational logic. So one of the things that makes me good at that, and I'm not born like that, that's just practice, right? Is that I have pretty bad emotions. Like I don't really ... Like emotion doesn't really come into my algorithms in my brain when I'm making a decision. It just gets factored out. And then the decision is totally cold, totally rational. And that makes me a really good decision maker in business, and it makes me really good at doing strategy sessions, diagnosing problems, and really good at creating training, but it also makes me like bad in other areas, right? Sam Ovens: Like communicating with my wife, and you know, when ... Like I'll give you a prime example. If she comes to me and she's upset, the first thing I try and do is figure out what the problem is. Why what event or situation has caused her to be upset, so that I can identify it and then solve it, because then I eliminate the root cause of her unhappiness, right? That's what my mind immediately races to. But all she wants me to do is just give her a hug. She doesn't want the problem solved. So that's a prime example of like me being rational and her being more emotional. Sam Ovens: If you are an F on the Myers-Briggs, then you are gonna have to really, you know, build that strength. You're gonna have to try and control those emotions. And it's not that you can't do it. You can do it. But it's gonna take more effort from you because you're gonna feel the urges to get emotional with them, and console them, and tell them it's all gonna be okay, instead of actually being cold and rationale with them and saying, "All right. Well, let's fix this thing and here's what we need to do." You know? Sam Ovens: So Ben Griffin says, "Hey, Sam. Do you think I should craft my website offer to be more than just an overview of the service delivery from start to finish? That's what I got so far, and I don't feel that's what I should say on the call to get them to want to work with me." Sam Ovens: "Should I craft my website offer to be more than just an overview of the service?" I don't really understand what you're saying. Can you be more articulate and more specific with your question? 'Cause I don't get it. Sam Ovens: Vanita says, "How do successful student interviews ..." Or, "You do successful student interviews. It's the same thing over and over. Can you show us some things they did? Maybe the direct out messages or them on a straight decision call? I think that will help people more." Sam Ovens: Yeah, sure. I think what I'm gonna do, now that we've done a whole bunch of them, I was planning to send out like a survey or do a post in the Facebook group, and ask how we can improve them, what things I should do differently. So I'm gonna write this down right now, so I can remember this. Sam Ovens: Yeah. 'Cause I think we've definitely done enough now. We've got a decent sample size there. We can get some feedback and start making some new improvements of it. Sam Ovens: Mitch Kinney says, "San Pellegrino is the premium version of Lacroix." Sam Ovens: Yeah, I like Pellegrino sometimes. Like just the plain one. But if you're talking about the flavored one? Dude, that's got sugar in it. So like it can't compare with Lacroix because it's full of sugar. And not just a small amount, like a lot. So if I was to smash back five flavored Pellegrinos? Dude, that's like eating like four chocolate bars or something. And that ... To compete with Lacroix, it has to have zero sugar, and zero like preservatives and acids, and all of that crap. It has to be pure. 'Cause that's one of the best things about Lacroix is that you can binge drink it, and you ain't gonna get fat or unhealthy. Sam Ovens: And Donald Dang says, "Sam, in your office, do you have a fridge full of Lacroix?" Sam Ovens: No, we got two fridges full. Sam Ovens: Vanita says, "Are you in any Facebook groups?" Sam Ovens: Yes, I am. Sam Ovens: "How much money do you want to make by the age of 100?" Sam Ovens: I don't know. It's so far away. That would be crazy. I want ... I think a good stretch goal for me is to be a billionaire by 30. And by billionaire, I mean, net worth of a billion, not a billion dollars in cash in my bank account. 'Cause nobody has that. And the people who do, they're worth way more than a billion. I mean, you know, the ... have a net worth of a billion by 30. Sam Ovens: So right now, I'm 28. So I've got two years. And to have a net worth of a billion, my company, Consulting.com, would have to make 100 million dollars a year in revenue. And that is $300,000 a day. And we can do 100. We've even done like $150,000 a lot of days this month. 150K in a day. So I mean, shit, I can see that it's not very far away. And so, you know, that's my goal. 100 million a year by 30. That means I'm a billionaire by 30. But we'll see if it happens. You can watch. You can observe. Sam Ovens: "What do you think for prenups? Does it protect all the money someone makes with their business? I see so many women screw their rich husbands over for the money if they decide to split up. How would I protect myself from this if I was ever to get married again?" Sam Ovens: Dude, don't worry about it until you've got lots of money. Like you just focus on getting some clients and making some damn money, you know? Don't worry about all this other stuff. Sam Ovens: "And do you forgive people who betray you and have them back in your life, or forgive and block them from your life?" Sam Ovens: Well, it ... It's hard. This question's quite high level. I mean, if it's like a family member then, yeah. Obviously, you know, I'm not gonna just forget about them. So, you know, family and really close friends have a higher tolerance level, but if it was a normal person, I mean, I wouldn't hate them or outcast them. I would just have no time for them any more. Like I wouldn't have any grudge against them. I just wouldn't ... But there's a lot of people in the world, and I wouldn't waste time with someone who has already ruined their trust. Like I'd just move on, you know? But the key is not to hold any grudges like, because then you're just sitting negative like angry about other people. Like I let go of things immediately and just move on and forget about it and keep going. Sam Ovens: Sven says, "Who's that guy that's always stays at your home? Family?" Sam Ovens: That's Rhett. R-H-E-T-T. And he is my personal trainer. So last year I decided to ... There's a cool story. Last year, 2017, I was watching documentaries on like the world's best athletes. Like, and the one particular one I watched was Usain Bolt. And I noticed that all pro-athletes, they have a small group of people around them. Like if you look at like Ronaldo. If you look at like any of the basketball players. If you look at Conor McGregor and Usain Bolt, all of those, watch their documentaries, you'll notice that they've got like chefs, and they've got ... or a chef. And they'll also have like a trainer, and they often live with them. Because it's something you wanna get right. And after I saw that, I was like, "Oh, I should do that." Sam Ovens: Because if my personal trainer's living with me, then he's gonna see everything I eat. He's gonna plan all of my meals. He can coordinate the meal plans, order the ingredients, get the chef to cook it. He can monitor my supplements. He can ... Like I weigh in every morning on the scales. He tracks like all of my metrics, and he plans all of my trainings, everything. And he monitors like what time I go to bed at night, make sure like I'm up at the same time in the morning. Sam Ovens: So kind of just like a observer to make sure I do what I want to do to get to where I want to go. Because like pro-athletes, they need people around them to achieve what they wanna achieve 'cause, you know, they have to eat really well. And they have to have good sleep, good relaxation, good exercise. They have to push themself when they're exercising. And that's very hard to do on your own, by yourself. None of them ... No one does that. And having the other people around you helps you. And my hypothesis with this was if I am healthier, eat better, sleep better, and I'm fitter and everything, then I should be more productive. And if I'm more productive, I'll make more money and be better at business. Sam Ovens: So by investing in a personal trainer that's in my house with me ... And it worked. Like it's made a huge difference. Being healthier and eating and exercising has made me more money. Like, you know, one of the biggest influences on your results will be your mood. Because if you're in a really bad mood, you're probably not gonna do your best work. If you don't do your best work, you're probably not gonna make much money. Sam Ovens: And one of the biggest influences on your mood is exercise, food, sleep. All right. So by working on those you can get your mood more stable. And when you do that, you're sharper, clearer, more productive, more dangerous. Sam Ovens: I recommend everyone, as soon as they start making more than $10,000 a month, you have to hire a chef. If you're cooking your own meals, and buying your own groceries, and you're making more than 10 grand a month, I don't know what you're doing. Sam Ovens: And then, you know, if you're getting ... If when you're making like more than 100 grand a month, I mean, I would consider having a trainer. Definitely I'd have a trainer, and maybe even a live-in trainer. It depends how hungry you are. You know, I want to be the best, and then I want to redefine what the best is, again, and again, and again. I'm not even happy with being the best. And so, to do that, I need to do things that no one else is willing to do. I need to do things that are weird, strange, and go that extra mile. And that's why I do things like that, you know? If no one else has a live-in personal trainer, and a chef, and all of that, then I'm like, "All right. I will do that. I will get an edge." It's kind of how I think. Sam Ovens: Collard says, "Are you still using Unbounce, or you've moved all of your funnels to ClickFunnels?" Sam Ovens: We have moved to ClickFunnels fully. Like one of the principles that I have in our company, Consulting.com, and in all of my training programs, is that I will never ever ever recommend you do anything, buy anything, try anything. I will never create a piece of content or training for you, telling you to do anything, unless I've done it myself, over a consistent amount of time, and I know for an absolute fact that it works. And not just works, but works really well. And is better than anything else I can think of. That's like the standard and the principle I've got. Sam Ovens: So when I recommended Unbounce, I used Unbounce myself personally, and all my results came from Unbounce myself. Then when I rebuilt Accelerator, I was thinking about using ClickFunnels, but I couldn't just recommend it without first of all doing it. So I figured out how to use it all myself, and then I built out all of my funnels in it, and then I tested them side-by-side. Unbounce and ClickFunnels. And I put them to the test. And ClickFunnels, I'm more happy with. It has faster page load speeds, which is very important for PBC advertising. Page load speed's important. It also doesn't do the compression thing to the images. Unbounce compresses the images and it makes them fuzzy. And it drives me nuts. ClickFunnels doesn't do that. Sam Ovens: ClickFunnels also, I find it easier to make nice-looking pages than Unbounce. Unbounce is quite tricky. And it's also easier to create mobile responsive stuff in ClickFunnels. And a huge killer is that ClickFunnels, I can share the templates with you with one click. Whereas Unbounce, I can't do that. So based on all of that, I weighed up all of those things and chose ClickFunnels 'cause it's best for you. Sam Ovens: [Gilles Dunkins 01:10:45] says, "Results focused, 100%." Sam Ovens: Trudy [Carad 01:10:50] says, "Good day, Sam. I'm on week four of the training, and my area of expertise is health and wellness. I've been posting case studies on Facebook on a regular basis. Someone sent me a message expressing their interest in my consulting services, and I'm currently in the process of setting up a date and time where I will call. Having the attitude that this prospect will sign up for my consulting services, I jumped ahead to the contract that you provide in week six. I have a few questions about it. One: Services. Should I mention the questionnaire/client on-boarding survey in the setup section? Should I mention that the client is responsible for purchasing any supplements, as I won't be paying for them. Then do I go on to describe that I provide an eight-week program, and then give them the details about that eight-week health and wellness program? Also, should I mention that after the eight weeks, I will be available to assist him, but at a fee of 150 an hour?" Sam Ovens: Yeah. So what you're doing is you're going way too far ahead. And it all started from the sentence that said, "Having the attitude that this prospect will sign up for my consulting services." You want to release your attachment to the yes. Remember? It's like one of the first things I teach you about sales. You don't want to start assuming all of this crap about them, because what if you get on the call, you've diagnosed their problems, and they're not a good fit? Are you just gonna make them an offer anyway? Like don't do this sort of stuff to yourself. You don't wanna get ahead of yourself. Sam Ovens: Remember that a prescription before diagnosis is malpractice. In the medical world, you'd get fired for that, you'd be on the news, and worse, you'd probably kill people. So it's this ... Treat it the same in business, you know? Like you're thinking about what drugs you're gonna prescribe this person, but you haven't even diagnosed them yet. Sam Ovens: And so I would just chill out about that, and I would just remove all of the premeditated and preconceived ideas from your head, and just get on the call, and just be a good listener. Ask them good questions and diagnose their problem. And then if you can help them, tell them how you can help them. And then if they're interested, tell them what you're gonna do for them. And then you can close the deal. Treat it like that. Don't go too many steps ahead. Sam Ovens: And also, don't worry about telling them that they can hire you for $150 an hour. That's not even relevant. You know, that's a conversation that can happen at the end of the eight-week program. You want people to just ... Like the worst thing you can do is to disrupt somebody's train of thought, when the thing they care about is here. And you're over here talking about all of the stuff that is just totally irrelevant to them. And they're just zoning out 'cause all they care about is here, right? Sam Ovens: And, you know, all they're gonna care about is solving their problem. I can tell you that. They're not gonna care about the questionnaires that you've got and that, you know, the finer details of the agreement. Because, truth be told, if you can solve their problem and they're confident, they're pretty much gonna accept any terms in the agreement because their main thing is solving the problem. Sam Ovens: And if they don't, then that comes up later on when they look at the agreement, right? It doesn't have to happen on the sales call. And then ... Yeah. You don't need to talk about the future, about your fee per hour. Don't worry about that stuff. You're jumping the gun. Sam Ovens: Brian Tillo says, "Thank you. Cool. Re: courses. Is it possible to do a hybrid Done for You in consulting for a company, or just stick to Done for You first?" Sam Ovens: Yeah. So ... You want to start with Done for You. Done for You in 101, that's where you start. Get at least five clients, and get them results before you even think about doing anything else. Sam Ovens: As soon as you've got like five to ten clients with Done for You in 101, watch week seven in the Consulting Accelerator Program. So click that blue button in the portal, go to week seven and there's three videos there, where I talk about going to the next level with your consulting business. And what the next level after that is a program we've got called, Up-Level Consulting, and in there I show you how to go from, Done for You in 101 to online courses and coaching programs. And the first thing we do is we create a hybrid offer. And a hybrid is a cross between 101 and an online course. And that's what we wanna do. It's kind of ... It's like you're doing some live Q&A calls as a group. You've got a Facebook group, and you've also got a content portal and stuff. Sam Ovens: And I explain how to do that in week seven. And go and look at week seven if you're interested in that. Sam Ovens: Isaac says, "Lumping mail with the landing pages is working for me. Thank you so much for your program. It has helped me so much." Sam Ovens: No problem, Isaac. Congrats! Sam Ovens: Jolene says, "When you talk about sticking to something long enough, and that this will bring success, I've seen many people in business for 30 years, and the business is still small. Or people who play music for years without becoming successful. How do I know if I am doing the right activity that will compound." Sam Ovens: That's a good question. And the ... You know, just doing something and sticking to it? It means that you'll be successful at it, right? You can't stick to something for a long period of time and not be successful at it, unless you make some really bad mistakes, and you ... something's up, right? You'll be successful. Sam Ovens: But what you're saying is that they've got smaller businesses, and they're not massive, right? So what makes the difference between people who just have small businesses and the ones that grow really fast? Well, I can tell you exactly what it is, 'cause this used to fascinate me for years. And I wondered, "What is that thing?" And it's obsession. That is it. The people who just stay small, they aren't obsessed. They treat their businesses as just a means to make money, pay their mortgage, like pay for their kid's college education, and maybe buy a boat, and then maybe go on a few vacations, and that's it. Their business is there to just provide money for their lifestyle, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's basically just having a business instead of a job, right? Sam Ovens: But the ones that do the best, that just skyrocket, they're obsessed. So like they will ... All they will live, eat, breath, and like all that they will do, all day, every day, will be this. And they'll be obsessed about it to the point that it's disturbing, and could even be considered like psychopathic. Like if you just go and watch like documentaries, or Google like Kobe. Go to YouTube and type in like, Kobe Bryant psychopathic tendencies, or like, Michael Jordan's psychopathic tendencies, right? And you'll notice this. All of the best athletes and businessmen, and everything in their field, the number ones. They've got like a psychopath level of obsession. And they will ... They're ... You know, they're just obsessed. They will do it all day, every day, and never give up. And they just ... They don't just want to be successful. They want to be number one. And not just at this current time. They want to be of all time. Sam Ovens: So that's what's different about them. And all the levels in between is just varying levels of obsession. So like our most successful student in the program to-date is Andrew Argue. And his business makes about a million a month, right? Why does he make that and other people make 300 grand a month, 100 grand a month, or 10 grand a month, or zero grand a month? Sam Ovens: It's obsession. I can tell you that Andrew probably spends 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, working on his business. And in those hours that he's not, he'll be thinking about it. And when he's working, he's not just thinking about it, he's executing and he's going hard. And he's hungry, and he's willing to do whatever it takes. And he's willing to invest money in the business. He's not just treating his business as a way to just make money for himself. What he makes in the business, he pumps it back in, pumps it back in, pumps it back in. That's the difference. Sam Ovens: So you've gotta decide what you want. You know, there's not a right and a wrong answer. Like there's nothing wrong with having a business that's just small, that makes enough money to live a good lifestyle, have a nice house, maybe have a beach house, and have a boat, and pay for your kid's education. Like that's the dream for a lot of people. And that's a shitload better than having a job. Sam Ovens: So there's nothing wrong with it. But if you wanna be really good, then you've gotta understand what the cost of that is. Because it's a huge cost. Not monetary cost, but like it'll take everything from you. And you'll have to sacrifice everything. It depends what you want. Sam Ovens: [Armen Kische 01:21:16] says, "Hi, Sam. I just jumped in, and so maybe you've answered this already. But I have 8 clients now with 12 to 18 months contract. I helped them create several income streams that they can have the freedom and lifestyle they want." Sam Ovens: Awesome. Congrats on that. Sam Ovens: And also, when you go to ... I don't know if you had a question in there, Armen. But I can't see any question, so I'll just take it that you're telling me what you do, which is totally fine. If you do have a question, ask me again. And articulate what it is. Sam Ovens: But when you Google, and when you go to YouTube and you search for these Kobe Bryant things and his stories, it's so cool to listen to them. 'Cause Kobe Bryant was like ... I think Kobe Bryant probably might have worked a little bit harder than Michael Jordan. He ... You can see why he's so good. He just did more work than anyone else. And all of his teammates tell stories about him. And there's this one story where his teammate, he's trying to get to practice every day to like first. You know, he wants to get to practice first so he can get some more sessions in, warm up, and be given edge over the other guys. Sam Ovens: But every day he comes into the gym, Kobe's there first. If he comes a bit earlier, Kobe's still there first. And then, Kobe like breaks his wrists, and the guy who's his teammate, he said, "You know, I know this is really bad to admit, but when Kobe broke his wrist, like I was so glad because finally I knew that the next day I was gonna be first to practice. Sam Ovens: And then he said he was walking down the corridor first thing in the morning, and he was looking forward to being there first. And then he just heard this boom, boom, boom, like the ball bouncing. And he was like, "No. No." And then he came in there and Kobe was practicing with his broken wrist, and he had already worked up a full sweat. And he'd already been there for like two hours. Sam Ovens: And he just said, like, "You just cannot outwork him, no matter what happens." That's the sort of thing that makes someone real good. You know? And all you have to do is study those guys to figure out what it is. Sam Ovens: Julien Wageman says, "How important is it that the niche has money? In the music industry, for example, most independent artists are broke. Is it important to think about that the niche should be able to pay 2,000 USD per month for a service?" Sam Ovens: Honestly, like I would ... If they're adults, like you know, if they're over like 18 years old, right? And they're in a country that has like a proper economy, right? Then anyone can find $2,000. They might not have $2,000 in their account, but they can find it because there is credit cards, there is selling things, there is loans, there's loans from parents, family. There's loans from the bank. There is ... And then there's just getting a job and saving a bit. And then saving two grand, which anybody can do. Sam Ovens: So, you know, I think that if the economy is all right, and the person's over 18, then they're gonna be able to find the two grand if what the problem that you're solving is really important to them. It's not so much about them having money. That's a binary view. It's like, "Oh, they either have the money or they don't." Right? That's not how things work. Like it's about whether they're willing to find the money because this is so important to them. And if you don't believe me about this, I can tell you that a lot of people, to buy Consulting Accelerator, have sold their cars. Sam Ovens: There was one person ... I'm not kidding. I put it on my Instagram story like a month ago or something. But the one person sold their engagement ring to buy Consulting Accelerator. Like this happens all the time. It's one of the main ways people join. Sam Ovens: Some people post on Facebook saying, "Hey, I've found this course. I really wanna join it. I need to find this much money. I promise whoever can help me out with this money, I'll pay you back." And I shit you not, like strangers have lent them different amounts of money, and they've pulled it together and been able to buy the bloody course. Sam Ovens: There's been some things that have even blown me away of how people have got the money together. And, you know, there's even stories of like people in China and other countries, when they've sold their kidney to buy an iPhone. Now that ... Like this actually happens. I'm not joking. So when someone wants something bad enough, they were literally willing to trade organs. And you shouldn't probably set that level of thing but, you know, it's ... My main point here is that when the problem's painful enough, and the person wants it enough, they will find the money. Sam Ovens: So, Anaya says, "What do you think about picking a niche in the luxury kitchen market? I can't pinpoint their pain points, but they have a strong desire to be the best in the market. Do you think I should focus more on smaller companies with pain points instead of trying to channel the desire?" Sam Ovens: Well, what's going on here is you don't know. Like you don't know what their pains are, and you don't know what their desires are. Because you said, "I wanna target this luxury kitchen market," and, "I can't pinpoint their pain points, but they have a strong desire to be the best in the market." And now you're thinking, "Should I target smaller companies that have pain points?" There's too many assumptions here. You need to base your decisions off facts, not assumptions. Sam Ovens: So I can tell by reading your words here that you haven't talked to the market enough. You either haven't ... My guess is you haven't talked to them at all, and you've just looked at articles and blog posts, and you've formed an opinion on it, but you haven't talked to the source. You need to talk to the source. They will have problems. There is no such thing as a bloody business that doesn't have a pain point. Actually, find me a human being that doesn't have a pain point. Everyone has them. No one is absent of pain points, unless they're unconscious, right? Sam Ovens: So don't assume. Know. Sam Ovens: Peter [Wikstrom 01:28:36] says, "When you talk about sticking to something long enough and ..." Sam Ovens: Okay, I already answered this question. Sam Ovens: "I am an INFJ personality. How do I stick to things even though I feel pain or rejection? The logical thing would be to stick to things, but I seem to be more driven by emotions than logic." Sam Ovens: Practice, dude. Practice, practice, practice. Sam Ovens: So I'm like ... I remember when I first did Myers-Briggs. It said I was an INTP, right? And I ... Like I had to learn to be an extrovert at times. So, you know, I've had to learn how to talk to strangers, do sales calls. I've had to learn how to do these Facebook Live things with people. I've had to learn how to make videos, put them on the internet. And I've had to learn how to do that. And I did. It was harder for me to do it than someone who's already an extrovert. But I figured it out. Sam Ovens: And then the P, that's the part that wants to be more like open-ended and not like structured and rigid. And to achieve what I wanted to achieve, I had to change that too. I had to get more structured, more disciplined, more ... and more like rigid with schedules and all of that. And what's funny is, your Myers-Briggs profile will change. So I did it recently and now I'm INTJ. So I'm still introverted, still intuitive, still thinking. The T ... My T is so strong that I ... Like I don't think that it will ever swing on the side of an F. But, you know, I've moved the ... I can move the I a little bit to the E, and I can fully change the P to a J. So like you can ... And this isn't me just trying to swing the survey results. Like this is actual, honestly, what happens. Like your Myers-Briggs test will change as you practice and evolve yourself. Sam Ovens: So, you know, it's not that, "Aw, you're an IFNJ and, therefore, you're gonna experience emotions, so you shouldn't do it." Like you have no other option. You know, you only have one life, so you've gotta find out how to change. And the way to do that is practice, repetition, stick at it, do it again and again and again. And you'll get it done. Sam Ovens: Right. You guys enjoying this so far? If you are, just hit that Like button. I'm just gonna have a sip of this Lacroix. Sam Ovens: I only saw about one Like come up. So you guys hate this. Sam Ovens: Now we've got a few more. Sam Ovens: Cool. Well, let's keep pressing on here. For people who have just joined recently, just doing Q&A here. If you've got a question, ask it there, and I'll get to it. Sam Ovens: Oh, shit. That questions box just blew up all of a sudden. So if I missed your question, ask it again. Sam Ovens: [Hayle Wekstrom 01:32:33] says ... Oh, you've already asked that question. Sam Ovens: [Riko 01:32:41] says, "As I'm researching my niche, I'm finding that they need a combination of Done for You, of Consulting and Done for You. How do you recommend dealing with that?" Sam Ovens: It's the same with every niche. You know, every single service also requires consulting, right? Like you can't build a website for someone without also being a little bit of a consultant to them, because you might have to make suggestions. You know, you're not just gonna purely listen to what they want and do it. You're gonna have to make suggestions, consult them on other things. It's always a little bit of a mix. Sam Ovens: That's why I call what we do consulting. Because, really, anyone who's good at anything, it doesn't matter if it's digital marketing or what it is, you have to be a good consultant too. Because like you're never just taking an order and filling it. Like it's always a mixture. Sam Ovens: Jules Duncan says, "Love it. Can't wait to attend the conference." Sam Ovens: Awesome. I'm looking forward to seeing you there. Sam Ovens: Collin says, "First time here. Love it already." Sam Ovens: Good decision on joining, Collin. Sam Ovens: And Peter says, "I've researched each of the five niches in the niche ... Should I research each of the five niches?" Sam Ovens: Start with one. So find ... Pick the one that you're most interested in, and start with that. And don't look at any others until you've exhausted that. Sam Ovens: Then someone says, "Why did you choose Ireland? Is it better for certain tax benefits? If so, can you share some of those things?" Sam Ovens: I chose Ireland because it's the best place to build like a ... to have really like a global corporation. There's lots of reasons why. First of all, they've got ... Well the main reason is taxes because, you know, the corporate tax rate is 12%, and over here it's a lot more. And, you know, like 12% beats 58%, which is like what people in California and stuff pay. And also, it has better IP laws. So, you know, they've got really good IP, Intellectual Property laws over there. Sam Ovens: And also, it's in the EU, so you've got access to, you know, all of the EU. And it has really good talent. Like there's a lot of good talent over there. You can find a lot of skilled people at really low prices. Because the wages, and salaries and stuff, is a lot cheaper over there. And, you know, there's a lot of good talent there. Like they call it, Silicon Dock." That's actually what they call it. Sam Ovens: And if you go over there and visit Dublin ... I'm not joking. There's like more activity there, in the tech industry, than there is in like Silicon Valley. Like Facebook's there. They're like ... They've got more than 5,000 employees there and they're just building another building for another 5,000. Like Apple is over there, Google, like all of them. Sam Ovens: So there's lots of reasons why. But it also makes the company more valuable if you ever go to floater to do like an IPO or things like that. But none of the stuff is even relevant until you make ... until you have to pay more than a million dollars in tax, right? Sam Ovens: So the main thing, for most people, is to focus on making money first, and don't worry about the tax stuff. Like only worry about that when it becomes an issue. Don't think it's an issue when it' not. Sam Ovens: Joshua, "With services, have you done the Dark Triad tests, and do you think they're also helpful?" Sam Ovens: It's just another test, man. Like it ... I've done them. I mean, it's kind of interesting, but I don't really see much benefit from it, compared to Myers-Briggs. A favorite one for me is Myers-Briggs, 'cause it immediately tells you what your strengths and weaknesses are. Sam Ovens: Joshua, "With services, I'm starting to become aware of my highs and lows. As you speak about week two, however, I'm unsure about how to get myself out of these patterns and habits. Should I just set higher goals to get myself out of it?" Sam Ovens: Dude, you've gotta become, first of all, aware. So, you know, it might happen once, and you might be like, "Oh, what happened there?" Then it might happen again, and you're like, "All right. Now I can see it's this pattern. Now I know what's going on." Then it might happen again, and you're like, "Damn. I knew that was happening, but I just didn't quite get it." And then you've got to be disciplined from that point onwards, so that when you feel it coming on, and you can sense it, and you can start to see what is happening, you're aware of it, you have to control yourself, and stop it. And most people know what they're doing is the wrong thing, and they just do it anyway, right? And once you're aware of it, you have to just develop that inner strength to discipline yourself. Discipline yourself. Sam Ovens: And it starts with like everything. You know, going to bed on time, waking up on time, if you do exercise every single day, if you push yourself hard in the gym every single day, if you eat healthy, and you ... You know, when you have cravings for sugar or chocolate or bad food, you don't give in to those cravings. You feel the hunger and you're like, "No. I'm not listening." And then, when you feel the procrastination pulling on you to check your phone, go onto Instagram, check Facebook. You know, you've got to fight back. You've got to feel it pulling on you and be like, "No. Not happening." Sam Ovens: And the key to this thing is, is, you know, if someone can't discipline themself in one area, they won't be able to discipline themselves anywhere. So just like working out every day, waking up at the same time, having like a clean house, eating healthy, if you start to do those things, then you'll start to develop really good self-control. And then when you feel cravings, and you don't act on them, that's when you get to that next level. And it's just more self-control, more self-control, more self-control, to the point where nothing rattles you. You know, you don't waver at anything. You have full control. Practice. Sam Ovens: Marianna says, "I'm doing the ClickFunnel stuff. Do I have to pay the 97 a month? Or am I clicking something wrong?" Sam Ovens: Yeah, so ClickFunnels comes with a free trial. And then the paid version is 97 a month. So it's definitely worth it for that. Honestly, you can get a website, a funnel. You can get like everything. And you can even build your client stuff on that. If you're doing digital marketing, it's worth it. Sam Ovens: Julien says, "Hey, Sam. When I do the Mindset training and write down the person I need to become in order to reach my goals effortlessly, it scares the shit out of me. Ha ha! Is this a normal reaction? How was this process for you?" Sam Ovens: Yeah, it should scare you. You know what that means? It's big. That means it's good. It's normal, you know? If something's not scary, it's probably not ... probably not that exciting. Sam Ovens: And Michael [Staneck 01:40:33] says, "What do you think of my niche? I help salespeople get more leads by digital marketing." Sam Ovens: It's a bit too generic. It sounds too vague, and it sounds to me like you haven't really articulated what you mean by salespeople? Dude, because there are so many salespeople. Sam Ovens: Are you talking about salespeople at like the local Metro store? What about the salespeople at the McDonald's Drive-thru? What about the salespeople at the Apple store? The Nike store? What about the salespeople at the local café? What sort of salespeople? Get specific. And then, when you get specific, talk to the market, and ask them what their problems are. And when you find out what their problems are, then you're gonna say, instead of, "I help salespeople get more leads by digital media," you would say something like, "I help ... You know, I help point-of-sales salespeople," which is like those ... If those credit card machines? Like I just made that up out of the blue. Like I'm just picking something specific. "I help point-of-sales sales reps get more lead flow, and fill their pipeline consistently through Google AdWords," or something, right? I'm making all of it up. That is not based on actual research. Sam Ovens: But it would be way more specific if you had done what you were supposed to do. But based on what you said here, I can tell that you didn't. Because digital media, what is that? It's everything. That means that you could be helping them with a DVD, a PlayStation. You could be helping them with a movie, a Blu-ray Disc. I mean, you could be helping them with an iPod. There's a lot of digital media, you know? When something is vague, I can tell that the details are missing. And when the details are missing, I can tell that there hasn't been an investigation. You know, the devil is always in the details. Sam Ovens: Peter Wikstrom says, "When investigating my niche and doing research, isn't it a bit rude to ask them about their deepest fears and what wakes them up at night? Or should I more draw my own conclusions from the conversations to be able to answer the question for myself?" Sam Ovens: Yeah, you're right. You don't just ask that question. It's a bit weird. But you ask other questions that kind of lead down that path, and you probe around, and you can sense what it is. You never assume. We never jump the line and be like, "Ah, I think what this person's fear is is this." You have to know. And the only way you know is by gathering the facts. And the way we do that is by asking questions. But there's lots of other questions you can ask other than this. Like, you know, you can start talking to someone about their business, and then what they want, and where they want to grow their business. Now you've found out what their desires are. Sam Ovens: Then you can start asking them, "Well, what's stopping you from getting there?" Now you're finding out what their problems are. And then you can start drilling into those problems. Probe, probe, probe. You just wanna ask why, why, why, why, why, why, why, why, why. And just keep going down, down, down, down, down. And then when you do that, you'll strike at something. And you'll sense that when it happens. Sam Ovens: Like when I do it? Sometimes I make people cry. Not like, not in a bad way. It's just that I've tweaked something that ... Like it's not that I'm being mean or being aggressive or something. It's just that I'm asking questions, and I'm going deeper than other people have. And I just tweaked a little, like pain point or a little sore spot in their brain. And it kind of sets them off and they get a little bit ... Some people cry. Some people get like totally change their entire like demeanor. They change everything. Sam Ovens: When you find that sore spot, you will know about it. When you hit ... When you tweak on that, you'll know what it is. It's very clear. Sam Ovens: Donald Dang says, "Regarding your silence, how long is too long? I find I'm really comfortable in silence, but there are some points where the silence gets so long that the pause pit gets uncomfortable to continue the call with me on the strategy session. For example, there are calls where I've stayed silent for four minutes if they don't answer how much money they're making per month." Sam Ovens: Yeah. So it isn't a rule here, right? It's not like we start a stopwatch and we're like, "All right. It's been this long. We gotta speak." You have to feel it out. And you learn it with instinct. But, you know, when you can ... I can tell when I've got someone in the spot, where the silence is truly them deciding, and their brain's ticking, and they're trying to process. And that's when the silence, I'll let it play out and draw it out as long as it takes. Sam Ovens: But there's sometimes when the prospect is cagey, and they're barely answering my questions. And they're kind of on edge, and edgy, and they're not really giving much. Blunt answers that I don't really think are revealing the true state of their affairs. And if that's what I get from somebody, and then I ask them a question and they don't answer it, I'm not really gonna give them a long-ass silence, because like I know this person's on edge already, and that's gonna get a bit weird. And so, that ... Like you'll learn it with practice, but that's kind of the answer. It's not a hard rule. It's not like a stopwatch thing. Sam Ovens: But when that happens, you know, like if someone is cagey and they're not answering how much they're making a month, I would just be like, "Oh, are you still here?" And they'd be like, "Oh, yes, I'm still here." And I'd be like, "Oh, well, did you hear my last question?" And I'd get them to say, "Yes," or, "No," or whatever. And then I'd say, "All right, well, I asked like, you know, how much money did your ... is your business making per month right now?" And I'd ask it to them again. And then if they didn't answer it again, I'd say, "Hey, I'm just being frank here. Like how come you're not answering my question?" I'd just hit them up about it. Like, it's a bit weird. Why aren't they answering the question? And if they ask why I need to know, I would say, "It's really important for me to understand where you're at, where you wanna go, and I need to know all of the details before I can tell you if I can help you or not, or whether we should even be having this conversation." Right? Sam Ovens: So Michael [Staneck 01:47:35] says ... Yeah, I already answered your question. Sam Ovens: "For the student interview survey, I would love it if all the videos had timestamps for each question asked to save time when looking for specific input." Sam Ovens: I agree. We're gonna do that for these Q&A recordings too. We just need more manpower because we're producing a lot of content right now. We're doing like five interviews a week, doing ... Like the Q&A calls, I've got three programs. And I'm doing Q&A calls on all of those. And then I'm doing the trainings, the YouTube videos, all this stuff. And I just realized, like yesterday, that I need to hire some more content people. So you're gonna be seeing a We're Hiring post in the Facebook group soon. Probably next week. We're, you know, I'm gonna be looking for some of these people. 'Cause we need more muscle to help us out in the content department. And, basically, what we're gonna do is ... Yeah, every single video, we're not only gonna have the recording, not only are we gonna have the transcript, but we're gonna have a bulleted list of every single main point. And if it's accumulate every single question, or if it's a customer interview, every question. And then next to the question, there's gonna be a link to ... And you click it, and it just goes straight to that part of the video. Sam Ovens: So let's say like 32.07, like 32 minutes, 7 seconds. Click that. Bam, it goes to that part of the video. So that way you can search using the High of Mind tool, find what you're looking for, then find the specific point, and then just click a button, and bam, you're there. Done. Sam Ovens: So, also what I'm working on is getting all of the customer interviews into the content portal categorized and searchable. That way, like when ... you can go in there and look at customer interviews and sort by industry, sort by money made, sort by different things. And also, you'll be able to search with the High of Mind search tool and find keywords and stuff like that. Sam Ovens: So there's lots of cool stuff coming up. It's gonna get a lot better. Sam Ovens: Lynsley says, "Sam, do you have any advice that would be different than the organic outreach methods for Facebook that you discussed in the course and in your Saturday meetings that I can apply to working in forums? I am a video games addict forums, but I can see it could be a long process getting prospects." Sam Ovens: Just try it! Honestly. I can ... Your language here suggests that you haven't tried and you're thinking that maybe this would be difficult. But don't think. No. Find out. Do it! Like private message them. Because I can tell you that the channel doesn't matter, the medium, the method. A lot of that stuff doesn't matter. At the end of the day, if you're helping someone solve a problem that's painful to them, helping them get to where they wanna go, they'll have a conversation. Sam Ovens: So try DMing them in the forums or reply back to their thread, and ask them. Just try it! Sam Ovens: Todd Barrack says, "Hey, Sam. How do you handle clients who absolutely insist on case studies prior to committing to come on board? I have one very good case study, but when I produced it, the average response from the client is, "Do you only have one case study?"" Sam Ovens: So, this ones' pretty simple. I would show them the case study, and then see what they say. And if they say, "Do you only have one case study?" Then I would just say, "Yes." Or, if you have more than one client, but you only have one case study, I'd say, "Well, I've got like five clients, but so far I've only collected one case study." All right? Just tell them the truth. Like people just like the truth. Even if it's not ideal, they just like to hear it. People get all weirded out when you dance around the truth, because then it's kind of a suggestion that something shady is there. Sam Ovens: There's nothing wrong with not having any clients or case studies. Everybody starts that way. You just gotta just deal with it. Sam Ovens: Peter Wikstrom says, "When doing the team's market questions, I find myself thinking what the niche would answer from the previous conversations with them, rather than going to ask them." Sam Ovens: Yeah. So, what? Like is that a question or a statement? If you feel that happening, that's fine I feel a lot of things in me happening. It doesn't mean I do ... I don't act on them. Like I might feel like, you know, watching a movie. Then I'm like, "Oh, no. Actually, I've got to do this work." And then I might feel like doing something else, but I just control it. Like do what you know needs to be done. Stop being persuaded and derailed by your feelings. Sam Ovens: Chris says, "Hi, Sam. I would love to start running paid ads to a funnel selling ECO for two grand a month. I have lots of results and case studies. What do you think is the best sale video to show them to get them on the phone? I'm using the case study and showing how I did the campaign, and how they can do it themself. Is that a good method to convert paid traffic?" Sam Ovens: Yeah. Do what's in the course. You're in this Consulting Accelerated course. Look at our fragmentation funnel, and look at how we use paid ads. Do a version of that. It works. Sam Ovens: Jarwood says, "Sam, my niche is to help recruiters start and grow highly profitable recruitment businesses through advanced market knowledge and a theme. Do you think I can do this just building on your philosophy and framework? Or should I actually start my own recruitment business and prove it works before doing so?" Sam Ovens: You know, I've already answered this question before. So, you can't show someone how to start their own recruitment business if you haven't started your own recruitment business. I told you this before. I remember it very clearly. And what I told you to do instead was help existing recruitment businesses. Help them get more clients, help them grow. And once you've done that enough, and you've mastered that, then you'll probably be able to bridge that gap and figure out how to teach people how to start. But right now your chances aren't very good of showing people how to start, because you haven't even helped one grow, and you haven't started one yourself, or taught anyone how to start one. Sam Ovens: So you're trying to connect too many dots. And it's risky business. Probably not gonna be successful. You don't need to start your own one. I mean, because that's a lot of work. What you should do instead is just start helping existing ones. Then it'll be easier for you to jump that bridge. Write that down. 'Cause I told you that last time. Sam Ovens: Keith Kruger says, "What do you do besides business and making money? What other hobbies have you got? Why do you want to be a billionaire in assets by 30? When is enough enough?" Sam Ovens: That's a good question. So I don't have any other hobbies. Business is my hobby. And I think about it. You know, there's other things I like doing, like I used to go fishing quite a lot, like out on a boat. I liked going boating. And I also like music, so I thought about playing the piano or playing the guitar or something. And I also like motor sport, 'cause I used to race go-carts, and then I used to race cars. And, you know, every now and then I think about buying a race car and racing it on the weekends. But the thing is is that like if I take on anything else, then it's gonna suck energy out of this. And there's no other way that that can happen. You know, if you have ... You only have so much energy, and if I put some of it into this, some of it into this, both of them are gonna be less than if I put everything into one. Sam Ovens: So I just channel everything I've got into the one thing that I'm most passionate about, which is my business. And then, you know, I don't ... That's not all I do all day, every day. I also have a wife. So I'm either like working on my business, or working out, or reading, or hanging out with my wife, or sleeping. Those are pretty much the only things I'll be doing. And I'm totally happy doing that. In fact, that's exactly what I'd wanna do. Sam Ovens: So that's why I don't choose any other hobbies, because it'll just split my focus. And then, why do I wanna be a billionaire by 30? It's not about being ... It's not about the money. It's about like the score. So like it's kind of like a game for me, or it's kind of like a ... I ... You know, it's like I relate a lot to watching pro-athletes. You know, they want to be like the best. And then when they're the best, they wanna be more than that. They wanna be the greatest of all time. And why? Is it the money? It's never the money. Never. Like Michael Jordan didn't care about the money. Neither did Kobe Bryant. Neither did any of those guys. Neither did Steve Jobs, Jeff Bezos, any of them. Warren Buffet. Like those dudes don't even like spend any money. Like they don't care about it. And it's more about just seeing how far you can push yourself, how far you can go. And trying to just test the limit. See how far you can go. And I find that really fun. Sam Ovens: And like, you know, I figured out on how to make a million, then eight figures, then the next thing for me is I wanna try and see if I can get to a billion. It's kind of like a score. Because if I can get there by 30, that's pretty good, you know? It's not about the money. Sam Ovens: If I was in this for the money, man, I would have stopped working a long time ago. 'Cause I already have enough money for the rest of my life. Sam Ovens: Ingrid says, "Does your future self include being a dad?" Sam Ovens: Yes. So I do want to have children. And I plan on having them when I'm about 30, which is why like I've always wanted to work really hard in my twenties, because if I can be a billionaire before I have a kid, it's pretty good going. And I've also wanted to hire a lot of people and build a big team, and remove quite a lot of the strain off of me before I go and do that. Because I wanna be able to spend time with the children and everything. Sam Ovens: And so, yeah, I definitely wanna do that. And also I know that it's not going to be ... Like pretty much every business idol I have has a family. Like the wealthiest people in the world have children and families. So it's not like not having them makes you better at business at all. And I do want to have kids. Sam Ovens: And then Peter says ... Yeah. I've already answered that question. Sam Ovens: All right. It's 5:03, so I'm gonna answer like two more questions here, and then we'll wrap this up. Sam Ovens: "I simply want to ..." [Trudy Caresse 02:00:12] says, "I simply wanted to have my ducks in order by having a contract prepared. Thanks for your advice." Sam Ovens: Yeah. I mean, you just don't want to be too ... Like, you know, the most efficient systems in the world, right? And this is a fact, like this is how the best systems operate. It's all by something called just in time. It's like the thing that like Toyota and Henry Ford, and all of them like pioneered. It's what Amazon does with all of their fulfillment. Like you always ... The most efficient machine in the world is when everything is just in time. You just prepared that part of the process just in time for the next part of the process, just in time for the next part. That's true efficiency. Sam Ovens: And so, when it comes to doing your business, you know, the contract isn't important until someone's signed up, and then they're asking about the contract. That's then just in time. And so I would, first of all, see if they sign up. If they sign up and pay, then you'll quickly scramble and pull together a contract, bam, just in time. And run it like that. Don't get ... Don't keep going too far out, 'cause you'll actually make the thing less efficient. Sam Ovens: Millie Sencks says, "Keith Kruger, enough is never enough for a cleaner from [Tim Growther 02:01:40]." Sam Ovens: Yeah. I mean, you don't wanna ... Like one thing that you might be doing, which a lot of people do, is thinking that, you know, there's a right way to live and a wrong way to live, and that me trying to be a billionaire by 30 might ... You might be thinking that I might think that that's the right way to live. Therefore, everyone should live like that. And if you are not willing to live like that, then you're not living your life properly, right? Sam Ovens: A lot of people think like that, but it's not how it works. Like it's every person's different. Every person wants to do something different. So you just wanna do exactly what you want to do, and that's it. And the only thing I have a problem with is when someone isn't doing what they want to do, and that's most people. You know, they have a dream and they're not doing it. Then I will pressure that person. But if someone's happy at like a certain level and they're just living life exactly the way they want to, they should stay exactly there. Sam Ovens: Kelly [Warchuck 02:02:57] says, "Hi, Sam. I'm a dentist who has been wanting to get into consulting for quite some time. I'm also very passionate about health and wellness, mind, body, and spirit. I'm feeling really stuck in finding my niche. I feel that dentists could be a fantastic target audience, although I'm not attached to that. Do you have any thoughts or suggestions on a new niche or how I can move forward? Thanks so much." Sam Ovens: Yeah. So you just need to do something. Like, you know, you thought ... You had a thought in your brain, like a little electric zoof! And then you thought, "Oh, I could target dentists, but I'm not attached to that." Like it takes exposure to like something, and it takes exposure to even learn if you should like something. And it takes exposure to like get attached to something. Sam Ovens: So if that was your first thought, like dentists. Then it's probably a good place to start. I would start talking to them. Start finding out what their problems are. And then, as you start to dig and learn about their problems, if you start to really enjoy it, and you think you can provide a solution, and you get excited about it, then that's when you might be like, "All right. This is what I wanna do." Or if you totally hate it, that's good too, because at least you know that this isn't what you should do. Sam Ovens: But right now you're trying to make a decision based on a thought and no substance and no facts. You need to do something. Sam Ovens: I'll do one last question here. This is a good one. Fitzgerald Council says, "What if you're obsessed with many things?" Sam Ovens: Good question. So ... if you were truly obsessed, you wouldn't be obsessed with many things. Because someone who's truly obsessed will give up everything that isn't that thing. All right? Like, so you aren't obsessed. You're just interested. And I don't think you've experienced obsession yet. Because when you do, you wouldn't ask that question. Sam Ovens: When you find it, you'll get rid of everything else. Trust me. You just probably haven't found that thing yet, or you haven't committed to any one thing enough to get deep enough into it to find that obsession in it. You know, no one gets truly like obsessed, and no one truly falls in love with like something until they get quite deep into it, you know? Sam Ovens: So I would just look at all the things that you're interested in, choose the one that you're most interested in, and then try and go deeper into that thing and get really good at it. And then see what happens. It'll probably spark some things off, you know? Sam Ovens: All right. Well, we're gonna wrap this call up now. So for those people who asked questions that I didn't get to answer, you wanna show up earlier next time. Sam Ovens: So these calls happen every Saturday, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. And that's Eastern time, which is the time in New York. And if you show up at 3:00 p.m. you honestly get the opportunity to ask me about 17 questions. And if you don't believe me, Vanita has asked me 17 questions for like the last 10 calls in a row. She's asked me 170 questions. And that's because she shows up on time. Sam Ovens: So if you wanna get your questions answered, show up early, because I just answer them first come, first served. Sam Ovens: And next Saturday, I am not holding one of these calls because I've got ... I'm doing my MasterMind. So next Saturday, we're skipping this, and then we'll resume the Saturday after that. Sam Ovens: And if you enjoyed this Facebook Live, just click that Like button. Give me some feedback. And the next one of these is gonna be next week. And then we're gonna be running the Q&A course with Howser and Jessie on the normal schedule. So you can ask questions there. Or, if you've got any other questions, the Facebook group's the best place to go. Sam Ovens: So thanks, everyone, for attending. And I'm looking forward to speaking with you soon. Sam Ovens: Have a good weekend.

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