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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, June 30th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, June 30th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for June 30th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right. I can see we've got a couple people jumping on. I can see Edward Tang. How's it going? Can you guys just let me know if you've got audio and video working before we get started here? We'll get started in a minute. I can see people are still jumping on here. Cool. It looks like both are working. All right. So for people who are new to this who this is the first time on one of these live streams, I do these every Saturday at 3:00 pm Eastern time, and we go for two hours, so from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm. I didn't do them for the last two weeks because I was on my honeymoon, but most of the time we do these every single week. To ask a question, you just write in that questions box your question. So just articulate your question clearly, and then I just go through them, first come, first served, in order, and we just go through them and answer everyone's questions. The recording is available afterwards as well. So let's jump in and get started. I can see there's a question from [Peoto 00:01:46] who says, "During the week, you have a rhythm and routine that allows you to be effective. When you leave on vacation every 90 days, you change frames, habits, and rhythms. What are the things you do during the holidays to keep a rhythm and habit so that when you come back from your vacation you are directly focused in your work?" It's a good question, and the truth is is that you can't ... there's always a little bit of turbulence coming back because you've been sleeping in a little bit, eating different food, maybe not working out as much, and definitely not working, so there's always a bit of turbulence, and there's nothing you can really do about that. I don't want to go on my honeymoon with my wife and then still keep training, still keep working, and then have a really strict diet. Then we're not going to go to any restaurants that she wants to, and then I'm going to be ... It won't be fun for her. So you've got to let it go and then that's the real reason for that vacation is to get out of your normal rhythm, just relax, just have some fun, and then try to get back into it as soon as you get back. This week, I definitely was not as productive as a normal week because all of those patterns that I'm used to, they're not as automatic as it is when you've been doing it for weeks in a row. So you go to do some different things and they're not as automatic and they're not as fast and effortless, but that's just part of getting back into something. It's like getting back on the bike after have never ridden a bike for a while. [Alock 00:03:34] says, "Hey, Sam. So I had a strategy session with a wealthy wife and business owner who is struggling to get her event designing company fully booked. I took her through the sales script and went over two and a half hours. All the emotions came out, and I asked her how committed she was to making this happen. She said, 'Nine.' Perfect. So I walked her through the rest of the script, delivered my offer, and it went well, and then she asked, 'How do you take payment?' Then I waffled. I got caught off-guard. I honestly didn't expect it to go so well. This was also a huge deal for me, 10K, and I started hesitating and acting super weird. It's like I malfunctioned, which then brought up all her issues around money. I regained some confidence and authority, but she lost trust in me. I'm planning to send her some follow-up work of mine this week and establish more authority again. How do I regain her trust and move forward with this deal?" Well, honestly, you need to forget about her, really. You don't want to attach to her now where you feel like the only way you can succeed is by closing this woman, all right? You want to make a little effort like maybe send her an email, but that's it. If she doesn't close with just a small follow-up email or something, that's it. Move on. There's plenty more fish in the sea, and you don't want to get hung up on this one woman. So just move on. Now you've learned this mistake. Now you know that the next time you get to that crunch on the call, you're prone to having a little freak out. Now you know that, so you're more likely to not make that same mistake the next time. That's how it works. You don't know these different limits until you reach them and you fail. Then the next time you get there, you know what's going to happen and you're more likely to not let it happen. [Jawad 00:05:37] says, "I've started offering small recruitment agencies to get more clients consistently with digital marketing funnels and retainers. I've had a couple of prospects asking for social proof of recruiters, and I've helped and I don't have any yet. I have case studies from clients. I've done generic [inaudible 00:05:53] for them, not in the niche. Should I build my website and have a value video and funnel to look more legit or should I just focus on getting my first paying client?" Focus on getting your first paying client. A lot of the time, if it's to look more legit, it's better to just be legit, you know what I mean? You want to focus on reality instead of perception because in the long term, reality becomes perception. You want to focus on being it, not looking like it, because that veil always gets pulled off and the best way to look like it is to be it, and the best way to be it is to get a client. So focus on getting a client. All right. Edward Tang says, "Sam, how do you deal with the boredom that comes with the daily grind and hustle? How do we overcome that human nature that likes variety, the enemy of efficiency and productivity?" That's a good question. The key is innovation. I'm always thinking of the bigger thing. A good thing to describe it would be think big but act small, execute small. So you're constantly thinking of where you're going, but then you've got to break that whole big picture plan down to these little tasks you've got to do, and then you've just got to keep executing on them, but that's how you get to the big picture, you know what I mean? It's like you've got to just put one foot in front of the other. It's like those mountain climbers that say, "Don't stare at the summit. Look at your boots," and by doing that, that's how you actually get to the summit. The mountain climbers that stare at the summit and get summit fever, they don't get there. So you've got to tell yourself that the way you get to the top of that summit, which is the most exciting thing you could ever do, is with this day-to-day grind and getting these things done. Also, you can invent new ways that remove things that you don't like doing. I'll give you a prime example. When I first tried to get clients ages ago in New Zealand, I cold called. I hated cold calling so much because I was an introvert. It was horrible. So then I started learning about direct mail and then Lumpy Mail, and I thought this was awesome because it was a way to escape that thing I didn't like, but then still I had to talk to people on the phone. So then I ultimately worked towards coming up with better ways so that I could get clients without doing the things that I didn't like doing. So use the things that make you bored as fuel to help you think of a way to do it without those tasks because if you look at my business, I've figured out how to remove all of those things. I removed cold calling. I removed even really the phone completely, and I removed having to do the work and fill the services. Now with our business people, total strangers, are converted to paying customers of ours without any phone calls and then those people are consulted and they execute and then they achieve the results without any phone calls. I've figured out how to evolve it along that continuum. So that's what you want to do. You just have to keep grinding on the stuff day to day, but innovate your way out and invent new things and think about where you're going. That's what makes it more fun. Debbie says, "Welcome back from your honeymoon." Thanks, Debbie. [Jawad 00:09:51] says ... Oh, I already answered that. [Peoto 00:09:56] says, "At the end of the strategy session when you say, 'MasterCard or Visa,' and they will pay, for me the answer is, 'Oh, I will do it later when I will know when I'm available to begin,' and then disappear. It's the second time I've had this issue. I dig deep into their questioning and doubts, but it does not change that much. Is it because I'm hesitant in the way to ask them for the payment right away or something else? It's even cheap. It's not $2,000 program, just a ridiculous three sessions for 89 each." Yeah, what you're basically seeing is a reflection of your own insecurity in them deciding right now. Probably what's happened is you have never bought something like that where you decided immediately, and so what you're creating in them is your belief of how this works, and also, your insecurity is showing through a little bit in it. This always happens when you start doing something that's totally foreign to you. So it takes practice. That's all it takes. You're just going to have to keep doing it again and again and again and again and again and again, and each time you'll get better. Honestly, it's just practice. Practice makes perfect. You just need to keep at it. But I can tell you that the absence of a yes is a no, and so if someone tells you that they will get to it later, then they're not going to. So understand that if someone says they want to do it and then they don't pay for it on the call, they don't want to do it. Don't believe that they do, and then get disheartened when they don't because you know that they're not going to. [Donoding 00:11:47], thanks for that. Arthur Norwood says, "Sam, what does it mean to aim for your goals indirectly? Does it mean focusing on helping others instead of making money?" This is a good question. I'll give you a perfect example. The most successful companies in the world of all time have never had their main focus on making money, and you can see this by their mission statement a lot of the time. So, what's a perfect example? Boeing, the airplane manufacturers, their original mission statement was to make the best airplanes in the world, and that's what they did, and when they did that, they made the most money and they were one of the most successful companies of all time, but then new management took over and they changed it round to something like, "To providing cutting-edge engineering and leveraging a low-cost structure to deliver financial performance," or something, something to do with making money. And when they did that, their entire business just ... it almost completely failed. So the best way to make a lot of money is to not focus on making a lot of money. It's to focus on providing a lot of value, and the way to provide a lot of value is to focus on the customer and what they perceive as value. What customers perceive as value is solving painful problems. So everything derives back from the customer's problem. If you want to make a lot of money, the best thing you can do is find a really painful problem for a market or a niche and then find out what a solution to that thing could be, provide it to them, make it really high value, and by doing that you'll make a lot of money, way more money than anyone who ever just tries to make money will make. So that's what I mean by that. It's like this thing is everywhere. It's like people who try to be happy, the way you happy is indirect. You don't sit down and try to be happy, and what's crazy, what's actually funny is that happiness comes from unhappiness. Happiness comes from achieving different levels of growth and pushing yourself outside your comfort zone and your limits, and these things are painful, and in the moment you're actually quite unhappy. So actually this is the achieving your goal indirectly as well, you know what I mean? There's things everywhere. Then [Peoto 00:14:44] says, question three, "In the strategy session, it is said to make the separation between the current state and the desired state. My niche is women seeking love. It's very emotional niche. As a result, clients make a constant mix between today's suffering and the desire to cope when they speak. Even though I try to tell the difference between talking about her pain and then after the desired situation, the client makes a constant return on their pain and mix it up with her desired situation and it stays like that until page nine just before, 'I'm an expert at.' How to manage to control the situation so that the customers do not overflow in their ideas?" It sounds like what's going on on here is you're not creating clear separation. It sounds like it's still blurry and mixed up in there. Even when you talk about the current and the desired, in their mind it's still blurred and mixed up in this ball here, and that's why it's hard for you to sell the vehicle to help them cross that gap because you haven't pulled the two apart and made that gap appear. I think what's going on here is you're not ... women seeking love is kind of abstract. You need to really pin that down. What is the current situation? If they're seeking love, that must mean they don't have it. How do they feel like they don't have it? You got to get them to tell you how they feel they don't have it, and you've got to really crystallize this current situation and understand it and put words to it and articulate it. Then you have to think, "Well, what do they want? What's their desired situation?" Well, if the problem is the absence of love, then the solution would be the presence of it. So what would the presence of it look like? Define it. Articulate it. Crystallize it. You have to make these things not abstract terms but realities because while they're still abstract terms, their ideas and words and concepts. They're not realities. What's probably happening on these calls is you're stuck in the conceptual abstract world and you're not tying it to reality. When you tie it to reality, it becomes crystal clear and then the gap is created, and now you have them in that position. I would say from that brief piece of information you gave me that that's probably what's going on. Mauricio says, "Hello, Sam. Quick question to warm up. Are you watching the World Cup at all?" No, I'm not. I don't watch any sports. I haven't my entire life, but I do like studying really good athletes, so I've watched all of Michael Jordan's documentaries, Kobe Bryant. I've also watched Cristiano Ronaldo's documentaries. I don't watch sports, but I study the best players in them. I don't why. It just doesn't excite me that much watching games of sport. I've never been much of a watcher. I'd rather to be in the game. So [Curin 00:18:11] says, "Hi, Sam. I almost know you're going to say, 'Go at your own pace,' but I want to just sense check my approach. I am assembling my war machine, and I have done 10 days of Facebook organic outreach, 13 a day, and getting a bit of interest, eight calls booked in so far. I am still working 9:00 to 5:00 so have chosen not to learn anymore with your program until the 30 days are up. Should I still put aside some time to progress with weeks five and week six or wait until I get to the end of my 30 days?" It totally depends if you have time. If you have the time to do it, do it. If doing more of the learning will cut into the execution of the plan, then don't do it. The execution of the plan is the most important thing. That's the first thing you must do. The second thing you probably have to do is your 9:00 to 5:00 job, and then the third thing I would do after that if there's time left would be continue learning. Just put them in that order. Execute that, then that, then that. Donald [Deng 00:19:23] says, "What kind of stuff would you cover in the AdWords critique video you have in your Lumpy Mail template?" Problems. The best way to help anyone is to find errors because if you go to someone and you present to them a nice idea, it doesn't mean much. It's honestly better to find problems and errors and issues than present solutions because once you find an error, the solution is needed and wanted. Everything starts with the problem. Wherever I'm doing an audit of anything, I would start with the problem. I would find holes in it. If there weren't any holes I could find, then I wouldn't create a critique video because I couldn't critique it. If I did, I'd send them on and say, "Hey, it looks really good. Congrats." So that's what I find, problems. [Peoto 00:20:22] says, "If you work 12 hours a day, six days per week, what are you talking about with your wife during the Sunday because your brain is only full with work-related stuff, no?" Yes, that's a good question, and yeah, it quite often is, but it's been interesting to watch because now by watching how passionate I am about what I do and everything, my wife really wanted to find something that she was that passionate about and now she's starting her own dress company. She found her thing that she wants to do. She wants to make these dresses, and so now she's got her own passion and we can talk about these things, like we could talk about business on a Sunday, for example, but in the context of hers so that she's happy. What's the best way to explain it? It's not that people don't want to talk at all about business or anything. It's often that people just want something of their own to have enjoyment themselves, you know what I mean? If she starts her own business and she's really passionate about that and I'm able to help her with that and then I'm doing my own thing too, it's like that would be perfect, and that's what's naturally started to happen. Joshua Westover says, "Hey, Sam. I did a poll in the community about this, but I wanted to get your opinion as well. I'm currently living at my dads living off savings and getting my business started. I want to move out because I feel I can't focus where I am and my head is clouded from family members taunting me about what I'm doing. What do you think would be my best option at this point? One, get clients, move out, build from there, two, move out, get a job, build business, and quit job, three, sell a lot of stuff, get money, move out, build business?" Three. Three. Sell a lot of stuff to get money, move out, build business. You don't need stuff, dude. Stuff sucks. I can tell by how you worded the sentence. You said, "I feel I can't focus where I am." So I'm guessing you've got an F instead of a T in your Myers-Briggs thing. It sounds like your environment is affecting your actions, and moving out can really help you a lot. It also lights a fire in you because you have to make rent as soon as the money runs out. I think it's a good thing to do. It will put pressure on you, and it will be a better environment, and also you will be more independent, and you don't need stuff anyway, so just do it. Number three. Question seven, "How do change the paradigm of one, money's a scarce resource, two, it's difficult to have success, and three, all the good ideas have already been realized?" Well, it's simple. It's just not true. That is a delusion. Money is infinite if value is created. Value comes first, then money. So value is everything. You start at value, and value is created by solving a problem. If you do that, you'll have more money than you could ever use in your entire life. So money isn't scarce. It's only scarce for people who can't create value. That's it. People who work minimum wage jobs because they haven't focused on getting a skill set or learning or self-discovery, they haven't found their passion, money is scarce to them, not because they're not worthy but because they don't add value. They only add enough value to earn a minimum wage. So money isn't scarce. I would say for most people, they're offering of value is scarce. Then the other one was ... Where was this question? "It's difficult to have success." It is difficult, but it's easily possible. It's not like we're talking about an impossible thing. We're talking about something that is easily possible. It's just a bit challenging. Then, "All the good ideas have already been realized." No way. That'll never happen. That just cannot be a reality. You've just got to think about it. It's just not true. [Jawad 00:25:26] says, "Offering digital marketing to recruitment businesses. I've been mainly doing direct outreach on a daily basis, 25 per day, to get my first client. Do you recommend exploring with the organic methods or how can I be more efficient generating leads because I feel I'm getting interest but need more volume in terms of calls and strategy sessions." Just up the volume. Just do more of it. It sounds like you're getting connections. Just do more of it. Scott Blanely says, "If I have an idea for a niche but I don't know if the market wants it, how do I find out? What are the steps to asking the market?" Dude, you've started from the wrong position. You don't have an idea for a market and then be unsure if they actually want it. That's kind of backwards. You start with the market. You understand them. You understand their problem. Then you have an idea to solve that problem, which is the solution, and then you have a hunch that they want it because it solves their problem which they told you they had, and then when you offer it to them you finally find out. If you want to know how you can know if this thing that you cooked up is actually wanted, the easiest way is to ask them. So whatever the niche is, message them on Facebook, email them. Say, "Hey, I have this thing that does X. Do you want it?" They'll tell you. [Peoto 00:26:55] says, "Hello, Sam Ovens, and thank you for your help on this one. It's a niche problem. In the video week 1.2 you evaluate the desired result, complexity, possible out of 10, higher the score, the better the niche is. Mine is women looking for the right guy. Behind this hides psychological blockage, self-confidence, comfort zone, men trust, and the result from it is the score seven out of 10 to 10 out of 10. Possibility five out of 10 question. Do I have to find another niche or dig into new way to make it faster and easier or something else?" I think you've found a great niche. It's a definite problem in the marketplace. There is a lot of women who want to find a man, and there's a lot of men that want to find a woman. It's a proper problem, and it's not likely to go away because if it did I mean the human race would end. So it is there, and it will probably continue to be there forever. So you've found something good. Now you just have to try and find the ultimate solution, and the only way to do that is to get a client and start practicing. Angie says, "Hey, Sam. Welcome back. Can you please direct me to where I can edit the strategy session emails? When I sign into my funnel, the email confirmations are coming from you. Strategy session in one day. I cannot work out how to edit it." Okay, so that's in ActiveCampaign, I'm pretty sure. So, ActiveCampaign. Find the campaign automation, click on the automation, and then edit the emails, and then the name in the emails, the who it's coming from and probably the email address too, you probably need to change those from mine to yours. [Jawad 00:28:57] says, "Do you recommend to do Facebook ads ourselves for digital marketing retainer clients rather than outsourcing?" If you want to, yeah. I mean the cool thing about doing Facebook ads yourself is I teach you exactly how to do it. You can do my training. I think it's in ... What is it? Week five in Accelerator? Do that. You'll know Facebook ads pretty well, and then you can master it yourself. That's what I would do because it's a really good skill to know and it's very hard to find people who are good at it and at a good price, and the chances are if you just do the training in week five, you'll probably be better than the people who are offering Facebook ad services. So it's best to just do it. Justin Foley says, "When you include additional services that the market requests, is it best to upsell them when pitching the main service you provide or is it better to start another funnel strictly for this new service?" You want to probably not do the other service. Only focus on the main thing, and if someone wants something else, tell them you don't do it, and say to go over here to get it and recommend them. Don't feel like you have to offer people everything they ask for. That is a surefire way to make a mess of your business and then kill your business by just offering everything. For example, when I did digital marketing retainers, when I was offering Google AdWords or SEO or things like that, and if someone asked me, "Oh, can you also do my website," I said, "No, I can't, because I'm focusing on doing your AdWords, but I know this guy who can do your website for you, and I can refer you to him if you want," and that's what I did. Make sure you stick on your key focus. Don't get diverted. Bart says, "Having difficulties driving traffic to both my website and growing Facebook. What tips can you give me to drive ... PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:31:04] Sam: ... and going Facebook. What tips can you give me to drive traffic and grow Facebook network? Or did you ... Oh, sorry, the question's already gone now. Week five, dude. I show you exactly how to run Facebook ads in 24 hours of content in really deep detail, so go to week five, watch it one video at a time. Watch the whole thing. It'll answer most of your questions. So Joshua says his friend Katie has a question. Are you familiar with Jay Abraham and Michael Porter and do you agree or disagree with what they teach? Michael Porter was attacked by the authors of the Blue Ocean Strategy, yet people in the data marketing field swear by what he says. Do you have an opinion on their teachings? I don't care about academic battles. I only care about results. You know what I mean? So I'll use a strategy or a piece I've learned from anyone and everyone and if it works, it's good. If it doesn't, I don't care about it. I don't get involved in like arguments between different academics. It's just stupid stuff. They've forgotten what they're supposed to be doing. [Joward 00:32:15] says, "What is in the morning smoothie you have after you work out?" Like what is it? Probably, I would ask Rhett. Just in the consulting accelerator Facebook group just go @Rhettcoots, tag him and be like, "What is in Sam's smoothie?", 'cause I don't really know. I just know that it's made out of almond milk and it has protein powder in it and then there's a bunch of other stuff. Peter says, "When do we know that we have to change niche? Mine is, yeah, I know what your niche is. I did 50 strategy sessions, exhausted all the possibilities of direct outreach, even on Facebook. That's not true. I'm sure on the Facebook network, which is 2.2 billion, you could find more than 50 people. And only two sales actually paid, including one of only $160. I know that I've not yet given 100% of myself in this niche, that I still have big problems on the strategy session and [inaudible 00:33:10] mindset, but I feel more and more tired of this." Dude, you just need to keep at it. You're not going to like nail this thing and you're not gonna become a master at it, and you're not gonna have profound life-changing results for people and have people start to come to you until you've really mastered this thing. And mastery comes with practice and repetition, so you just need to stick at it. Keep going. Obviously, it's important to you, otherwise, you probably wouldn't have chosen it. I can tell you just haven't like chosen a niche based on what someone else is doing. If you were telling me that you were doing Facebook ads for real estate agents, then I would know you probably just were copying someone else, but you've chosen something here to do with, that's personal, I would say, so it must mean something to you, and you have some sort of affinity to it. So you just need to stick at it and keep at it till you really master it. Peter Wikstrom says, "I've had a lack of mindset for a long time around money and lifestyle, trying to live in the apartment with the cheapest rent right? Always sharing apartment with someone, wait until the last minute to pay bills, 'cause I don't like seeing money leaving my account. I see that this is the mindset of the poor and I cannot use it any longer. What is the best way to get into the abundance mindset mentality but still be frugal around expenses, because I see many rich people are frugal." Yeah, so dude, you just need to understand that like the main way to make money is to add value. It's not to save. Right? But you also don't wanna be irresponsible because that's dumb. So you wanna be frugal to the point that you're not irresponsible, so I guess you don't wanna blow your money on stupid stuff like bottle service and like fancy cars and ridiculous like Gucci belts and things like that. Those things, the people who buy those things, their businesses always die. So if you ever wanna know whose business is about to blow up, look for the person buying those things. And then so you can be tight, like that, but the main way you're gonna get rich is by value. Creating value, so solving massive problems for people and doing it in a way that is way better than what anyone else on earth is doing. Just focus on that. Your eyes, right now are on your bank account, but your eyes shouldn't be on your bank account, your eyes should be on your customer. And you should be obsessed about them, not your bank balance and by obsessing on them, the bank balance will move. That's how you do it. Joshua [Westover 00:35:55] says, "My niche is helping people with the fear of flying from speaking to the market. I am starting to discover some common problems this market wants solving, mostly things like not being able to go on holiday with family, missing out on work opportunities and having the inability to travel and see the world. I was wondering if I should incorporate these problems into my message and direct outreach? Should I focus on the most common of these problems? I'm currently struggling with landing calls so wondering if this might be the issue?" No, dude, these things come with the fear of flying. So you're helping people who have the fear of flying. And the issues that people who have the fear of flying have are the things you described. And you're not changing your message or things like that, I mean, you know, you're still solving the same problem and the reason why you probably haven't got people on the phone yet is you probably just haven't done enough of it. You need to practice it. Obsess about it more. Do more of it. Do it more consistently. Do it more rapidly. And do it for a longer period of time. And Christopher says, "In order to edutate a local neighborhood for signing up for roofing estimates, I'm considering doing voice mail broadcasting. Would you lead with the problem or the benefit?" You're looking at it the wrong way, from how you worded that sentence. You said in order to edutate a local neighborhood for signing up for roofing estimates, I'm considering doing voice mail broadcasting. A better way to look at it is I'm looking to solve a problem for people. Help them. Not edutate. So people who might need a new roof, I mean, you need to rethink how you're doing this, because the premise of how you thought of this gave you the thing to do and because you wanted to edutate them, you came up with a voice mail broadcast, which most certainly would edutate. So I think you just need to rethink it from the first principles of how you came up with that, you're trying to solve a problem. You're not trying to edutate the person. KC says question on price point, "I've a lower price, $997 for a report, but my biggest subscription is a $10K per month consulting. I offer them. Is it best to get them in the smaller $1K offer first and then upsell or go for the big sale and then down sell?" Dude, it is best to sell them what they need. That's what's always best. So diagnose, you know, do the script, diagnose, "Oh, okay. You have this problem". Then once you've diagnosed, whatever solution is best for them, tell them that. That's the best way to do things. Stephanie says, "Hello, Sam. Very pleased to talk to you directly. I made my value video with PowerPoint, but as I turn it into the MP4, the visual quality is really bad. Is there any other device to use or did I miss something?" Okay, so you made your value video with PowerPoint. That's probably the issue. You use PowerPoint to create your slides, then you use a screen recording software to record your screen with PowerPoint displaying those slides. So that might be the issue there. So you need screen recording software and if you're using PowerPoint, you're probably using a PC. So if you're using a PC, the best one for that is, what's it called? Damn, I forgot. But I tell you in the training. The best one for a Mac is ScreenFlow and then Camtasia. Camtasia. If you've got a Mac, use ScreenFlow. If you've got a PC, Camtasia. And use that to record the video, not PowerPoint. That should solve your issue. Donald [Dang 00:39:42] says, "Is it bad to only pursue a specific type of consulting, i.e., digital marketing, for the money, when you really don't care about helping these people. If so, how do you either change your mindset to change this or find a specific group of people and niche that you actually care about? Is the desire to help someone conditioned over time, helping the industry, or is pursuing an industry you don't care about the equivalent of banging your head against the concrete wall hoping one day it will crack?" Yeah, I've got a good example for this, which I came up with on my vacation when I was chatting at my friend. Like if you're in a niche that you don't care about, it's like being married to somebody you hate just for the money. That's what it's like. It's like literally being married to the person you hate just for money. So like what makes a good relationship and a good marriage makes a good niche. So like, it's first about the passion and the love for it and if money comes of that, that's great. That's if you really don't care about it and you don't like it, then the chances of success happening there is very low. Just like being married to a person you hate. The chances of like anything great flourishing from that is like zero. Peter Wikstrom says, "I know you talk about focus and mastering the one thing, but what about if one currently needs different sources of income to make ends meet? How do I apply focus then? Yeah, so you want, like, you know, survival comes first. So you gotta survive to achieve anything, so that kind of comes first, so yeah, you have to do what you have to do to survive, but you should be constantly wracking your brain about how you can merge and consolidate and get rid of those things to narrow it into one focus. So you can do it in the meantime, but think constantly, how can I get rid of this thing or merge them all together or consolidate them and make it one thing?" [Deborah 00:42:11] says another, "I currently have an eight week program that I have been selling at the rate of about 50% when I get the strategy session. At what point should I either increase the price or fit the eight week program into a six week instead that I can upsell later? Should I have a client go through the entire program first?" So you have an eight week program that you've been selling at 50%, at what point should I increase the price or fit the eight week program into a six week instead that I can upsell later? Why would you wanna upsell the same program to the same person? I don't understand that. I think, don't think about trying to make more money from squeezing more out of this person. Think about just doing more of what you're doing. You know? Like, it sounds like you've got a program right now. That's good. And it sounds like you're selling it at a high conversion rate, which is good so just keep doing what you're doing and do more of it. Don't look at increasing your prices unless they're ridiculously low. Like if they're a good price, keep them there. A lot of people in business, they think, "Oh, I should constantly increase my price", or "I should try and upsell people all of this stuff." It's the wrong way to think about it. Just provide the most value you possibly can and if you can add more value to people, do it. Sometimes that means not raising your prices but making your product better. Sometimes it means making your product bigger and lowering your prices. Like honestly, you wanna think about just adding value instead of like trying to get more money out of every customer. Peter Wikstrom says, "What do you think about helping introvert entrepreneurs becoming confident and outgoing and growing your business? In my market research, I've found that many introverts struggle with talking to strangers and getting out of their comfort zone. This affects their business massively, because there are invisible to the marketplace. Any thoughts on this?" Yeah, it's a good start. Like it's definitely a problem. There are introverts that want to be entrepreneurs and I know that exists, 'cause I used to be one. So and I still am an introvert, but now I'm an entrepreneur so I'm already in motion, so that's a good problem. Like if it interests you and you're passionate about it, you can start digging into it. Start looking deeper. And then Julian Wageman says, "Hi Sam. What do you see are the biggest mistakes people make when doing market research?" The biggest one is just looking on Google and blogs and articles and never talking to a human being. That's the biggest one I see. Or assuming they know what the person wants by doing a thought experiment in their own brain. Those two are wrong. The only way you can know what they want is to talk to them and ask them. Any other way is a delusion that you've cooked up in your brain that is most likely to fail. [Sekina 00:45:32] says, "Hey, Sam. I'm really enjoying your training modules. However, in week two, and I few niches I'm interested in but I'm wondering how to go about making sales calls and knowing if they are the right pick?" So if you've got a few niches in your mind, then you have to pick one to start with. You're not married to that niche, you can change it. You can try another one later if you want, but right now, you have to commit to one. So you just think, gun to your head, if you had to pick one, what would it be? Whatever that is, start with that. And just drill that one, until, you know, and see what happens. That's the way to do it. Julian says, "Hey, Sam, when doing once first digital marketing service for clients in the niche, do you think it is a good idea to offer them a commission-based price and structure where I get paid per sale that comes through Facebook ads?" No. Too hard to manage. Too hard to police. Best to stick to fixed fees. [Ryan Reyna 00:46:28] says, "My goal is to have the most simple yet extremely effective fitness program to help people transform their body and mind." Sounds cool. "Do I need to have a funnel and website or can I keep it simple with Facebook only?" You've just gotta test it. If you're getting clients with Facebook only, that's great. But my guess is that that will only work organically with you manually as a human being doing something and at some point, as you keep scaling that up, it's gonna break. And at that point, you need to optimize and machine the process. And then use ads and automate it to make it work like 24/7, 365 instead of having human input. I would take the organic method you're doing on Facebook to the limits and just find out where that limit of it is first and then when you find that limit, build out the ads and the funnel and all of that. Sophie says, "Hi Sam. How you doing?" I'm doing good. Julian says, "Hey, Sam. Do you think to offer a money back guarantee if certain results are not met through my digital marketing services is that a good idea?" It's hard because, as a digital marketing person, it's not just you, it's the business, as well. Like their product, their message, their price point, their service, their sales skills, their everything is being tested. Not just your marketing, right? So trying to offer them a guaranteed sales results is kind of stupid. You should just guarantee like the work and the best effort and tell them what you're gonna do and tell them that it's a team effort, because I could do digital marketing and I know a lot about this stuff and I could do it for a company, but if their stuff sucked, we would fail. So it's a team effort. You don't have to be all the responsibility. Denise Perry says, "Hi Sam. Nice to see you in person. Sam, I'm a conflict resolution consultant ready to leverage the delivery of my service. I am done with the done for you, but I built the framework for an eight week conflict transformation course over the winter and have been trying to figure out how to bring it to market. Up to now, I'm all word of mouth. I'm in week four. Client attraction, Deep dive and now trying to figure out if I'm better served putting your program into place for my coaching service and then adapt for my course or put everything into what I'm learning into my eight week course, which is why I signed up and the latest scenario. What I am learning is putting the cart before the horse. I still need to feed my kids and I'm realizing putting my full program together, which resembles yours, is going to take a great deal of effort and I'm going to need lots of help. Thoughts? Much appreciated." Yeah, so what I would do if I was you, is like the way you're selling them for you is the same way that you will sell the course. The same way you market them for you is the same way you'll market the course, because these two things are the same. Think about what you're doing in a done for you scenario. You're helping people with conflict resolution. Human being comes in. They have conflict. You work with them. You resolve conflict. Conflict no longer exists. Value is provided. Think about what the course is doing. Human comes in. Conflict exists. Program interacts with people. Conflict is resolved. Human no longer has conflict. These two things are exactly the same. The only thing that is different is that there are pixels and bits delivering the information instead of flesh and atoms. It's like bits instead of atoms. That's the only difference. So it's the same. How you market it, how you sell it, identical. It's the same thing. The value is the same. But the thing that you're getting caught in your mind on is that these things are different when they're not. Mitzi says, "Hey Sam. I wanted to offer a done for you social media but I don't know if targeting Spanish-speaking businesses" ... "Hey, Sam, I want to offer done for you social media but I don't know if targeting Spanish-speaking business owners in the US would be a niche, or do you think should be even more specific and target a particular industry?" No, I think that it's a good one. Because you don't to pick an industry. That's old thinking. There's only so many industries, right? A niche is any way to cluster a group of people that have similarities. That's a niche. Any form of cluster. And it can be done on any variable. It can be done on language. It could be done on location. Could be done on anything. So obviously, you have some sort of affinity to businesses and Spanish and America, which is good. You're using those variables to combine something. So I would say that that's a good niche. You'll be able to differentiate yourself from other people approaching Spanish-speaking US businesses, because they won't be, and you will and you'll understand them better than the other people will and then, you know, it sounds like a good idea. It's the good start of an idea. You have like the germ, now you just need to do the progress. Like just focus on it, start talking to the people. Talk to the market. Start moving this thing forward. Elsa says, "Hey, Sam. I recently watched your video about productivity being bullshit and I completely agree that laser-focus is key. I know you're not a dad yet, but do you have any suggestions on how to stay focused and block off distractions when you have small kids who need lots of attention?" It's a good question. So you've got to, like if you have a husband, you could say, "Look, I need to lock myself in this room for these hours to get this thing done. I need you to look after the kids." Or if you are already making money and you're able to do this, you could get someone to help you with the chores around the house. Because I know that growing up, watching my parents care for me, most of the effort they were putting in was not what was considered value for me. So like the thing that's valuable for a child growing up is focused attention from a parent. But cooking, cleaning, doing dishes and doing laundry and playing taxi driver, that's most of what parents do. And that isn't focused attention on a child. So anything that isn't focused attention on a child is waste. And anything that is waste, we should eliminate. So like when I'm a parent, I'm gonna make sure that I have help to do every task that isn't the main thing that the child finds valuable, which is focused attention. You know what I mean? So I won't be doing dishes, cooking, cleaning, playing taxi driver, but like when it comes to the things that are important, I'm gonna make sure I do those. So I would look at everything you spend your time doing and try and think which things are actually value as a parent and which things are just like admin tasks and chores and waste and try and eliminate those things. Matt [McDonald 00:54:08] says, "My current nine to five really zaps my energy. Have any successful students tried working or a company in their niche as another method for learning their market before going all in with their own consulting business?" Not really, but people have worked for a company, and then found that they want to solve a problem for that niche and then quit. But I don't think anybody has thought, "To learn about this niche, I'm gonna become an employee in it." So like yes, people have found ideas from their job that they've been in, but no one I've seen goes and gets a job just to learn. If that makes sense. Brandon [Rudinsky 00:54:57] says, "Sam, I've done forty strategy session calls and closed none so far. But I've come up with some good information on how to close them. My niche is helping lawyers to get more clients using the power of social media and digital marketing. Currently, I've been getting my strategy session calls by doing cold calls and following up to get appointments and so far, I've gathered is that they get most of their, 80% of their cases going to court from referrals and almost 80% aren't doing any digital marketing and have really bad websites. Some of them even said I don't want to grow and increase my business, although it's hard to tell whether that's an objection or whether or not they're being true and genuine. So that's where I'm at for that." Yeah. Like you just haven't cracked this niche. Like lawyers is, they're all very different. Like there's a lot of lawyers that I work with that have the worst website in the world, but they're totally busy, 'cause all they are is themself, that's their business and their time. And they're totally busy and they get all of their work through referrals and these are like really smart tax planning people. Like the one person in America that knows the tax treaty the most out of everyone here, between America and Ireland, right? So that one person is sought out by everyone and so they constantly don't need any ads. They don't even need a website. 'Cause they're totally filled up. But there's some high-volume consumer-facing lawyers that digital marketing is something they need a lot. Like personal injury attorneys. Those sorts of attorneys, anything consumer-facing. Consumer-facing attorneys, those are the ones more susceptible to needing ads. Business-facing attorneys is very different. So like what you'll find, you just haven't been in this niche long enough, you haven't learned the ins and outs of it enough to understand how it operates and you just need more practice, more time. You need to drill into it more. You need to learn more about it. Elsa says, "Sam, I'd love your feedback on my revised message. I help female entrepreneurs double their productivity through cycle syncing and agile project management." Yeah, I mean, if that's their problem. I don't know how you came up with this. I'm just looking at this message and cycle syncing and agile, I know what agile project management is, I don't know what cycle syncing is. But if that truly is what they want and what they need, then that's a good message. But ultimately, I'm not the judge of whether your message is good or not, the market is. So I would say take this message to the market, and see what happens, 'cause they're the only true judge. Mitch [Kinney 00:58:06] says, "Can you recommend somebody to do my Facebook ads for me the way you teach it or do you recommend I do it myself?" Do it yourself. Peter says, "In one of your last videos on taking many breaks, you said that you were thinking during the holidays on how to improve the next 90 days. Can you give us some things that you're doing so we can do the same?" Like you shouldn't do the things that I'm doing. You should do your own review of yourself and your situation and then come up with your own initiatives, right? 'Cause everyone's different and everyone's in different scenarios and situations so I would tell you what mine are anyway, but one thing I realized when I was on vacation is that I want to achieve something way bigger than what I'm trying to achieve now. So I want a way bigger mission. A way bigger thing to achieve and tackle, which is what I decided to do. And I came up with that bigger thing. And then I realized once I'd chosen that way bigger thing, that it's impossible to achieve it on my own and that I need an army of people to do it and that I need those people to be really high-performance, really driven, really smart and that I need to focus more now on building up a huge, smart team than trying to squeeze more efficiency out of myself. So that's how my perspective changed. Before I was focusing on squeezing every ounce of efficiency out of myself, which was a good thing to do, 'cause I wanted to be as high performance and as productive as humanly possible, but then I decided to now get all of that efficiency out of my team and build a culture and all of that. But that will not be relevant to you if you're just starting and you don't have a niche, you know what I mean? Ellen [Cohen 01:00:06] says, "Hey, Sam, thank you for getting back to the weekly call. I have my first client done for you. I am now working hard to deliver for a great result. I find myself wanting to get more clients and also wanting to finish my website. The client is paying 6K per month. What is the best way to balance my time to deliver for the client, get more clients, and work on my website?" So I would first of all, forget about your website. I'd focus on delivering for your client, first and foremost, but you need to like really over deliver for this client. You just wanna make sure you're definitely delivering what was promised to the client. First and foremost, number one. Number two, getting more clients. That's all. And then as you get more clients, you need to fulfill for them, too. Forget about the website, right? Like the website is nice to have. These things are what makes things really work. Melissa [Jisky 01:01:00] says, "Hey, Sam, my question is about Facebook's [inaudible 01:01:04]. I have to turn my ads off. Then when I turn them back on, do I have to wait for days for initial conditions to run again or does the system remember what it learned in the past?" Like try turning them back on and see if it works, right? Chances are, I bet you it doesn't work. 'Cause when you turn all your ads off, they get a bit messed up, but it's always worth a try. Because you never know. So turn them back on. See if they work. If they do, good. If they don't, then grab all of those ads, turn them off and them duplicate them. And then run the new ones and then delete the old ones and see if the new ones work. That's what I would do. Brennan says "Also in regards to reality, is an extremely popular delusion. I've been doing more research into the week one and week two, and do you believe that we really can operate in a simulation? That there are multiple dimensions and that these things exist like quantum- PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [01:02:04] Sam: "That's, there are multiple dimensions and that these things exist like quantum jumping between different dimensions. For example, from the third dimension to the fourth. How do we do this? How is it even possible? You can please give your opinion on this? Reality as an extremely popular delusion, because I've seen opposing views on both." I don't know what the answer is to that. But, it's like basically what I know from looking, what I'm trying to teach to most people by looking at that is to just totally break everything they ever believed. You know what I mean? Because, if you want to really grow you have to totally just break every rule and limit that you'd set in your brain. You have to get rid of it all, and then you can start to see things properly and think bigger and see different things. That's basically the only reason why I talked about that. The answer to the questions you're asking I have no idea. Maybe I'll look into those things when I have the resources to really find out. That could be cool if I had a multi-billion dollar company. I'd probably startup a little company looking into these things. But, right now I'm just focusing on helping people start their businesses, get clients make money. I've left that one out to the side. Debbie says, "I gave a similar problem to [inaudible 01:03:29] with the current situation and desired situation in the strategy session. As a book publisher, they want me to choose them, because traditionally publishers choose their authors, and they pay them in advance. Because, they want me to choose them and their story book, prospects continuously repeat themselves, telling me about their story in the book, not about the book itself. Like telling me their story on the call will convince me to choose them. It wastes a lot of time, and makes me board and frustrated. If I stay with the program and just let them talk, they will talk for 20 minutes without stop, until I interrupt them. Can I position their mindset at the beginning of the call?" Not really. You've got to understand that their current situation is they're telling their story, and no one's listening to them, and no one will publish their story. That's their problem. Now, you're asking them for their problem, and they're really telling you that. You've got to listen to that. If they start to go for more than 20 minutes, you have to cut them off, because they can't take up the whole call with just telling their story. Do you know what I mean? You're asking them for their current situation, and they should tell you their story. Then, you should say cool, and all of that. Then, really the solution is, that you're helping them. You're enabling them to tell their story. In a way, you're choosing them. You are doing that. You are telling them that they can put their message out there. But, what they're doing to you is, they're spewing up the pain and their problem, and there's no way you can change that. Especially, at the start of the call. That's going to happen. Christopher says, "Are you and INTP or an INTJ?" I've done the test, right now I get INTJ. Because, right now I'm focused on a lot of execution, and a lot of management and things like that. But, I have been INTP for a long time too. I'd say I move between those two things. You're not one thing and fixed forever. You can move these things around. The one thing I definitely am is, I and N and T. That's very strong, and I don't think I'd change I to E, or N to S, or T to F. But, I definitely change J to P quite a lot. Alexander says, "Hey, Sam. Thanks for your program. I'm picking my niche, and landed on helping eCommerce businesses who are stuck by more traffic by increasing their customer LTV. How would you improve and optimize in dollar in this niche? Thanks, I'm picking my niche, and landed on helping eCommerce businesses who are stuck by more traffic by increasing their customer LTV. How do you improve and optimize in dollar in this niche?" The only way to improve and optimize in dollar in anything, to do it. Get a client, deliver the services, get better at it, repeat. Get a client, deliver services, get better at it, and just keep going, and going, and going, and going, and going until you get really good at it, and then you can change around what your message is, and what your niche is, and what you offer, and all of that. But, the only way to perfect anything is to do it, practice. [inaudible 01:06:57] says, "Question nine. Hi, Sam. I'm in week two and I have a few niches I'm passionate about. However, I'm wondering how to find clients, and make sales calls after deciding on a niche." The course tells you how to do that. You're in week two, so I guess that explains it. The course will show you what to do. You just got to keep going through following the steps. Monica says, "Hi, my niche is musicians. I help professional violin and viola players play without pain, injuries, tendonitis, and stage fright." This is a cool one. "I've been doing this already. I know it's a common problem, still I'm stuck with many doubts and insecurity about contacting people on Facebook, et cetera, and charging more than I do now. Usually it is others who contact me via my website. What do you think?" I think you've got stage fright. You got to do it. Do what you teach them to do. Play your violin, and reach out to them. You just got to do it. It's a change in behavior for you, right? When you do change behavior, there's resistance, there's friction, it's normal. But, you just got to get it done. "Hi, Sam. Just wanted to get your thoughts and suggestions on my website. Niche, data science managers who want to get their teams competent in image analytics or natural language processing. Offer, two day online training seminar. I help, I have been a data science consulting developing and teaching image analytics and NLP, and I am launching my own business. Now going through your course, thanks for the amazing content, it blew my expectations out of the water. Thanks. Data science mangers who want to get their teams competent in image analytics and natural language processing. Offer is a two day online training seminar." What is the problem here? Because, you said for me to checkout your website and give you thoughts on it, but what are you trying to achieve? Because, I need to know what the objective is before I provide any recommendations. What is your question? Define your question and you objective, and then I will be able to look at the variables and give you my recommendations. Monica says, "Where are the scripts for the email that you send after people register or not through ScheduleOnce?" They're in the, what's it called? They're in the active campaign template that I give you, and that is in week six, and it's called, Marketing Automation, or something. It's in week six somewhere, and it's to do with marketing automation. I can tell you those things. In the content of those emails is in the active campaign, how to set it up, cheat sheet thing. Jay Mark says, "Hi, Sam. How do you qualify a prospect when you do outreach after you have added them in Facebook? How do you conduct the survey? How do you qualify a prospect when you do outreach after you have added them on Facebook? How do you conduct the survey?" You just introduce yourself. Say, "Hey, my name is this, and I do this, are you interested in learning more?" That's it, you don't need to do a survey on them. You just need to start a conversation, and naturally the survey will kind of do itself. Do you know what I mean? Jeff Hall says, "Hey, Sam. Just finished week two and really like it. My question for you is about the mind and character. I understand the whole thing, pulling out the guns and knives, et cetera. I think it's definitely necessary. I'm wondering what your thoughts are abour bringing the two in harmony with each other? A lot of conventional psychology focuses on creating harmony and peace with their constant internal conflict. Do you think there is a good way to get the character and mind to work together, and be at peace with each other, besides succumbing to the lazy tendencies of character?" Yeah, it's practice, man. Because, honestly, the things that I sucked at, and hated, and had a lot of resistance at doing, I can turn into things I love doing. It's just practice, like practice makes perfect, and repetition drives something in, and it makes it automatic. You just, you don't want to get caught up in the concepts, right? You've just got to understand that the way your brain works is, there's stimulus, and then how you react to that stimulus is your choice. People who get triggered by anything, it's not that the stimulus did it, they did it. Someone can insult you, but you have to, yourself, decide to be insulted. Someone can even inflict pain on you, but you have to, yourself, decide to be in pain, right? Most people don't understand this. When you're doing a task, and you don't want to do it, and you feel resistance to doing it, it's not the task that is causing it, it is you. You need to intercept that synapse in your brain before it goes and gets over to that other piece, and change it a bit. Be like, I'm gonna choose, I know what's going on here, but I'm gonna choose to resist this temptation to quit, and I'm gonna keep going and get it done. When you do that, when you keep, when you're able to control your mind and it's responses to different things, that when you get really good at stuff. You're not reactive to things. Things happen all the time, but you choose what you do. You're not just, you're not like a rat in a maze. Mauricio says, "Hello, Sam. I don't have a niche yet. I'm doing digital marketing for now, but people ask me to work with them, which is cool. But, from different niches, and I can't say no, because I'm focusing on getting my first client to start making money, and leave my nine to five job as quickly as possible. I have a hard, hard to have a niche on digital marketing. How can I handle all that?" In a way, your niche is digital marketing. It could be better than that, but in a way it is digital marketing. If your main objective is to just get some clients, make some money, and quit your job, then just be a generalist right now, and take on some random digital marketing clients. Then, that might enable you to quit your job, and then you might decided to pick a niche to focus on doing digital marketing for, right? It's all right to start off being a generalist for your first few clients. There's nothing wrong with that. But, you want to become a specialist, so just go through the generalist phase at first to achieve what you're trying to do, and then pick a niche and specialize. Jeffrey says, "Hey, Sam. Do you need to have the 297 ClickFunnels plan to run everything?" No, the cheapest one will work just fine. Damion says, "What's the biggest difference between how you imagined your life to be like when you started, and what it's like now?" Honestly, the best way to describe it would be that, there isn't one piece here that really was in how I imagined it back then. It basically just is totally different. One thing that is the same though, I guess, is that I wanted to have a successful business, and I do. But, how everything looks, and is, and what I'm doing, and how I'm doing it is totally different. Justin Foley say, "Thanks for the insight." No problem. Rena says, "Hi, Sam. I just joined, week one, I have my niche. I want to teach classes on beauty services. For example, eyelashes extension class, but also do marketing for them, and drive leads to their business. I've seen other training academy that teach classes, but don't teach marketing. Please advise, thank you." My advise it to just do the course work, and it will answer all of your questions. Forget about what you want to do, and just look at what the market is that you want to serve, and look from their point of view. The best people in business, they don't look through their eyes. They get into their customer's eyes, and they look from that point of view, and they're like, "What does the customer want? What is the customer's problem?" Then, they look through their eyes, and they're like, "How can I offer a solution to that problem?" Then, that's what they do. If there's something they really want to give to the customer, but it is not needed from their perspective, they don't do it. Because, that's just mindless. Learn to get out of your perspective, and into theirs. Raphael says, "Hey, Sam. I never got to the physical products you offered a while back. Are there any extra content in it?" Yeah, there's a few different scenarios there. If you were part of the old Consulting Accelerator, and then you upgraded, it's different than if you'd purchased it now. Everyone who purchases it now automatically gets shipped it pretty much right away. You'll have to contact support, because I don't know what situation, what yours was. Email, and you said you submitted a video, so you were an old customer. Send an email to [email protected], and they'll help you out. Roman says, "Sam, I've been selling life and health insurance for 10 years now, and I'm considering helping agents acquire high quality health and life insurance leads. I'm obviously familiar with the specs, but concerned with the fact that health and life insurance lead generation is extremely expensive and competitive. Wondering if I should do what I know, or the alternative would be digital marketing for small businesses?" I would do what you know, and there's a problem there though, that is kind of exciting, right? Because, first of all, you've got a lot of experience doing, selling health insurance. 10 years of doing something is a bit of experience. Obviously, a problem for these people is leads, as you know, because you are one of them. You want to, now, get out of doing the job, and now help people who are like you. You know the solution to do that is, more leads. But, now, you're faced with the challenge that leads are expensive, or at least you think they are. Now, you've got to solve that problems. That's fun. The things that are worth doing look hard and they're problems. You've got to solve them. Just look at it as a challenge and an adventure, and try and figure it out. Try and figure out how to get them at a price that makes sense for others, and then try and get them at a price that's way cheaper than anyone else, and try and become the king of getting leads at a good price for these people. Danny says, "Hey, Sam. Do you have any recommendations for Facebook ad contractors, instead of just going to Upwork? Like actual companies or names, et cetera. I'd like to not reinvent the wheel. If you look in week six, there should be a module called hiring and managing contractors. Maybe it's called minimum viable service delivery, or something like that. There's instructions on how to hire these types of people in that module, week six. Javan says, "Hey, Sam. How do I find more people to interview for market research for my niche, treating autoimmune disease?" Well, I would find, so if you're treating autoimmune diseases, then I guess your niche is people who have autoimmune diseases. How do you find more of those people? I don't know. Search for Facebook groups, find someone who has an autoimmune disease, I'm sure you can find one, and then ask them, "Hey, how would I go about finding more people who have autoimmune disease, or do you know anyone who has it?" Find a doctor who treats these people, ask them. "Hey, you work in this field. How do I find more of these people?" Use your brain, think, how can I find more of these people? Then, if you don't have the answer, ask people who work with them for clues how. Julien says, "Hi, Sam. Sometimes I can be quite the perfectionist, and it makes me move forward quite slowly. Have you ever experienced this? How did you overcome it?" Yeah, I think everyone does at some point. You've just got to, if you're new to this, then you're gonna be a bit slow, because you've got all of this baggage, right? You're basically totally pushing every part of your brain, because you've never been in these scenarios before, and you've never had to do this stuff. It's hard, and you move a bit slower than normal, but you just have to stick at it, and practice, and then you will start to just accelerate. I started so slow, but now I'm just going very fast. Because, it's just practice. Just don't worry about how fast you're moving now, if you stick at it and keep practicing, you will explode. It just takes a bit of time. [inaudible 01:21:19] says, "Sam, for every 100 lump email packages, how many business owners should respond to my digital marketing offer if I am doing it right? Why there is not a focus for reverse engineering numbers for the lump email method completely separated on the program?" I don't know what that number is. If you send out 100, you've got to do phone calls after you send the lump email out too, if you really want it to work. I would send the lump email, and then call as well. I would send at least 200. If you then call all 200, and if you don't get any action out of sending 200 and calling 200, then something is wrong there. But, there's not a golden rule or number here that I can give you, because there's so many variables. Keith says, "Sam, as a business coach of 15 years doing the face-to-face meetings, I've had to have a mindset change taking my business online, and have struggled to identify my niche. Your interviews have helped, especially going back to the basics, as to what you are really good at. As an ex CEO, and having several CEOs as clients, I had an epiphany for my niche. I help overwhelmed CEOs suffering from stress and frustration regain control of their lives. Does this sound good to you?" It sounds great to me. It sounds fine, but my opinion is worthless. Because, the only opinion that matters is the market's. I would say, sounds good. Now, let's test it. Talk to these people, see what they think, and their response and reaction to you is what I would determine to judge whether this is a good message. Jennifer Mayfeild says, "I just started week three, and definitely journeyed some personal shifts in week two. Lo and behold I'm in negotiation with the first client. I need pay structure help. The client wants to pay me in hourly. I know you suggest something different, but don't have clarity on it. In addition, the client mentioned some pay in stocks that do have a great deal of potential. I'm not sure what to propose for pay and retainer to begin with, plus there's this added stock opportunity. Would you suggest, what's your suggestion? Thanks for any help." I would not take an hourly thing. I would explain it to them like this. Look, my job is to help you achieve this outcome as fast as possible with as little effort as possible. Why should I be incentivized to do it slower, and take longer, and make it more painful and complicated than it should be? It makes sense. The hourly model makes no sense. Why should be incentivized to do things slow? Just say it like that to them. Say, "How much is it worth to you to have this thing solved," and then come up on a price that makes sense for the value you're providing with that service. In terms of stock, it totally depends on the company, right. If it was Google, yeah sure, that's some good stock, Amazon, mm-hmm (affirmative), but it depends on the company, and it depends if the company is public or it's private. Because, if it's private, there's probably options. You got to look at the company, and it's valuation, and what the deal is, and what you need more, cash or equity. You have to determine whether, if you really need cash right now, and cash is your main focus, I would take cash instead of stock. But, once you start to cover yourself with cash a little bit, I would take the stock. But, I would only ever take the stock if the company is good. Joshua Westover says, "On Facebook is it important to wait for people to accept your friend request before messaging them? In a couple of cases, I've messaged people when they haven't accepted my friend request, and they still replied, and we got into a conversation. Is there a reason why this may not be a good method?" For the most part, when you message people when they're not your friends, that message will go to the spam box. It'll go to the messages box that's people don't see it, right? There can be exceptions where someone actually goes and checks that inbox, but it's rare, right? The chances of it working are significantly lower. Plus, if Facebook learns that you're someone that's messaging a lot of people that you're not friends with, that's gonna start to flag you in their system. I would say, as a good rule, you should try and only message people who accept your friend request. But, obviously, you can break that rule a little bit, just don't make a habit of it, because it will bite you. Kyle says, "Do you remember what your initial ROI is with the case study video you shared with us?" Yeah, it was like five to one. If I spend a grand, I would probably make five. Roughly around there, yeah. [inaudible 01:27:08] says, "Great to hear from you." No problem [inaudible 01:27:13]. Donald [inaudible 01:27:14] says, "Can you come to a conclusion of a problem in the industry based on personal experience? I.e. if you've actually experienced the problem itself and overcome this problem being inside the niche, or would this be a wrongful assumption, and you must ask for market anyway?" No, you can scratch your own itch. You can definitely do that. But, you want to also ground it with the market as well. If I have a problem and I want to solve it, then I might also see if other people have this problem, and they want to solve it, and they're willing to pay for it. It means that we don't need to do as much research there, but we still want to validate that this thing exists in other people, other than ourselves. Because, people do have problems that they're passionate about that no one else is passionate about. You really want to validate that. Maria says, "I've been trying to stick to the routine of hearing my manifesto every morning. I used your as inspiration, but in a way I feel like it is not speaking to me." I wonder why. "But, in a way, I came up with one of my own, but I'm still not excited to listen to it. Any ideas to make my manifesto more attractive?" Well, I'm not surprised that my one didn't resonate with you, because it's not yours. Now, you've made one that's your own, and now that one probably needs some tweaking, and it's gonna evolve a bit. You can't just sit down and come up with this amazing thing that's your thing for the rest of your life. It's probably going to stem from this thing, and it's probably gonna have similarities from this thing, but it's gonna become way clearer, way more articulate, way more powerful, way more focused with time. I'm still working on mine today. I'm still constantly improving, and reinventing, and making this thing that I'm chasing bigger. Kevin [inaudible 01:29:21] says, "Is it okay to offer SEO and Facebook ads together, or should they be separate, since SEO takes a bit to generate traffic, and FB ads can be a lot faster?" That question makes no sense, unless it's tied to the problem of your market, right? This is, we're looking at the means, and we're not looking at how it's applied to a problem to achieve an end. We're confused, we don't know what to do. But, all you have to do is, you have to look at the problem. Whatever the problem is, then the means should, one of them should be a better option to apply to that problem, and achieve the outcome. Whatever one is the best fit for the problem to achieve the outcome, that is the one you choose. Matt Wiseman says, "I just wanted to get your thoughts and suggestions on my website, text box." You already asked me this question. Gail says, "Hi, Sam. I have three different niche idea. If I choose one, but then later want to change to another, is it hurting my chance from changing my mind a time or two? For instance, as I present myself on Facebook or LinkedIn." No, it's not. There's a lot of, there's billions of people in the world, and so there's, you can use other people. You're not gonna chew through all the billions of people in the world on your first go. There will always be more opportunities to do other things for other people. Don't worry about it. You just choose one, stick to it, do it, see if it works. Don't worry about the future so much. Just focus on right now. Joshua says, "Do you think a Facebook group would be a good way to build my audience and connect with prospects, even though I'm just getting started with my niche?" Potentially. You could try it. If you really know that what the niche is and what the problem is, then you could start doing it. But, I would first focus on getting one client, to be honest. One client should be achieved before these other things, because otherwise, these other things are going to become a distraction to achieving the one client. Kevin says, yeah, I already answered your questions. Same with Danny's. John Max says, "What's your current scaling strategy with Facebook ads?" We teach some of it in Accelerator in the Facebook week about scaling. But, if you want to see the full noise of what we do on Facebook, then go and look at Uplevel. Uplevel Consulting, you can learn more about it in week seven. That's where I teach the unleashed methods that we use to spend and make millions of dollars. Accelerator teaches a lot about Facebook, but Uplevel is the next level of everything. Roman says, "Sam, I've been selling" ... I think I've read this one. Yeah. Yep, I answered your question. Keith as well. Iona says, "Hi, Sam. I've got a niche, and it's single parents, and I will be helping them master their emotions. I've joined a Facebook group for single parents, and I can see plenty of things that I can help with. I'm just finding it hard to specify a message. Is it mastering your emotions and gaining confidence, what do you think?" PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:33:04] Sam: I'm interested in how you came up with this niche. You probably have experience with it, I would guess, because otherwise someone just doesn't pick this. So if you've got experience with doing it, then if you've found that mastering your emotions and really doing that helped you a lot and now you're also seeing signs of this existing in other people in these Facebook groups, then there's probably evidence there that this thing exists. And your message is probably as good as it needs to be right now to start reaching out to the first few people. And I would start doing it now. Start messaging people, adding them as friends, and talking to them and telling them what your message is and seeing if they're interested in talking more. And taking action and actually doing it, your message will evolve and get better. No message gets good without action. You don't just sit down and come up with a great message. You come up with usually a pretty shitty one, and then through action and iteration, you get really good. Donald [Dang 01:34:22] says, "How do you get over the fact that you feel you are insufficient to pursue consulting in a niche you're passionate about? I've been trying to figure out e-commerce through trial and error, and I can't figure out how to scale products. Would I make an offer around consulting, around getting start up e-commerce store owners their first few sales or wait until I can figure out how scale before I consider consulting? Also, regarding your Facebook ads ... " I'll answer the one question first. I would say you need to first figure out how to crack this thing and then that will ... Good things are hard to crack. You got to understand that. Becoming a master at something is hard, but it's fun. That's what makes it fun. So keep grinding on this problem until you solve it, and then when you do, you'll take off. You'll start flying. So just keep at it. And regarding your Facebook ads strategy, "How do you modify for e-commerce? Since in e-commerce you are testing many different products, it can be tough as there are many variables to consider. 'Is the product wanted? Is my targeting wrong?' How do you reduce the variables in this case?" Yeah, so it comes back to the basic principles. What is the niche? What is the problem? Does this product solve this problem in any way, shape, or form? If those are true, then you could look, "Is this product selling in other places to this niche?" If it is, now we've really eliminated a lot of variables, but if you're blindly picking products and then blindly marketing them on Facebook, then that is pretty much bound to fail. Everything derives from a problem. You want to start there and then work forward. Kevin [Statom 01:36:33] says, "When doing Facebook ads for other businesses, do you recommend having the credit card on file with Facebook for the ad spend or them paying me the ad spend upfront and using my credit card?" I recommend you create them an ad account and you're business manager. I would even share that account with them so they can see what you're doing, and then I would get them to load their credit card on to that account. Now you're using an account that is theirs. They can see what you're doing, and it's billing their card and they're just paying you for the management. That's what I would do. [Amara 01:37:09] Castillo says, "Hi, Sam. I love your program. I just wanted to say I'm learning so much." That's good to hear. "I picked my niches today. Now I'm thinking to do it two languages. Is it a good idea?" Probably best to do it in one first. So just do it in one. One language lasts a long time. I'm still on English. Still going to be on English for a while. I plan to do all of them, but right now, still trying to get English under control. Make it simple. Remove the variables. Arthur says, "Hey, Sam. What are some ways I can really hook people in at the start of my value video?" By really understanding the niche, what their problem is, and what their desired situation is, and speaking to them in a visceral way that really gets their attention and they're like, "Shit, how does this guy know everything about me?" That's how. Joseph Phillips says, "Hi, Sam. I help divorced men recover their wealth at 20, 30, even 40% per year with private investment tactics they control. I wonder if I'm hurting my growth by focusing just on divorced men. One in five men are divorced in the US. That's 30.36 million men. I currently average one client every 10 days." I don't know why you'd limit it to men because what you're doing is investing this money for people who are divorced, so really there's no need for it just to be men. The investments you pick don't differ if the person is a man or a woman. Nothing you really do differs if it's a man or a woman, so I would do it for everyone. Grace says, "Do you have that publisher's info, Sam? I'm a published author looking for a new publisher. You never know unless you ask. I'm just doing it." I guess what your question means is do I have that publisher's info who asked me the question about it. Yes. I just forget. It's Debbie was the name, I'm pretty sure. Debbie, if you're still on, message Grace Dayton, or Grace Dayton, you can search for Debbie or you can look earlier up in these questions that people ask. After this video, this will be recorded and you can scroll through the questions, find the person who asked that question, and then message them. [Javad 01:39:42] says, "Hi, Sam. How's it going?" [Javad 01:39:45] Monica. Great answer. [Hakhan 01:39:47] says, "Hey, Sam. I just enrolled in the program, and I love it. I see that there are mostly seven videos every week. Do you recommend watching one every day and reflect on that video in the rest of the day or just watch as many as possible when you have time? Got so eager I watched four vids on the first week today." Just go at a pace that you are comfortable at. Just make sure that you do the action items because you don't just want to chew through the videos and skip over the worksheets. If you can watch the video in full and do the worksheets, then you can move as fast as you want. Just don't skip the worksheets and the action items. [Javad 01:40:27] says, "Nice program. I'm almost at finding my niche." Nice work. [Antee 01:40:32] says, "Cheers, Sam, from Finland." How's it going, [Antee 01:40:37]? [Antee 01:40:37]? Sorry if I say some of these names wrong. Allison says, "Sam, for the past four years I've been in a fairly comfortable position where my husband's income covered all of our expenses. I didn't actually have to make money and could simply focus on the children. Due to a couple of recent developments, that's about to change, and the financial pressure is on. While I know that the pressure can be great to push us into action, I'm sliding into panic mode, which actually paralyzes me. Any advice?" Well, I mean you just have to just not panic. It's not the pressure that's making you panic. The pressure is the stimulus. You're making a choice to panic. That's the reality of it. So you just have to make a different choice. Don't panic. Use it as fuel. Use it as energy. And it's probably a good thing, to be honest. I really like being in those scenarios because I can tell you when everything's just coasting, it's not very fun. It's not very challenging. Challenges are good. [Antee 01:41:53] says, "What's your opinion on the best combo for automated webinars, ClickFunnels or WebinarJam or Infusionsoft or similar?" Well, I mean you're going to need a combination of all of these things. So you need the landing page software, which is probably ClickFunnels. Then you need a automated webinar software, which is going to be not WebinarJam, but it's called EverWebinar, and then you need some marketing automation software to tie it all together. You can use either ActiveCampaign or Infusionsoft. You need a combination of those three things, landing page software, webinar software, marketing automation software. [Bongunny 01:42:30] says, "I'm currently working on understanding the needs of elementary and high school principals. Do you think that government organizations, in this case schools, are worth going for? I don't know if they will have the money and the permission to spend it. Still working on understanding the discretion they have in spending." Well, I would say find the answer and then decide. I don't know the answer. You don't know the answer. So we shouldn't try to decide right now. We should try to get the answer, and you can get that. Just call up a principal, and be like, "Hello. I'm thinking about helping schools solve big problems. If I was to help a school solve a big problem, would they have the permission to pull the trigger on it and buy?" They'll be like, "Oh, yeah, easy, if it's what I want," or they'll be like, "Nah, it's going to suck." It can be solved really quick. Just call them up. You're not calling the president. You're just calling a school principal. Don't get intimidated by it. Clarice [Starling 01:43:38] says, "Can we meet? I am in New York." Well, if you get to six figures and there's a high chance of that happening because I'm going to do some customers meetups. So do the work, get results, and then you will most probably be able to meet up, but make sure you do the work. Alexia says, "How do I create a follow-up sequence for prospects who I have already had a discovery call?" Okay. "Usually they aren't ready for me yet, and I want to keep in touch with them." So you will. Your retargeting will be in touch with them, and if they opted in for your emails and you're going to be sending an email once every week or something like that, those emails will be in touch with them. You'll be in touch with them without you having to really force it. It'll happen. Retargeting will do a lot of it. But your main focus, Alexia, should be new clients not ones that didn't buy. You're more likely to close a new, fresh prospect who's never heard of you then you are to convert someone who said they didn't want to buy from you. Lucia [Allego 01:44:54] from Lima, Peru. "I'm a certified ontological coach. What do you think about this niche?" I don't even know what that is. I'm going to have to Google it. Ontological. What is that? "Relating to the branch of metaphysics dealing with the nature of being. Showing the relations between the concepts and categories in a subject area or domain." Got it. Now, what is your question? What do I think about that niche? I don't know much about it. I just found out what it meant. "I help people to get to know themselves better so as to achieve their goals through a coaching program." That's not really your niche. Your niche is helping people get to know themselves better. There's a few questions coming into my mind right now. One is, "Do you actually have a client?" Two is, "What is their problem?" Because do these people wake up every morning going, "Man, I don't know myself, and it sucks," or is it showing up in other ways like through being in a job they hate and all of these other things? It sounds to me like you need to focus on the person and their problem and how that relates to reality and what a solution would look like for that instead of getting caught up in that ontological coach thing. I would say right now you really like the ontological coach thing, but you need to forget about that for a moment and think about the customer of yours and what their problem is in reality and how you can help them solve that. Forget about the thing that you help them with. I mean forget about the things you do and that you know about and that you're passionate about. Just focus on the customer and their problem. That makes things clear every time. Austin Lacey says, "Just curious why you sold your SnapInspect software business, and do you still think SaaS is a good business model and recommend it? Seems like a great passive stream, so just wondering why you don't do it anymore." I sold SnapInspect because I was way more passionate about this, helping consultants start and get clients and grow, and I was making more money with this than with SnapInspect and I was more passionate about it. So it was a no-brainer. SnapInspect was a great company, and it made money, and it still exists today, but I wasn't passionate about the niche. I definitely didn't wake up and start and just have property managers on my mind. I really wasn't intrigued by them at all, and so I was able to identify a problem they had and solve it and create a successful business but I wasn't passionate and driven by it, so sold it. One thing I can tell is that there's really no such thing as a passive stream, especially when it comes from a company, because a company is anything but passive. You have to put so much effort and attention into a company that it is not passive. People who say that they've got five companies and these passive income streams, they delusional. They have five very non-passive income streams that they could probably do way better with one. It's best to have one focus, one company, and grow that thing than it is to have all of these different companies. Pedro says, "Hey, Sam, when I put my message out to my market I usually put it out in public. It angers a lot of people in my niche because my offer seems to get them results too quickly. Should I play it down so I should gain more trust rather than ambivalence or is getting these reactions a good thing since they strike a nerve?" I honestly don't know because I don't know what your niche is. This is what could be happening. If these results are really happening for everyone all the time, really fast, then you should keep doing it, absolutely keep aggravating the market, but if you're talking about a few fluke scenarios and then not what happens for most people, then that can upset some people because it's a bit misleading, you know what I mean? So it depends. If it absolutely can be achieved and it has a lot of times then don't care what people say. Just say it because it's true, but be careful not to present things with too much sugarcoating on them because that happens a lot, especially in the online course and training market. People say that, "Oh, you can make lots of money without doing anything and just lying on the beach," and that pisses people off because they know that's not true. It's fine to say to people, "You can make a lot of money," but you have to tell them they're going to have to do a lot of work and then it's fine, but you just got to be honest with them. Keith [Kruger 01:50:23] says, "Sam, thanks for answer my question about my niche. I help overwhelmed CEOs suffering from ... Do you think FB ads will work with this niche or would LinkedIn be better?" I think LinkedIn will be the best start because you can do direct outreach on LinkedIn. Perfect. You're going to be able to search for it. CEO is the job title, find them, direct message them, great. Facebook ads will probably work well for the paid method. So I'd start with LinkedIn direct outreach using it organically. Then once you've maxed that out, use Facebook ads to go into the paid realm. Rosita says, "You are so inspiring. Thank you. You are a therapy for sometimes creeping self-doubt." Cool. Thanks. Glad I helped you. Debra says, "I don't think you saw this question. How do I transition on the strategy session call from discussing my offer and shutting up to getting them to discuss pricing if their response is, "Oh, that sounds good," or, "I like that. First, how much does it cost?" So you've got to try this out. If they say, "Oh, that sounds good," don't say anything back. Just be quiet and watch what happens, and they'll probably say, "All right. So what's next?" Then to that, I would say, "What do you mean," because they're trying to get me to talk about it, but I'm going to make them talk about it. So they'll be like, "Oh, that sounds good," and they're waiting for me to then fill in after that, but I won't. So then I'll just leave it awkward, quiet. Then they'll get awkward, and they'll break, and they'll be like, "Okay, so what's next?" They're expecting me to say something. At that point, I wouldn't be silent. I'd say, "What do you mean?" Then I'd put it back on them, and they're going to go, "Oh, what's next?" I was like, "Yeah, what do you mean?" They'll be like, "Okay, what's the price?" I'd say, "Oh, okay. Well, the price is da-da-da." You got to have the confidence to test it. Who cares if one of these things goes real awkward and really wrong. It's one of them. Test being quiet and just making the person uncomfortable. Test the pressure because sometimes the pressure's pretty intense. Sometimes you got to pause the phone just because you might feel like screaming or something because the pressure's so intense in the silence. I don't mean pause the phone. Mute the phone, I mean. Darren says, "Hi, Sam. What would you recommend to do if you get a client within the first couple of weeks when we haven't learned Facebook ads? Outsource?" Sure, yeah. Outsource or learn it, learn it on the job. Get the client, and then jump to week five and start reading, going through the content, and applying it for your client at the same time, or outsource. Either option works. Ila Rubel says, "Sam, I'm an artist. Just curious. What's the value of the painting set behind you?" What is the value of the painting? I don't know what you mean unless you mean the price. Speaker 1: No, she's meaning what's the problem- Sam: Oh, what's the value? Speaker 1: No, what's the problem art is solving? Sam: Okay, yeah, well, if you're trying to figure that one out, if you're an artist, what problem is art solving for a human, that's a hard one to figure out. I was trying to figure that one out myself. In one sense, you've got a room or a wall or a space that someone wants to look nice and feel nice and that, and so the value is making a room look and feel nice and appealing. In another sense, I think people buy art because they want to express themselves. So it's a form of self-expression through individual things that they like and they think is them. It's quite hard because we're not dealing in really, really simple things like, "Oh, this person is not making money in their business and they're not getting clients and value is getting them clients." It's a little bit more abstract, but it's still has a problem, solution thing that provides value. Then in terms of artists, there's this one thing that interested me. This hedge fund manager bought this dog that it looks like a balloon dog toy, but it's- Speaker 1: Jeff Koons. Sam: Yeah, Jeff Cootes or something. Speaker 1: Koons. Sam: Koons. He spent $54 million on it. So what problem is he solving there? Does he want to make a room look nice? Probably not. Probably what's going on there is I would say that he wants to show that he has a ridiculous amount of money to other people so he can feel superior. That would probably be the problem that that's solving for him. So he has a need, the guy who purchased that $50 million toy, has a need to look superior to others and that thing solved it. So no matter what way you look at it, there's always this problem, solution value thing existing everywhere, even in things that look like totally irrational purchases. This thing is always there. It's just harder to find and articulate with art. All right, well, it's almost 5:00. It's 4:58. I do these things every Saturday, and we go for two hours, from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm Eastern time. I'm going to do a few more questions. I'll do three more questions, but if I don't answer your question, it means that you got on here too late and you asked your question too late, and if you want me to answer it next time, get on here on time. Some people on this call today honestly had the opportunity to ask a question. I would say they asked at least 10 different questions. So if you get here on time, you have more than enough opportunity to ask your question. You can ask multiple questions. Let's do this. Tanya. "Hi, Sam. I want to get your opinion on my minimum viable offer. I help technology industry managers in HR decrease turnover by implementing a people analytics system." I think you've got to start with the problem. What is the problem? If it's people turnover, what is the root cause of turning over lots of people? Is it really that they don't have a people analytics system, or is that the company's culture sucks and they don't look after their people? I would say it's more likely to be that than the technology system they've got tracking the people. I could be wrong, but I've seen this sort of question asked a lot of times. Quite often, software isn't the root cause of these human-related issues. It's that there's a deep, rotten part of the business that's making people leave, and that needs to be solved. A technology system can't put a Band-Aid on a broken leg, you know what I mean? So I would drill into that problem and find out what the root cause of it is and you might be able to solve it way easier than implementing some analytics system. You need to drill into the problem. Know the market, drill. Darren [Kingston 01:58:23] says, "Hi, Sam. What would you recommend if there's a possibility to secure a client even if you are just on the niche research phase. I don't know enough on how to help, but I have someone that has interest." Well, if they want to be your client, I wouldn't say no. I'd just say, "Sure. What do you want me to do for you?" And they'll tell you, and then if you think you can do that or learn how to do that, then take it. Sounds fine. I mean I wouldn't put off getting a client just so I can go through the steps because you can learn with a first client. Getting a first client is a big milestone in and of itself. Even if you end up doing something in a totally different niche, even if it's totally different than what you end up doing later, getting your first client is still a really valuable experience, so I'd just take it. Last question from [Keshan 01:59:17] Pattel. "Hi, Sam. I'm definitely a generalist and a do-it-for-you person. I've just started investigating outsourcing to leverage time and make time to search for work. Question, what are the few things you consider when looking to outsource partial work for a job and project?" I think outsourcing ... you got to, first of all, define who your niche is because you're asking me and mine's a little bit different because I have a team of 50 people, so it might be a bit different, all right? I think people who find a lot of value in outsourcing are smaller businesses where they don't want to have an office and lots of in-person people. So I'll answer it from both positions because I've been in both. Back when I was a small business, I was looking to outsource all the major functions like Facebook ads or coding or websites and then also admin-related tasks. Those things I wanted to outsource, but then when we got really good, we wanted to bring those things in-house and we don't want to outsource really anything. I mean the things we outsource now is the manufacturing of the box set that we ship to you because we don't want to have that as a core competence. I would say really the business owner wants to outsource all of the things that they don't consider a core competence for their business, all right? So anything that isn't the main thing that they do should really be outsourced. I would talk to lots of business owners of different sizes and ask them the same question and figure it out because I might not represent the market. You've got to talk to lots of them to see. All right. So that's it for this call. We went for two hours. It's 5:00 now, so thanks, everyone, for attending, and if you didn't get your question answered, make sure you get here at 3:00 pm next Saturday and you'll have time to ask lots of questions. This recording will be posted in the Facebook group pretty much immediately after I end this call. So thanks, everyone, for attending. Make sure you put it in your calendar now, Saturday, 3:00 pm Eastern time, New York. This call's happening again. If you liked this call, just click that like button. Let me know. Let me know if you enjoyed it, and thanks, everyone. We'll be speaking next weekend, and then Nick Hauser and Jesse will be doing the Q&A calls on the normal days as well. Have a good weekend. PART 4 OF 4 ENDS [02:02:10]

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