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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 7th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 7th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for July 7th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: All right, what's going on? I can see we got one person on right now. Nafis, how's it going? Nafis, if you can just let me know if you've got audio, video working, if you can see me and hear me speaking just so I know that we're good. Social [inaudible 00:00:51] here, All right. Video and audio is good. Perfect. Well, welcome everybody. If it's your first time on one of these live streams, I'll tell you how they work. So I do one of these every week on a Saturday from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM and that's eastern time, which is the time in New York. And I do these pretty much every single week and how they basically go is we just do Q & A. So if you've got a question you can just type your question in the comment box to the right hand side and then go through and answer these questions in the order that they come in. So let's go ahead and get started here. I can see Nafis is, "Can you give any tips or resources for the transcendental meditation that you do? Never done it before." I don't do the transcendental meditation. I just do a very simple one. I think meditation is supposed to be doing nothing. So I don't try to complicate it. I don't try and use a special pillow. I don't use a device, an app, I don't use anything because that's kind of polluting it, that's not the purpose of meditation. And so what I do is I just sit on this little chair thing first like in the morning and I closed my eyes. I breathe through my nose and then I breathe out through my nose and I just focus on my breath. The point where it's touching my nose there on the skin and I just focus on my breath. And I don't think about anything, I don't count, I just try to focus on my breath and do nothing for 20 minutes straight. That's what I do. It's very simple. It's free, you don't need anything, there's no complications. It's just that. And really what meditation is, it's the art of focused attention. So what you'll do is you'll start focusing on your breath and then very quickly you realize that you start thinking about something else and you get distracted and then you catch yourself and you're like, "Oh." And then you pull it back, pull your focus back. Then it happens again and you pull it back and then it happens again and you pull it back. But what happens with time is you get better at catching yourself when you get distracted and go on the tangents, and you get better at correcting it and pulling it back. And it's a process where I still have not done one session where I've just done no thinking for 20 minutes straight. The idea isn't not to do that. The idea is not to do that. I mean there's perfection, but it's to just practice focused attention and fighting distraction and self correcting and coming back. that training will help you throughout the day. You might have distractions all over the place, all day at work or in everyday life, and you just get better at noticing those things, not reacting to them and just staying on task. I highly recommend meditation for everyone. I think it will make you way more successful, way more money. There is no argument I can possibly think of where meditation would not help, and it's free and it's easy. So you should do it. What else we got here? I can see we've got Joshua Wister [inaudible 00:04:30] Sorry if I say any of these names wrong. Angie Kingston, Tyler [inaudible 00:04:45] says where do I buy your amazing disc mat? It was just custom made. Because I searched, I scoured the internet, I couldn't find one. What they're called is they're called disc blotters or disk pads. And back in the olden days when they used to write with fountain pens and ink and feathers with ink in them, they needed one of these pads because the ink would go through. But no one sells them anymore because they don't really serve a functional purpose, but they look pretty cool and I like them because they're more comfortable and it doesn't wear on your desk. So I just got someone to make one for me. Like my my interior designer, I just said, "Hey, can you design one of these for me and throw it together." I think it costs me like 200 bucks. So if you want one of those, just find a designer to do it. Get them to find the materials, create the design and then yeah, you can do it yourself. Joshua West overseas. Hey Sam, my niche is helping people overcome the fear of flying. I've been looking back over the sales script and have been trying to figure out a good data point I can get from a prospect, the equivalent of when asking a business prospect how much money they're making per month in the part five of the script. Would asking them to score their fear threshold out of 10 be a good option for this? Or maybe just asking if they're comfortable with dealing with the fear and leaving it as it is. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks. So my niche is helping people overcome the fear of flying. I've been looking back over the script and then trying to figure out a good data point from a prospect. The equivalent of me asking the business how much money they're making per month. Okay, so this is a simple one. So the money one is just trying to get a current situation of the business. And the way we check the pulse in a business a lot of the time is through the sales, the revenue. It's one metric we can check. Now because you're not selling to a business here, you're selling to a human who has a fear of flying you don't ask the money question. It's irrelevant. But you need to gauge the current situation. So I would say, "Currently are you able to fly at all? Tell me how many times in the past year you've had to fly somewhere and you haven't, and you've either canceled the trip or you've taken other forms of transport to get there." Right? That's getting a number, a measuring point and a solid baseline of where they are now. Right? That's all you need to do. Nothing on a scale of one to 10 like we just need a measurement. [inaudible 00:07:45] for teaching coaching programs does it have to be six weeks? No, it doesn't. The length of the course should be as long as it takes to get the person a result. So if you could really get the person the desired result in two weeks, that would be better than six or eight. Right? Because people want to get things in short timeframes. But if it's impossible in two and your course is two, then that's bad. Don't think it has to be a specific number of weeks, it should just be as long as it needs to be and no more. That's it. Peter Wickstrom says how important is meditation for you to press through pain and manage stress and pressure? I think it definitely helps. Meditation definitely makes you more of an observer than a reactive person. And definitely you get good at noticing things before getting triggered. So a lot of people, they walk through life and then someone might say something and then they get offended. Most people think that if someone offends them, it's the person who was doing the offending. It's their fault. But it's actually your fault because you have to make the choice to be offended. Right? And that's you, not them. So if someone says something to me it processes with me. I don't just get offended, I chose. "Should I be offended by this or should I just not even listen to this person?" I choose not to listen. And so I just keep moving. Nothing happens and I don't get caught in all of these situations because I'm not reactive to things. But most other people, they're so reactive, they can't catch the synapse in the brain between when a stimulus gets their senses and when they react. It's just like it just happens immediately. They can't catch it right then. But when you become well trained and when you do meditation and when you're really good at focusing, you'll catch that thing and then you will choose how you respond, and you will be way better in painful situations. But practice, it's not just meditation, it's also practice. Like you get good at dealing with heavy hard situations, by going through heavy and hard situations like on ever increasing magnitudes. Right? I've also been through lots of things which are hard, struggling, working hard. That gives you thicker skin. You get stronger as you go through these things. Back in the beginning when I first started, man, I was so fragile and weak because, I just never had to go through anything. And so everything was affecting me and I was just like a bag of nerves. But over time you get better. So I definitely was not ... I was probably the worst person you've ever seen when I got started. Don't think that successful people just get started and they're awesome at everything and they're not reactive. That is not true. It takes practice and time. Jowad says, you mentioned once you'll be updating the course with the improved organic action strategy. What are the most effective organic attraction and lead generation methods right now looking for recruitment business owners on Facebook and Linkedin? Yeah. So the best way ... basically organic direct outreach is a better way to do it now, which is to use social media and Linkedin and things, instead of just using code email and direct outreach over the phone or via lumpy mail. All right, the world's moved a bit now and so the best way now is join Facebook groups where your niche is. Join those and just observe. And then on Link ... I'll cover the Facebook method first. So what is your niche? Join Facebook groups. Don't post in there, just watch and observe and learn. And then you can start adding people as friends on Facebook. And then when they accept your friend request, then you can send them a message and ask them if they have this problem and if they're interested in discussing it. And then you can do it organically that way. The things you don't want to do is post in the Facebook group because then if it's a self promoting post, the person will just ban you. Now you're out and you can't do anything. So you want to be in there and be observant and if you can add value, add value, but don't be self promotional. Whatever you do, don't do that because people will just kick you out. And then you want to naturally add people as friends, wait until they accept it, then message them, that's the way to do it. And then on Linkedin you can search for people who are in your niche by their different job titles and everything and then you can add them as connections and then when they accept your connections, you can message them on Linkedin. And you're basically messaging people, trying to have a back and forth conversation for a little bit, then trying to get on a 15 minute chat, like a phone call. Ask them some questions and then scheduling a strategy session, do the strategy session. And that's what I would be doing over email, like organic email and I'd be doing that over direct mail. I'd be doing that over everything because it's faster, it's easier, it's more personal. James Protesis, what are some of the things that you cover in art before, other than making an online program? Yeah, well the main thing we cover is how to move from done for you in 101 to having a training program. That's the main shift that happens there. But on top of that, I mean, I also show how to scale up, so how to run different funnels. So in accelerator we cover the most simple funnel, which is the fragmentation funnel which has the value video in it. We do that because it's the easiest, lowest tech, lowest time investment, easiest, most simple funnel that I've seen. In up level we covered the JIT webinar funnel, which is an automated, just in time Webinar. It's a bit harder to make, it involves some tech and things, but it works better. It gets higher quality strategy sessions and we also cover the 2K automated funnel. It's the funnel that I use to sell consulting accelerator without any phone call or anything. So we cover all of those funnels other than just the one we do in Accelerator. I also cover how to do Facebook ads at another level, so how to use lookalikes, how to do all of that and to run Facebook ads that sell a course instead of just consulting services. The strategy sessions, how to do those to sell a course instead of consulting services. And then how to hire sales reps, how to hire Facebook ad manager to run your stuff for you. How to build a team instead of just being a one man band. And I'd figured mindset. So the mindset stuff we covered but on another level. Like how to develop a better mindset, a bigger thinking mindset and also how to start getting rid of all of the tasks that rob you of your time. So things like hiring a chef and hiring a cleaner, and getting rid of all these day to day things that suck a lot of time and automating all of that and really turning into an efficient machine. So our playbook is very different. It's not just selling online courses, it's a whole another shift. And you can learn more about that in week seven of Accelerator. So if you're on accelerator, you can go to week seven and you can look there and it will tell you everything you need to know about it. Peyton Wickstrom says, how important are your free days and holidays for your productivity? I find I need to take one day off a week. That's Sunday. I would like to work seven days a week, but I get worn out. The burnout does happen. It's a real thing. I've tasted not sleeping, that didn't work. There was a failure. I tasted not sleeping that much, didn't work either. And I've also tasted working seven days a week, doesn't work either. So I found that the max I could work was 12 hours a day, six days a week. So that's it. So I work from 9:00 AM in the morning until 9:00 PM at night and I get eight hours sleep every night. I go to bed at like 10:00 o'clock and I'm asleep by 11 and then I wake up at 7:00 in the morning and then I go to the gym and everything, workout, meditate and then start work at 9:00 and work until 9:00 and that's how it works. And six days a week. So I work Monday to Saturday and then I take Sunday off. Sunday I don't do any work, don't even check emails, nothing. And that's really good to rest and recover. So on Monday I come back to work feeling refreshed, but it's also important so I can spend good quality time with my wife as well. So that is what I've found. I wanted to find that limit, how far could I push myself to the point where anything past that I can keep working, but it just, I might as well not be working. And that's what I found, 12 hours a day, six days a week. And that one day off is important. Eight hours sleep a night. That's important. Miguel says, thanks for the meditation explanation. I've been using apps, but I'll start trying the method you laid out. Yeah. Honestly, if you can do something without an app, it's better. But I have like no apps on my phone and I have got barely any software on my computer. I'm a minimalist. Now, you do need tools for things, but meditation is not one of those things. Meditation, you can do without anything. Brandon says. Sam, if you were mentoring someone beneath you, what books would you have them read? I bought all the books you recommend from youtube videos and from the accelerator. So first and foremost, I would tell you to go through this entire program, one video at a time in order. Watch everything in full and do the entire thing. Until you do that, I wouldn't recommend reading any books because you should do this first. Once you've done that, make sure you implement it because by implementing it, you will get results and learn more than you will from any book. Right? Action in the real world will teach you more than books. So until you have done that, focus on that, don't worry about books. But once you've done that and you're taking action and everything, then that's your main focus. Then your second focus should be books, but sometimes you won't even have time for books. Right? So taking action in my business takes priority over books. So sometimes I don't read anything because I just need to do this thing and that's it. That's very important. You don't want to be sacrificing taking action and doing the course just to read a book. That's silly. You've got to prioritize. But my favorite books of all time would be ... It changes all the time because I read different books. But as of right now, my number one book of all time would be probably Principles by, what's his name? Ray Dalio. Principles by Ray Dalio. And then the number two one would probably be Made in America by Sam Walton. What's a third one that's really good? Just trying to think. I'll give you three. I know I wrote them down recently because I'm making my team read them right now. Principles by Ray Dalio, and then what else have we got? I mean The Amazon letters to shareholders. It's not a book, but you have to read those. From 1997 all the way until now. Every year, every word you have to read those. It's not a book, but it's the best story you'll ever read. What else would I recommend people read? Then probably just Psycho-Cybernetics, like a mindset book. So you've got two books there. Principles which will teach you really plain thinking and also it's coming from a billionaire. So you're learning principles learned over a lifetime of a billionaire. That's going to be good information. Same with Made in America by Sam Walton. Principles learned over the lifetime of a billionaire. And in the third one is Psycho-Cybernetics. You're learning principles learned over a lifetime from someone who devoted their life to studying the mind and psychology and self image. So those three books, they're highly recommended. Then Rick Romano, Hi Sam, heard you say accountants need funnels and Facebook ads. I like this idea. Are there other niches you'd suggest that need that as well? I don't know if I said that. I don't know if I actually said that, but what accountants need most of all is to learn how to sell and to learn how their offers to people help them achieve a result instead of just being the technical application of the accountant's skill. They need to learn how to price their things on outcomes and value instead of time, and they need to learn how to sell to business owners by showing them how they can provide value other than just providing them with time. That's what accountants need more than a funnel. I'm always worried whenever someone says that Facebook ads and a funnel can fix something, because most of the time it can't. The problems that I see businesses have, they're deep rooted fundamental flaws. They're not things like ads and funnels. They're like its value for the customer and communicating that clearly. So first of all, I just wanted to clear that up. But then are there other niches that you would suggest that need that as well? We're looking at things the wrong way. We're looking at funnels and ads and what's a niche that needs that, so that we can give it to them? Wrong way to look. You're starting with the thing and then finding a place to apply it in the market. You want to start from the market, identify the market, find the person or the persons, talk to them, find out what their problem is, and then find out what a solution to their problem is, and then offer that solution to them. You have to start this process from the customer or the person in the market and the niche. You can't start the process from you and you can't start the process from the thing you want to provide. It doesn't work. It'll become convoluted and you'll mess it up. It has to start from the customer. Very important. Peter Wickstrom says, when doing direct outreach via email or Facebook chat, how do I get them to sign up on a strategy call rather than just chatting on Facebook chat or email? How do I move them over to the website and to book a call with me? So when doing direct outreach via email or Facebook chat, how do I get them to sign up on a strategy call rather than just chatting on Facebook chat or email? Yes, you just ask him. You're like, "Hey, I was just wondering if I could talk to you on the phone for like 20, 30 minutes. Would this time ..." You know, it's best if you suggest the time, "Would this time on this day work for you?" And then they'll say either yes or no, and if they say no, they'll probably recommend a time that does. Just ask, that's the best way. You don't want to move them over to your website from a conversation. If you're having a conversation with someone by email or chat and then you point them to your site, that's not going to work. You want to just move it. You want to book it in on their conversation then get on the phone with them. Rick says, does this course teach how to do the funnels and Facebook ads or only Facebook ads? If it doesn't teach the funnels, who would you recommend learning from? So first of all, Rick, I would recommend getting funnels and Facebook ads off of your mind because that isn't what creates value. That isn't what's going to make you a lot of money. That isn't what's going to help a lot of people. I know they are hot topics and they're things that people want to just obsess about and there'll be a time and place where you can do that, but first and foremost you have to find out who your niche is, what their problem is, and then you need to offer the solution to their problem and iterate it until it's perfect. And then once value is created there, then Facebook ads helps you blow that thing up, but until that thing exists, Facebook ads does nothing. And to answer your question, this course teaches you how to do it. Both funnels and Facebook ads. You get both. Judy says, Sam, this is about Facebook ad management. How do I keep providing value every month so that the client won't stop the retainer after three or six months? So from reading your question, it is very clear to me that you have not run Facebook ads for someone either, otherwise you wouldn't ask this question. A lot of people when they start, they think that there are things in the world that just are done once and they don't even need to be done again. But there is nothing in the world like that. If you get Facebook ads working for someone, you just did not just going to continue working by themselves forever. No. Now that you have to continue to work and the job to get them to continue to work is just as hard as it is to get them to work in the first place. So they needs it. If the person, if the business owner just stopped paying you, the ads would stop working, the customers would stop coming in. It's an ongoing thing and pretty much everything in business is. Nothing is a one off fix. Everything is continuous and it needs servicing and updating all the time. Because the world and the environment's always changing and you've got to ... There has to be some person observing it and monitoring it and making tweaks to make sure it stays operational. Jowad says, can I ask my prospect straight up, what is the most painful problem in their business right now on the strategy session? Yes you could, uh, but I mean then strategy session is really where you're coming on to try and sell them something. So you probably want to have already done your research, talk to people and find out what their problem is, before trying to do it on the call. However, you will continue to learn lots of information and continue to tweak and optimize your offer and your messaging after you've done your initial research. Your initial research and talking to people will form the basis of your business. But then once you start doing strategy sessions, you continue to learn and then you'll continue to iterate and tweak. Joshua [inaudible 00:27:44]. Hey, Sam? For my niche, fear of flying. I'm adding 40 to 45 people everyday on Facebook who have this problem. I'm currently getting no more than five to 10 of those people to accept. I have public content based around my niche, which gets great engagement, but I am struggling to raise these numbers so I can listen to more people. Do you have any tips on how I can improve this or what I might be doing wrong? Yeah, I would just look at the people who are accepting, right? Okay. Everyone who you've added and who is accepted, and then look at everyone who you've added and hasn't accepted. And then try to discern the difference between those two. What clusters these people together? What unique attributes that identifies these? What unique attributes identifies these?? What is the difference? There won't be one. Then you will understand it and then you can add more of the people that have those attributes, who are likely to accept, and less of the people who have those attributes who are likely to not accept. You need to just learn and optimize. You need to turn it into a learning machine. Look at these things. Study them, make tweaks, right? Rick says, I'm only in week one. Where would I find people to ask them questions so I can find out what they need? That's a good question. So we need to find out, first of all ... I mean people are everywhere, right? So you see where would I find people? Everywhere. You need a specific type of person. So like you need a niche. So let's say you want to focus on, I don't know, I'm going to make this up. Don't think that this is a good niche. But let's say it's Yoga instructors or yoga studio owners. You could choose that. Now who are you going to talk to? Yoga Studio owners? How are you going to find them? The Internet, social media. Now you found them. Now you can make a little list. Now, you can message them add them on Facebook and Linkedin and whatnot and start talking to them. That's how you do it. But first of all you need to pick some form of niche. Then you need to find the people. Then you need to talk to them and ask them. Rick sees how much money's spent on ads. Do you think it takes people to get their first client from Facebook ads? Well, you don't get ... I just want to make this real clear. Facebook ads doesn't make clients. What makes you get a client is by identifying a niche, finding out what their problem is, and then offering a solution to their problem that adds value, that they're happy to pay you for. If you do that, you don't even need it and you'll be getting clients and making money and then when you use it, you will make a shitload of money. But if you don't do that, you won't make money and then when you use it, you still won't make money. I need to make that very clear. Most of business is getting the fundamentals right not ads. And a lot of people, they wonder how I'm able to spend so much money on ads and scale my business to the numbers that it makes, and they think I'm really good at ads and I am. PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:31:04] Sam: And they think I'm really good at ads, and I am good at them, but honestly, it's not just ads. If I was selling a product that was shit or if I was selling something that didn't really solve a problem in the world, then I would not make any money. Most of the money I make comes from really solving a problem, solving it well, and solving it better than someone else. And having a lot of proof in case studies and stuff built around that. That's what makes me most of my money. Not the ads. Gotta understand that. Then the ads are just like jet fuel, right? The ads just blows the shit up, but the fundamentals have to be there. And then if you get that right, like you'll already have a client without ads. It'll happen organically. Then it'll work for you in its first week when you put it off Facebook. Getting ads to work ... It's not getting ads to work. It's having a good offer and then using ads. You can't run ads for something that sucks and make it work. It just won't work. Kim Rico says, "Hi, Sam. How's it going?" [inaudible 00:32:15] says, "Hey, Sam. Thank you for taking the time to invest in your people. I have changed my niche to wealth management and over the past year, I've been building skills in this area because of certifications and courses. The barrier to entry in this niche is higher. Do you have any advice for being successful in the wealth management sector, consulting high net worth individuals?" Yes. Same advice when dealing with any human anywhere it the world in any niche is to talk to them, find out what their problem is, find out what stuff in their life sucks. Find out what stuff they hate. Find that thing that is just pestering them all the time that they wish they could change. Identify that thing, then come up with a solution to that thing, and then offer that solution to them, and at a price, sell it to them, and then you have a business. Just like that. That's it. It doesn't matter who the person is. Doesn't matter about anything. That's just what humans do. They have problems and then they pay money for people to solve those problems, or things to solve those problems. That's all it is. Don't think that because you're in the wealth management sector that things are going to be any different. They're not. It's the same. Peter Wickstrom says, "Now when I have to set up my website on coaching introvert entrepreneurs, some part of me just wants to move over to doing marketing since it seems easier. Is that a common thought when starting the outreach?" Yeah. I mean, honestly, then when you start setting up your website for marketing and you start doing marketing, you're going to start thinking that you want to do the coaching for introvert entrepreneurs. You've got this thing which is like the grass is always greener on the other side, but it's not. The grass is greener where you water it, so understand that you're getting distracted right now because the pressure is coming on now. Now you've got to do something. You've got to talk to people. You have to face the market, and now your brain is going, I don't want to do this. This looks like something that could make me uncomfortable. What can I do that isn't this? And now, you want to switch. Don't switch. Push through it. It's just your brain playing tricks on you. It's not real. Give it a go first. [inaudible 00:34:41] says, "Sam, thank you for taking the time to answer our questions. My question is about my niche. I'm targeting small engineering software companies with revenue up to 3 million dollars per year selling to auto manufacturing companies. Their pain point is to increase revenue and keep it. Should I expand my niche to other software areas to increase my target market?" You're targeting software engineering companies with revenue up to 3 mil. Selling to auto manufacturing companies. Okay. There's no need to expand right now. I would just get some clients. Get as many clients as you can in that specific field, and then once you find yourself facing the limits of that field, then you might want to expand. But until you meet those limits and you are finding the top of that market, don't worry about it. Keep it small. You can always make your market broader, but you should start with the narrow market. All right? People get this one wrong. They think, I should start with this huge market, because then that means that I can make a lot of money, but then they have no focus. They can't get attention so they don't give a start. It's best to start with a small sliver and then start widening it up. Brent Justice says, "Hey, Sam. Thanks for your amazing course. Question, do you have a difference in video based FB ads over single image in Carousel? What's your favorite?" I can tell you after spending, like, 5 million dollars on ads or something over a course of probably four or five years, that our image and text ads still work the best. So, the image and then the text, long copy, they work the best. Hands down. Better than video. Better than Instagram ads, better than Carousel ads, better than every different damn type of ad that exists. Those work the best. Even today, I would say 90 percent of our spend is on those image text ads, and only like, a small little bit is on video and other things because my team just likes experimenting with things, but image text ... That does it. Zachary says, "Sam, one week into your and I'm extremely impressed." Thanks, Zachary. [inaudible 00:37:10] says, "How do I come up with ideas for email sequence content and email marketing content for a physical product?" It's very simple. You just go back to the problem, honestly. I've repeated this for five years, but it still hasn't driven into people's brains. A product is not what we're really selling. We're selling an outcome that a product is a tool to achieve. I look at the product. I'm supposed to write some copy about it. All right. Who uses this? Who is the person? Why do they care about this product? What problem does it solve for them? Understand the person, the market, then the problem, and how they use it to achieve an outcome and get a result. When I understand that, I can write all sorts of stuff, because you're talking to people about problems and solving them ... Stories about how people have used them in these ways to solve problems in these ways ... And then you might share case studies of people who had this problem that used this tool and then got this outcome, and then different misconceptions people have about this problem and how to solve it. It's the same shit just again and again and again. It's so simple, but people over complicate it. Peter Braun says, "I have problems to stay focused and get easily distracted. You mentioned lately that you use binaural beats. Can you tell us which product you can recommend?" So, they're free, man. I don't use any website for it. I don't use any special software. I don't pay any money for it. I just go to YouTube, I search for binaural beats, and I find a random one and I click on it. I'm like, do I like this? Yes. All right. Cool. Done. Start working. If I don't like it, I'll click on another one, and I'll keep clicking on ones until I like them, but it only takes me one or two clicks to find one I like. If I really like it, I might bookmark it under binaural beats or something in a little folder, so next time I want to listen to something, I've got a collection of them I can listen to. But you don't need a software to listen to binaural beats. You just need headphones, and you go to YouTube and you play it. That's it. Kim Rico says, "I'm loving the program. My current focus for my niche is helping event space and venue owners increase their bookings with a small marketing budget. Would you recommend I narrow down my niche even further, because the audience I'm speaking to could be a person who owns a venue or it could be a hotel who has an event space." Yeah. That's fine. They all fall under the category of event space and venue owners. You're thinking, this is the category, event space and venue owners, but within this category, there are subcategories of hotel owners and then restaurant owners, or whatever, right? That's fine. There's always going to be subcategories of subcategories of subcategories. If we follow that chain down even when you get to hotels, then there's luxury hotels. Then there's big hotels, cheap hotels, motels, right? So, you just need to choose a category level that's going to be narrow enough but not too microscopically narrow, and I think you've done it by saying you help event space and venue owners. That's good enough. Dan Chung says, "Hey, Sam. What are the metrics you look at when testing a new webinar on cold Facebook traffic? I know ROI is king, but say your product is a thousand dollars. How much do you need to spend to statistically determine if it's profitable or not?" If you're selling a thousand dollar automated product using a webinar and Facebook ads, then you should definitely upgrade to up level consulting. Go to week seven, watch the videos there so you can learn about it, and then go into up level, because that's where I cover this stuff in detail. I don't really cover selling automated products on Facebook for a thousand bucks with ads in accelerator. But to answer your question anyway, I don't want to just leave you hanging on this one, how much would I have to spend before I know whether it's profitable? I'm guessing you're asking this question because you've never run ads for this product before, so you've got so many things to test here, right? If you've run it on YouTube and it's been profitable and now you want to see if you can make Facebook profitable, chances are quite high. But if you're selling something on a channel for the first time ever, it's a real thing to test because you don't know if it's the funnel, you don't know if it's the ads, the audience ... There's a lot of variables you need to balance. I would say you have a pretty good idea after spending ... If you couldn't get one customer within five thousand dollars, then you pretty much know that something is really wrong there. But if you spend one or two grand and you don't get one sale, that doesn't mean that it's not working. It means that ... Because that can happen very easily. You need to get things right. It's not a function at how much you spend, it's a function of how many variable you key through and how many different variable you test, and how well you test them, and how well you know the numbers and how good you are at testing it. That's what makes the difference. Not just the amount of money you spend. Peter says, "When setting up the website according to the course, a prospect needs to type their email three times to book a strategy session. Do you recommend it, or can I decrease it to one time?" Honestly, that's the thing we do, and it works really well. I would just stick with it. I agree, it could be better if they didn't have to do it, but your time isn't best spent engineering that. Your time is best spent just putting people through the damn funnel, you know? Because I know it works. It still continues to work. It's made people lots of money ... Some people multiple millions. Instead of focusing on that little detail, just focus on doing it, and then once you're doing it really well, then you might come back to that detail and just clean it up. But for now, just do it. Paul [inaudible 00:43:53] says, "Sam, thinking of doing two one hour sessions for my coaching and mentoring program. I help financial securities traders increase their performance by focusing on their mindset in psychology. In your experience, how would coaching sessions go for maximum effectiveness?" That is a very broad question. If you're helping financial securities traders, then you should know what their problem is and you should have some sort of familiarity with their problem, and how long it takes and how a session works. You should be the expert on that, not me, because I don't know financial securities traders in that because I haven't looked into them or anything. You should be the one that knows that, and if you don't, then you should talk to them and find out. You're never going to really learn until you start doing it, so after you've done a hundred sessions with these people, then you're going to have a feel for it and you know how to optimize it to make it more efficient. Maybe all you need to do is start and that's it. Then you'll figure it out. Bottoms Up Fitness says, "Hey, Sam. How's it going?" Brandon says, "Sam, this is a question in regards to week five and using our proven concept after getting three clients. Should we be using cold course as an organic method of gaining raw materials and begin to get those three proven clients? Secondly, if your goal was to get to 20 million in the quickest amount of time, would you use the fragmentation funnel? Your course is so damn long and there are so many parts that it has been six months and I'm still going through the damn thing to understand. I guess I'm just trying to find direction and where the hell I'm supposed to be going, because I'm caught in all of these different trends and I'm getting different opposing views. Ty Lopez says the average millionaire has seven different flows of income. Do you? Is this even true? There's just so much information that over time, it's all piling up. Sorry it sounds like I'm complaining." I totally know your situation. It's like you're listening to too many people. Turn off ... Delete social media off your phone. Delete the Facebook app. Gone. Delete Instagram. Gone. Delete Snapchat. Gone. Delete everything off your damn phone. Put your phone on airplane mode. Put it in a drawer. Delete everything off your computer. Don't go and look at Facebook. Don't look at your newsfeed. If you want to go and learn specific things from a specific group, like the Consulting Accelerator group, go to Facebook, go into the group, and then ask the question in the group. But whatever you do, don't look at your newsfeed. Your newsfeed is just full of shit, which is going to just twist your mind and distract you and pollute your brain until you don't even know what to do, which is what has happened. I never look at my newsfeed, ever, and I don't have any social media on my phone, ever, because I know that nothing can happen from looking at my newsfeed that is helpful. The only things that can happen is harm, so I don't do it. You need to do that, first and foremost. Second of all, that thing about needing seven flows of income ... It's a load of shit. You do not. You just need to get one. That's all you need to start, because once you've got money flowing through, now you're making money, right? I think it's stupid when people who have zero flows of income are worried about having seven. Just get one. I've got one, but within that one, there's different flows. We get traffic from organic. We get traffic from ads. We get traffic from all sorts of things, which makes it not so risky. But I only really have one business. Consulting.com, that's my only company, so really, I only have one real flow of income and that makes a lot of money. More money than most people with multiple flows of income. So, that's bullshit. You don't need to listen to that. Just stop listening to other people, man. You're confusing yourself. Just do the course one step at a time. Forget about Facebook ads. You need to pick a niche. What is your nice? Pick it, stick to it, now talk to that niche. What is their problem? Identify the problem. Now you have a niche and a problem. Next step, brainstorm what a solution to that problem could be. Then find it. Now, go try to sell that solution to the niche who has the problem. Do they buy it? If they do, good. That's validation. Sell it to more of them. Do we have three sales now? Good. Now, what we can do is we can start running ads to that niche and scale it up. Before long, you're making a lot of money. But just stop thinking about trying to make 20 million. Stop trying to think about what Ty is saying or how to have seven flows of income. Just focus on picking a niche, finding out what their problem is, solving that problem with a solution, and getting one client, then two clients, then three. That's it. Everything else that you could possibly do or think about or even imagine right now is waste. Just focus. Paul says ... Already answered that. [inaudible 00:49:33] says, "How do I get testimonials if I have none?" Well, you pick a niche. Then you talk to the niche. You find out what their problem is. Then, once you've identified that problem, you brainstorm about a solution. Then you try and sell that solution to that niche who has that problem, and then if they buy it, good. Then you deliver the services to them and help them solve their problem. Once you've solved their problem, you can ask for a testimonial and they should give you one. And then you do another client. They give you another one. Then another client. They give you another one. That's how you do it. Everything starts with the niche, then the problem, and then the solution, and then helping someone. That is it. I can't even tell you how many times I've repeated myself on this thing. It's just again, again, again, again. It's the only thing I'm really good at, is actually finding a niche, finding their problem, solving it, selling it to them. That's it. That's business. That's all it is, and I'm just really good at it. If you want to make a lot of money, then that's all you need to do. It's that simple. I'm not very good at social media. I didn't have an Instagram until this year, and it still ... It's not responsible for really any results at all. I'm questioning whether I should even have it. I'm not good at social media, I'm not famous, I don't speak, I don't do any events, I don't write a book, I'm not a blogger. I don't go and do all of this crap which everyone else does. I just help people solve problems. That's it. That's all you need to do. The only reason why people have forgotten this and can't seem to see it is because the world has become so damn noisy, and you have people like Ty telling you all of this stuff. Just block it all out and just focus. That's why I don't do any of that stuff, because all these voices start coming into your head. You start looking at all of these different things and then you start worrying, then you're so confused you don't even know what to do. It's always the same thing. Solve the problem. Alesandro says, "Sam, I would like to get clients for financial advisors, hedge funds, et cetera. Do I need to get a testimonial free of charge first, or can I go straight without testimonial?" It depends. If you think you can do it without the testimonial, give it a shot. Give it a crack. I think it's better to get a client and get paid for it than it is to start with a free client and then get paid on your next one. However, if you don't have the confidence to charge for your first client, or you're paralyzed with fear because you can't even talk to the first potential client, then your best course of action is to do a free one. All right? That's it. Decide on that right now. That thought process should take all of three seconds. Decide, commit, do. Jeffrey says, "Sam, realizing that we need to think about automating and moving to up level much faster than we might think. I have also switched from trying to have a lot of clients to an amount I can manage and still have time to automate my services and just raise my pricing as my strategy. Looking at my time is pivotal." Sure. Once you've got done through your clients and you're delivering results for them, it's really stupid not to go and build a course. Seriously. Because it's way more preferable to sell a course that shows people how to get a result for themselves than it is to just help someone with doing it done for you. But, here's the catch. You can't create a course, or at least any course that's going to be remotely good or sell, unless you've the done for you first. This is the catch. People are out there these days teaching anyone to create a course, even if they've never done it and have no experience doing it. All of those people that make those courses fail. None of them succeed and they wonder why, because they don't know what to put in the course, so they end up putting bullshit in the course because they never did it. The best person to teach is someone who has done it, so do it first, then teach it. That's the process. If you have been doing and you can get people results, join up level. I'll show you how to put it into a program and make you way more money with way less time. Victor says, "Hey, Sam. Good to be here. What's the hardest belief for you to break?" I don't know. I've never really thought about it. I don't have a list of hardest beliefs. What are some hard ones that I can remember? I guess some of the hard ones, for me, personally, I don't know if this is for everyone in the world, was that when you're starting out, when I was brand new, was the thought that money was really scarce. I had never seen much money, never made much money, and then even my family had never really seen much money, so I thought money was very scarce. I always believed that and behaved like it was and all of that. That took a while to change that belief. The second one was that making money and charging people and selling stuff is evil. That took me a while to break that one, too, to see that helping people solve problems is about as good as you can be to anyone. That business is actually a tool for helping people and doing good, not just trying to be greedy and make money. The people who make the most money in the world are the people that actually help the most people. They're not the people who are the most greedy and the most evil. They've actually just added the most value. Seeing that business and value and helping are all the same thing, that took a while to see. And then understanding that ... I guess just having confidence, like any form of confidence. Understanding that the fear isn't real. Understanding that it's in my head, not in theirs. Pretty much about fear and starting and money and all of that. That's why the mindset stuff is quite powerful for people who are starting out. [inaudible 00:56:34] says, "Hey, Sam. While not directly linked to your course, I would like to have your opinion on something. From your experience, what are some specific benefits that small, privately owned companies get from improved leadership? I have few ideas, but have trouble formulating them in a way that would resonate with business owners. Any ideas?" You want my opinion on what benefits ... If you're trying to do what I think you're trying to do here, which I might be wrong on, but I think that you're trying to come up with an idea for a niche in an offer that you can sell to people, and you're trying to do it by starting in your own brain by thinking that you're going to sell to small businesses, and what you're going to help them with is leadership. You're not quite sure if that's what they want or what the benefits are of that, so you're asking me and then you might be using my answer as validation that this might be the right thing to do. Could be wrong, but if that's what you're doing, don't do that. Talk to the market directly and ask them about their problems. Don't ask them what this thing would do for them. That's the wrong way to go. Start at the problem, and if the problem has nothing to do with leadership, let go of the leadership. A lot of people, they come in and they're like, I'm going to do this discovery process. I'm going to pick this niche. But instead of asking them what their problems are, I'm just going to ask them if they want this thing which I think they need. That's dumb. You are not supposed to enter the conversation with any preconceived ideas about what you think they want. Otherwise, you'll poison the well. You have to have a totally blank mind. No preconceived mind, no biases. Just find out what problem is, and then once you've identified that, then figure out how to solve. You have to do it that way. I want to make that point clear, but I'll answer your question anyway, because I might be wrong on my assumption. You said, what are some benefits that small, privately owned companies get from improved leadership? Everything. If you have a bad leader steering the ship, the ship is going to crash into a rock and sink. Even if the company is good and it's founded on good principles and it's also got a good niche that actually has a problem, and you're actually offering a solution and doing something of value, if the leader isn't good, then the whole thing will fail.Leadership is just as vital as having the fundamentals right. There has to be someone in the business that cares so much about it, as if it's like a child ... As if it's an actual living child. Because unless someone does, unless someone has that level of obsession and care, no one else will and the thing will die, so it has to have that. It's mandatory. It's not even a nice to have. It's so important. If you look at the best companies of all time, they've had leaders in them that are obsessed. Look at Amazon. Right now, it's the most successful company of all time, in the history of the world, and its CEO started it and has been CEO ever since it was started, for more than 20 years. Right? That's how important leadership is. If Bezos wasn't in Amazon, it would not be here, because he cared so much about it. He had such a vision for it, that that's what was required to help it do what it did. Leadership is everything. Hannah says, "What is the best way to phase direct LinkedIn outreach? My niche is weight loss for entrepreneurs and busy corporate workers. Do I send them to my funnel, or try to get them on a sales call? It's hard to say I help blank with weight loss without offending people." Yes, I agree. I would post in the Facebook group, in Consulting Accelerator right now, and ask this question, because I know there's people in the program that help people with weight loss and use organic methods, and they get clients and are successful with it. They will be able to give you a way better answer than I will. I know it can be done and I know they definitely do it. They might even just directly say it, you know what I mean? What I would do in your situation, number one, is I would ask in the Facebook group because people will tell you the answer, but number two is I would just try being blunt in the first place, you know what I mean? Because the way you learn is by trying something and testing it. If it backfires and people are really offended, then at least you know. You're like, oh, okay. This probably isn't the nicest way to approach it. But I would never assume that it isn't the nicest way to do it because I could be wrong. I would actually offend some people to make sure that it actually offends some people, because who knows, maybe it's a really good way to get clients. The way I'm thinking about it too, is PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [01:02:04] Sam: And the way I'm thinking about it too is sometimes the best way to help someone is to be brutally honest with them. And like if I was fat, I would want someone to come over to me and be like, "Dude, you're fat. What are you doing? Why don't you fix it?" Because what, are we supposed to just not talk about it? I mean, it's going to be better for everyone if they fix it. And the direct approach is the best. In my company, I'm very blunt with people. If I think someone's doing something stupid, I will say it and be ruthless about it, because ... And if I see someone dancing around the facts just to be nice, I hate that stuff. What's most important is the truth and making sure that we are facing the truth and making the best decisions possible with the truth. That is it. Not trying to just be nice to people. Because what's nice for people in the long term is by doing the right thing. You know what I mean? Joshua Westover says, "Hey, Sam. I have a background in music and was thinking the other day about the value that music provides to people and why they invest in it. Do you think it's still a case of music solving a problem for people and that's why they buy such as music allowing you to feel and express emotions? Or is it something else that motivates people?" Yeah, so everything has a problem solution scenario to it, even music, even art, even alcohol, everything. Right? So it just gets a bit harder to understand the problem solution, like when we get into things that are in the arts, but it's still there. So music is about people like ... It's about enjoyment. So like wanting to ... The problem might be, "I feel bored, so I want to feel good and have some pleasure, so I want to use music to do that." Or, it might be like self-expression. "I identify with these people in this group through this music, so I want to listen to this music and make it known to people that I listen to this music so that people know who I am and what I am like." And people do that a lot. That's why a lot of groups cluster, especially in schools. They cluster around different types of music. You might have some gangster people who listen to gangster music, then you might have some emo people who listen to the emo music. I don't even know if those people are still around, but I remember at school they were. And then you might have another type of people, like girls that listen to Beyonce and all of the female artists, because their hero isn't going to be a male artist, it's going to be a female one so that they feel more alike the artist. It's a thing of self-expression and identity and also pleasure. And those are solutions to problems. They're just a little bit more complex. So everything has this thing. It's just ... It's just a bit harder to see. [01:05:27] says, "How do you break someone's belief system which they've had for over 40 years, mainly around not being able to ask for money up front from clients and thinking you have to grind and hustle to make money and you cannot easily make money?" So you're asking me how do I break someone's belief system. I don't. Ultimately, the person who believes it breaks it themself. So I'm guessing you're the one with the belief system, and you're asking me how I would break yours. You break it, not me. You choose what to believe. You're just choosing to believe the one that's wrong. And you can change it right now if you want. You can choose to believe the right one, and have a better life. It's up to you. You've got to choose. I can bring it to your attention and say, "Hey, you're believing a lie." And then you see it and you're like, "Yeah, I am." But you have to make the decision. It's your choice, not mine. So you've got to decide what you want. [Jaward 01:06:34] says, "What is the toughest thing you have been through emotionally and psychologically?" I don't know. It's hard to pick exact times, but starting out was pretty hard because I was just so emotional. I couldn't call people, I was afraid of talking to people. I didn't have much confidence and I wasn't making much money. Well, I was making no money. And I had ... I was very fragile and weak and I didn't have much proof or evidence to prove other people wrong if they questioned me and all of this. So I just felt really fragile and like I wasn't going anywhere and that everyone was judging me and all of this stuff. So that was kind of hard. And then, what else was hard? And then it gets hard growing the business too. So when there's just chaos everywhere, right? And the chaos is harder to deal with than the emotional problem in the beginning. Because when you're starting a business and you've got all this stuff in your head, at least it's all in your head and it's not real. But then you start growing a business and it blows up, and then you have reality chaos. So there really is shit all over the place that you need to fix. And so it's not longer just imagined, it's there. And that's hard to deal with because it's stressful and you've got to really learn how to prioritize and you've also got to learn how to departmentalize. The better I get in business, the better I am at departmentalizing things. So like I need to focus on something here, it needs my attention, because it's the priority. But I need to be so focused on that that I won't even think about all the other stuff going wrong everywhere else, and about all these other people I'm letting down, or all these people on my team who want to talk to me about something they think's really important that I'm not listening to them about because I know that right now, this thing just needs to be done. And because what happens when you grow a business bigger is it's always chaos. There's always chaos everywhere. There's always a million people that need your help, and there's always things that people claim are urgent right now and you have to departmentalize and really just not let it get to you, and you need to be really good at dealing with it. You need to be totally happy and working on the task at hand, even though you shouldn't be, and there's all of this chaos going over here. I would say that dealing with that's harder than the start. The good news is is that you don't have to deal with that until you're making a lot of money. But I also love the second one because it's fun. That's what make you a really good businessman is when you've got to deal with so much stuff coming at you at all times, and you've got to learn how to play a million chess games, a million three-dimensional chess games all at the same time. That's kind of what it feels like. Sarah [Creesom 01:09:48] says, "The Obstacle is the Way." That's a good book. Relentless is a good book. Essentialism is a good book. So Relentless and Essentialism are my favorites too. I didn't put them in my top three, but they are in my top 10 for sure. Peter Tahoe says, "A question regarding NDAs and protecting intellectual property. Ideas can't be trademarked, so how best to protect when bringing to a potential client?" Forget about an idea being protected. The people who try to focus on protecting their ideas and their IP and stuff, they never protect it and they end up losing, because you're playing defense. You don't want to play defense. You want to play offense. So the person who wins is the person who can apply that idea the best to the most people and use it to deliver the most value to the most people the fastest. That's who wins. Not the person who just uses NDAs and tries to protect their IP. So just forget about it. If you want to use an NDA, use one, but don't think that's going to be the thing that really stops things from happening. You just need to be the best at it and apply it in the best way and help the most people. The only way to really win in business is to be the best at what you do. No legal stuff's going to protect you. If someone is better than you at doing what you do, they will get you. They will take you out and they will win, regardless of what you do to them legally. Mona [Laterach 01:11:32] says, "As an introvert, I don't want to talk." Yeah. That might be true. But I'm an introvert too, and I would prefer to just read books and just look at numbers and just write type to people. But I can't do that because I wouldn't achieve the goal I want to achieve if I did that. So I have to look at the goal I want to achieve, and then I have to look at what is necessary to do to achieve that goal. And then I have to think, "Do I want to remain in my comfort zone as an introvert that doesn't want to talk to people, but by doing so, not achieve my goal and fail? Or, do I want to get outside of my comfort zone, talk to people, go through a bit of pain, and achieve my goal?" And to me, that answer is very simple. I want my goal. More than anything. So I'll do it. So just, you've got to stop thinking, "Oh, I'm an introvert, I don't want to talk." Who cares what you want? You want ... What do you want more? To not talk to people or to get your goal? Choose that and commit to that. Allen Cohn says, "Hey, Sam. Thank you for taking the time to answer our questions. My question is about my niche. I'm tired of small engineering ..." I think I've already answered this. Yep, done it. All right, Brandon says, "Sam, what is the cap rate on the Accelerator? What is the top line and the bottom line for the Accelerator system? 5 thousand a month? 10 thousand a month? There must be a reason why you have Uplevel and the Quantum. What is your expectation of students within these three cohorts of programs? What is the money progression top and bottom line for each program? And secondly, does it even exist? Or do you see people that just take the Accelerator and crush it and become millionaires? Also, in terms of Uplevel, I applied to Uplevel and got declined because I wasn't in the Accelerator. I assume that was an error. What I'm saying is should I be in Uplevel or Accelerator? Because I'm trying to base my knowledge of the end goal." Yeah, so I mean, Accelerator is a course that shows you how to get started and how to get clients. Like pick a niche, find a problem, solve it, create an offer, price your offer, sell it to people, test it, iterate it, perfect it, and then get at least three to five clients organically, then move to Facebook ads, build a funnel, scale it up like that. And then, basically reach the point where you have exhausted the done for you and one on one model. Now, different people can do different levels there, but you can absolutely go from zero to six figures with Accelerator. And tons of people have done it. And you could probably push it to a million. But it's smarter, like once you're making money, as soon as you start making money, it's smarter to upgrade to Uplevel and then learn how to transition from done for you to courses, because then you can make way more money. So I'd say it's easy to get to six figures in Accelerator. People do it all the time. And then Uplevel is the main one that's created a lot of the millionaires, because to make millions, they often do that with programs, not done for you and one on one. So then that happens in Uplevel. And then the really hungry people who want to be the best in the world, they join Quantum. That's basically how it works. You don't need Quantum or Uplevel to get clients and make money. You only need Accelerator to do that. But if you want to make a lot and if you want to crush it and be the best, then the other programs are there to help stretch you and help take you to those other levels. And I think for you, just judging from what I know about you from this call, I think you just need to focus, man. You probably don't need Uplevel right now, you just need to pick a niche, find a problem, find a solution to that problem, sell it to them, perfect it, get clients, start making money. Once you've got at least three to five clients and you're making money, move to Uplevel. You can do that right now. Yusan Moon says, "Should I register my business and then set up credit card payment option for the phone before officially getting clients through organic methods? Should I register my business and then set up credit card payment option for the phone before officially getting clients through organic methods?" "I do not set up credit card payment ... If I do not set up the credit card, the other manual option would be receiving checks." Yeah, I would just set it up. Here's the thought process behind this. If you want to be an entrepreneur, and you're pretty committed to doing it, it's worth it to register like a business, right? It doesn't cost much money, it's very easy to do. So just do it. Cost like 100 bucks, can be done in a day. Register a business and then name it like your name. So in New Zealand, I called mine Ovens Enterprises or something. And then, the cool thing about doing it like that is the first niche you started might not be what you end up doing. But you don't need to register a different company. You can just use the same name and just have all these different businesses that you try or whatever ... Just create a company. You're going to need to do it no matter what you do. Then, create a bank account, and then ... Like a business bank account. And then, set up Stripe so you can collect credit cards. Because no matter what you do in any business, you're going to need those things. And they're pretty easy to do and they're pretty much cheap or free. So do it. And then, do it fast. And then, go and do the call so that you can accept credit cards. That's what I'd do. Magdalena says, "I don't have any experience in digital marketing or consulting, but I want to start working with digital marketing. Do you think it's a good idea to practice that during week five by setting up a Shopify store?" Yeah, I mean, you've got to decide. I think the best way to learn digital marketing is first of all to go through week five and learn all about Facebook ads. And then learn all about the funnels and stuff I teach. Set them up, build your own one. And then I would run some ads for yourself, even if it's just to turn something on and spend like five bucks. Even if you're not even doing it to try and get a customer, just to play with it. Because then you'll understand it by doing it. And I'd do that first. Then what I would do is after doing all of that, if I was comfortable with it, I would then go out and try and get some clients. Because the best way to learn is by working on client's businesses. I would do that over setting up a Shopify store because at least if you're helping a client's business with Facebook ads, you don't have to worry about the business side of things, you're just focusing on the ads. And you know a market exists there because they're in business, they're still in business, and they're getting customers, so they've got something right. And now you're just helping them with ads. But if you're doing both, if you're setting up a Shopify store and doing the ads, you don't know which variable is out. Your store might be off, your products might be off, or your ads might be off and you don't know what one. So that's why I would actually start with clients. I learned that way. Most of my good clients learned that way. I think it's the best way to learn. Joshua says, "What software do you use to record your customer interviews?" So I use ... What's it called? Skype. And then I use Skype Call Recorder, which is Ecamm. It's called like Ecamm Call Recorder. Or you can just Google, "Skype Call Recorder." I use that and Skype. Pretty simple. Nadine say, "Oh my, I didn't see this in the upcoming Q&A course in the program so I didn't think you were doing it today. Almost missed it." Yep. We probably will start putting notifications in there. We haven't started doing it yet, but I mean it's pretty simple to remember. Every Saturday, 3:00 PM. You can pretty much count on that. So if you just remember that, you're good. And you can just put a repeating thing in your calender, Saturday at 3:00 PM, it's happening. Brandon says, "Another question, Sam. You talk a lot about focus and mentioned huge names like Warren Buffet and Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, but what does it really mean? What is the DNA equation of this focus? Is it just sitting down on your ass and doing like Charlie Munger talks about? I'm not really understanding to the full point what focus is and how we develop this laser focus you keep talking about." Yeah. So focus is best understood by what it isn't. So what we can do is just look at focus and then turn it upside down. What isn't focus? Distraction. So if you're not doing distraction, then you are focusing. So that's the easiest way to understand it. Don't do distraction. And if you're not doing distraction, you're focusing. So that's the easiest way to put it. Trying to focus in distraction is harder. It's best just to eliminate distraction. So it's like deleting all the apps on your phone, stop using social media, stop listening to podcasts, stop watching YouTube videos, eliminate everything. Unsubscribe from every single list that you're on, eliminate it all. Stop listening to all of these people shouting on the internet. The only way to start a business is to pick a market, find a problem, solve that problem, deliver it to them and add value. That's it. There's some nuances around like how to do the marketing and things, but the fundamentals, that's it. That's all you need to know, so you don't need to listen to other people telling you all of this bullshit. Just focus is not listening to anyone. It's knowing that that's the only thing that matters and just doing that. So focus for you right now would be stopping listening to everything, deleting everything, and then saying to yourself, "I'm going to work from 9:00 AM in the morning till 9:00 PM at night, five or six days a week. And then only thing I'm going to do is I'm going to pick my niche right now, and then the only thing I'm going to do is talk to people in that niche and try to identify what their problems are. And I'm not going to do anything else at all unless it's that. That's the only think I'm going to do. If I'm doing anything that isn't that, then I'm being an idiot. That's focus." And I mean not even talking to your friend on the phone. Not talking to anybody. Just that. That's focus. Friend might want to meet up for lunch, someone might be in the city, someone might want to have dinner, parents might want to talk to you, someone wants to do something, house might need cleaning, you might want to get a haircut, there might be an event on, someone might be doing a webinar, someone might be doing this, but you don't even know that because you're not looking. The only thing you're doing is this, and the outside world doesn't even exist to you. You're in your own world. That's focus. Paul Olsen says, "What would you say when your clients ask how many other clients have you had? Do I lie to them and pretend?" No. Honestly, it's best to never, ever lie. Unless it's a life or death situation. So what I would do is I would just tell them. I would say, "Well you're my first client here." And if they have a problem with that ... Like here's the thing, a lot of the time when people ask this question that you're asking, they're thinking in advance that this is something that people might ask for, and it's stopping them from trying in the first place. Because a lot of people, you've got to look at this. How does anyone have any clients if everyone in the world starts with zero? There must be a way to get a client when you have zero, otherwise no one would ever have a client in the history of the world. Just look at it logically. So think that you absolutely must have a client, end results, in order to get your first client is absolutely madness. It's impossible. So it obviously happens, and it obviously happens a lot, very frequently, for everyone all over the world all the time. So it happens. So stop thinking that this is impossible and therefore you shouldn't start. You should start. There's a high chance they're not going to ask you. And if they do, just tell them the truth. If they don't buy, they don't buy. And if it becomes an issue, a repeating, reoccurring issue, then you might want to do your first client for free in exchange for a testimonial, and then you can go on and make money on your second, third, fourth, fifth clients. Simple as that. Joshua said, "If I've remembered correctly, you said that when you moved to the US, you went there and stayed without getting a Visa for two years. I also love the idea of moving to the US sometime in the future, but from what I've read, you have to have a Visa to stay for longer than six months. Am I wrong about this? Is there a way to stay longer without a Visa?" Yeah, so depends where you're coming from, what country and all of that. But I entered the country on a ESTA which is an E-S-T-A like Visa waiver thing. And you're allowed to stay in the country for up to 90 days at a time on that thing. So I had to leave the country every 90 days. I left every 89 days, which sucked. It was a pain in the ass. And there's also a chance that when I came back in that the customs officer would just say, "No, you've been in here for multiple 90 day periods already." So it's a risk. You probably don't want to do that. But you can absolutely move here and then within the first 90 days sort out the Visa thing. That's what I would do. I wouldn't delay moving here just so you can do the Visa. I'd move then do the Visa, just because it would just move things faster. I wouldn't recommend waiting two years, that was stupid. That was a bit too long. But yeah, that's how it works. If you're on the Visa waiver program, the ESTA, it's 90 days at a time, not six months. Oh, and plus, if you've been here for more than six months, then you have to start paying taxes, even if you don't have a Visa. So it's not like you get to escape that. After six months, you got to pay tax, even if you don't have a Visa or anything. That's one thing that definitely happens. You also can't get a job, but you can own a company. There's all sorts of nuances to the law. If you talk to a lawyer, they'll tell you about it. Darlo says, "Hey, Sam. Good to see you live. My niche is helping dogs that have arthritis and/or skin allergy with herbal formulas. I buy herbs from the wholesale supplies and customize the formula for customers. What are the legal liability concerns I should be cautious or prepared for? Same questions for my other possible niches such as woman with hormone issues?" You don't really need to worry about anything unless ... I'm pretty sure if you're in the health space, you just have to tell people that what ... You can't say certain things, like this is a cure or this is that or that. Because if what you're doing is natural and not FDA approved, then you there's certain words you can't use. And you also can't make it seem like it's a cure, you have to still say, "This is not like replacement for medical treatment." Or something like that. If you have a problem, a medical problem, you should seek a doctor's advice. Just Google it. I don't even know the ins and outs of it, but I know that you just have to make a few disclaimers like that and you can't make any ridiculous promises. And that's it really. If you do that, you're fine. You don't need to do anything crazy. If you Google, "Legal requirements for selling natural medicine, or natural whatever," Google will tell you want to do. Nothing to stress out about. Tony said, "I've tried to be an entrepreneur in the past and I failed." So have I. Lots of times. Most entrepreneurs have. "I've bought several courses because I want out of corporate advertising sales after 27 years. I hate it." I don't blame you. "I know my business, but because I've failed, I'm procrastinating. What advice would you give?" I mean, it's just like you try to ride a bike for the first time, and you fell off, and you grazed your knee. You've got to just get back on that bike. That's it. I mean, just think about it like a bike. Because everyone knows the first time you get on it, there's a very high chance that you're not going to ride it perfectly and you're probably going to fall over an graze your knee, get a bit hurt. Pretty much 100% chance. But even the second time you might graze your knee, but you get it pretty quickly. It becomes learned and then you've got it, boom, you're away. That's what it's like. The first business I started failed, and it hurt, but what was I going to do? Not try again? Just stay unhappy? Just go again. You'll get it. You've got to just think about this logically. If I don't try, I get nothing, guaranteed. Or if I do try, there's a high probability that I will succeed. Very simple decision. I would try. I would always try, forever. Even failing trying, I would rather be doing that than not trying at all. Orison says, "Hey, Sam. Are you saying that with a few clients saying yes to our first offer hypothesis, and then we work with them, solve their problem, and then through word and testimonials and FB ads, our reputation grows, and then we get more clients?" Yeah, so, I mean, I don't know what I said specifically that made you ask is this what you're saying, but this is how simple it is. If you pick a niche and you find out a problem they have, and then if you find a solution to that problem, and then you help the market with it, and you actually deliver it and you help them get results, and you keep improving it and you keep trying to get them better results and better results, and you just make it your thing and you get good at it, you will have clients, you will be making money, and you will be having fun. And then, with time, you'll make more money, more money, more money. And then, at a particular point in time, you'll reach the limits of your business model, the done for you, one on one business model, because there's only so many clients you can get if you're doing the work yourself. But that's pretty easy to figure that one out. If you're using time to deliver the services, and every new additional client requires more time, you don't have infinite time, so very quickly, something's going to run out there. That's your time. Then you find the limits of that model. And the good news is is when you meet the limits of this model, you're making money. You're making six figures most likely, which is great. And then, you can move to Uplevel and selling a program. And by moving to that new model, that new business model, you can now go to seven figures because it's not as demanding on your time. That's it. But it all starts by solving a problem for a market. That is it. Carina says, "Hi, Sam. Should I consider an insurance for my business in case a client might get upset or I can get them results or I can't get them results they want?" PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:33:04] Sam: Get them results they want. Like, if you're starting out and you're brand new, you probably don't need it because you're not going to be worth suing, be most businesses, if you're helping something with something that's like medical, or psychological or something like, and there's a lot of risk there then yeah you probably should, but if you're just helping someone with their aunt or something like that, you know it, you're fine. Especially when you're small. You don't need insurance before you get your first client, I can tell you that. Once you're starting to make some money, than yeah sure, talk to some lawyers and then they'll advise you on what best to do, but I hate it when people tell these start up business owners who haven't even made a dollar and they don't have one client that the thing that they should be worried about is all of this legal shit. That is not what's important when you don't have any clients. What's most important is getting a client. Of course, you use your common sense not to blatantly break the law, right, but if you're not breaking the law and you're just seeking to help people then you're going to be fine. Then when you're making money, get a check from a lawyer. Kurt says, "Hi Sam, if I want to enter a health or life coaching niche, should I be concerned about not having certifications, as the consequences of giving bad advice can be dire?" It's, like first of all, if you have a qualification, and you give bad advice the results are still dire, right? So, well let's be clear about this, having a certificate does not give you the ability to give bad advice, help people, like give people dire situations and get away with it. If they did, then that's really, really, really bad. Certificates don't really do anything, the most important thing is helping someone achieve, solve their problem and get the result. The only time certificates are needed in this system is like, for example, it might be an engineering thing, right, like if someone's going to sign off on some like structural check for some frame for a bridge, they probably need, they probably have to have an engineering certificate or something for that, because it's pretty important. Same with an open heart surgery or something. Like, in these sorts of scenarios there, you need a certificate but in most day to day business you don't need anything because you know, we're helping a business solve a problem that's very simple, and we can just do it. So certificates aren't needed unless you're planning to build bridges or do open heart surgery or something like that, you don't need one, or sign off on some legal thing as a lawyer. Those are the only real times you need certificates. [Alock 01:36:17] says, "Do you listen to [inaudible 01:36:19]?" I don't listen to anyone first of all, but I don't watch anyone's YouTube videos and I don't listen to anyone's Podcast, I don't, I'm not on anyone's email list and I don't read anybody's blog. I just want to make that clear, because most of that information is noisy. I do read people's books, that is one thing I do, but all of that other crap is noise man, it's noisy information and it's not very good. Books, a lot of effort goes into those and they're very refined and they're very, you know, I like books. So I read books but I don't listen to anyone with Podcasts or anything like that. I've read his book Power of Now, it was good but that's about it. [Corina 01:37:11] says, "Hey Sam, should I consider an insurance-" I already answered that one. "I'm on week three about to go to market, I'm wondering what to do when they ask for testimonials? Or whether they know if it will really work, if I'm a scam? I just, just a random over the phone? Or is this, or is that where the real selling skills come in? I'm confident I can sell with the problem, which is binge eating, and also when you say, how can we make this work for you in the sales script, do I mean putting down the price?" First of all, there's a high chance that they probably won't ask you for testimonials. If you're very confident in your delivery and everything. People get clients without testimonials, we've covered that, that's a fact. So what you've got in your mind is mostly fear not fact. So just do it and see what happens. Then if they do ask for testimonials, you can tell them that you don't have any, but you have this, you know you can solve them with, you know you can help them solve their problem because of XYZ. That's how I'd answer that one. Then if it's just a random over the phone, I mean yeah, people, randoms, buy things over the phone all the time. I mean, I have never spoken to you before in my life and we didn't even speak on the phone and you gave me money. You bought from my webinar without speaking to anyone and we haven't even met ever. So there's proof that, that happens, but that happens not because of knowing someone. People don't buy from people just because they know them, that's silly. People buy form people when they believe that they can solve their problem. Remember that. It's not about knowing, it's not about being friends, it's not about familiarity, it's purely about do I believe this person can solve my problem. That's it. Then, yeah you just got to do it. Seriously. You've just got fear, that's normal, everyone has fear, nothing to worry about, you just got to do it and you'll figure it out. [Nadin 01:39:34] says, "Hey Sam, so my niche is helping inspirational digital nomads to get remote jobs. I've done the market research and found that the most common problems people have are the following in this order: number one, finding jobs. They are qualified for work that are not high tech search and software development for example, so finding jobs that they are qualified for. Finding jobs that can be done from anywhere, particularly outside the U.S., and getting responses from their applications." So, oh I'll read the rest of your thing, "so I've been getting great feedback and receptiveness via my direct outreach and Facebook posts, done about 15 strategy sessions but haven't landed a client. I know I need to do at least 30 before I can consider reevaluating my offer but I'd like to know what you think about my message at this point. Is it too general, should it be something more like I help people who want more flexibility to find remote jobs or that I, or that can be done from anywhere? Or I help people that are not high tech to get remote jobs? The one I have now sounds more catchy and direct but I'm not sure if it's specific." Alright. Well here's what I would do. So immediately I'm not sure what the main objective you're trying to achieve is. Is it helping these people live anywhere in the world, wherever they want all the time? Or is it getting them a job? Because it's like, there's other ways to live wherever you want all the time. For example you could, if that's the main thing they want, to live anywhere and be a nomad, then I would probably say, starting their own business is going to be a better tool to get them there than finding remote jobs. So you've got to be real clear, like what is the main thing here? Is it getting them the job or is it being a digital nomad, or being remote? Like what's the main thing? Then what's the best means to achieve the end? What's the best tool to achieve the outcome? Then you should be offering them the best tool. That's where I think this isn't clear. Alright, what else have we got here? So [Corrine 01:42:13] says, "Hey Sam, still struggling, searching and finding out my niche. I'm a really sporty mechanical engineer but I can't really decide where to go. To help runners with their lower leg problems, about 10% have problems with this, I know exactly ow to fix this up finding out myself, this is people to people, easy to set up but I think a little cheapish. Help the fruit industry with the problem I have to figure out. I think something like this is really my purpose but I don't really see how to find out what their problems are and hope this is around mechanical engineering." Well, this is easy, number two. Number two you've picked and industry or a niche and you don't know what their problem is and that's good. Whereas with, because you can find out by talking to them, right, but with number one you've picked a niche and a problem purely based on the fact that you already know what the solution is. So number two. Honestly the best problems to solve are the ones that you don't know how to solve, because that's more of a challenge and it means you've got to really figure it out and that's way more fun. It's very easy to figure out solutions to problems once you know what the problems are. Especially if you are an engineer, you know how to think this way. So, like, ... I would go, and you said number two is your passion. Do number two. Easy. Done. Josh says, "Hey Sam, if you're trying to get your first client for a coaching program, how much of the program should you have finished before selling it? Should you have details like a welcome pack finished for example?" Go watch week seven. I can tell you haven't watched week seven because if you had you wouldn't ask that question. Debra says, "Hey Sam, when you first started to see growth, did you focus on specific things on certain days? For example, outreach three days in a week and having openings for two, or strategy sessions two times a week for example? Time blocking I think they call it." Yeah. What I would do is, basically like in the morning, so I didn't block it by days, so like in the morning I'd typically do marketing activities and in the afternoon I'd typically do sales, but if someone wanted to book a call for the morning, I would still do it then, but I just made sure every morning I was doing marketing. Getting out, adding people, messaging them, sending emails, getting stuff out the door. Then second, I would be doing all the calls, but if the calls happened to fall in the start I would do that anyway. Dan says, "Thanks Sam for answering my webinar, [inaudible 01:45:14] question, your response about keying through the variables makes a ton of sense. I will definitely consider joining up. However I've tested the webinar on warm traffic and even had sales with cold traffic but I wasn't profitable and I wasn't sure exactly when to turn things off." What is a good sign? If you've been profitable on warm, that's great, and if you've made sales on cold, that's even better, because if it's just not profitable, then that doesn't mean that it's always going to be unprofitable. It's a really good sign. So I'd have way more confidence in that being able to be profitable now that you've given me this information. When it's got no history of ever selling even in any scenario, and it's a no on ads, that's when it gets a bit scary. You shouldn't ever end up in that situation by the way. Something should've been sold, someway, somehow, before it ever arrives on ads. Our people will show exactly how to do that, we'll go and smash that out in the first Q&A call. Rick says, "Are the 10 smart market questions for us to answer or are they what we ask the customer in the research phase?" So this is good, now I can see the pattern in all of your questions you've asked me. So, every question you've asked me so far, it's all been about you, including the ten smart market questions. So this is your number one thing you've got to catch, because now I've caught it, now you need to catch it and change it because it will just change your entire brain. So you're thinking through your eyes only, and you need to be able to see through two peoples eyes, the client, the market and yours. The most important view si from the clients view looking at you. That's the most important view to be able to take in business. Like I am very good at looking at things this way, right that's what enables me to do a lot of things well and that's the thing that you're missing which I can tell now from the recurring pattern in all of these questions. So it's definitely, you answering the questions from the perspective of your market and the way to do that if you can't, if you're not your market is to talk to the market. So really it's your market answering that questionnaire but you're writing the actual words in, because we can't just send that sheet out to them, or maybe we could, but it probably wouldn't work very well to just email that to a bunch of people and say hey fill this out for me. They'd probably be like, what the hell? So you've got to go and talk to the market, ask them those sorts of questions, find the answers and then compile them and find out what these things are. That will change everything. Honestly the biggest through I see so many entrepreneurs make is getting out of their own head and their own view and then just being able to see things from the markets point of view. The best businessmen in the world have multiple views, like they can flip between thousands of different views and see how everyone sees everything inside this massive machine. Jeff [inaudible 01:48:33] even has like, a saying, like, "Point of view is worth 80 IQ points." So being able to take a different point of view from your own is worth more intelligence wise than actual intelligence itself. You're more likely to be successful and smart if you can take lots of points of view than if you're just good at math and numbers and spelling and all of this crap. It's the most important thing in business and probably in life. Jo, Jan [Schroeder 01:49:09] says, "I had a funnel on delivering clients to me. I had a funnel on delivering clients to me, Facebook ads, Agency, but now I feel my mindset is blocked. It is like, I know what to do, where to go but I just have something blocking my mind. I know it sounds ridiculous but I know how to get, but I don't know how to get rid of it. Something curious is that between 6:00 P.M. and 1:00 A.M. it doesn't exist and I get a lot of shit done but just not the right things. Any advice on how to get rid of that?" Well, it sounds like you just might have forgotten what you want, or what you want might have changed. So I would sit down and ask, what do I want? What am I actually trying to do? Because quite often you'll start doing this self sabotage thing, when ... this isn't like, you've forgotten what you want and why you're doing this in the first place, even though you know how to do it, it's just that you've forgotten what you want. So you've got to be real clear on what you're trying to achieve, what the objective is and then if this is the best way to get you there, then it all makes sense. Then you've just got to do it. Then that choice is up to you. Sure you might feel like there's a block but that's your choice. I feel like there's a block a lot of the time but then I'm like, yeah, that's just me making it up, it's not actually real, am I just going to whimper away and just lie down on the floor and have a cry or am I just going to get it done? I choose to just get it done. So it's like sometimes that thing pops up all the time and you've just got to push through it. It's always your choice, remember that. There's never anything actually stopping you, it's always you and you are choosing it. So Anna says, "Hey Sam, what do you think of the food and beverage industry as a niche? Have you had any experience with it directly or indirectly?" My only experience with it is that I've consumed beverages and eaten food. That's it, and what od I think of it as an industry? It's just an industry. I mean you need to do, you need to go through the course, like go through the modules, watch them start to finish, week one, then week two, then week three. Then complete the exercises, answer the questions. Find out what the problems are that exist in the food and beverage industry. What makes a good niche is a niche with a problem that you know how to solve. That's a good niche. A niche isn't just good by its own, what makes a good niche is a combination of three variables, not just the niche. Rick says, "Sam I really like the idea of helping coaches get clients, but Christian Nicholson already does this. Does that mean I should do something else?" No. Dude, like I help coaches and consultants get clients. I don't even know who Christian Nicholson is. Just because someone does something doesn't mean there's none left. You're looking at the wrong thing now, so now you're looking at the competition or other people that are doing something, like if you want to help caches get clients, then you should just master it. Become the best in the world at it. If you become better at it than Christian, you will beat them. If you become better at it than me, you'll beat me. So just because someone's doing it doesn't mean that it can't be done. You just got to solve the problem. Karen says, "Love your straightforward wise advice, read the fundamentals, brilliant." Yep. I've repeated them towards the point where I thought most people would've gone insane but they are still being repeated and I will keep repeating them. Joe [Defrins 01:53:35] says, "Hey Sam, if it can help you one of the main things that made me take the buying decision of getting your course is because of seeing you on your Instagram story plus your 45 minute interview on YouTube, my question is, if I already know my message, my niche, and the problems, should I just do those 15 minute chats or can I just do the strategy session call right away?" I mean, if you get clients, I mean, sorry if you already know what your niche is, if you already know what their problem is then you can, like you just need strategy sessions. If you can get strategy sessions without the 15 minute chat, do it, but for most people there needs to be a little bridge between a cold conversation with a stranger and a strategy session, usually that's the 15 minute chat, but you can do whatever you want. So long as it ends up in a strategy session and that client, like you can do anything. So just try it, if you think it's going to work best, give it a go and if does, do it, keep doing it. Alex [Shepoval 01:54:44] says, "My niche involves health advice. I'm worried about liability in this niche, I don't advise anyone to take drugs but what if someone follows my advice and has a medical problem? They could've had, had that medical problem anyway, that is how-" Yeah, like, ... you're thinking about the wrong thing. You're thinking about everything that could go wrong, you're already thinking about losing, right? We're in this game to win, not to lose. So you got to think about what are all the things that could go right? Or maybe you'll help all of these people. Like, you know so think about that one, not the other one and then if you're not telling people that you're a replacement for medical care or all of that and you've got the disclaimer there, and then if you want to you can just make them sign an agreement that's just reinforces that, then you're fine. You've disclaimed yourself. Provided you're not saying, I'm a replacement to critical surgery or this specific medicine and then you have a disclaimer, you're okay, tons of people help people with advice about being healthier and it's not illegal. You're allowed to do it. If that person does end up having a problem, and you've disclaimed it and you didn't do anything wrong, then no liability is on you at all. It's as simple as that. So Joshua says, "Hey Sam, you've said in the course and these live sessions that the only thing that made you successful was the fact that you never gave up, but was there one single thing that motivated you to never give up? Maybe wanting a successful business, proving doubters wrong? Yeah, man this one's so simple, because what are the options here? Give up, guaranteed failure, guaranteed mediocrity for life, guaranteed regret, guaranteed shitty existence and then death, that's it. Or, the other one is, try, high chance of succeeding, then winning, then having good existence and then not having regret. Which one am I going to choose that? I would actually be mad to choose the one which is give up. Anyone would be totally stupid and delusional to choose that one. Why on earth would anyone do that? It makes no sense to me at all. Who wants a guaranteed mediocre regretful, regret filled shitty existence? Nobody. So why would anyone give up? Giving up to me is like just lying down on the floor like a sick dog, just like waiting to die, right? Why would anyone do that? Bill [Hall 01:57:46] says, "Can you explain or expand on what you mean by kill your social app?" Yeah well I mean delete it. So like, you just delete the damn thing, because it's just a distraction. So, like I'll show you my phone here. This is my phone here and if I show you it, ... and I wish I could get rid of this over here, this one. I really do. If I was you I wouldn't have that app. Like I've got nothing except for that, I don't have the Facebook app or anything, but the only reason I have that damn Instagram thing is because you guys asked for it. Because I did a survey to all my customers, the main thing, one of the main things that showed through was people want to know what Sam is like in his personal life and behind the scenes and people want to connect with him because he seems like a robot. So like a robot I processed the data and then made the decision to do it. So that's the only reason why I'm doing it. If you guys didn't care about it, or if you didn't want it, I wouldn't do it. The moment you don't, I'll stop doing it. So, if you're starting out in business, don't even worry about that, you don't need it, like just get rid of all the noise. Honestly. Trying to focus is hard. Like if I was moving around all the time, going to different Airbnb's and like being one of those digital nomad people, if I was doing that and socializing with all of these different people, and trying to go to the gym, and listening Gary V and Grant and all those other dudes that scream on the internet, if I was trying to do all of that and start a business, I would fail. Hands down dead. My way of succeeding is to eliminate the variables. Just get rid of that, get rid of that, get rid of that, get rid of that, just keep removing them all until the only thing that's left is this. Then it's not as hard to focus because the only thing to do is to focus. That's what, that's the easiest way to do it. Remove distraction, don't try and use willpower to push through, because willpower is unreliable. I mean you want to build up your willpower over time and make it stronger but I would choose removing the thing rather than just trusting my self to not get distracted by it. That's a very important thing to do and really successful people do that. They will just isolate themselves, like pro athletes do this, whenever it comes close to the game season or you know like the finals, they'll totally isolate themselves. They just totally leave everything, the outside world doesn't exist to them, because that's so important for them to get into the zone and get focused on what matters. I'm pretty good at doing that. Some people might say that's anti-social. It is, but I'd rather win than be social. So, we're pretty much at the end of this call today. So like I said to everyone, we go from, we do one of these every single Saturday and we start at 3:00 P.M. and we go till 5:00 P.M. and that's New York time. If you asked a question and I didn't answer it, than it's because you showed up to this call too late and if you want to get your question answered you need to show up on time. If you want proof of that, I'm pretty sure Joshua [inaudible 02:01:44] asked 18 questions on this call. 18. So if you show up on time, you can get 18 questions answered. If you show up late you might get zero. It's your choice, you can choose whether you want to get the help or not. Just show up on time. Now if you liked this call, if you found it helpful, just click that like button, let me know, give me some feedback. Then, our next call's going to be next Saturday. Then if you don't want to miss it, go and put it in your calendar right now. Put it in your calendar, don't forget it. Also, the Q&A calls that happen on like Monday, and on Friday, they're still going to continue as per normal with Jesse Clark and Nick [Howser 02:02:31]. If anyone has any questions until then, Facebook group is the best place to go, all those Q&A's. So thanks everyone, have a good weekend, hope you enjoy it and I'll speak with you all next week. PART 4 OF 4 ENDS [02:02:47]

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