Consulting.com
Consulting.com
 

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, June 9th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, June 9th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for June 9, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

00:00
/
00:00
Sam: All right. I can see some people jumping on. Let me know if you have, if you can see audio. I mean, sorry. If you can see my screen and you can hear my voice. Let me know if you've got audio and video working. I can see we've got Anita on. Susan, Tammie. [Ketchem 00:01:00], [Kindel 00:01:02], McCarthy, [Joward 00:01:03], [Avenesh 00:01:04], Peter. Cool. Sam: All right. So Anita has got her first question. But she asks like eight. I'm only going to answer one at a time. You know? So because otherwise it just gets out of control. So I'll answer one or two of Anita's questions here. Sam: So, when will you be sharing the next selection generator with us? I'm not sure yet. We're still working on it. We're still testing. I'll let you know when I've got a time frame. And then she says, number two, I am based in the UK. Does it make a difference to you say prospects if my location is in the UK and not the USA? No, it doesn't. It does not matter. Sam: And so what we're going ... For people that are brand new and this is their first time on one of these live streams, basically how they go is we do them every Saturday. Almost every Saturday. And they go from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM. And that's New York time. Eastern time. And you basically show up and you can ask me anything you want. Ask me any questions. And you just ask in that questions box. And then when I get to them, I'll answer them. And if I miss your question, it's not that I deliberately missed it. It's because these questions start flying really fast sometimes and I just can't see it. It just jumps past. So if that happens, just ask it again. And don't think that I missed it on purpose. And I'm just going to turn off this other light here. Just turn that off. Because otherwise it mixes the white light and the blue light. Sam: And let's just jump right into some Q&A. So that's what people seem to get the most value out of. People asking questions here and me answering them. So Susan Perry says, "Hi Sam. Have I gone too niche with this? I'm a lawyer. I help lawyers quit drinking and regain control of their lives before the habit takes its tole on their health, relationships, and career. Or should I open it up to I help professionals?" Yeah, I would just say I help professionals because that really is pretty damn niche. Like you help lawyers with drinking problems. I think just helping professionals with drinking problems, that's already a pretty good niche. That's what I would do. And that's probably a pretty good niche because lawyers and professionals, they're professionals. And so they've got a lot of self esteem and all of that, that comes with it. And so they're probably not likely to go to an Alcoholics Anonymous or something because that wouldn't be a good look for them if they're a respectable lawyer or something. So, I don't know how you got that niche, but it sounds interesting to me. Really interesting. Sam: Tammie says, "Hey Sam. Great to see you." Thanks, Tammie. Evan S. says, "Hey Sam. I've been a fixed wing airplane flight instructor for many years getting paid on an hourly basis. What do you think about charging based on training phase, completion instead of hourly? Do you have a proven process that you suggest to make this transformation?" Yeah, so I don't think anyone should really charge hourly. I just think it's kind of a flawed model. And really it should be in someone's best interest to complete the thing as quickly as possible. Not to just get ... Because otherwise if they're charging on time, the person just wants to prolong the thing because that's the sort of behavior hourly wages is incentivizing. For someone to actually drag things out and go longer. So it doesn't make sense. I think always charge on a project basis and based on completion. Sam: "Also, I can sell an online private pilot ground school training program as an info product to the same audience. Is it a sound business model? I have an in settable passion for flying airplanes and sharing the joy of flight. An obsession." Yeah, I mean if you see it as a need there. Remember that all of this comes back to problems. So you've got to talk to the market, which you know. You're instructing this market. It's what you do. So you've got to talk to them, find out what their problem is, and then see if this is a fit. So if some sort of online training program on this sort of thing is something that solves their problem and gets them to where they want to go, then it's aligning properly. And it's a good idea. Sam: Peter says, "Hi Sam. From the UK." Hi Peter. Anita says, "How do you deal with the negative voices in your head? I've got to ask this." So, I don't listen to them. The cool thing about action is it drowns out thought. So if you're doing something and you're in the zone and working on something, you don't really have any voices in your head. You're not really thinking. And so quite often when you start getting stuck and paralyzed by thoughts, it's when you're just sitting idle like thinking. And the way to get out of that is to do something. Start executing. Sam: Jolene says, "Hi Sam. You said that on the Myers-Briggs test you are very much on the thinking side and [inaudible 00:07:00]. I feel I will always be on the introverted because I scored [inaudible 00:07:06]. I wonder how much effort I should put into becoming more extroverted. Do you think it is very important to become more extroverted for me in order to become successful as a consultant?" Sam: Yeah, I mean, you have to be able to put yourself out there. Right? You don't have to become an extrovert. So I'm not an extrovert. I don't like going out to parties and being really loud and talking to lots of people all the time. I'm not like that. But I have to be able to do live Q&A calls like this. I have to create videos and put them on social media and the internet. And I have to have confidence to put myself out there. Otherwise, no one would know who I was. And so I have to kind of turn into a little bit of an extrovert at different moments. And that has to happen. But you don't need to turn yourself completely into an extrovert. That's not necessary. Hope that made sense. Sam: Victor says, "Hi Sam. Do you believe one's IQ is fixed? Or are there things we can do to improve our mental capabilities beyond doing what you outlined in week 2 in the [inaudible 00:08:19] workbook? Are there any specific practices you engage to improve your mental performance? Sam: I don't believe somebody's IQ is fixed. I don't even believe in IQ test. I've never done one ever. I don't care about a test result. I don't want to walk around and be proud of having a high IQ. I don't even know if I have one, first of all. But who cares if you've got a high IQ? I'd rather have a low IQ and a successful business than a high IQ and no business. So just put your mind on the right thing. You should be optimizing for the right objective. And that isn't certificates. It's not fame. It's not being smart. It's not having a high IQ. It's literally just solving a painful problem for your market. That's it. So you're just thinking about peripheral things that are of no importance. No one has ever said to me at any time in my entire career, hey, what's your IQ? I've never even been asked that question, to be honest. It doesn't even come up. It's not even in someones thought process when they're hiring you or wanting to invest in your program or anything like that. Sam: And then Julian says, "From the Myers-Briggs test, what was the greatest weakness you needed to overcome and how did you do it?" I would say it's definitely introversion. So I'm introverted. And back then I was really introverted. So getting on the phone and doing sales calls, big obstacle. Creating videos, getting in front of the camera and then putting those videos on the internet. Another big thing. Doing those things was probably the hardest obstacle for me to go through. Sam: Peter [wickstrom 00:10:09] says, "Sometimes I find myself reacting automatically in some situations due to a past trauma. For example, a negative father or negative past relationship. Now I become fearful in the face of authority. And automatically leave the situation. What's your view on changing this programming from the past and designing a character without those habits? Now it is like my amygdala is automatically triggered." Sam: I mean, you've got to just catch it. You've got to be able to ... You can't just think it just, it's automatic and I can't do anything about it. I'm helpless from it. You can do something about it. You don't have to ... There is in the moment there, you do make the decision to evade the situation. And so you've just got to get better at catching it right there and be like, this is happening. I can feel myself getting tempted to evade. But I'm not going to. I'm just going to keep going and push through it. That's what you have to do. And the only way to do that really is with practice. Repetition, practice, consistency, and time. That's what makes things change. The mindset document in creating your new character, that's a good start. But that doesn't actually make the things change. The thing that really makes things change is doing the thing all the time, consistently, repetitively, over a period of time. That's what changes things. That's what changes your behavior and your habits and all of that. But it starts with deciding who you want to be and then repetition to make it happen. Sam: Julian says, "Hi Sam. I find talking to new people very exhausting and tiring. Can you share about the process of how it was for you when you become more extroverted? How long did it take you from being introverted to becoming comfortable being extroverted?" Sam: Yes, so I mean I'm not extroverted, first of all. I'm not ... I don't go out and I'm not like loud and just talking to people all the time. I'm not extroverted. I just know how to turn it on to get out of my own way and do like a live Q&A call like this. Or create videos. Or do social media. Or do sales calls or things like that. That's it. You don't need to completely change your Myers-Briggs. But you need to be able to fix the situations where your Myers-Briggs profile limits you from being able to do what you need to do. Sam: Evan S. says ... I've already answered this. [Joward 00:12:47] says, "Hi Sam. Would you say to someone who is almost losing their confidence in being able to help their niche ... What would you say to someone who is almost losing their confidence in being able to help their niche and then lose motivation to do productive work? I've been looking at this niche for four months now, full-time. After I've quit my job I've been sending at least 20 outreach messages consistently every day. So far I've had about nine 15-minute calls and six strategy sessions. The engagement numbers are about 10% on a good day. I've iterated my message about eight times now to try and improve but I can't seem to be able to identify the most painful problem with my niche. Now I'm at the stage where my confidence has gone down. I'm frustrated with my inability to generate sales calls. I feel like I have all the time in the world but I can't do much with it. What's your advice for someone in this situation?" Sam: It's simple. You just have to keep going. Like what are your options here? One, you could give up. And then that sucks because you're definitely not going to achieve anything. The other one is you can just keep going and eventually you'll figure it out and you'll crack it. And you just have to stick with it. I don't know what the answer is to what's going on because I don't have anywhere near enough information to be able to answer that question. But I can tell you that you just have to stick with it. And I can tell you that a lot of breakthroughs happen just after that point where you think about giving up. It's often just after that point where you swear you're going to give up, that the breakthrough happens. So you've got to stick to it. Sam: Sven says, "Sam, how would you set up a health and fitness coaching program? Meaning how do you stretch out the information over the course of several weeks? For example, I offer a certain diet they must follow and a supplement they must take. Wouldn't I be able to tell them that all in one session which would mean the program only lasts one week?" Sam: You never stretch something out to make it longer. That's silly. That's like writing a book and then just being like I've got my main point done here. But now I just have to make it 500 pages. Never do that. A course is only ever as long as it needs to be. And that's it. So if your program ... It sounds like what you have isn't really even a program. Or maybe it is a program and it's just like one week. I mean, I'm not 100% sure. But I know for a fact that if it's just one week, you shouldn't try and make it six weeks or something like that. That's silly. Sam: Damien says, "What are the things you are doing right now that are pushing your comfort zone?" So for me, it's like growing a team and the culture and all of that. So, I figured out how to manage myself. And I figured out how to extract a lot of efficiency and a lot of horse power out of myself. But now we're kind of ... Now I'm getting to the point where I can't really extract that much more efficiency out of myself. I work very productively. I don't get really distracted. And I can learn new things rapidly and I've squeezed a lot out of it. There's still a little bit more I can get. But most of the efficiency I'm not going to get isn't from me. It's out of my team. And so that's totally foreign territory for me. Like now turning to my team and helping them and cultivating them and growing a really good culture and a really good team. That's totally foreign to me. Plus as an introverted person, that is ... Dealing with a lot of people and all of that, that's a little bit uncomfortable for me. Sam: What else? Thinking big. A lot of the things that we're thinking about doing right now, we're thinking about tackling and getting involved in, they're big. They involve a lot of risk. A lot of money. A lot of time. And a lot of work. And so it's really, it's like you need to get bigger balls to deal with this stuff now because it's like these are big things. It's not like just small little things anymore. It's like we're thinking quite big and we're thinking far out into the future. And that's quite scary. Those are really the two main things: thinking big, long-term projects with a lot of risk, and also cultivating a team and really building an awesome company and structure and all that. Sam: Ramsey says, "Hey Sam, how's it going?" So Elsa says, "Sam, I'd love your feedback on my message hypothesis. I help female entrepreneurs make more money with less stress and a lot more ease by doubling their productivity. Do you reckon it's specific enough?" I think I help female entrepreneurs make more money with less stress and a lot more ease by doubling ... I think that this isn't grounded in a problem. Well, maybe it is. I mean you need to talk to the market, which is female entrepreneurs. You need to find out what their problem is. And then your message should speak about solving that problem and getting them to where they want to go. I mean to me when I read this, I'm like yeah, it just sounds like it's obvious. I know I need to be more productive. I know I need to have, I mean it would be nice to have less stress. And it would be great to make more money. But it's kind of like it's missing the unique element or some kind of kick or punch to it. That's what I think is missing. Sam: Peter [whipstrom 00:18:53] says, "How do I learn to enjoy pain and become triggered to take focused action to solve a problem? Rather than my current habit: give up or become helpless." Practice. A lot of practice. And just discipline. I mean, don't expect it to happen to you overnight. If you've been just defaulting to evading and giving up and feeling sad for a long time, to build this other habit of just smashing it down and never giving in and being relentless, it's going to take a little bit of work and practice and time to build that. So just understand that first of all, and start right now. Start practicing right away. Sam: Edward Tang says, "Hi Sam, you've always said that success is 50% tactics and 50% mental. Does that mean we should always be learning and reading up on books not only to improve on ourselves and marketing but also our mindset on a daily basis? How would your learning ritual look like every day?" To be honest, most of what I've learned comes from doing. Not really from reading. Like doing is what I do most of the time. And I don't actually read as much as most people read. I mean, not most people. I read more than most people read. But I'm not a crazy reader that reads a ton of stuff all the time. I've read quite a lot. Sam: And when I have a problem that I need to solve, or when I'm looking for new perspectives, I'll read about that specific thing that I'm interested in. But if I know what I need to do, then the only thing that's on my mind is doing it. And I don't want reading to get in the way of doing it because then reading would be unproductive. So you don't really need to think about it too much. I mean, all you need to be doing right now is executing. And through executing and doing, you'll actually learn the most. That's where the ... That's the true learning classroom is through execution and doing it. Sam: Elsa says, "Hi again, Sam. Once you picked the consulting niche as your focus, what was your process for mastering it? What did you do to become so great at it?" Practice. I started out with plumbing clients. Right? And window-tinting businesses and rug companies. Like done for you digital marketing clients when I had no idea what I was doing. And people at the Yellow Pages, and those guys suck at digital marketing, they were my competition. And I was always jealous of them. I was like man, those guys are so good at what they do. And all of this. Sam: But I practiced. I'd read about it. I'd learn. And I just kept at it, every single day. And I just got better, and better, and better, and better. And then it's kind of surprising. It hasn't even been that long. Maybe five years. And now I'm really good at it. But that's what happens. If you do something every day over a long period of time, you will get really good at it. Sam: Kate says, "Hi Sam. Can you please comment on the following? I help local businesses generate consistent leads using a proven four-step sales final process. I know we should niche with local businesses. However, initially concentrating on pavement, cleaning, long care, and mortgage companies. Is this a good strategy or not?" I help local businesses generate consistent leads using a proven four-step sales final process. Yeah, I mean it sounds ... If you've talked to them, that's their problem and you know you have a solution for it, it should work. And now the only real acid test to know if this thing actually has some legs or not is to go and do it. Go and pitch this to them and see. Sam: Peter [whipstrom 00:22:55] says "I find visualizing and pictures really works well for me and has helped me to design my life. But how do I work with specific numbers, net worth or income? It's much harder to visualize a picture of one million dollars or ten million dollars than it is to visualize myself living in a certain type of apartment or having certain natured experience." Sam: Yeah, simple. Imagine the lifestyle that much money gets you. So imagine the apartment. By just imagining the apartment you want, for example, you can't have that apartment unless you have a million dollars. Or ten million dollars or something. So just by doing that, you're starting to visualize having ten million dollars. It's not so much like visualizing ten million dollars in a bank account or something. It's like visualizing the whole picture. Sam: Ramsey says, "Sam, quick question. I am in the emotional niche. Just wondering, I can't skip the done for you so I gotta skip to coaching or one on one?" One on one is a great place to start. Done for you doesn't really work in a lot of coaching and personal training sort of niches because the personal trainer can't lift the weights for the client. So it's like one on one. Sam: Donald says, "I feel like inside my mind I ping around all of these ideas-" Sorry, Donald [Dang 00:24:21], your question is gone. Sam: Peter says, "How do you deal with negative people when starting out. I find that 90% of people I try drag me down." Just don't talk to them. Simple. You don't have an obligation to talk to people. Just ignore them. Sam: Ben Griffin says "Sam, what did you do when you started out delivering websites to small businesses? I have a prospective client who wants his website to look like his competitors. How does this fit with the theme we provide of things modular that can be moved around to fit a client's needs? What did you do?" Yeah, so go look at the [dm 00:25:03] bonus in the program. [dm 00:25:06] bonus. It will talk about that stuff in that week. It's in the program. Sam: Ania says, "I've eight years amazing experience in business on the Polish market and now I want to start on the English one but I have a problem to pick my niche. How do I eliminate what I am already good at and pick only one and become an expert?" I don't know. Find the one that you're most good at. But remember it's always going to be a mixture of things. I might say I'm good at helping people start and grow consulting businesses. But to do that, I've got to be good at mindset, sales. I've got to be good at funnels and conversion rates and metrics and statistics and analytics. I've also got to be good at technology. I've got to be really up-to-date with all of that. I've got to know digital marketing. I've got to know Facebook ads. I have to know what makes a good website. And I also have to know accounting. Sam: I have to know a lot of stuff just to be able to do that. So I might say I help people start and grow consulting businesses. But really, I have to be good at 12 different things that make that happen. So don't think you have to just choose one of those things. Because if I just chose sales, then I wouldn't be good at helping people start a consulting business because I wouldn't know all of the different pieces and how they all fit together and click together to make it happen. Sam: So, Robin says, "I would like feedback on my I help statement. I help automotive industry employees prepare for retirement and by positioning their investments in such a way that will support their lifestyle in retirement." Yeah, I think it's too many words. You just need to say like I help automotive industry people prepare for retirement. Something like that. Because that's all you need to say. You don't need to make it more complex than that. Sam: Sven says, "Sam, when doing direct outreach, is it best to book a strategy session directly or should you send them to a link to schedule a call?" Schedule it directly. Don't send them to a link. Pin them down on a date and time. Get their email address. Put it in your calendar. Send that invite to them. Pin it down on the call. Don't do the sending to a link. Sam: Rock says "Hey Sam. If you have no history of any results, what are the best ways of getting a foot in the door with my first client? I'm in the helping martial arts facilities grow niche." You can just pitch them and say I'm going to help you. And if you've got the balls to do that, then you can get the money upfront right away and then learn on the job. But if you don't quite have the balls to do it and ask for money, then you can tell them that you want to help them for free. And then you can just help them for free, learn on the job, get them results, get a testimonial from them, then see if they want to start paying you for the services. Or get them to refer you to some people that they know and then you can get them as paying clients. So either way works there. I recommend just trying to get the money and learn on the job. That's obviously a better option. But failing that, for free. Because that still leads to money. Sam: So Anita says, "Are there any new training modules lined up for Facebook ads training?" If you're in Up Level I mean, the new version of Up Level was rolling out right now. I'm pretty sure you're in Up Level. So they'll be some ... There's all new stuff there. Sam: Donald [Dang 00:29:00] says, "I'm terms of direct outreach, specifically email, how long should my feedback loops be? I.E., should I send 100 messages and iterate 200, and iterate 30, and iterate?" I think at least like 30 to 100. But then you don't need to stick to an exact rule. You kind of know. You have conviction when you need to iterate. But you don't want to do it with too little. So that's kind of the rule. At least 30 to 100. Never less than that. And then above that, whenever you just have conviction that you need to iterate. Sam: Jolene says, "Hi Sam, you said that the" ... Yeah. I've already answered that question. Angie says, "Hi Sam. Do you recommend charging a lesser amount while you're testing and getting proof of concept?" Only if you don't have the confidence to ask for the full price. Price is a funny sort of thing. Often you just charge what you think that it's worth. And if you try and charge a value for it that you don't really believe that it's worth, it's hard. So I recommend trying to charge full price. Even when you're learning. But if you can't bring yourself to do that, then drop it down a little bit to somewhere where you're comfortable because you can always bring it back up later. Sam: And Anita says, "Will you charge for the new 3.0 version?" Not sure yet. We totally don't know yet what's going to happen with all of that. It's not the main priority right now. The main priority is rolling out the rest of Up Level. And cleaning up all of that stuff. And then we're going to come back over to this. Sam: Robin says, "Hey Sam. Do you still confess your alchemy of self statements every day?" If we're talking about the affirmations, I don't really do affirmations like every single day, these days, because I just don't really feel like I need to do them. And I might be wrong in that. But I look at what my goals are every day. And I look at where I want to be and that character and that vision and the mission. I've got that really clear. And I look at it every day. I look at my goals and all of that every day. But not so much the affirmations and all of that. Sam: And it's only because I don't really feel like I need to get pumped up to do what I need to do. I'm just, bam, on. I can just drop straight into the zone and just work. So I don't need to prepare myself like I did when I was first getting started because I didn't believe in myself as much. I was shy. I was scared. I mean, I was riddled with fear. I had a lot of mental conditioning to do to myself back then. But these days, it's not as much. I can just work. Sam: Sven says, "Sam, why all of a sudden did you decide to start using social media such as Instagram?" Two reasons. Number one is that I have a big team now. And so as soon as I had a big team, they can do social media for me. So [Rick 00:32:20] is the one that does the posts of my Facebook. And he's the one that does LinkedIn posts. He releases the things on YouTube. And all of that stuff. I don't actually do it. I create the content but I'm not the one who has to release it all and do all of that stuff all of the time. So part of the reason why we're doing it is that I've got a team to do it. Sam: And the other part of it is that when I did a customer survey, the big thing that was coming through was that people wanted to see behind the scenes. And they wanted to see what my life was like and what I was like because they thought that I was fake. Or not fake but ... Some people actually thought I was fake. Some people thought I was a robot. And my customers didn't because they've been through the program. But my customers wanted to see more behind the scenes, more raw stuff about what my life's like and how I do things. So that's why I made the decision to start doing more social media stuff. But in the beginning it's very important that you don't take your eye off the most important thing and do social media instead. The most important thing is getting clients, making money, and helping your clients solving their problem and adding value to them. And anything that isn't that is a distraction. But once you're doing that, and then you have a team, now you have the ability to go and do some other things as well. Sam: So Allister says, "Sam, although I've been progressing through the training, I keep self doubting my choice of niche topic. I have a ton of business ideas. Any advice?" Yeah, you're just a human being that's normal. You're going to doubt everything until you master it and you get really good and you start to just break through and believe in yourself. But until then, you just have to keep driving forward. Don't get distracted. Just keep at it. And it will happen. It just takes time. Sam: Biagio says, "Sam, I have my niche is talent recruitment acquisition. I'm trying to laser focus my attention on getting various employers to reach out to me instead of just cold calling them to fill their top talent globally with procedures. What is your suggestion on this?" Well, I never recommend cold calling. I think that's a waste. I think you should do what's in the training. I think you should try emailing them. You could try researching them on LinkedIn. You could try adding them as friends on Facebook and messaging them that way. That could be a great way to start the conversation. And then later on you could progress that to the phone call. And then once you get proof of concept and three to five paying clients, then you can transition to using Facebook ads. And that's a great way to get people coming to you instead of you chasing them. Sam: Jobe says, "Our first live Q&A." Welcome, Jobe. Sam says, "How would you think of a niche helping high growth eCommerce companies grow? Is that a good start or ain't it?" Sure. Anything is a good start for a niche. What makes a good niche is just talking to them. Understanding their problem. Finding out what they need. Finding out the gap that's missing. The thing that ... The piece that's missing to get them where they want to go. That's what makes a good niche. Right now you just have a hunch of something. And that's a great start. Now you need to talk to them. Now you need to do the research. Now you need to get to work. Sam: Peter says, "Sam, I'm still going through the training modules. And it might be covered later on. But I wanted to ask if you'd talk about figuring out the total cost of subcontracting before getting to sales calls and offering solutions to clients to factor in your expenses?" Yeah, it's in the training. You'll see that isn't an issue. When we craft your offer, when we do all of that, we think ahead. We think about what are costs are going to be. We think about how much value we're bringing to them. And we wouldn't craft an offer if we didn't think it was going to be profitable and worth our while. So just go through the training. Trust the process. Go one week at a time. One module at a time. And you'll be good. Sam: Anita says, "The 30 calls you said we need to do before we rethink of niche, does that include the 15-minute chat?" Not really. But if you ... Just make sure you've done enough calls. And then if it's just so bad and you've done less than 30, like let's say you've done like 15, 20 of them and it's just so bad, that you hate it so much, then it's probably a good idea to change niche, right? Remember the rules that I give you. They're not like set in stone. They're like good guides. But you've got to use your own thinking and instincts as well to guide you through the process. Sam: Elsa says, "Sam, I'll be completely honest. I've been struggling with finding the time to the alchemy of self mindset practices fully twice a day. If you had only 10 minutes a day to devote to mindset, what is the number one piece that you would prioritize?" I would just say reading over what you want. What are your goals? Just reading that over. And then who you need to be to achieve those goals? Just look at that and read it every day. Because that way you never forget what you want and what you're trying to achieve and who you're trying to become. Sam: Anna Marie says, "Sam, my niche is women's professional sports. I'm planning to go for the teams as well as the individual athletes. Should I go talk to the owner of the team or the marketing director of the team?" I'd try the owner first. Try to reach out to the owner first. See what happens. And then go from there. But start at the top. Sam: Todd says "Aloha, from the big island. Sam, this course is golden. What one question would you say is the linchpin in the sales script?" All of them. If we take any one question alone, it's kind of useless. So there's never this one thing that's really, really, really good. It's all of the things together. But the one question that you definitely don't want to miss out and that I think is the turning point in the call is what's stopping you ... So this is what ... This is your current situation. This is your desired situation. Tell me what's stopping you from getting there on your own. It's called like releasing control and self admission. That part's golden because it gets the person to think and admit to you that they can't do this on their own. And once they've admitted that, you have them. Sam: And Sim says, "Hiring virtual versus hiring team in your local city, what difference do you notice? And is it possible to grow a team virtually or in other countries successfully? What are your tips to manage this?" In the beginning I think it's better to do virtual because it's cheaper. And there's less headache. And you don't need an office. And you don't need any of that stuff. Right? So in the beginning, use virtual. Smarter to do it that way. But later on when you are making a lot of money and now building an amazing team is your priority because here's the thing, all right? No great company was ever built with VAs or a virtual team. Ever. Sam: So they're great. VAs are great. And virtual teams are great to get a business off the ground and get it moving and kind of start making money and all of that. But there comes a time when you have to make a decision like are we going to try and be the best in the world? And hire the smartest people in the world? And have the most intense team in the world? Or are we just gonna keep being an efficient VA and virtual company? Right? You've got to ... That's the turning point where I say then you should get an office, hire an in-house team and all of that. But work as long as you can using the virtual team because it's cheap and easy and it's a lot less stress. Sam: Cam Roland says, "Hi Sam. You talked about using one funnel to generate business but how many times have you changed your case study video in the past five years?" So, when I first released that case study video I used that for I would say six months. And then I moved into a just in time webinar funnel, which is slightly more advanced. And it was still generating strategy sessions. And then I used that for a good year. And then I moved to the most advanced one I got now which is the fully automated webinar that I'm using to sell Accelerator. Sam: So it's not that ... At any one given moment in time I've always really had one funnel. But it's been, over the years, four different funnels. But just one at each given time. And they keep getting better. And I only make it better when I know how it can be made better. So typically I start with a funnel and it's the best I can possibly do right now. And then I learn a lot and I get more results. And the story I can tell is better. And I know more information about the niche. And it becomes so obvious to me that this webinar now sucks. Or this case study thing now sucks compared to what I know I can make it. And when it gets to that point where I know it sucks and I know I can make it better, that's when I remake it. It's typically every six months to a year that I'll do that. Sam: Kyle Baker says, "Hi Sam. Greetings from Detroit. Really appreciate how much effort you have put into so much quality knowledge with all of us. It has triggered a complete 180 in my mindset really giving me the push to tackle everything I've found has held ... One minute. Lost this. To tackle everything I found has held me back. Right now I have a company I started a couple of years ago that is kind of like niche clothing brand. I've taken my art and made it into custom lapel pins, patches, stickers, and a few other accessory-based products. I have used it as an outlet to help other people build clothing brands. Do you have any advice on taking what I'm doing and really growing it with the tactics of consulting that you have shown us?" Sam: Let me think about this. Yeah, well I think if it's already selling and it's already working, then it means you have a proof of concept in what you're doing, right? Because it's working. And that means that it could potentially work at a much larger scale. Sam: So the first job is to get something working at a small scale. And then we try to stretch its limits to as far as it can go. So if that is true and it is working at the small scale, then I would look at the Facebook ads training and I'd learn all about that. And then I'd try to start running paid ads. And then I'd list all the products that you're selling online using like Shopify or maybe you've already got an online store. I don't know. And then I'd try and adjust the copy. And the conversion rate optimization. Try to improve and tweak all of the page variables. And then the Facebook ads. And I'd try and see if you can get customers for your company using ads. And if you can do that you should be able to scale a lot more than you've ever done in the past. So that's what I'd recommend. Sam: You can definitely use a lot of the principles. Because the principles I teach in this training, they're all about business. They're universal. It's like find a market, solve a problem for them, and then create a message that really communicates that value. Strikes a nerve. Gets their attention. And then know how to sell. Know how to market and advertise. Know technology and the latest platforms. And know a conversion rate optimization. Know your numbers. Know your conversion rates and metrics. And then know the financial elements of the business and how to optimize all of that to make it efficient and get a good profit and a good return on capital. That is how every business runs. So really, if you look at it from that principle, you can apply this to anything including your business. Sam: Michael says, "Hi Sam. First, love the course. Thank you. Second, when you're researching the belief systems and current trends of the market, what fundamental things do you look for?" Honestly, in the beginning I have no idea what I'm looking for. I just want to talk to them and just probe, probe, probe. Find out what their problems are. Find out what their desires are. Find out who they are. And just what they want and what they're doing. I'm always fascinated with people and what they want. And sometimes I'm fascinated ... Most of the time I'm fascinated that they don't know what they want. And that's actually the cause of the frustration because they don't know what to do day to day because they don't know what they want. And they don't know what they want so they get tangled. And when you don't know what you want, you don't know what to do because you can only choose your actions when you have an objective that you're optimizing for. And so when I try and find that and then I try and probe them until I can really find what they want. Sam: A lot of the time I've got to help people discover actually what they want. And only once that happens, then can we start to look at their actions and see how those align. Or most commonly, misaligned with what they actually want. Because they didn't even know what it was. And then try and see how we can now optimize this behavior and actions to give them what they want. I know I speak to 30 people or more. All the patterns start appearing to me. And I'm like all of these people suffer with this. But when I'm speaking to one person in the beginning, I have no, I can't see any patterns. Even three, four, five, I can't really see them. Something happens honestly at that 30 people mark. It's like all of a sudden you start to catch a lot of things. Sam: Elliot says, "The breakthrough comment about giving up too soon is so true guys. Just breaking through a similar hurdle myself." Yeah. It's honestly quite unbelievable. I don't think you guys know how much I sucked when I started. I didn't know how to sell. I didn't know how to do digital marketing. I didn't know how to do anything. I truly sucked and I had no confidence. No money. And I was in a garage in New Zealand. And that wasn't even that long ago. Sam: It's kind of surprising because you just forget about it and you just start doing things every day. And you've just got to keep at it. And keep striking the hammer. And before long, all of a sudden everyone looks at you and they're like how is he doing that? And it's pretty crazy because I didn't do anything special. I just kept at it every single day for what's considered a long period of time but really isn't that much time. It's like five years since I first began. And I just kept at it daily and never gave up. And then got here. So it's like focus, consistency, and just never giving up and making sure you're doing it every day. And then it seems like you're making no progress. But all of a sudden it just goes boom. And just explodes. Sam: David says, "Hi Sam. How easy is it to move your business to another country? Say you set one up but six months later you move to another country. What is it best to do in terms of the business in such a situation?" Well, that depends on what your company is and how many people you have on your team and how much money it's making and all of these things. Right? But if it's just a small business that's barely made any money, then it's so easy to do. You just wind the company up. You incorporate one in the other country. And you just start there. And there's no issues. But when you get entrenched and you get multiple years in and you've filed lots of tax returns and you've got financials and you have employees, and you have intellectual property and you have all of this stuff, now it's harder to do because you're moving these assets from here to there. And you just can't do that. You have to ... you either ... It's complex, right? So if it's just a small business, it's easy. But once you get bigger, very hard. Sam: Cam Roland says, "Hi Sam. You were saying in your interview with Matt Koffman that one on ones rather than group coaching hurt the client. How does it hurt them?" So you've got to understand that in the beginning it will help them because you're talking to them and you're catching the areas in your program. So when you first build your training program there's going to be holes in it. There's gonna be parts of it that aren't clear. There's gonna be parts of it you haven't explained in enough depth. And there's gonna be parts of it that are just flat out missing, that you never even thought that need to be in the program. And so when you're doing your version one program, you're doing one on ones actually serves as a mechanism to catch the errors and the flaws in your training program. But once you plug those holes and eliminate those errors, then the one on ones start to become more of the person is just using the one on one because they've got it rather than they're actually using it for any purpose. Sam: And what we see most of the time is that when people are in a group scenario, they are more likely to succeed than when they're in a one on one scenario because there's a lot more possible connections with a group. If you think about it like a network, if there's just one person and another person that's just one connection, two nodes. It's very rigid and there's not that many possibilities here. But as soon as you have five, now there's tons of different possible connections. And so that's kind of how it works. Because someone might ask a question that you never thought of asking. Or that you wanted to ask but didn't have the courage to ask. And so all of a sudden, all of this stuff starts to happen when you have a group. Sam: This is the stuff we teach in Up Level consulting. If you're interested in this stuff, like Matt went through Up Level, all of the guys who have done the massive numbers, they all went through Up Level. Every single one of them. So if you're interested in doing that stuff. Moving from one on one and done for you to online courses and training programs, go check out week seven in Accelerator where we talk about Up Level. Sam: [Joward 00:52:43] says, "Thank you, Sam. I think that is true. I feel like I'm slowly building momentum and zeroing in on something which I can actually get revenue from. I guess some things just take time and you have to be patient to get to the breakthrough. By the way, my niche is helping recruitment businesses block the competition and become leading businesses in their niche." Cool. And yeah, you don't want to expect it to take forever. But you want to expect it to happen as fast as possible. But if that doesn't happen you can't get disheartened. For some people it happens quick because they're either in a scenario where there is so much pain and there's so much pressure on them because let's say that someone had just had their second child, their marriage, and they've got a mortgage. And they've decided to quit their job and start out on their own. That person is more likely to succeed than someone who is single and lives at home because there isn't that much pressure on that person. Sam: And so there's all sorts of different things that make some people move faster than others. One of them is pain. If the person is in more pain, we see them move way quicker. The other one is just a level of maturity. So how quickly will stop going out and drinking on the weekends. How quickly they'll stop going and hanging out with people and playing Xbox and doing that sort of crap that isn't that productive. And then the third one is really their level of experience and knowledge in a particular field. Like someone might have been working in this field for ages and they've noticed the problem. And now they're starting their business in it. So these different factors determine whether someone is successful real fast or over a longer period of time. Sam: You have to remember with me, I didn't get my first client until one year after I started. Twelve months. So I was slow. But it was because I was like 21 or 22. And I was living at home with my parents. And I didn't have a fire under me to go. And also I was introverted. And I was still going out partying and drinking and all of that. So that's what made me slower. And that's why some people just explode way faster. But at the end of the day, you've got to never give up. The only way you can possibly lose is if you give up. You got to remember that. If you never give up, then you've got nothing to worry about. Sam: How's it going, Sean [Vaslin 00:55:39]. Julian says, "Hi Sam. Do you take care of your health when you work so much on the computer? What do you do to avoid health problems?" That's a good question because yeah, I work a lot. And when I work I'm not really moving. So it is a problem. So I have to exercise and eat healthy and sleep properly and all of that. So I have a personal trainer that lives in my house full time and he trains me five days a week for about one hour each time. And we train cardio two days a week and then weights three days a week. And they're intense sessions. He really pushes me to the limit. Sam: And then I make sure I get eight hours of sleep every night. And I also make sure that I don't drink any alcohol. I don't eat sugar. I don't eat processed foods. I also don't have gluten or wheat or dairy. And of that. And all of my food is cooked with a chef. And it's healthy. And so because I stay hydrated, I don't drink alcohol, I sleep well, and I exercise a lot, I'm able to counteract the negative externalities that come from sitting at a desk a lot. So that's what you got to do. I would be really fat if I didn't exercise. In fact, I was way fatter not that long ago because all I did was sit at my desk. So yeah. You have to do some things. Sam: Arthur Norwood says, "Hi Sam. Which of your outside of work hires has improved your life the most? Was it hiring a chef, your personal trainer, or something else?" It's hard to say. I think the one you notice the most is the chef. Just because it's immediate and all of a sudden you don't have to think about anything. And you just have so much time on your hands. So the chef one works instantly. Sam: The personal trainer one, you have to work. So if you hire a personal trainer, the problem isn't solved. You still have to wake your ass up and go and sweat at the gym. So it's a bit different. With the chef, as soon as you hire them and they're working, the problem is solved. It is done. You don't have to do anything. And so that one you notice really quick. And that's the one I would tackle first because of that. But the long term effects of the personal trainer are probably bigger than the chef. The chef has immediate short-term benefit. The personal trainer, you don't notice that benefit until about a three to six-month horizon after you start. Because it takes time to get fitter and get into shape. And to fix the issues that you had. And then after that starts to occur, your thinking gets clearer. Your emotions start calming down. And you become much more stable. Much more rational. And you actually are way sharper. And you can work longer and you have more endurance and all of that. And so I think longterm benefits of the personal trainer outweigh the benefits of the chef. But short-term benefits of the chef are amazing because you notice it instantly and you're like holy shit. Why didn't I do that ages ago? Sam: Sven says, "How do you differentiate between judging and judging. Example, walking past an overweight person and your friends say she is fat and ugly. Do i agree with them and basically judge that person? Or what do you mean by not judging when you talk about it Consulting Accelerator? I feel like I can hardly have a conversation with other people without some form of judgment." Sam: So that's thinking about something that's so small minded and petty that I don't even ever think about anyone I walk past on the street. I've got way bigger things to worry about than someone's body size. That I don't even know. That's on the side of the street. This stuff is so petty. Usually this stuff is talked about by people who have nothing to do. Right? So I don't ... This isn't even in my comprehension mechanism. If I heard someone talking about that and bitching about them like I would question why I'm even hanging out with those people in the first place. Because I don't hang out with anyone that actually does stuff like that because that's so petty. And I think you just need to forget about that. Who cares? The only person you really need to worry about judging is yourself. And until you're perfect, which you never are, then there's no point in trying to criticize and judge other people. Sam: Just going to have a quick La Croix. Melon flavor here. This is the official consulting.com drink. So Michael says, "Hi Sam. First, I love the course. Thank you. Second, when you're researching the belief systems and current" ... I already answered that. Donald Dang says, "I remember you started as a generalist as you started to figure out what you were good at. Then you niched down. I think you stated in a video you did six months ago. Would you recommend the path in which you went throughout your journey? Starting generalist and nicheing down?" Yeah, it always kind of works like this, right? You don't know what you want to do. And obsess about it until you've tried a number of things. So that's what you need to do. Sam: Joshua Westover says, "Hi Sam. Can I get your feedback on my current direct outreach message? Do you think it's structured in the best way possible? Hey Amy, thanks for accepting my friend request. I saw that you're part of the theory of flying group and I wanted to reach out to you personally. My name's Josh and I help people overcome their fear of flying currently within six to eight weeks. It's a fear I used to have but I overcame it fully using an entirely natural process and help others do the same. Let me know." Sam: It sounds fine to me. And actually I know someone who has that problem. Because I met them the other day. And because he came to my mastermind event and he lives in Florida. And he took a train. And I was like, "Dude, why the hell did you take a train?" And it's because he has a fear of flying. So this thing really exists. Send me a message and I will tell you the dude. I don't want to say his name on here because it doesn't need to be known to everybody. But if you private message me I'll tell you who he is and then you can message him. Because he definitely needs to fix that. Sam: So Anton says, "Hi Sam. Where do I find problems people have?" With people, you know? People have the problems so you go to the people. And you talk to them and you find out what their problem is. And then you've found it. Sam: Balky says "Hi Sam. I have a look of my message. I help ex-pats professional migrant women to achieve a mindset shift and an action plan to live a fulfilled lifestyle." Sounds good. Now you've got to test it. Go out. Start pitching these people. Start talking to them on the phone or messaging them on Facebook. Start some conversations and click back some feedback. Sam: John says, "Hey Sam. I started a lead generation business but I got one lead personally ... I started a lead generation business I got one lead personally drove to the lead. Then I closed him and gave the job to a cabinet friend of mine and made a little bit of money. I haven't gotten any more leads. What is the best platform to generate leads? And what is the best way to learn how to become a master of generating leads for home renovations?" I don't really know. You started the lead generation business. Why did you start the lead generation business if you didn't know how to generate the leads? Sam: Lead gen you can use direct outreach which we teach you in here. And that can be done over the phone. It can be done via email. It can be done via LinkedIn, Facebook. It can also be done via ... I think I already said email. It can be done by physical mail. Like sending out lump mail or postcards or something. And it can also be done with Facebook ads, Google ads, all of that stuff. Lead generation is always the same. But you've just got to find the one channel that's going to fit best for your particular niche and scenario. Sam: What I would recommend doing is finding the best lead generation business in your niche. And finding out what they do. Identify the best and find out what the hell they're doing because they're doing something right. And learn from them. And if there isn't a lead generation business in this niche to learn from, then you want to find the best business. So if you're helping ... What was the name of this niche? Home renovations. So I'd find the most successful home renovations business in America or in your state or whatever. Maybe even overseas. And find out how they're generating their leads. And learn. Learn what they're doing and figure out how you can emulate that for your business. Sam: Balky says, "Is it too general or needs to be more specific?" I don't know because that's all I can see. I can see your actual message. It needs to be in the same message that you send to me. So that I can know what you're talking about. Sam: Clara says, "Hi Sam. I am losing my motivation and doubting my niche all the time. I'm just wondering if you could tell a bit about male niche or female niche means I started with my niche completely female oriented, but now I'm wondering if I could not include males as well in my offer. I help shy people to be more confident and believe in their potential through a six-week coaching program. Do you think that you wouldn't be precise enough and wouldn't reach because of two different approaches for both genders? Thank you." Sam: This thing here. If you don't know if you should do male or female, then you should do both. Because the only time you should ever just discriminate against an entire sex and only do it for one person, you really know why and you have a good reason why. If you don't have any good reason why, then it's kind of makes no sense. So do it for both. Like we help anyone from anywhere in the world of any age and any gender and any anything. The only thing we care about is that they want to start a business, get clients, and make money. If they want that, then we'll help anyone. We don't just do it for men or women. I never understood that. But for dating and things like that, I can understand why someone might have a method that only really works well for women. Or maybe if it's parenting or something like that. Maybe it's specific. But you should only choose a specific sex or something like that when you have really good reason to. Otherwise I don't [inaudible 01:08:02]. Sam: James Baxter says, "What advice would you have for a recent college graduate who has the responsibility of loans to pay?" Yeah dude. Don't worry about the loans. Just do the Consulting Accelerator course one week at a time. One module at a time. And do the work. And then honestly, forget about the loan because later on it will be nothing. I remember my student loan when I left college. It was like thirty-five grand or something. And I was like oh my god, thirty-five thousand dollars. This is so much money and all of this. Then I just forgot about it and focused on doing work. And in the first three hours of today I made more than that. So who cares? It's nothing in the grand scheme of things. If you focus on the work, forget about that crap, then get results, get good at what you do, the loan will be nothing. Sam: Elizabeth says, "Hey Sam. When you were getting plumbing clients did anyone asks what makes you different? If so, can you explain what that was? My problem is that a prospect asked me to come in and [inaudible 01:09:12] his referral and asked why I would pay for you when 20 others are saying they can get results. I have results but I wanted to see everything which my clients don't want. I'm not sure what to say." Sam: This is a good question. You've always got to think about that. What makes you different from everyone else? What makes you different? It's always so important because that's what's going through your prospect's mind. And so you want to put it through your mind and have good responses to these things. If I was speaking ... When I first got a plumbing client I learned all about their business. I took the time to understand that not all clients for a plumber were equal. Sam: Plumbers wanted much more to have hot water cylinder repair clients than they wanted to have fixing a leaky tap. But Yellow Pages and them, they didn't understand that. They just drove them any type of business. And also, plumbers cared quite a lot about the area that they got, the geographic area, where they got clients because if they did work in some areas the people were least likely to pay. And that's an issue. And then if they did work in other areas, it was a long commute. And they had to go over a bridge or something at rush hour which it takes forever. And that's a cost. And that's pain. Sam: And so they typically ... Not all clients were equal to them. And they typically wanted clients in a particular area and in a particular type of category. And so how I differentiated myself is I quickly learned in my city, what the best areas were that plumbers wanted the jobs in. It's typically new developments. That's where there's lots of jobs. And they wanted hot water cylinder repair jobs in a new development. So if a plumber asked me, I would say well you know, if you go work with the Yellow Pages or these other guys they'll just bring you generic clients anywhere in Auckland. And that's really it. And if that's what you really want, go work with them. Sam: But what I do is I know the clients, it's better to have them in these new development areas because you can get lots of repeat, lots of different jobs and it's all within the same sort of area. That means when you're working between jobs, you barely have to commute far at all. And there's lots of money over in these areas. Plus, it's close to your base. And I know that you want hot water cylinder repair clients. So we would prioritize that. We'd be like our first thing that we're going to try to do is get you hot water cylinder repair clients there. And if we can't get you those, then we're going to substitute it with these. And then if we can't give you those, we'll substitute it with these. And only our last priority is to get you the generic crap that Yellow Pages is getting you. Sam: And when I said that to them, they thought I was like a god or something. You know? Because nobody else even asked the plumber the question what do you actually want and what is your life like? They just basically came in there and started pitching them. And saying the same sort of crap. Don't underestimate how shallow your competition will be. They won't go very deep. They won't put much effort in. And they won't do much research. And it's actually shocking how little, how bad they actually are in a lot of cases. It's quite shocking. Sam: Ramsey says, "My niche is helping men with dating. Can this be done as a done with you or strictly skip to coaching one on one?" What are you going to do? Are you both going to date the same woman? "I'm starting out and remember you saying you have to start with a done for you and then possibly my niche." It's a good question. But in this case you can't really do the done for you. It doesn't really make sense. So you do the one on one. So you coach someone one on one via Skype or even in person. The subject, the participant, they have to be the one that actually goes out and gets the date. Right? But you're advising them on a one on one sort of scenario and you can't do the done for you in that case. Sam: Britain Lynn says, "What do you think of my niche statement? I help sport manufactures grow their revenue by increasing the number of customers and the frequency in which they buy through digital marketing." I think if for this niche that is their problem and they really care about getting more customers and the frequency of customers, then that's spot on. If you've talked to the niche, you understand the them, that is their pain. And that is what they're waking up in the middle of the night sweating about. If that's it, then that's a good message. But if you just made that up because it's what you think they want, then I would fact check it. Make sure it's what they want. And then the only thing to do right now after you've done this is to go and offer it to them and see what they say and test with action. Sam: A couple of repeat questions here. Albert says, "Sam, would you happen to know a website that has funnel examples for Google ad words campaigns? Looking for ideas to set up a Google ad words campaign." I would ask why. What do you want to set up an ad words campaign in the first place? Why you want to find a funnel for an ad words campaign? Because it sounds like the thinking isn't clear behind this question. Sam: If you picked a niche and you know what their problem is, and that you think that ad words is the best thing to solve that niche's problem, then I would look at who's the person that's doing the best in that niche. And has sold their problem. And I would look at what they're doing. And if what they're doing is ad words, cool, do ad words. And then you just want to look at what funnel they're using. And then use that. And then test that. It's all different depending on what the different niche is. The different category. All of that stuff. So you want to go find the people who are doing the best. That's where you'll get the best ideas from. You don't get the best ideas from people who just write blog posts on the internet. You get the best ideas by finding people who are doing the best because anyone can say this thing does well. And I think this thing does well. But it's a whole nother thing to find someone who is truly doing the best. And then that's the best way to learn. Sam: Joshua says, "Do you think it's a good idea to start off with a Beta price like a five hundred dollar coaching course, for example, if you're brand new to a niche? Or should you go straight for the two grand clients?" Go straight to the two grand clients. The only instance which I would say you don't is if you absolutely don't have the balls to ask for two grand. In which case you would just do $500 because that's better than nothing. Sam: Biagio says, "Sam, what you said makes sense on practicing to get good at something over time. The talent acquisition industry needs deep human touch. It's crucial. It's so competitive that people and employers don't know what to do to get top talent without having them slip away. People absolutely need to follow up and feel the true sense to be wanted in the workforce. How do the sales funnels and Facebook ads support this theory because it's mostly social media and not human to human?" Sam: Yeah, so I mean you're looking at the wrong thing. What people really want isn't so much human to human interaction. It's more they want a job that's going to challenge them. They want to be a part of a company that is doing something unique and big and bold and is actually exciting. And they want to work with smart people. They want to be stretched. And more than anything, they want to evolve and grow and learn. And they want all of that. They want all of that more than they want human connection during the recruitment process. Sam: So if you put out a Facebook ad or something and it said, are you looking for these things, and the person was like yes I am, yes I am, they would be like this is so awesome. I can't believe I could get a job that is going to enable me to grow like this. Compared to a job that sucks where they're not going to grow at all and the mission is lame and the talent is sub par. And they've just got human to human connection when they get hired. Who cares about that? It's not the main thing. So never ever lose sight of what the main thing is because it's not human to human. Quite often people substitute with human to human when they miss the main things. Like when you get the main things right, you don't really need all the deep level of human to human connection that you think you need. So I would look at that stuff. Sam: Matt Gambino says, "Sam, I have my email message down that I sent out to my niche for digital marketing services. Can I scale direct outreach by hiring people to do mail out hundreds by the day? Not bulk mail. All individual emails." Don't worry about that right now dude. You haven't even sent it. So, your first priority is to start sending this thing. Get some clients first. And then make some money. And then think about hiring some people and scaling it. All right? Right now you're thinking out to the future and you haven't even taken the action you need to take now. So only worry about what you need to worry about right now. Sam: Sven says, "Sam, how many close friends do you have and do you go out a lot?" Close friends I would say I only have like five. And I don't go out really that much at all. I don't like going out for drinks because I don't drink. Plus I have bigger things to do. More important things to do than going out and drinking. And then I take Sundays off, and I hang out with my wife and we go do whatever she wants to do. Go out for brunch, go out to dinner. Meet up with some friends. Or we might go watch a movie. Walk around the park. Or some weekends we might go away somewhere. Sam: My work schedule is basically 12 hours a day, six days a week. So I work from 9:00 AM in the morning until 9:00 PM at night, Monday to Saturday. And then I take Sunday off. Completely off. No work at all. And that's my schedule. So 12 hours a day, six days a week. Sundays are always off. And then every 90 days I take 7 days off. So 90 days on, 7 off, 90 on, 7 off. That's how it works. You don't have to do that. But that's what I do. Sam: And Sven says, "How did you meet your wife since you are an introvert?" I met her at a bar on Saint Patrick's day. And we were in groups. So the two groups that we were in kind of met and then we just started chatting. Stephen Taylor says ... Plus she's an introvert too. So that's why we get along. Because we don't like to be just really loud all the time and stuff. We're both introverts. So that's why we get along quite a lot. When I had extroverted girlfriends, it just didn't work. Sam: Stephen says, "Hey dude. Are there any examples of how to structure your organic outreach emails or books to read on copy that will help?" Yeah, the program shows you what to do. Consulting Accelerator. I give you a template and I tell you how to adapt to your template and tweak it. And try different iterations. And then you'll learn how to tweak it and try different iterations as you start taking action. You don't need to read a damn book on this stuff. The course shows you what to do. Sam: "Hey Sam, how do you use feedback loops to self confidence and shyness?" Well to be honest, I'm not really thinking about feedback loops. If I'm trying to have self confidence. But I know how they work. I know that practice produces everything. So the main thing I'm trying to do is practice. Just practice, practice, practice, practice, practice. More than everybody else. Because if i practice more than everybody else, more consistently than everybody else, for a longer period of time than everybody else, then I will beat everybody else. Simple as that. Because with practice comes learning, comes the feedback loop of self confidence. Sam: You don't just trick yourself to be self confident. It doesn't work like that. You don't read a book and then develop self confidence. You don't go to a Tony Robin's event and then leave self confident. You get self confident by practice, seeing your stuff work, seeing that you're actually good at what you do which takes a bit of time. And then when you see that, then you really are self confident. That's how it happens. It's not just like some click thing. You have to just keep at it. And you're not going to be self confident when you're keeping at it. And that's the hard part. But then all of a sudden you are self confident. And then the feedback loop start going and going and going. And that's how it works. Sam: Elsa says, "Hi Sam, follow up from my previous question. What if I use the following message. [inaudible 01:24:05] What do you think?" I think that message is fine. Now you need to go talk to them. Offer them this. Say this to them and see what they say back. You've done all the work you can in your head. Now you need to go out and execute. Sam: Julie Fring says, "Hey Sam and everyone." How's it going, Julie? Maryanne says, "Hey Sam, thanks for doing these Q&As and for developing everything so fast that we can learn. I have a big challenge. I'm wondering how to find the balance between my two companies. One is an advertising agency I've been running for the past 17 years. The second is a startup I've been running on the side for the last four years. I love my job being creative, but my passion is in the startup where I'm not making any money yet. We're making a concept to solve bullying, loneliness and lack of motivation in school. How can I pursued schools to work with us in a pilot so that we can get the proof of concept? A pilot in school like this and will take a lot of time and we still might have to do this free the first time. Any advice to get paid or find funding before the proof of concept?" Sam: Yeah, so, in this situation because the advertising agency has been around for so long you don't just get rid of it and just go all in on this. But what you want to try and do is you should have a team that can keep that business running. And if you don't, you should try and find a team that could keep that business running so that you can switch your attention onto something else without the ball getting dropped in that business. I always tell people, we just sell one product, Consulting Accelerator. But we're not going to be a one-product company forever. As soon as I had a team big enough to watch the ball everywhere and make sure it doesn't get dropped anywhere, then I was able to move my attention and focus over to building out another product, Up Level. Sam: And so you can do the same here. You just need to make sure you've got a team in place there so by working on your other business you don't kill the other business. Because otherwise it's so hard to balance that, you know? You can only do one without at a cost of the other and ... I mean, it's hard. You need to put people in place there to keep the machine moving. So that's my advice there. And then if this new startup really takes off and looks promising, at that point just cut the other business. Sell it. Or just give it to other people and let them manage it completely. And just forget about it. You've got to take it out of your mind to actually focus everything you have on the new business. But you don't make that decision until you see that's what you should do. Make sense? Sam: Now the second part of your question is, "How can I persuade schools to work with us in a pilot so that we can get the proof of concept? A pilot in school like this will take a lot of time and still we might have to do this for free the first time. Any advice to get paid or find funding before proof of concept?" Sam: So this is simple. I mean, one thing you could do is I guess you haven't even tried to see this to a school yet? What I would try and do first of all is come up with some pricing for a pilot. And then try and sell it to them and see. You might be able to sell it to them. There's a high chance. In fact, this company that my friend has, they sell boarding school management software to boarding schools. It's called Boardingware.com. And they sold their first version to schools for money when it didn't exist. It was just a .pdf and they sold it. So I know you can do it because I advised those guys early on and they did it. And then when they built their product, they gave it to them. Sam: So you can sell it as a pilot for sure. You just have to try and do it. If they really need this thing it will work. And I would try and not raise any funding in the beginning unless you absolutely have to. Because you've got your advertising business. You should use the money out of your advertising business to feed the other business. What you can do is you can do a intercompany loan. Sam: So if you take some of the money out, if you get a lawyer to draft a loan agreement between the two companies where Company A can loan money and give a credit line to Company B, then you can pass money from this one to this one to fund it without paying any tax because it's a loan. It's a movement on the balance sheet instead of in the income statement. And all you'll have to do is pay the minimum interest rate at the AFR rate right now which is like 1.2%, 1.3% or something. And if you do that and you have a document, then you can pass the money between the two companies without paying taxes. And that's what I would do. Sam: And when that company starts making money, you pay the loan back to that one, and you haven't had to pay tax. Perfect. Do that. At only 1.2% interest which is a write off for Company A. So it makes total sense. That's what I would do to fund it. And then I'd also try and pre-sell it to people. Or try to get money from the pilot to cashflow it. Because otherwise if you raise capital, you've got to give away equity. And you want to hold on to the equity. You only want to give it away when you absolutely must. Sam: Anita says, "Do you think having a defined niche and generalist niche side by side a good idea?" I don't even know what that means. I think you've just got to pick a niche. Start working in it. Get some clients. Do some work for them. Get them some results. Get some more. Get some more. Get some more. And then things start to evolve. Sam: Chris Watson says, "Hey Sam. Should I learn how to do Google ad words or out source the service?" I think in the beginning it's best to outsource it because you'll get a client faster. You'll start making money faster. You'll deliver the end results faster. And you can learn by observation. And then you might decide you want to learn how to do it. And you'll be in a better position to learn because observing someone who's doing it. Plus you have clients you can start working on. Or if you decide you don't want to, you don't have to. That's what I'd do. Sam: Anthony says, "Hey Sam. I'm in the motivation niche. I have two friends with similar visions but slower drives to get the work done. After your course, I dedicated to nothing but work and learning and I see they aren't as hungry. What is the borderline between me trying to help them see, or give up on the team dream?" So, are you in partnership with these people? Did you go into business together, all three of you and now you have a lot of drive and you're doing all of the work but these other two are slacking? Or is it you're just caring about your friends not being motivated? It's hard for me to tell by the way you articulated this. Sam: I would say if you're partners and you have equity and you're in the same company that they're not pulling their weight and you are, I would tell them one morning, if you don't pull your weight, you're out. And I'm just going to quit and start my own thing. And I'd do that. I'd give them one warning. If they didn't behave, I'd be out. You can't have people holding you back, ever. You've got to cut it immediately. Give them a warning. Everyone deserves a warning. But if they fail, cut them. And then, if they're your friends then I'd ask why the hell do you care about how their motivation anyway? Sure, it's great to want you friends to be motivated. But if they're not, there's not much you can do about it. Just get back to work. Focus on yourself. Sam: So Pierre says, "Sam, what would you say is a good idea as an agency at the moment doing digital marketing done for you to hire consulting? Do you have any recommendations in this regard? Maybe taking feedback and laying the groundwork for a program to sell?" Yeah. This question is wrong. The question is messed up because you're asking what's a good idea. There are so many good ideas. I'm not like an idea machine. You've got to go out and find them. And ideas come from problems. And problems come from people. So first of all, you've got to find a cluster or people. That's what we call a niche. Just pick a niche you're interested in. Find it. Now talk to them. What is their problem? Identify the common thread in a problem that exists among lots of people in this niche. When you've found the problem, what could be the solution to it? Then give them the solution. Sell it to them. Do it that way. Sam: Start with done for you or one on one. And then once you've mastered it and you really have a system and a process and like a recipe for helping the person solve their problem, now you have what's necessary to create a program. And then you can create a good program. And then you do that. That's exactly what you do. But your question is just like what's a good idea? I mean, I don't know. You've got to go and talk to the market. Pick a niche. Follow the process. Sam: Matt Gambino says, "Sam, I get about three responses for every 500 emails. But I've got two paying clients so far from email over the past seven weeks. Are the two lucky or can I improve this? What do you think?" Dude, I'd be an idiot to try and answer that. I mean, I don't know. The only way you'll know is if you do another 500 emails and see if you get two more clients. I would like to think that if you did it once you can do it again. If you'd only done it one time, it would be a bit riskier. But you've done it twice already. So it's a good signal. Typically if you can do something once, you can do it again. If you can do it twice you are more likely to be able to do it a third time. If you can do it a third, you're more likely to do it a forth. And with every time you do it, you're more likely to do it one more time. And so you've just got to keep at it. Stop worrying about what might happens and go find out what actually does happen. Sam: [Argopeno 01:35:04] says, "Hey Sam, how's it going?" Cecilia says, "Hey Sam, I keep between two options for a niche. One expands laboratory services for companies. Or two, improve laboratory skills for people working in a laboratory. One would pay more but it's more work. Two would pay less but probably easier to execute. What do you suggest?" Honestly, I tend to try to ignore the money because it's like ... I don't totally blindly ignore it because you do need to make money. Otherwise your business won't survive. So you take money into account to make sure that you're not going to be irresponsible. Sam: But after that, I would do what's going to add the most value to the customer. So I tend to focus on what's going to add the most value for the customer. And I like to do that because I know if I do that, long term, I'm going to make the most money. Quite often the easiest thing to do is not the thing that's going add the most value to people. But there can be exceptions to the rule. I would just choose what is best for the customer. What's going to add the most dramatic, radical amount of value to their life. And I would pick that one and tackle it and master it. And also what you're interested in. What one you really want to do and kind of get excited about doing. Sam: So Mark says, "Hey Sam, my niche is helping people with gambling problems to stop gambling through one on one training. I'm having fears around telling my friends and family on Facebook that I'm doing this because gambling was something that I used to really struggle with until I worked out a way to stop for years. Part of what worked for me was free self help groups like GA, AA for gamblers, as well as spending a shit load on personal development. I'm having a lot of doubts around charging people for this. However I know this is a big problem in Australian society and New Zealand. What would be the next steps?" Sam: So first of all, don't have doubts about charging for it because money is important. Someone who is willing to pay money for something, they're more likely to achieve it. And they're also going to respect it more and they're more likely to get results. Plus, you're more likely to give them a good service because you're getting paid. And now you can actually reinvest in the business, make it better, you can hire people to help you with the business, make it better, and also live which is a prerequisite to be able to do good work. So that's why you need money. So charge, first of all. Sam: This is even going to happen to charities, by the way. Charities have a flawed business model where they just get donations and then give away their donations and then get more donations. In the future, they won't be like charities. They'll be non-profit businesses. Businesses that have a way to make money by adding value, but then they just use that money to donate to people. So don't ever think that you're doing something bad by charging, because it's really important. And you're actually helping people more by doing it. That's the first piece. Sam: The second piece is saying on Facebook what you're doing. Yeah, I mean, just do it. Forget about yourself. You've got to understand that this is bigger than yourself and what people think about you. What have you got to lose here? Really like nothing? Maybe someone being like you used to have a gambling problem. Who cares? That's your worse case scenario, right? But what have you got to gain? Well, you could get clients, make money, start a business, and totally change you life, then change lots of other people's lives. So there's an asymmetric upside compared to the downside. The downside is small. The upside is big. So you do it. Do it now. Sam: Hector says, "Hey Sam. So I spoke to the industry where I want my niche to be in and found out their biggest problem is finding low skilled workers but I have not found anyone who has found a solution and was thinking about trying Facebook ads to generate employees. However, I also haven't found anybody who has done Facebook ads for that purpose. That being said, should I niche down on a different problem? Or should I try running Facebook ads to generate employees?" Sam: I would try running Facebook ads to get employees because I know it works. Because we do that. We've tried job boards like Indeed and all of those things. And it sucks. It's so hard to find good people with job boards these days. It just doesn't work. But we do a post on Facebook. Sometimes it's just organic. We don't even pay money for it. And we get like thousands of applications. It's insane. And then when you put money on it and you boost it, it does even better. So I know it works. So I think you should try it. I mean, I don't know for a fact it's going to work in your specific situation. But I know that it works because I've done it for myself. And my guess is it's going to work for you too. So you should just try it. Sam: Pierre says, "What would your one, two, three standard operating procedure be for delegating to your virtual assistant?" Well, what I typically do if I need to delegate something to someone is I'll just screen record my screen. I won't even think about it. I'll just screen record. And I'll just explain it. I'll be like hey, can you go and do this? And then I'll go to the next thing, can you do this? And can you do that? And then can you go on through that? And I just explain it with a screen record and my mouse and clicking on different things. And then I just send them that video. And that's the brief. That's how I do it. Sam: And then we use Slack, so I will just record the video then send it to them on Slack. And then when they've got it they're like got it. And then when they've done it they're like done. That's how it works. Works quite well. I find screen recording briefings the best. Compared to having to try and write an email and articulate all of these things. Very hard. Sam: Jalen Easton says, "Hey Sam. Excited to be here. Can you give me feedback? Should I include something more unique because I know the market for young men is flooded. I help young men overcome themselves and to take the reigns of their mindset and health." So this isn't ... I don't think you've talked to the market and found out what their problem is. It's very broad. I mean, you could probably get away with this message once you had become the most popular, well known person in helping young men. Then a broad thing like this could work well. Sam: But when you're starting out, a broad message like this going to just young men which there's a lot of them, then it doesn't have enough bite. So you have to talk to young men and you might have to get a bit more specific with like young men with what problem? That's what you're missing. Right now you've got young men, which is the niche. But you don't have the problem that young men have. And that's what's making the message weak because you said you'd help them overcome themselves. But what does that mean? You need to find a problem. Young men with like a drinking problem. Or young men that don't know what they want to do with their life. Or young men miserable in their jobs. Or young men something else. You need that other variable there. It's absent right now. Sam: Peter Braun says, "Hi Sam. I'm still at the beginning of the program and I'm from Australia. Austria." Sorry. "I wonder if that Accelerator program also works in Europe so successfully? I have worked in the US as well and I know they have a different mindset than here. Any other successful students in Germany and Switzerland and Austria? All of your great student interviews are from the United States." Sam: I known it works in Europe. I've got a guy in my mastermind who actually lives in Switzerland. In Geneva. And he makes like $400,000 a month. And I actually have another person in my mastermind, a lady who lives in Switzerland now. And she does at least forty grand a month or something. And that's just in my mastermind. I mean, then in the program we've got lots of people in Europe. Tons. A lot of our sales come out of Europe. And I know it works there. So don't think it doesn't. I know for a fact it does. Sam: Jon [inaudible 01:44:40] says ... I don't understand that. I've just got ... I don't understand your question there. Christopher Long says, "Hey Sam. I'm a huge fan of you. I've a question for you. How can I tap into a market oversaturated with players that created a toxic environment of racing to the bottom in terms of price? Hence, clients have a default expectation that the service offer should be at a low price." Sam: It sounds to me like you're analyzing the market from the outside but you're not talking to the human being in there and seeing what their problem is. Honestly, this looks like an analysis that someone would do for a university assignment. It's abstract, from the outside. Just looking at it, lots of players, lots of competition. I mean, imagine doing an analysis on the consulting market. There's a lot of players. There's a lot of competition. And it would look like a bad idea. Right? But that's irrelevant. You go and talk to the people in it. Because it doesn't matter if it's oversaturated. It doesn't matter what the competition is like. It doesn't matter what's in there. If you're solving a problem that exists, then it means that these other people are missing the problem. And they're not your competition because they're not addressing the problem. Only people that are addressing the problem, the same as you are, are your competitors. Not just people in the market. Sam: Helga says, "Hey Sam, you talk about focus and consistency. Let's say someone has not become crystal clear on their vision. What they want. They know they want a consulting business and becoming successful but no clarity. How would you guide them towards becoming clear? Many struggle with that." Yeah, I get that. And so what you've got to do is you don't know exactly what piece you need to focus on. But the main thing you've got to focus on is working. Doing something. Learning. Sam: And Michael Phelps, the world's best swimmer, his to-do list each day was like wake up, get in pool. And that's it. Because he knew if he spent all day in the pool, every day, that he would get really good at swimming. And so a lot of the time I don't know what to do. Especially when I got started. But if I just woke up, started working, things start happening. So in the beginning when you're unclear and you're uncertain and all of that, you've just got to make sure that you're working. At least be reading something, researching, executing, implementing, trying to sell something to someone like if you do that all day, every day something is going to happen. You're gonna find clues. Notice patterns. Start to optimize things. Start to do more of that. Less of that. And you're gonna find the thing. It's just about showing up and just working. Sam: Joward says that, "So true, dude. It's because I'm an outsider to this niche and I still have a few things to learn about it. Also, I don't have a massive amount of pressure because I had some savings which is helping me run without a job right now. And my wife works too. I'm getting some traction with my niche now. I'll learn on the job. Thanks so much for the insight and motivation." No problem. Sam: Brandon says, "Sam, you spoke a lot about focusing on one thing. If we are focusing on consulting, how can we focus on just the funnel or just the ads and ignore everything else? Can you explore more on your philosophy of the one thing concept?" Yeah. So it's obviously more than one thing. Right? Because if it truly was just one thing, then how would I eat? How would I sleep? How would I have a shower? How would I do all sorts of things, right? So it truly is never just one thing. That's impossible. I would die. Sam: And it's more than one thing. But there's like one single point of focus which is more than company level. So it's like at the company level I'm just looking at this one niche. I'm just looking at solving this one problem. And I'm just looking at getting customers in this one method. In this one way. And I'm just looking at selling this one solution to them. So it's kind of like I'm only focusing on the core components. And I'm only focusing on one of the core components that come together and form the whole. But a business is made up of more than one thing. Sam: Even in our business now we've got customer support. We have Facebook ads. We have funnel that has a webinar in it. And then as far as teaching Consulting Accelerator, I've got to be good at sales, marketing. I've also got to be good at how to find a niche. We've got a Facebook group. I'm doing this Q&A call. So there's more than one ... I think you're just getting a bit clouded on this one thing. And hopefully that makes it clearer for you. Sam: Joshua says, "Sam, I'm in a similar situation to what you were in living at my dad's. Not at all much pressure. Have goals to move out ASAP but what do you think I can do to light that fire in me to move it forward?" Well, I mean you can do it by yourself. You just have thing get real with yourself. And be like how bad do I actually want this? Am I just going to keep fucking around? Or am I actually going to do this? So you can have that conversation with yourself now and you can start to mature and just do it now. But if you want to try and put in some external pressure, you could move into an apartment or move in with some other people and put yourself under the pressure to have to make that rent. And that might add some external pressure too. I mean, you don't have to do it. But it will add more pressure to you. I can guarantee that. Sam: Joward says, "I've got the cleaning out of the way now because I can afford it. It's a great relief but still really looking forward to tackle the cooking situation. I think that's the toughest hurdle to have to worry about meal planning, then shopping." It is a pain. But until you've got enough money, there's nothing you can do about it. So it should be motivation to make some money. Because then you can get rid of the pain. Sam: Brandon says, "Sam, when is the new training coming out? Secondly, Sam, I spent" ... Yeah. As far as the second training I mean right now we've just released Up Level consulting which is our latest program. And if you want to learn more about that, go and look at week seven. We talk all about it there. And Up Level shows you how to go from selling one on one and done for you to selling leverage group programs, online courses, that sort of stuff. But if you're talking about the new version of Accelerator, we haven't talked about any dates or anything like that yet. So until we talk about any form of date, it's still early days. Sam: "Secondly, Sam, I've spent countless hours and days reading books. And I saw a post on memory and time and the gap between things being paid off and being used. And being using [inaudible 01:52:24] reaching out to my audience over social media and creating content for them would be the same as strategy calls. And if you can, explain more." Yeah, so dude, you just need to get clients. Forget about creating content and blogging and all of that. I mean, actually in the training I tell you it's a good idea to just have three posts on your website. But that's it. Just so that if someone goes to your website it just looks like there's something there. And also if you're doing direct outreach on Facebook and LinkedIn, have at least some posts on your Facebook and LinkedIn. Sam: But beyond that, don't think you're going to get lots of clients from just content marketing. Content marketing is something that works well in combination with direct outreach. So if you've got a little bit of content on your profile and your website and you're just going hard with direct outreach, it acts like a support mechanism. It helps that happen. But on it's own, don't expect anything. Sam: Angie says, "Hey Sam. I'm having trouble trying connect to my click funnels and my domain name. My cloud" ... This sounds technical. I'm not going to be able to solve this on this call. It sounds like you need to get on support with click funnel. Seriously, they've got good support. They have live chat. If you're in click funnels, down on the bottom right you should be able to initiate a chat. They will fix it for you. The most common problem their support team gets is hooking up the damned domain name. I know because everyone has that problem. I even had it when I was trying to set up. Just talk to support. They'll help you out there. Sam: Brandon says, "Sam, what are the key things we need to have in order to be hitting at that 200 grand a month mark, that 400 grand a month mark, and that million a month mark? I've been watching your interviews with students. And you said that you see a huge difference between those earning six figures, seven figures, and eight figures. What are the differences and what should we be doing that we aren't and that they are?" Sam: So first of all, the main thing you should be doing is getting clients and just making six figures a year. Until you do that, just forget about making a million dollars. Forget about making a million a month. Forget about all of that stuff. Because all it's going to do is just distract you. In the beginning, all you care about is one client. And then when you've got one, all you care about is two. And then when you've got two, all you care about is three. And you just put one step in front like that. That's the only way you can do it. Sam: And then, once you're making some money, then go and look at week seven in Consulting Accelerator. And it will show you all about Up Level consulting. And then I recommend going into Up Level. And then I'll show you how to go to the next level. But right now you need to finish level one. It's kind of like a video game. You've got to clock level one first before you can even play level two. So just do that. When you're ready for two, go to two. And in level two, I show you how to do this stuff. Because that's the program that everyone who has made seven figures went through. And if you watch the interviews, they all say Up Level, Up Level, Up Level. That's where it all happened. Sam: Oscar says, "Hey Sam, I have my niche. I'm helping people online to get a healthy mouth by healthy living. Learning them how to brush properly, do you think this will be good on LinkedIn and does the page of the blog ... pages ..." Sorry, I don't understand this. I don't know. I might be totally wrong but I don't know if that's a problem for people or if it's a problem that people are willing to pay two grand for. Sam: Maybe if someone has an actual mouth condition that's really bad and causes them a lot of pain. And it interrupts their life. And their career and everything. Then someone might be willing to pay for it. But your average person, to just have a healthy mouth, all they've got to do is just brush their teeth and go to the dentist every now and then. I don't know if you've found a problem. You should find a niche. Then research that niche to find a problem. And go through the process the way I teach it in the program because sometimes when you don't follow the process the way I've outlined it, you can get muddled up with things like this. Sam: All right. So we're at 5:00 PM now. So we're going to wrap this call up. Like I said, we do these calls pretty much every Saturday. And we do them from 3:00 PM until 5:00 PM Eastern time. If you asked a question and I didn't answer it, it's because you didn't show up on time. And if you showed up on time you would have gotten to ask me about 20 questions. And so if you didn't get your question answered, show up early. Get here on time. Get here at 3:00 PM if you want your question answered. Sam: If you guys enjoyed this, just hit that like button. Let me know if you enjoyed this. If you found it helpful. And also, next week I'm not going to be here. And same with the following weekend. So the next two weekends I'm going to be on my honeymoon. And so I'm not going to be doing these calls. And then we're going to be resuming them. I'll tell you the exact dates so you can put it in your calender now. [inaudible 01:58:07]. So there is no live Q&A call, like there's no livestream, no Facebook live on the 16th of June or the 23rd of June. But we resume on the 30th of June. So 30th we're back in and we'll be doing them every week again. But next two aren't happening. But that doesn't really matter because you've got the two Q&As happening every week with Jessie and Nick Hauser. And those run all the time. Constantly. Those are never off. And you've also got the Facebook group for help as well. Sam: So thanks everyone for attending this live stream. Hope you enjoyed it. Hope you got some value. And if you got any questions, use the Facebook group or the Q&As coming up this week. And look forward to seeing you guys getting results and ringing the bell. See you later.

Comments