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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 28th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 28th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for July 28th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: All right. Can see some people are jumping on. Can see Boniface, Maude, Nathan. How's it going? Hey, just let me know if you've got audio working and video. Let me know if you can see me and hear me just before we get started here. Can see John, Matthew, MD. Welcome. Cool. Well, it looks like we got audio and video working. So, let's jump ahead and get started here. So, first of all, if this is your first time on one of these livestreams, welcome. Congrats on joining the program. How these work is I usually do one every Saturday. But sometimes, I'm away or something and I can't do it. But it's, I would say, 80, 90% of the time, we do one of these ever Saturday. How they work is we go from 3:00 PM until 5:00 PM Eastern Time. That's the time in New York. How they work is you can just show up live, ask me anything you want in that chat box, and I go through the questions first come, first served and just answer them. So, if you have any questions, just let me know in that questions box and we'll get started here. Today, I will be finishing this call about 15 minutes early, so at 4:45 because I have to do something at 5:00. So, today, yeah. Just letting you know in advance. So, let's get started. Nathan says it's his first livestream. Welcome. So, Piator has a question. "95% of my prospects have tricky financial situations. They don't have money. But if I don't close them, is it because I'm not good enough or that, even with a strong desire, they cannot and will not pay?" Yeah. Well, money is an interesting thing. It's not as black and white and most people think it is. Most people think, oh, people have money or they don't have money. A lot of people think that if someone doesn't have money, then they truly don't have the money and they can't buy anything. But that's not really how money works. People find ways to buy things. What they can do is they can use savings, they can use a credit card, they can go and get another credit card, they can get a loan. They can ask a family member or a friend, or they can just save money and just earn some money, and they can sell things. They can do all sorts of things that generate money so that they can get that money and then use it to buy things. That's how humans buy pretty much everything. They're like, "Oh, I'm saving for this. Oh, I'm saving for that. I'm saving for a vacation. I'm saving for an iPhone. I'm saving for a new laptop." People don't just binary state have money or don't have money. They make things happen that they want. So, when someone tells you on strategy that they don't have the money, really what that means is that they're not seeing the value or most likely, they're not seeing the value because if someone can clearly see the value, then it's a no brainer decision to buy. Like Consulting Accelerator, it can help you make a lot more than $2,000. It costs $2,000. So, people can see the value. So, they sell things. I've seen all sorts of stories. People have sold their cars, people have gotten loans, people have done all sorts of things to make it happen. It's not just a lot of people don't have that much money in their bank account. But they make that much money appear in their bank account so they can buy. So, what it means most of the time is that someone doesn't see the value, or what it could mean, but I'm guessing it most likely doesn't, is that you've priced it too high and out of the market. If Consulting Accelerator was $10,000, a lot of the people who said, "I don't have the money," that more means, "I don't have the money," because it's harder to generate 10 grand. Someone can still generate it, but it's harder. So, I would say with you, first of all, how many strategy sessions have you done? If you've done less than 40, then I wouldn't listen to the objection. I would just keep going and doing more because with more, you'll talk to more people, you'll encounter more situations, you'll get better skills, and you'll probably figure it all out. So, volume is a cure for pretty much everything. If you want to know how to get good at strategy sessions, do more of them. If you want to know how to get good at anything, you just do volume. Volume cures pretty much everything. If you want to know how I got good at it, I did probably one and a half thousand, 2,000 calls. That's how. I wasn't just better at it naturally. I just did 2,000 calls. How did Andrew Argue get better at it? He's done 2,000 calls. How did all of my seven figure people get better at it? 2,000 or more calls. No one I've seen get to seven figures has made less than probably a thousand calls. So, that's a good metric for you. Pure volume will help you get better and with volume, you'll figure your way out. You'll figure a way around all of the objections you're getting. You don't need to think, "Is this objection a reality, should I change niche?" If you just keep doing strategy sessions, you will figure it out. Just trust that the volume will cure it. Piator says, "Is it good to get testimonials from a customer at the first, second, third session and publish them as testimonials and not waiting for the final result?" Well, you want to get a testimonial after you've helped someone get to where you promised them they were going to go. So, the best way to do it is get your first client, help them achieve the result that they wanted. So, help them make that transformation from the current situation to the desired situation. Once you've helped them do that, then you want to get them to tell that story on a video. You can interview them and get this video from them or you can just tell them, "Here's the three things you need to say. You want to say your current situation, what it was before you started working with me, then what it was like working with me during. So, before, during, and then after. Now what's life like after working with me?" That's the formula for a really good testimonial, before, during, after, because it shows a story of transformation over time, which is how things work. That's why if you watch a lot of my testimonials, you'll notice they say before, during, after. If I share a testimonial, I'll say, "Andrew Argue went from 17,000 a month in November of ... Oh, no. It was in January of 2017 Andrew Argue joined and he was making 17 grand a month as a generalist done-for-you agency. Then we got him into the accounting niche, we moved him from done-for-you to programs. Then we got him onto ads and all of that. Then he grew to, now he's at a million dollars a month." So, that story of before, during, after, I say that again and again and again because humans like to, that's how they make sense of things. Before, during, after. That's how movies tell stories. It's how everything tells stories. So, make sure your testimonials say that and only ask for them after you've delivered the transformation. Then Piator, if you can ask some of your questions later on in the session just because you've asked the first three in a row. So, just ask the rest of your questions later on. I need to give other people a go here. Nathan says, "Is CPC and CTI relevant for local business services? Getting $2.50 link clicks, but $12 leads for Invisalign. I'm not on the ads training yet." Yeah. So, the ads training will show you how to look at ads. Basically, there's one thing that matters with ads and that is cost per acquisition and is cost per acquisition less than we get from the sale because you're basically looking at ROI. So, if I put a dollar into this thing, how much money comes back? Do I get two dollars back or do I get one dollar or do I get zero or 50 cents? All I care about is just getting more back than I put in. That's it. So, if I'm getting more back than I put in, I don't care what my cost per click is. I don't care what my cost per lead is. I don't care about any of that stuff. Like I've said a lot of times, I'd pay a thousand dollars a click and a thousand dollars a lead if a hundred percent of leads purchased. But that's just to prove my point that cost per click doesn't really matter, neither does cost per lead. It's all about ROI. That's the bottom line and that's why you need to track ROI. Most advertisers don't track ROI. So, therefore, they fall back onto these CPCs, CPLs, and they start making all of their decisions based on these metrics, which don't reflect the truth. So, that's how a lot of people get confused. [inaudible 00:11:11] says, "Sam, how did you have the balls to go 50k in debt when you didn't even have a track record of success? How can I gain the same confidence? I keep getting, 'I can't afford it,' but I know I'm close to crossing the threshold. But I'm also going into debt. How did you make it across this threshold?" I was only in debt because I had a student loan and students loans, they've become so ingrained in culture, it's like it's not even debt. So, pretty much everyone had one and that pretty much made it okay to get one. So, I didn't really think about it really as debt. Parts of New Zealand, it's different. They don't charge interest on student loans. So, I didn't really worry too much about it. So, I wouldn't say I had balls to get into debt with a student loan. It just was normal. But yeah. What I guess you're asking me here is, "I keep getting, 'I can't afford it.' I know I'm close to crossing the threshold, but I'm also getting into debt." You've just got to think about it really plain and simple. If you give up now, you have a hundred percent guarantee of failure. You will fail, you won't be successful, you won't make any money, and you will regret it. So, hundred percent chance of failure, hundred percent chance of regret, mediocrity, and sadness. That's one option. The other option is to keep going. If you keep going and never give up, you will figure it out. You will be proud of yourself. You'll feel happy, you'll change your life, you'll do all of that. So, those are the two options and it's pretty easy to choose from those two options. So, whenever you get really down, you just got to think about it like that. It's really, really simple. If you never give up, you'll win and if you give up, you're guaranteed to fail. So, I just looked at it like that. Didn't matter how painful it was. The reality was that. Lucio says, "What do you think about these niches?" Then you didn't tell me any niches. So, I don't know how to answer that. EL says, "Hey, Sam. I've got two questions for you. The first, for my lack of experience with Facebook ads, would it be possible to target educational institutions and NGOs and get good results for the accountants current clients I'm working for? I'm working a on a funnel for 3% audience. They are for ... The second question I have is if I live in a country of eight million people and so far, yes, I have my proof of concept established with accountants, would it be right to keep targeting only them or would working with other businesses be a good idea too?" So, the first question, "Would it be possible to target institutions and NGOs and get good results for the accountants clients?" I don't understand that first question. It's very confusing. So, I don't know how to answer that. You'll have to make it clearer than that. Then the second one is, "If I live in a country of eight million people and I hae my proof of concept with accountants, would it be right to keep targeting only them?" Yes. The right time to span out further and open up, widen the net, and widen up your niche is when you've exhausted your niche. So, right now, your niche is, it sounds like accountants in your country, which I'm not sure what your country is. But somewhere with eight million people. So, first of all, keep pushing on that until you take it to its extreme. Keep pushing on that until it's just getting to the point that you can't not longer get the growth you want inside of this little niche. Then at that time, I think the easiest thing to do is to go international with that same niche of accountants. I think it's better to go international with the same niche than it is to go into different niches in the same country because you're looking for the most similar cluster of people. If you're helping accountants in your country, the most similar thing is going to be accountants in other countries. So, that's what I would do. Then once you've maxed out accountants worldwide, which is quite big, then you can probably think about a different way to widen it up. That's what I would do then. Caro says, "Hey, Sam. How do you measure the job quit, six figures, seven figures, as a result of your program?" That is a good question. So, what we did is in, how long ago was it now? It was last year, I think. Yeah. I can't remember exactly when it was. But I would say about one year ago or maybe a year and a bit ago, we did a massive survey. So, we basically emailed [inaudible 00:16:30] time, we had, I think, 10,000 customers. We emailed all of them and we said, "Hey. Send us through a testimonial video and answer some questions for us." Three and a half thousand of those 10,000 submitted a video testimonial and told us how much money they had made and whether they had quit their job or not and all of that stuff. So, that's how got the numbers and that's why the numbers haven't been updated in the last year and a bit. So, when I say that we've got 25 million ears, 451 making six figures, and 3,000 jobs quit, things like that, and together, our customers have made over 400 million, those numbers are old. That's what had happened about a year and a bit ago. Right now, those numbers will be a lot higher. When we do another survey and we ask people to update us again, we'll update those numbers again. But those numbers are understated. We have a lot more seven figure, six figure, jobs quit, all of that stuff right now. Also, those numbers were only from the people who actually reported it. We have the other group of the customers who didn't report it. So, the numbers are way higher than that. Gabriel says, "Hey, Sam. Thanks for having these calls." No problem. Mitch says, "What do you think of having sales reps prospect to sell the program? Or should you only send them pre-qualified strategy sessions from the funnel?" Good question. I think it's better to only send them pre-qualified ones. The way I think about it is what's best for ... We have been in these shoes before. When we start our business, we have the option to go out and cold call and prospect and network or we have the option to generate warm leads for us and then have inbound calls. As you have experienced and I've experienced, it's way better to have it inbound coming to you. Way, way better. You can make more money, it's more fun, it's more productive, it's a better use of your time, there's less waste, there's more efficiency. So, we experienced that. That is true because we saw it happen. We observed it and we found it to be true. So, then why when we hire other people to do the same thing would we not do what we found to be true? It doesn't make any sense. Oh, this is obviously the best way to do it, but now that we've got other people doing it, let's give them the shitty way to do it. Doesn't make any sense. I would continue to do it that way. That's how we do it. We have sales reps that sell Uplevel Consulting and we're just pure inbound. I don't want them doing outbound because I know it's inefficient. Matt McDonald said, "Is Lumpy Mail still effective for attracting business owners in a niche, e.g. solar companies, that still use door to door and outside sales as their main sales funnel?" Yeah. Lumpy Mail is still effective. It just depends on a few things. One is the niche. Can you easily find their address? The address that you find, is it accurate? That's one factor. The other factor is, is sending them a Lumpy Mail item, is it highly likely or unlikely to actually get to them? That's the other factor. Another one is your offer. Is your offer really good or is it just same old, is it something they've seen a million times? And what is the concept of your Lumpy Mail package? Is it unique and cool and is it jaw dropping or is it lame? Then there's the followup. Do you follow up on the phone after you send the Lumpy Mail or do you just do nothing? Lumpy Mail, we can't say Lumpy Mail works or Lumpy Mail doesn't work because someone could try it and it doesn't work. Someone could try it and it dow work. It's these variables here that make it work or not work and depending on these things, it can be really effective and make you a lot of money or it can be noneffective and make you no money. So, it totally depends on those things. Can you get the address? Is your office strong? Is it differentiated? Do they receive the package? Then how unique is your Lumpy Mail package? Is it something that's really awesome or is it lame and do you follow up? Those things are important and I need to know those things before I answer a question like that. Caro says, "Sam, I read that Facebook is seeing an uptake in the story function. However, the advertising is picking up slower. Do you think this will be the future and it's different from traditional Facebook ads?" I think that ads on Facebook, I've been doing it for a long time. It's actually surprising how long I've been doing it for. It shocked me the other day when I realized that because I created my Facebook fan page when I started doing ads because that was the only way I could advertise was if I created a fan page. I looked at the start date of my fan page. I'll look at it again right now because I'm pretty sure it was about [inaudible 00:22:03]. So, if I look at social, Facebook, Sam Ovens, when was this started? It was 2011. Wow. So, January 1st, 2011. So, it's seven years. So, that's crazy. So, I didn't realize I've been advertising on Facebook for seven years. That's kind of scary. So, I've been doing it for seven years and I've spent a shit load of money on it and I've tried everything. Everything that Facebook's put out, we've tried it. What I've found is that the thing that works has been the same since day one. That is an image ad with long copy. So, a news feed ad that has an image and long copy. It's the same. What worked for me seven years ago still works for me today. We've tried everything else, nothing beats it, and it's still the same. So, looking at that track record, if I'm to look out into the future and think what's it going to be, what do you think it's going to be? The same shit. Maybe they make some changes, but maybe they try some different stuff. But it's still going to be those news feed ads. When it changes, I'll let you know. But that's all you need to focus on. Write good ads, choose good images, let everyone else worry about all of the fancy crap like chatbots and video ads and all of that. Just focus on doing that. I've been focusing on doing those basic ads and we make a lot of money with them. Cristo says, "Hi, Sam. I just started with the accelerator. I hope to proceed with the next course soon." Awesome. Welcome, Cristo. Joshua Westover says, "Hey, Sam. I'm putting up regular Facebook live content to my personal profile. But I've noticed recently that some of the replays have been disappearing with no warning from Facebook. I haven't been copying people's material, apart from occasional referring to a book, and there has been no background music, etc. Do you know why my content might be disappearing from my timeline? Have you ever had this issue before?" I've never had that issue before and I don't know why it would be getting removed. I think if it would get removed by Facebook, they would at least put a notification there and be like, "We removed this because someone reported it." I would ask Facebook. Then what I would also do is I would, once you've done a Facebook live, what I do is I download it. So, you can download the video to your computer after you do the live. I do that every time so that I have the video too because in that case that they take it down, you could just post the recording there for everyone. John Greek says, "Question. I'm interested in applying software programming, which I have 15 years of experience in, Python, for example, as a solution to a given niche's problem. Do we have any examples of applying the CA approach to a software based solution in niche's needs?" So, that is a good question and the answer to that is it's no different. You know what I mean? Right now, you're looking at ... This program, Consulting Accelerator, it teaches you how to look at a market, find a problem that the market faces, find a solution that could be created or given to that market to solve their problem, and then how to charge money for the solution by providing it to the people who need it to solve their problem. That's it. That is how simple it is from a first principles level. So, then, if we're looking at the software market, it's no different. Why do people buy software? To solve a problem. Why do people by anything? To solve a problem. So, it's no different. So, of course, it would work. Where you might betting tangled up is by looking too much at the thing and not the people. So, you said in your thing, in your question that ... Sorry, and some of these questions are flying by real fast. So, if I miss your question, just ask it again, please. But in your question, you said you've got 15 years experience in Python and you're wondering if this is going to work for helping software market. You need to take your eyes off of Python, off of your 15 years experience, and off of software in general. Forget about software because nobody buys software because they want software. Nobody wants software. People want what software does for them, which is solve a problem, get them an outcome. So, put your eyes on the problem, not the code, and talk to the market, find out what their problem is. Thoroughly understand that problem. Then see if through coding and all of that, you can solve their problem. If you can, then good. You're good to go. Sometimes it's very confusing when you're trying to start with what it is that you're good at and you're trying to push that onto the market, then try and find a way for that to work. It doesn't work that way. That's the backwards way to do it. You have to start from the market and their problem and then find a fitting solution. It has to go from the market to the solution. It can't go from the solution to the market. You have the engineer it the right way if you want this thing to work. Mohammed says, "You said how you never care about being first into something. Watch all" ... Oh, I missed that question. That looked like a fun question too. Dude, can you ask that question again? Sorry if I miss people's questions. They're just flying by really fast right now. So, Gerald says, "Hi, Sam. How do I get into Uplevel Consulting? Hit the mark on the consultant's journey, have reached group coaching." Cool. So, that's a good question and how you do it is if you go to week seven in Consulting Accelerator, week seven, it's called The Next Level. It'll show you about Uplevel and it will tell you how you can get into it. I will also tag Rhett Coots who works with me. So, I just commented on your thing, Gerald, and tagged Rhett. So, you can also talk to Rhett about it too. Now, what's next? Daniel Gandolfi says, "Hi, Sam. I love the course. I have a mindset question. Have you ever tried self-hypnosis to reprogram any previous limiting beliefs?" I don't know. I don't exactly know what self-hypnosis is. I've never been hypnotized by a hypnotist. I haven't intentionally done self-hypnosis either. But what I have done is obsessively focused on the character traits that I want to have. That's what setting goals is. I write down exactly what I want and exactly who I need to become to achieve that goal that I want. Then what I do is I state affirmations that say the skills, that reinforce the skills in my belief system that I don't have, but that I want. Then I read those things again and again and again and again and again and again every single day and I work on that and I practice it until it literally brainwashes me and it becomes true. So, that's what I do. The truth is, is that if you ... Here's an extreme example if you just want to know how humans work and how their minds work. So, there is Stockholm syndrome, which is if a child gets kidnapped and they're taken away by the kidnapper, that is not what they want. That is the worst case scenario. That is the most horrific thing that could possibly happen to somebody. Then let's say that kidnapper holds them hostage and forces them to live in a bunker or something for 20 years. What happens is a lot of the time when they get free, they miss their kidnapper. They want to go back. Now, this is an extreme example, but what does that tell you about our mind? If that is the worst thing that can possibly happen to you and we can learn to actually enjoy that and want it, even when we get free of it, then you can make yourself adapt to anything. Absolutely anything in the world, you can make yourself adapt to it. Even the thing that you think you hate the most, you can learn to love it. It's how your brain works. Your brain is just, it likes what it's used to. It likes what's familiar. Anything can be made familiar. Another example is people who get sent to prison. If someone goes to jail, who wants to go to jail? Nobody. That is the worst place. That's like a horror story. No one wants to go. But people go to prison and then when they get out, they miss it. They can't function in [inaudible 00:32:10] society. They want to go back. They want to go back so bad that they commit a crime on purpose just to get sent back. There's another example. So, can you like sales calls? Yes. It is a lot easier to like sales calls [inaudible 00:32:28] and those things can happen too. So, just with those examples, you know that through affirmations, goal setting, repetition, and practice, you can get good at and enjoy and love anything. It just takes practice and repetition and time. That's all there is to it. If you think you can't, then you're lying to yourself and it's on you. It's not reality. You have just chosen to believe the lie. So, you just got to choose what you want. Gabriel says, "Hi." Oh, man. These questions are going fast. Joshua Westover says, "Hi, Sam. I've been charging my program in US dollars and I'm from the UK. I keep track of my finances in pounds. But I've found that," I think that's pounds, yeah, "but I've found that most people I speak to are in the US. Is it bad idea? Should I stick just to the UK pounds for both my program and finances?" It depends. What did I do? So, when I was in New Zealand and I was just selling to New Zealanders, I charged in New Zealand dollars and I did all of my finances in New Zealand dollars. That was it. Then when I started selling to people in America, I started using US dollars because US dollars is what Americans want to use. Then I had this trouble you have. I always had some stuff in New Zealand, some stuff in US, there was currency conversions, it was hard to do accounting, and all of this stuff and it was a pain in the ass. Then it got to the point where I started making, most of my money was coming from America. Then I made the decision, "Hey. Most of my money's coming from America right now. More money is going to come from America in the future. So, I should change my new standard to US dollars," and that's what I did. What I did is I opened up a US account in New Zealand. So, you could open up a US dollar account in London, if that's where you are. So, you can, with your bank, open up a US dollar account, do all of your accounting in US dollars, pay for all of your software, pay for all of your contractors in US dollars, and then do everything in US dollars, even though you live there. That's what I would do. We have a company in Ireland and we do everything in US dollars, our bank account's in US dollars. We even pay our Irish employees in US dollars. The only time we change it to euros is when we have to just file the tax return with the government. But other than that, it's all USD because having multiple currencies is a nightmare and you want to stick to one uniform standard. I've talked about this quite a bit, but you always want to simplify things. So, one currency, one bank account, one card, one credit card, and then one time zone. So, our time zone is Eastern Time New York and it's been like that even since I was back in New Zealand. So, when I was in New Zealand and I started to notice most people were in America and I was going to be selling a lot into America, even when I was in New Zealand, I set all of my times in Eastern Time. So, that made it really easy because I just had one uniform time zone, one uniform currency, and it was really easy. That's what you should do. Simplify it right down. Everyone everywhere in the world will accept and pay US dollars. They're used to it. Everyone will figure out Eastern Time because it's an easy one to figure out. So, you can use that and service the world. Elaine Kohn says, "Hi, Sam. How do I price my offer to a startup in artificial intelligence if they do not have a constant income yet? They expect to close the first deal for about 500k in August and their goal is to do 10 million in one year. Thank you." "How do I price my offer to a startup in artificial intelligence? if they do not have a constant income yet? They expect to close the first deal for about 500k in August and their goal is to do 10 million in one year." I have no idea how to answer that question because I don't know what it is that you do. I need to know who is the market, what is their problem, what is the solution you're providing to them, how are you pricing that service right now? I need to know these things to answer that question. I don't have the information I need to process that from what you gave me. All right. Mike McCormick says, "Hi, Sam. Do you listen to music when you're doing work. I heard classical music, such as Mozart, can really help productivity." Yes, I do. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. I don't listen to one type of music. Some of these things are great, like someone says, "Oh, I listen to Mozart." You listen to Mozart, but after three hours of it, you're going to be pretty fucking sick of it. If you try to listen to it all day every day, you're going to go mad. So, I listen to all sorts of different stuff. I'll listen to rap music, rock music, old music, new music. I'll listen to drum and bass music, and then I will even listen to some classical music sometimes. Then sometimes I'll listen to binaural beats. I would say most of the time, I listen to binaural beats. You want to try listening to those things. They're awesome. What I don't like about music is that songs are only three minutes and that means that every three minutes, it's changing. What's annoying is that if you don't like the song that changes to next, it interrupts your thought pattern because now you have to consciously go to Spotify, find another song, play it, and then the same thing's going to happen to you again probably in three minutes. So, that's hogging up too much brain space. It's distracting. Binaural beats, I like because you can listen to one track for three hours. So, it means you're going to be uninterrupted for three hours straight, which is good. I like that. Also, it doesn't have words or vocals in it. So, you're not paying attention to that. It just produces these sound waves that resonate at a frequency that heightens your awareness. So, your brain uses brain waves, which resonate at a different frequency and some frequencies, the higher the frequency, the more aware and awake and alert you are. So, when you're relaxed and ready to fall asleep, you're going to be in, I think it's theta or delta or something, a very low frequency. When they studied people like monks that did meditation and got to the highest peaks of it and when they studied martial artists when they were in the zone and when they studied long distance sniper shooters that shoot targets from miles away. Their brainwaves were in a ... What was it called again? I have to tell you. Had forgotten for a sec. [inaudible 00:40:19]. Damn. What's it called? I'll try and find it for you because this is what I listen to a lot of the time. Highest brain wave frequency. It's called gamma. That's the one. Gamma wave. So, when snipers, long distance shooters and martial artists and monks and stuff, that highest state is called gamma. So, when you're in the zone, fully in the zone, you're in gamma. When you're sleepy and tired, you're in delta, theta. What I like listening to is binaural beats that resonate at gamma. So, I look at gamma frequency binaural beats and I like listening to those because it has an actual scientific effect on you and it's way easier for me to focus and get into the zone listening to that compared to music. But sometimes you get sick of listening to those and when you get sick of listening to those, I move to music. When I get sick of music, I move to that. If I get sick of both, I move to nothing. I am always rotating between these three things. So, I recommend you do that. Mike McCormick says, "There are a lot of affirmations in the Alchemy of Self document. How many would you recommend to use for maximum effect?" It's not about the number of them. It's about the ones that are relevant to you right now. So, what you want to do is look at your current situation right now, who you are, where you're at. Look at where you want to be in 12 months. Then figure out what character traits you need to possess to get to where you want to go in 12 months. Then look at those character traits. As yourself, "Do I have these right now? Am I strong in these things right now?" If you are not, which is most likely because you aren't there, then have affirmations that relate to those things. If there's affirmations that don't relate to those things that you need to possess to go where you want to go, you don't need them right now. Affirmations are designed to help instill skillsets and beliefs in you that you need right now to get to where you want to go. That's what they're for. As you keep progressing, those things you need will change and that's when you adapt your affirmations. So, you don't need to read all of them. You don't need to try and have a thousand of them. You just want the ones that are relevant to you right now. Matt [inaudible 00:43:17] says, "I'm in my second week of the accelerator course and loving it." Awesome. Glad to hear that. Caro says, "Sam, thanks so much for answering my previous questions. Last question for today. I'm currently making a research on the websites of my potential clients. There are three groups: those with really good ones, terrible websites, and no websites at all. Which group would you start first with?" I would try all three, to be honest, because I don't know, you don't know. So, instead of guessing, I don't like guessing. I like knowing. So, I would try all of them and see which ones are the most responsive, see which ones end up being the best. Then through that experiment, I would focus on the ones that we find to the best. That's the easiest way to do it. Zara says, "Sam, I'm in week one. I'm a week one student. In looking for my niche, is it important to consider to how big the market is for the niche?" No. Not unless you're looking at a market that's 20 people, which there really isn't. That's not really a definition of a market. That's like a group. So, if a market exists, then it's probably big enough and that's all you need. Remember that you're not marrying your niche and you can expand it over time. I started helping people ... If you want to know how niched I was, I started helping plumbers in Auckland, New Zealand get hot water cylinder repair clients using Google AdWords. That is so small. First of all, New Zealand is tiny. Auckland is a subsegment of something that's already tiny, plumbers is a subsegment of that, and then plumbers that want hot water cylinder repair clients is a subsegment of that. Then the ones that are attracted to using Google AdWords is even smaller. So, that is about as small as it gets. But I was able to grab a foothold in that market because I was so focused. No one else was that focused. It enabled me to differentiate myself, learn that craft, and bam. I took that foothold, then I expanded out to helping plumbers all over New Zealand get hot water cylinder repair clients. Then I expanded out to service based businesses. So, any businesses in New Zealand that wanted clients through digital marketing that was service based. So, offering any service. Then I expanded it out to helping them not just with Google AdWords, but with SEO, and I had a contractor who I used for SEO. So, I didn't have to provide that one. Then I started doing Facebook ads too and I widened it out further. At that point, people started to approach me and ask me how I was starting my business. Or no, how I was succeeding at getting these clients and making money and all of this. So, then I started teaching one dude, his name was Toby, how to get clients. Then this other guy, Stanley, I started teaching him. This was over Skype with a Dropbox folder. Then they started getting clients. Then other people started wanting to buy recordings through that Dropbox folder. So, then I started selling the recordings to that Dropbox folder that I originally taught Stanley and Toby how to do this thing. Then I got 14 customers of that Dropbox folder recording. Then I was like, "Oh, shit. Maybe I should create a course on this because obviously, people want this." So, I created a course on it, sold it, made more money doing that than I was doing through my done-for-you. So, I was like, "Okay. This is a no brainer. Obviously, there's more demand over here than there is here, but only because I did this first." So, this is where people get tripped up. They're like, "Oh, I should create a course because that Sam makes more money doing a course than he did doing done-for-you." That is true, but that doesn't mean that you can just go straight to selling a course because you don't know what to put in the course. No one's going to want the course from you because you have no credibility or backstory that shows why your course is worth listening to. So, you have to go to one to get the other. Then I started doing the courses, then a new course, then a new course. Then it's expanded now and we got lots of customers. Point of the story is that look how small I started, so niched, and it evolved into something quite big. So, you want to start small. But you're married to that thing. You're not stuck there. You can start expanding it out. What I've learned is that opportunities present themselves as they are seized. So, as you start seizing small opportunities, small opportunities, more of them start appearing out in front of you. Right now, if you're starting from the starting lines, you have no idea what's going to happen. You might see this one niche and think, "This is so small. How is this ever going to make me this much money?" When I started, I thought it would be a miracle if I was able to make six figures a year. Then when I made six, I thought it would be a miracle if I could make seven. When I made seven, I thought it would be a miracle if I could make eight. When I made eight, I figured it would be a miracle if I could make nine, which is a hundred million. Now I can see how I'm going to do that quite quickly. When I do that, I'm going to want a billion. Then if I get to a billion, may as well go for a trillion. They keep expanding out in front of you as you keep moving forward. I think a lot of people, they try to see everything from day one standing at the starting line and it's impossible. You have to climb one mountain to see the mountain to climb behind it. Things that start really tiny can end up really huge. So, you've just got to trust that these things will start appearing as you start going forward and don't worry about it. Pretty much every great business in the history of the world started very small and ended up being big and they had no idea they were going to be big when they started small. That's just how it works. Gabriel says, "Hi, Sam. Thanks for taking my question, having these live calls. I'm having trouble starting my business due to uncertainty about which problem to solve for my clients. My research from speaking with several of my ICAs says that they mostly interested in sales, but also considered it brand important. Should I focus on solving their main problem, which is sales or should I integrate both problems into my offer since they're both important? My niche is helping SMEs increase their sales through digital marketing." So, you want to focus on the main thing. Talk about getting them more customers. But in your process of getting them more customers, if you do a little bit of work, which relates to, what was the other thing, relates to improving their brand, if improving their brand is a variable that contributes to getting customers, then that is part of getting customers. So, this is again like, what sort of thinking is this? It's incorrect thinking, basically, because you're seeing these two things as separate things like, oh, I can help this client get more customers or I can help this client improve their brand. They really want to get more customers, but they also want to improve their brand. Which one should I pick? They look separate to you, but really, they are one. Really, this one is a subsegment of this one. So, if they want to get customers, part of getting customers is having a brand. It stems from it. It's the same thing. So, you want to focus on helping these people get clients. If that involves a bit of branding, it does. It's how it works. It's just like, Consulting Accelerator shows people how to start a business, get clients, make money. That's what it shows them how to do. You know how much stuff I cover in this program because in order to do that, we have to look at mindset. We have to look at goals. We have to look at time allocation, planning. We have to look at changing who you are as a person. We have to work on sales. We have to work on marketing. We have to work on creating a service. We have to work on financial stuff so that we can do all that. We have to work on Facebook ads, funnels. This is how the market's really confused. People create a course on Facebook ads and then someone creates a course on sales, then someone creates a course on mindset, then someone creates a course on finance, and you need all of these things to achieve creating a business that makes money. So, I focused on helping people create a business that makes money and it involved teaching all of these things instead of just teaching the thing. My eyes are fixated on the person, the problem, and the result they want and helping that happen. I don't care about the vehicles I use to get people where they want to go. I will interchange these vehicles and dispose of them and replace them without any attachment to them at all. I do not care about the vehicles. I care about the transformation. That's all. So, just keep your eyes fixated on the transformation and use the best vehicles available at the time to get them there. That's what you want to do. Mohammed says, "How do you learn specific marketing strategies with, let's say, Facebook other than through testing yourself? From the sounds of it, you don't know learn from any gurus. You watch all the pioneers go into it and figure it out, put the best pieces together, and win. But how do you identify the pioneers and how do you learn from them? Example of specific things is, let's say, is proper audience explosions and the impact that has on performance or different scaling strategies. Do you just look at the teachers with the most spend under their belt?" So, first of all, how I learned, how I teach myself all of this is I'm really good at looking upstream. That's what I call it. I look upstream on everything. So, most people, let's say they want to learn Facebook ads. They're like, "Oh, how do I learn Facebook ads?" and they just focus on, "Oh, what setting do I click? What do I do in the Facebook platform?" What buttons you click on in the Facebook platform, those are not the things that create Facebook success. Facebook success comes from having an offer that solves a problem for people really well and it's something they really want. Then you use Facebook ads to put that message in front of them so that they know that it exists so that they can buy it. That's it. So, what I do is I look upstream from Facebook ads. If you want to be successful on Facebook ads, you need to have a really good offer. How do you know if your offer's really good? Well, who's the market, what's their problem, and then what's the solution and do they see value in the solution? You know that to be true if at least three people have purchased from you. If those things exist, then we can start going downstream to Facebook ads. Now, how do we use Facebook ads? Well, how do we know who to target? Well, we know who we sold this thing to. We know what they're like. So, we target them. How do we know what to say in the ad? Well, what did we say to the people we sold? Let's just put that in the ad. What image would appeal to them? Well, who are the people that purchased? What things are they interested in? Let's try and put that in the image. All right. Done. That's how you do ads. It's not about the technology. It's about the offer that's being promoted on the ad's platform. How can I describe this? It's like having, let's say you've got a Ferrari. A Ferrari with no gas in it. Then you put water in its gas tank and fire it up. It is not going to work. Facebook ads, it's like a Ferrari engine and if you don't have a good offer, you're just putting water in it. It's not going to work. If you do have a good offer, it's like putting gas in there. It's going to go really well. That's all ads is. So, I would tell you if you want to learn how to do it the best, have the best offer, and you'll figure out the other stuff easy. How you figure out the other stuff is you buy a course. Figure out who's doing the best in Facebook ads out of everyone in the world. That's what I do. If I want to learn how to do something, first of all, I trace it upstream, I make sure I have the components necessary to put into this thing to make it work. Do I have that? Yes. Okay, cool. Now, who is the best person in the world at doing this thing? I just ask people, who is it, who is it, who is it, and I listen to their responses. Then once I start to notice a repeating pattern, I start to know who it is. I also look at who is the best and then how did they learn to be the best and I start tracing those nodes upstream. Once I start tracing everything back to what looks like a source, I go to the source. I like to drink from the spring, not in some plastic bottle. So, I'll trace things where they originated from and I will get that. That's a really good way to learn. In this training, I show you a lot about Facebook ads. I don't know the most about Facebook ads in terms of its features, in terms of what buttons to click on, or anything like that. But I know how to make a lot of money with it. The reason why I've made a lot of money with it is because I have a good offer and I also know how to use the professional. But if you're just a genius at the platform and you don't have a good offer, you won't go anywhere. So, that's how you do it. Brian Tilow says, "I'm in the process of solidifying my niche. I've had quite a few military members ask me how I transitioned. While real estate is good, there is no definite pain and immediate need for it, just listening to the market. So, I found out their pain points is resume writing and acclaiming to post-military life. My niche is helping transitioning military veterans transfer their skills and values into the civilian world." Yeah. So, I would say their pain points aren't necessarily resume writing. Resume writing is a task. Their pain point really is, like you said, acclimating to post-military life. That is definitely a pain point. I know that for a fact because you hear about it all the time and post-traumatic stress and all of that stuff. It is definitely hard. If somebody's come from a battlefield to civilian life, that is the biggest environment change you could possibly have and you're constantly going to be on edge because whenever you change your environment, you change everything. I know that's a pain point and that's an awesome one to focus on, by the way, because it's a big, big one and it's painful and the people who have that pain are aware of it and desperate for a solution. So, that's good. Then you have credibility because you did it yourself. So, obviously, you know how to do it because you did it. Now, all you need to do is help other people do it. I think that's probably one of the best niches I've ever heard from anyone probably. If you pull that off, that's the best, honestly. You will be absolutely flying. So, you should do it. Gabriel says, I already answered that question. Matthew Doctor says, "Why are you opening an office on the other side of the country instead of just going in at New York City?" It's a good question and the reason is talent. So, if you ask me, "Sam, what's your biggest problem right now, it's finding really smart people." That is it. A lot of my time these days is spent trying to find these people and meeting with them, talking to them, and trying to convince them to come work with us. What I've noticed is that we need a lot of engineering people and they're mostly over on the West Coast. It's actually a thing. They're all over there and it's very hard to find them here. A lot of them don't want to move from there to there, so that's why. Instead of me trying to convince them, I'm just putting a base over there so that I can get them and they're happy to work there. It's a talent based decision. Steve Walther says, "What's the benefit to having your company based in Ireland?" There's a few. There's strong intellectual property laws there. Two is there's lots of good talent there and it's very cheap. Three is they have a good tax structure. So, taxes are good there. So, that's why. But you don't need to worry about that stuff until your company is $10 million a year or more. At that point, it's worth looking at the corporate structure of it and how to make it most efficient and all of that. But until then, doesn't really matter. Joshua Westover says, "Sam, do you have any recommendations on how to get really good at coaching people one on one? I want to get my delivery really good. Are there any books you'd recommend for this or is it just about practice?" Practice. That is honestly it. If you want to ask me, "Sam, how did you get good at strategy sessions?" Practice. What does practice look like? 2,000 calls. That's what it looks like. If you want to ask me, "Sam, how did you get good at ads?" Well, I did it. I've done it for seven years and I've spent probably, I don't know, four, five million dollars on ads. That's how you get good. "Sam, how'd you get good at helping people get results?" Practice. How did I get good at anything? Practice. Honestly, I can't think of anything in my life that I have actually been naturally good at, other than not giving up. That's it. That's the only thing that I've found that I've had. But even then, I gave up temporarily. When I first started, I gave up during the day, or like that. But I never gave up on longterm. You know what I mean? That's the most important thing. I wasn't good at anything when I started. I'm an introvert, so talking to people on the phone, extremely hard. I didn't know anything about business or anything about marketing, numbers, nothing. I had to learn it all and I only got good at anything through practice. It's just time, repetition, consistency, practice, just over and over again, over and over again until it happens. Yeah, and someone asked me other day too, they're like, "How do you get so good at answering people's questions on these Q&A calls and things?" It's like, "Dude, have you looked in those archives?" If you look in the archives of all of our Q&A calls, so we have more than a thousand hours of Q&A calls that are archived. So, that's a thousand hours of answering questions and that's only since we started archiving the damn things. We were doing it for four years before that happened. So, there's probably, I would say, three to 4,000 fucking hours of answer questions that I can prove that's how you get good at it. It's not being naturally gifted at it or anything. If someone tries something, they're like, "Oh, I'm no good at this answering questions thing," I'm like, "What have you done? One one on one? Dude, I got the equivalent of 4,000 hours." So, that's how. Never look at someone and think that they're gifted. The gift comes from practice. No one just has something and then they just are good at it. It's practice all the time. Michael Jordan wasn't born good at playing basketball. In fact, he actually didn't make the cut for his college team. He was told he should give up and that he sucked. So, he wasn't naturally gifted. He turned into the best in the world. It's the same with everyone. It's practice. People that believe otherwise, they're delusional. Mike Giles Martinez says, "Sam, our product is senior chief financial officers on a part-time basis. We are 400 CFOs worldwide and over 1,000 clients." Nice work, dude. That's a solid effort. "We never used Facebook. Would it work? We charge 1k a day rate. Market is one million euro to 15 million euro businesses or sectors." Absolutely, it will work. Like I said before, what makes Facebook ads work? Having something that works without Facebook ads means that it will work on Facebook ads. So, if you've been successfully selling this thing, which you have because you have a thousand clients, Facebook will blow this thing up. It will absolutely work. Hundred percent. Will it work for you first pop, first day, first try? Maybe, because you've got a lot of experience. But maybe not. But will it work if you figure out the variables? A hundred percent. That thing will crush it on Facebook ads. Brian Kelly says, "Yes, it changes your current state. Hard to concentrate." Sterling Cooley says, "Brendon Burchard has some type of coach certification course that's pretty good." Yeah, I don't like certifications, honestly. I personally hate certifications because it gives the person the illusion that they are good at something and that's dangerous. Someone's good at something when they're good at something, not when they're certified. There is a difference between actually being good at something and being certified because I'm good at Facebook ads. I'm not certified at Facebook ads. I'm not certified in actually anything at all. Zero. I like it that way because I always rest on my results, not my certifications, because I have none. That keeps me aligned on the right thing. I think it's so, so stupid when a coach is like, "Hey. I should be your coach because I have an MBA and I'm also qualified in Wistia video creation and Facebook ads and Google Ads and Google Analytics. That's why you should trust me, because I'm really well certified." Run away from those people. Run, run, run, run, run. You only want to trust someone when they've actually, they're good at solving a problem and they can prove it. The only way you get good at that is by trying and then solving it and then solving it again and again and again and getting better at it every time. Then when you're the best at it, you're the best. It's never about a certification and people who focus on those things often get sidetracked and end up not being very good at it. If you want to see what I'm talking about in reality, this is interesting to look at. The people who are authorities and experts on things often suck at the thing that they're the authority on. So, this is a really fascinating thing to look at because the person who's famous for something, where has most of their effort gone? Into the fame. The people not into being good at the thing. So, the people who are often really good at something aren't necessarily the most famous for it. But they're the best at it. You've got to choose as an entrepreneur and a businessman, which one do you want to focus on? Being famous for it or being really good at it? I can tell you that the one who always wins is the one who's actually good at it. Every time, never any other instance of it ever. Maybe in the short term, the one who has the fame will bit ahead. But with a long enough timeframe, the person who is actually good at it will always win and [inaudible 01:10:26] not about having a New York Times bestselling book. It's not about any of that crap. It's just about being good. Just focus on that. Mark Lawrenson says ... That's a reason, by the way, why we're never doing certifications at consulting.com. I will never be offering people certificates saying, "You are now successful," because how dumb is it to give someone a certificate saying, "Congrats. You're successful," if they're not successful? How does that work? Someone's like, "Hey, man. I got this certificate. It says I'm successful at consulting." It's like, "Do you have a client?" "Nah." "Making any money?" "Nope". Now that person is walking around in the world believing they're successful when they're not, which is wrong. Someone's successful with our course when they get clients and make money. Then when that happens, they don't need a certificate because they know it's true. So, that's why we do it that way and I encourage all of you to see things the same way because certifications and university degrees and all of this, they're abstractions from truth. Any time you're dealing with an abstraction, it's not actually truth. It's something that is intended to be close to it, but most of the time, way off. So, it's just best to optimize and focus for truth. Mark Lawrenson says, "Sam, do you think people believe they are born with a certain personality and this is who they are? I need to know." Do I think people believe they are? Probably. But the thing is, is that you can't remember when you were a child, like when you were one day old, two days old. You can't remember that stuff. Because you can't remember that, you have no idea. No one else knows that because they're not inside your head. So, they don't know either. So, I would say people believe that because people, once they get a certain kind of character and personality, they start to just focus on that thing and they're stubborn to changing it and they end up just continuing as this thing. That's how most people go and so they assume, "Oh, I can't change. Oh, I can't do this. I'm not good at it because I do this." Then they assume that, "Oh, I must have been born that way too." In reality, what happens is that you evolve through your environment and what you do and your experiences. So, that's how you get to who you are. You can change it at any point in time. The more extreme you are on one side, the harder it is to change. But it's absolutely easy to change. If you're an introvert, it's not that you were born that way. It's just that your childhood and upbringing created a preference for being alone and in the quiet. That's it. If you're an extrovert, you must have been talking to a lot of people and social and talking to your parents from a young age and it's been evolving along that thing. But it's easy to change. If you don't believe that, then I got two good examples for you. The Stockholm syndrome one, kid gets kidnapped, literally worst thing that could happen, ends up liking their kidnapper and not wanting to leave. Then person goes to jail, that's the worst thing that can happen to them, they think, then they end up not wanting to leave and committing a crime just so they can go back. That shows you how humans attach to things. We have attachments and we have attachments to what's familiar and what we're used to. So, if we have always been quiet and reserved and shy, then we have an attachment to that. If we've always been outgoing and social, we have an attachment to that. Does that mean we are like that? No. It's just a preference, and so you can change it. Thomas says, "Hi, Sam. Good to see you. I have a proof of concept with consulting. My dedication is to help people to heal codependency and narcissistic abuse so they are free from the pain, the abandonment, and the manipulation that they endured now and in childhood when it all started. After working with me, they experience lasting happiness and are full of just self love and freedom. With that niche, I have only one high ticket four figure client. All the others are small ticket three figures. While I iterate my message and keep outreaching like hell, I'm starting to build my online course. I do not yet have enough savings [inaudible 01:15:42]. Is there a payment option for this too and how many percent of my time and efforts would you recommend me to put into creating my online course vs. time for one on one model?" So, I would talk to Rhett, I'm tagging him here on your comment, because he can tell you about it. He can just tell you about it via chat too if you want. Then what would you do? I would focus on not making a course. Not right now. Even if you joined Uplevel, I'd say don't make a course right now. You need at least ... Or it depends about your hundred dollar clients because you also have those. But if you only had one client, then I wouldn't make a course because one client can be one client you don't know the patterns. Once you've worked with at least three, you know how clients can differ and you know how to solve the problem based on differing variables and different personalities, different environments, different conditions. So, you're better at dynamically solving the problems. With one person, you're only good at statically solving the problem because you're used to one environment, one personality, and one situation. But the more you deal with more people and you make your thing work with all of these variables moving, then you start to get really good. So, it depends whether you've had much of how close you've worked with these other ones. If you've been doing Q&A calls or one on ones with the three figure clients and if they've gotten results, then you might be ready to create a course. But you said you might not have enough money for it. So, that gives away that one. I would say you need to work with more clients one on one that aren't hundred dollar clients. You need some $1,000 one on one clients, at least three of them first. Do that first because lots of people ask, "How do you create a good course?" You don't. I'm not a good teacher and I'm not a good course creator. I don't know anything about education and I don't know anything really about creating a good course. I've never looked at those things. But what I do know is how to do it really well and doers make the best teachers. That's how it works. So, the person who can do the thing the best, doesn't matter how bad they are at communication, how bad they are at teaching, they will be the best teacher every time. Doers are the best teachers every single time. So, how do you create the best course? You have to be the best doer. So, that's it. But I don't have any ninja course creating skills. Just fucking good at doing it, really doing it in real life, and getting really good results. Then I take the information which I've learned from experience and I just put it into a course. That's it. It's like how do you create good ads? Have a good offer. Then just put it into some ads. You just got to focus on the main things and not these other things. It's not about a course. It's about having a good method that's proven. It's not about a good Facebook ad. It's about a good offer that solves a problem and gives people value. If you get those two things right, you will just fly. That's really all I focus on and worry about is just those things because I know if I get those things right, everything else will just happen, which it does. Elaine Kohn says, "Hi, Sam. I'm asking my question again and giving more information. How do I price my offer to startup in the artificial intelligence if they do not have a consistent revenue? They will close their first deal. My niche is selling engineering software the automative industry. My offer is to help them get more leads. I charge my first clients 6k." Yeah. So, there's a critical piece missing from your message and it is the problem. So, do they have a problem, what is it, and do they know they have this problem? Are they aware of it? Is it painful for them? Do they want to solve their problem? If they do, good. Now, what would be the [inaudible 01:20:27] for their problem? If it is what you've got, good. If it isn't what you've got, forget about what you've got. Give them what's best to solve their solution. Best to solve their problem. Then if that's true, then you can just start selling it to them and it's easy because you're like, "Hey. Do you have this problem?" They're like, "Yes." You're like, "I've got a solution." They're like, "Cool. Give me it." Done. That's it. You just got to learn to see things real simple. First principles. If you get that stuff right, you figure everything else out easy. Sterling Cooley says, "Hey, Sam. I feel too much like a hammer looking for nails. I am able to prescribe technology to treat insomnia through vagus nerve stimulation. But I found that helping managers get better performance at work is what I like to focus on as a result. I think they're related, but I'm only doing direct outreach and my results so far have been very mixed. Is saying manager too general? Reason for that title is they are by far most likely to be depressed plus have means to afford solutions." Again, you're looking at it like that these two things are different. They're probably the same thing and very closely related. It's probably tripping you up because you think, "Oh, I'm jumping niches. Oh, I'm doing this. That means I'm not going to be able to do that or I'm doing that. That means I'm not going to be able to do this." It's like it's a ... What's the word to describe it? It's like a dialectic thinking. It's like binary. It's like zero on. Is it on, is it off, is it that, is it that? It's the same damn thing. So, really, I would focus on helping managers get more performance at work. One, because that's a specific group of people. Two is that is a problem that exists. Three is they do want that solution. Any manager that thinks they're performing low or have a desire to fix it, people who have low performance, and most of the time, they're not aware that they're even low performing. Those people are the people who will never really do much to improve it because they don't even think that they're low performing. But a manager who is low performing and thinks they're low performing, they're a high performing person. A lot of the time, what you'll find is they're not even low performing. They're actually really high performing, probably the most highest performing person ever, but they still think they're low performing. This is what's interesting about successful people. They never actually think that they're good at it. Well, they do know they're good at it, but they always think that they can do way better every single time. This is a good market. Really good. I would focus on that one and I bet you that you'll be able to help them with insomnia probably through the other thing you use because you're going to find out that a large thing that managers struggle with is not getting enough sleep. I know because I'm one of them. So, I'm a manager who cares about performance, I did cut back on sleep, and I paid the price. Then I hired personal trainer and everything to fix it and started tracking my performance. Sleep was probably the thing that made the biggest difference out of everything I did. So, I could have supplements, I could work out, go to the gym, and I could have a chef and eat a really strict diet. But out of all of those things, the one thing that made the most difference was sleep by a mile. Probably four times powerful as any one of those other things. So, you need to sleep eight hours a night. For other people who are watching this, sleep is more important than exercise, diet, everything. I would focus on managers who want to perform better and I bet you you'll be able to wind in that other thing that you were talking about. Debbie says, "Needed this for motivation and clarity." Awesome. Glad to help. Mike McCormick says, "Once you get a client signed up over the phone to do Facebook advertising for them, what's the next step once you hang up the phone? Do you send contracts? What exactly would I need from them to get started? Is there a standard process?" Yeah. You need what you need. If you get them signed up on the phone, if they paid you, then good. You can send them an agreement if you want. I give you an agreement in week six of the training. They can sign that, send it back to you. Then you need what you need. So, if you're going to set up ads for them, what do you need? You're probably going to need to know about their business, about their market, who they are, what their pain points are, how their solution works, what it is, why it's different from the competition, what imagery the market might be responsive to, and what things they've found work best in their experience when marketing and selling their thing. That's what you need to know. You need to know what you need to know to do the job. I'm guessing you asked that question because you're thinking too far out into the future from where you are now. Just start and you'll figure these things out as you go because if you had already signed up a client on the phone for Facebook ads, you'd easily figure out what to do because you're like, "Oh. I need what I need to do the job." Then you'd ask for it, then you'd get it, then you'd do it. So, don't worry about the future too much. Just keep moving. Julian Plata says, "What would be the key 10 questions you ask your prospective client to make this research to narrow down your niche and start understanding what are their desires and where they predict themselves as they [inaudible 01:26:54]. You say to pick a niche, but the niche you point out is highly dependent to the desires, needs, and solutions needed. So, my understanding of picking a niche is not to focus in that the solution or trying to think in what they want to be because we don't know. But to get here, you need to know how and what to ask." Yeah. So, it's not about 10 questions. It's about understanding. My objective with anything is to understand it because once I understand it, then I understand it. Now I know what to do. But until I understand it, all I need to do is understand it. The only way I do that is by asking the questions, which I'm curious about, to form an accurate picture in my head about how it works. So, it's not about 10 questions. I don't have a list of questions I ask and then tick them off and then once I ask all 10, I magically understand something. It doesn't work like that. Nothing in reality works like that. So, you have to talk to a market nonstop until you get it. Tell me about your biggest problem that you face on a day to day basis. That's a good starting question. Then from there, they tell you all of these different problems. Then you have to drill into things. Then if they tell you five, they're like, "Oh, I don't like this, I don't like that," let me give you an actual example instead of talking in abstractions. So, I had this software company called SnapInspect. How I got the idea for it is I picked the market, which is property managers. Why did I pick them? I just thought these people would probably have a problem and I was somewhat curious about property managers. So, I just picked property managers. That was about as scientific as it was. Then I had no idea what the hell these people did. No idea at all. So, then I started emailing them and asking them, "Hey. I'm doing some research on the property management market. What do you find to be the most painful problem that you face on a day to day basis?" Then they would tell me. Some of them would, some of them wouldn't. Then the answers you get from that question don't tell you what it is. It's a starting point. People don't know. There're people who don't have very clear thinking because if people knew what their problem was, then they would be able to solve it because most of problem solving is just problem definition. Once a problem is defined, it is as good as solved. So, they don't know what it is. So, part of the game is trying to figure out what it is and they don't know. So, it's kind of fun. So, you ask that question, they give you some answers, and then you continue the conversation from there. A lot of what they told me at first was, "Oh, I hate having to," I was thinking. This was quite a few years ago. I remember people saying, "Oh, I hate the phone calls that clients give. They call me all the time and they ask me things. Oh, I hate voicemails." These are surface level things. You're going to get all [inaudible 01:30:32] people tell you that aren't really problems. They're just daily annoyances. But you have to talk to enough people before you start to notice a pattern and it's all about the pattern. It's never about an individual response. You can learn nothing from and individual response. So, you talk to lots of people. I talked to probably 20 or 30 of them, started on email, then it progressed through to phone calls. I even met some of them for coffee. All I was doing was a dude interested in their life. People like talking to people who are interested in them, so it works really well. Then I found from that a repeating pattern, which was so obvious to me after 30 calls and not obvious to me at all after five or 10, so this is why you need to talk to lots of people, is it was property inspections. So, pretty much 25 out of 30 had said property inspections. But I couldn't noticed the recurring pattern and the theme until I did enough. Then it stood out to me. It just jumped out, hit me in the face. I was like, "Oh, this is it." Then I looked and there was no real solutions to it. Or if there were solutions, they weren't very good and they weren't aware that they existed. Then I was like, "Okay. Well, I'm going to solve this." So, I solved it and it worked. I sold it to lots of people, the company was successful, I built the product, and the company still exists today. I sold my shares in it. I had a partner because he was a developer and I sold my shares to him and I focused on consulting. But why I said that story is because that is the way which I find any market problem. I start talking to the people and I'm just seeking to understand. I would ask people questions and just listen to them and just drill them relentlessly with questions until I had a full clear mental picture of what their life looked like and what their problems and frustrations were and exactly how the process worked. I still know to this day exactly how the process works to do a property inspection, from end to end, every single step and every frustration and every part of it. I just kept asking questions until I understood. So, that's what you need to do. You're not trying to ask 10 questions. You're trying to understand. If you're trying to do market research right now and you're trying to figure out a market and their problem, I would just write down, "Ask questions until I understand everything." That's it. So, if you're like, "What should I do?" It's like, ask questions. "Who should I ask?" The market. "When should I keep asking questions too?" Until I understand. "When do I know I understand?" You'll know. Simple. [inaudible 01:33:46] Johnson says, "You mention your current salary is about 50k. Was that always the case? What do you suggest for a person with a 300k debt, mortgage, credit card debt, student loans?" Yeah. It's definitely not always been the case. When I first started in business, I thought the only reason why you had a business was to make money for yourself so that you could spend it on fancy shit because I didn't know any better than that. So, I used to pretty much, every dollar I made in profit, I used to take personally and then spend on dumb shit.

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