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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 14th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, July 14th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for July 14th, 2018. 


Transcript / MP3

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Sam: How's it going, Edward Tang? I can see a few people jumping on here. Pietor [phonetic 00:00:31]. Can someone just let me know if we've got audio and video working? Let me know if you can hear me. If you can see me. Just so I know we're good to go here. Cool. Well, how these calls go, if it's your first time being on one of these, welcome. I do one of these calls every Saturday. Almost every Saturday, sometimes I'm traveling, sometimes I'm away so I would say, you know, maybe 90% of the time we do one of these every Saturday. And they happen from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time, which is the time in New York. And how they work is you can just jump on, ask me anything you want in that comment box, and I go through people one at a time and answer their questions as they come in. First come, first served. So let's jump right into it. I can see Pietor has a question here. He says, "Last time I asked you if you worked 12 hours a day, 6 days per week. What are you talking about with your wife during the Sunday? And you said talking about your wife because she loves Debt Now, but what about the time that she was not into business? Mine has no business and not interested to that." Like what do we talk about? I don't know I don't have like an agenda. Just talk about whatever. I mean I don't plan that. Sunday's like, we'll just do whatever she wants to do. And we talk about whatever. And it's not really planned. And then Angie says, "Hey Sam, how are you?" Good thanks, Angie. Shelley says, "Hello, how's it going?" All right, Jolene says, "Hey Sam. Somehow I feel weird and lonely starting my consulting business because most of my friends and family don't think in an entrepreneurial way and they don't get what I'm doing. Did you experience these feelings? How did you solve this and overcome it?" Yeah well it's normal, right? It's kind of like changing worlds. Like, you know that's why the Welcome Week in Consulting Accelerator it says Welcome to a New World. Because it is like a new world. It's like going to a different planet. Because all of a sudden everything's so different. And then you know, you're hanging out with all these people that are starting their own businesses, talking about mindset stuff, talking about affirmations, talking about solving problems, and thinking big and all of this stuff. And then you go back to your normal life, and you talk to people about it, and they don't understand, they just don't get it. So it's totally normal, you know? Like it is a totally normal thing. If you've lived a normal life with normal people, and then you change to wanting to become an entrepreneur and all that, you're going to experience this thing. And you know it's real simple. For me it was like, well do I really want to do this? Answer is yes. Okay, so I'm just going to keep going. And then what happens is, you know, I still remained friends with everyone, and my family obviously, they're still my family. But we just, we're not ... with my friends, we're definitely nowhere near as close as we were, because I used to hang out with them every weekend, and all that, go out drinking with them. Now I live in another country. So we're still friends, but we're nowhere near as close. I'm not doing the same patterns and the same routines as we did before. And then if I'm hanging out with them, I probably won't talk about business stuff, because I know to me that's what I'm interested in, but to them, that's not what they're interested in. So I don't try and preach it, or I don't try and force it down anyone's throat. If someone's interested in it, I'll talk about it. If they're not, I won't. And it's just normal. It's a normal experience. You've just got to keep going. James Perota says, "Five all time favorite books." I really like Made in America by Sam Walton, Principles by Ray Dalio. I also like the Amazon Letters to Shareholders 1997 till 2018, those are awesome. It's not a book, but it should be. Those are awesome. What else? Psycho Cybernetics, great book. And then Blue Ocean Strategy. Great book. There's five. Mike King says, "Hi Sam, great program. What's the hardest part about being you?" I don't know. This is kind of an interesting question. I guess it's just thinking big. And having to then operate in reality and build what I want. So there's what I can see, and there's what I want, and there's what I want to build, and there's what I want to do. And then I have to come back here and I have to work one little brick at a time. I've got to place that brick, then I've got to place that brick, then I've got to place that brick. And so it's way slower than I would like, and it's way harder than I would like, but that's just the reality of it. Because I think big and I want to move fast. I wouldn't really consider it a problem, it's just that is what I find hard a lot of the time. James Perota says, "How do you allocate your personal income?" Me personally, I take as little as possible. As little as I possibly can. Let's say $100,000 a year, $50,000 a year. I think my salary has been zero for a while. But then I think we're gonna put it on 50 or $100,000 a year. And then I'll just use that. But I'm not trying to make money for myself. Because you don't want to take too much money out of the company for you personally. Because that's a waste of money, right? You've got to pay taxes on it, you've got to pay all of that. Whereas I like making money so that I can then reinvest that money and make more money. And I'm not even really doing it to make money, I use money as a force for hiring smart people, and building things. So it's like, it helps me build faster, and it helps me build bigger. And I want it to all go around in that company. Keep building, keep building, keep building. And I don't want to just use it myself to buy things. That seems lame to me. And that's a good strategy. The best businessmen and entrepreneurs in the history of the world, they build things, and they don't really take the money out of the business for themselves. They just keep pumping it back in, keep pumping it back in, keep building, keep building. And ironically, that's actually how you make the most money for yourself. By not trying to take the money out. The people who take the money out and buy fancy cars and houses, they end up broke. And the people who keep putting it back in, they end up the richest people in the world. Pietor says, "How the part of the five week and the five strong points and the opinion of your friends, week one exercise, will you get to clear on your niche?" I totally don't understand what you said there. Sorry. Try to make that clearer. James Perota says, "What do you think of index funds?" I don't really think anything of them. I like putting my money where I have most conviction in it. And that is in my own business. So I hold a lot of cash because cash is important, it's powerful. And it buys you time, and it buys you resources, and it also can help you out if you get into a storm, or unforeseen things, which always happen. So I like holding a lot of cash, and then I like investing in my own business, and in myself. I don't really like investing in ... if you invest in an index fund, what is the returns gonna be? 8 percent, if it's good? Right? In my business, I make more than 100 percent a month. Why would I invest in an index fund? And then Pietor says, "When do you know you have to change your niche?" When you have totally exhausted your current pick for your niche. What you've got to remember is that it's pretty much never gonna be the niche, it's gonna be you. Right? So if someone picks a niche, and they try it, and they can't find it, they can't get a customer, they can't make it work, it doesn't mean that the niche doesn't work. It means that the person doesn't work. So you've always got to remember that. And never try to shift the blame to the niche, because it's most likely you. Your heart might not be in the niche. And that's a good reason to change. If you're not really passionate about it, if you truly hate your niche, that's not a good sign. I talked about it with my team the other day, we were like, picking a niche is kind of like a wife. You don't want to just be with someone that you don't like, and that you just hate every minute of it, just to make money. Right? Imagine ... people who pick a niche that they hate just because they think there's money in there are like people who marry someone who they dislike just to get money. It never works. You might collect a couple of paychecks, but you're gonna be miserable, and it's never really gonna last long. When you pick your niche, you don't want to think too much about it, but you should have an interest in it. There should be something about it which makes you curious, and attracts you to it. And you're just interested in it. You don't have to be a skillful person in that niche. You don't have to know a ton about that niche. And you don't have to have any experience with that niche. Those things don't matter. But what you should have is curiosity. You want to start digging around in there. You want to start asking questions. And you also want to learn and discover. Those things are important. And that's what helps people really do well in things. Edward Tang says, "Sam, I agree with your post about your level of success equals your level of sacrifice. And ever since I've begun implementing what you have taught by segregating away from my friends, learning to say no to Friday nights, I've gotten, gained so much extra focus and time to work on my craft. However now that I'm only spending leisure time with family and relatives, I started to feel rather lonely. How should I go about dealing with this? It's just ... " Sorry, it keeps moving. "How should I go about dealing with this." Damn, this thing keeps moving. Well, I guess that if you're lonely, it probably means that you're single, right? And so it's easy for me to not go out really at all, because I'm married, and I live with my wife. Also, with my company, there's a lot of people who work in there. And I talk to them on a daily basis, and I've also got my Q&A calls, and all of that. So I don't feel lonely at all if I don't have to go out. Because there's people all around me, all the time, plus I've got a wife. So if you're single, and you're gonna have to find some time to go and meet people, and do that stuff. Because that's something that is in you that you can't get rid of. You're going to always have a very powerful, primal driver to find somebody else, right? And there's no amount of logic or real discipline can overrule that thing. So you're gonna have to make some time to go hang out with people. But you just want to make sure that it's not like going out all the time. You're just gonna have to find a little bit of a balance. But then once you find a girlfriend, or a wife or something, then you can start going out a whole bunch, because you've already satisfied that need. That's why when I saw Rhett, when Rhett moved into my apartment with me, and he started training me, he started taking that philosophy about not going out and all of this, and I was watching it, and I was like, hmm. This isn't really gonna, Rhett's gonna get lonely because he's not gonna have a girlfriend or whatever. And also, he's not going out, so he's not likely to meet somebody. So then I just did a promotion for him on Instagram, and then found him a girlfriend. James Perota says, "Do you suggest charging a minuscule amount for strategy sessions?" No. I mean, if you're already doing it and it works for you, keep doing it. But if you're thinking about doing it, I would stick to what we teach in the program. I've taught a lot of people, I've helped a lot of people make a lot of money. And the way we teach in this program really works. So Deborah says, "Hey Sam. Procrastinating on doing these Facebook ads. Any truth to results when launching an ad over a weekend versus a weekday?" The best time to do anything is always now. Well, the best time to do it was yesterday. The second best time to do it is now. So if you're thinking, "Oh, should I launch my ad on Monday or Tuesday or Wednesday or Saturday?" Now. That's the best time. Nigel says, "Sam, you say we should find a problem in a niche and solve it with the best service and solution. However, I have a great knowledge and experience and a love for finance and accounting. I don't want to offer digital marketing health or fitness services. Should I find a niche that needs finance and accounting services, or should I just ditch my drive to be a finance consultant and look for problems regardless of what the offer will solve it?" So this is a good question. I have seen lots of people who have a fascination and an interest about finance. You should have a look at a customer interview by a guy called Mark Ford. M-A-R-K F-O-R-D. Watch that customer interview. And you'll see what he did. He was in your shoes, and he's now a consultant for financial advisors. Another one is Chris ... had a blank, I forgot his last name. But if you find a customer interview by a guy called Chris, he also was fascinated by finance, and now he's doing consulting for financial advisors, making a lot of money too. So look at Mark Ford, and Chris ... I had a blank on his last name. Chris Wills. W-I-L-L-S. Chris Wills, Mark Ford. Watch those two. And that'll open doors in your mind about what you could do that is related to finance. And then Pietor says, "What are the things that you're still doing during your holidays? Health coach, woke up at 6 a.m.?" If I'm on a vacation, which isn't that long. I'm on a vacation for seven days every 90 days. So a total of probably four weeks out of the year, right? Total of 28 days. Not that long. When I'm on vacation, I really don't have any schedule, plan, routine, anything, because that's the point of a holiday, just relax. But one thing I try to do is do some form of exercise. It's probably not gonna be my gym routine, but on the last vacation I had, I just went and did yoga with my wife, and that was doing something, you know? Because I don't want to have seven days off without doing anything. I want to make sure to either go walking, hiking, do yoga, go swimming, do something. Because it's good to keep active. But I don't really worry too much about my diet. Because if I tried to stay strict on my diet when I'm on vacation, then I'm just not very fun to be with going to restaurants, because I can't eat all of this different stuff. And then it just becomes a pain in the ass. So I let that sort of stuff go. I also let my routine go. I'll sleep in till 9 a.m. if I want to. It's about relaxing, right? That's what a vacation's for. Now a bunch of questions people asked just moved up, and now I can't see them. So if I miss your question as I go through these, it's because it's moved up on the screen and I've missed it. So just ask it again. Pietor says, "I work 60 hours a week on this niche for the last seven months. Have a lot of experience in the niche, and no real results. Where guys like Samuel that you interviewed lately, the Tom guy, make 25K in less than six months. Any idea why there's such a difference?" Yeah, everything and everyone and every situation is different. There's some general rules and principles that apply, but you can't compare yourself to somebody else and get disheartened. Because sometimes, like look at me. It took me a year to get a first client. Whereas some other people might get their first client really fast. But then look what happened to me over five years. Right? So don't compare yourself to people, because acceleration happens rapidly, not evenly over time. So you might start slow, and then just explode. It's not just a slow linear trajectory. So don't get disheartened by that. And you've just got to stick to it. And figure out why. Why aren't people buying? Then ask yourself, how can I fix that? You've got to ask why all the time, and you've got to stick to things, you've got to focus, and you've got to work really hard. Pietor says, "Is it normal to be fed up to listen to your prospects during the strategy session?" Maybe on some strategy sessions. Maybe some people. Some people are a pain in the ass, right? But if it happens to you on most of your strategy sessions, then that's a sign that either your attitude's wrong, or that you're in a niche that you have no interest in. Luke Schumacher says, "Hey Sam. I help coaches and consultants generate leads on autopilot. My only hump in this niche is I don't have a case study or testimonials. Best way to get around that? Otherwise all other feedback has been great." The best way to get around not having testimonials and feedback is to get testimonials and feedback. And the best way to do that is to get a client, and so you've got to get clients. And then you've got to deliver good services to those clients, and then you've got to ask them for a testimonial and feedback. And now you have it, now you can use it. That's as simple as it is. Shelly says, "I'm so glad that you do these calls. Really appreciate hearing your many great insights on such a wide range of subjects. Always [inaudible 00:20:53] wisdom." Thanks Shelly. Tucker says, "Hey Sam. I provided tons of value to a company that I used to work for by hiring 40 employees. Now I'm helping other businesses grow. Would you advise me to go back to my old client and ask for a testimonial? What should be said in that testimonial?" Yeah, just ask them. Current situation before they hired you, then ... ask them what it was like before they started working with you, then what it was like during the process of working with you, and then ask them what life is like now after they've worked with you. You want those three states: before, during, after. Because that's the story of transformation, and that will help other people understand what you're able to help people do. And then Timothy says, "Do you recommend offering several different packages for different prices?" No, I recommend just simple pricing. Figure out what your client's problem is. Then offer a solution to that problem. And offer it at a nice, simple, standardized price. Zach Marcus says, "Hey Sam. My name is Amos, I'm using a fake name because I got kicked out of my niche's Facebook group for messaging and probing too much for market research, and I'm now going undercover. My niche is people who are suffering from anorexia, most of them are females, and their commonalities are self starvation, exercise addiction, suffer eating anxiety, and have an intense fear of gaining weight. Despite being a male, I overcame this before, and I know it's a painful problem because I almost died, and it consumed my entire life, and that's why I chose this niche." "I did my best to fill up ten smart market questions and ideal client worksheet based on the commonalities both my niche and I share. But I'm still having doubts, because some of the answers I wrote are still vague and incomplete unless I talk to the market." "My question is, number one, how much is too much market research before moving on to the next MVO module, and two, is it okay to take what I wrote as a hypothesis, move on for now, and continue to refine them as I go along the training and do the strategy sessions?" I would say you've probably done enough. Because you've been in that yourself, right? So you've done some market research on this market, but also, a lot of your market research was done when you went through that. So I would say you've done enough, and now it's time to talk to the market and then start messaging people, start doing strategy sessions, start making offers to people. And during that process, you'll be able to sharpen, hone and refine your message and your offer. And I think that's a cool niche, by the way. Any time you can relate a niche like that to an actual life story, it helps you, because you're an insider. Paul [inaudible 00:23:42], sorry if I said that wrong. "Hey Sam. For two year, I've had an eight week Shopify e-commerce training program. The training helped me understand why having both newbies and experienced people in the same training is dumb. I've analyzed over 3K of my strategy session applications, and over 80 percent are newbies. I'm clear on their problems and desired outcomes. It seems my offer has morphed from e-comm/Shopify to help people make an extra 5K per month in their spare time. E-comm just happens to be the vehicle, but I'm struggling to find my niche because it's so big. In this situation, how do I narrow my niche? Is it man, woman, certain age or demo or background? Or do I just pick one? Sorry for the typos." Yeah, it's simple. You help people start ... or if you help people start, then you would say, "I help people start a Shopify store and make $5000 a month." If you help people with existing stores grow, then I would say, "I help people with Shopify e-commerce stores grow to 5 grand a month." Right? It's as simple as that. You don't need to cut it up into man, woman or age groups. What clusters them together is the fact that they are interested in Shopify stores, or already have Shopify stores. That's the cluster. Jennifer Nicole says, "Hey Sam, thanks for your time. How much is the uplevel program? I need the online course building training." So Jennifer, what you should do is go to week seven in the accelerated program. Go to week seven, and watch the three videos in weeks seven. And then if you're interested, apply to uplevel through that. Nigel Walker says, "I lose all my time outside of my corporate job due to friends, co-workers, girls, due to socializing. How did you get over this? And what did you tell them? It's shocking to people, and even myself, to go from being social to anti-social and unreliable." Yeah, well it's a decision, right? You can't have both. I mean, you kind of can. But it's gonna be an average both. Right? People who start really great companies and make really great progress, they're not social butterflies that are out all the time, keeping up their life. The people who are really good socialites aren't really good at anything else in life. You know? They don't build things. They don't do things. What they do is socializing. Right? So you've got to decide, what do you want to be? Do you want to be a socialite? Or do you want to build something great? You've got to just make that decision. And if you chose to build, then you've got to let go of it. Just stop going out. At first, it will be hard. And at first your ego's going to be weak, because if someone calls you weird, or if someone calls you anti-social or unreliable, you might take that to heart, and think, "Oh my God, I'm doing something wrong." But as you mature and actually learn to see things for what they are, not for what people think, then you'll realize that this is something that other people can't comprehend, because they're just not there yet. They don't have the level of awareness that you have, they don't see it. And that's fine. You don't care what other people think about you, you just trust your own instincts and your own analysis of things, all right? People that come from the normal world, where they're so worried about what other people think about them and say about them, it's so hard for them to go against what other people think and say about them, right? It's so hard, because they're so used to that. But what makes really good entrepreneurs and businessmen is they learn to trust themselves, and even when that is at complete opposites to what other people think about them. You know? You should learn to have no problem about what people think about you. That's what makes you strong. And that's what'll make you good. You've just got to understand that it's an opinion that somebody else has about you. Who cares about their opinion? The only thing I care about is my opinion of myself. And how that opinion happens is by the results I get. That's all I really think about. Anything else, I don't hear it. I don't even see it. Doesn't exist. Pietor says, "How to control a prospect during the strategy session who speaks a lot, even too much. My last strategy session was two hours long." You've just got to tell them. You've just got to butt in and be like, "Look, we've got an hour here. And I really want to hear everything and stuff, but we have an hour here. So I need you to try and condense your answers to much more bite sized pieces, because otherwise we're gonna go way over time." You've just got to tell them the truth. Don't let it keep going on and get frustrated. Say something about it. Michael Block says, "Sam, what sector would you most like to create a legacy? Or how do you want to make a difference to the world?" I basically want to rebuild the world's education system. So build a new one. Because the current one, it's broken. John says, "One question. I am a businessman with my own bakery. I made a big step to freedom, because I find my way to live more as a business owner instead of a business maker all day. I think this is a big issue in Germany or in general, to become a real business owner. Do you think this could be a niche? To solve the problem, to make the next development step?" I guess it could be. I think you'd have to do the work. You've got to watch week one, one video at a time, do the action items, just do the work. And the work will show you what to do. And you'll be able to answer this question yourself. I don't know enough information here to be able to answer your question, but if you do the work, you will figure this out. Just trust the process, put one foot in front of the other, and get it done. Peter Braun says, "I might get a client sooner than I can finish your course. I just finished week one, because setting the fundamentals took time. I would feel more confident to talk to the client after finishing your course. What weeks and modules should I have finished, definitely, before I approach the client?" I would just watch week one, and then I would just look at the sales script in week three. Week one in full, and then just the sales script part in week- PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:31:04] Sam: [inaudible 00:31:00] four and then just the sales script part in week three. That's all you need to talk to a client, right? Then, you don't need to finish the whole course before you talk to a client. That's silly. Ingrid says, "Hey, Sam. I have a really wild, wild vision of myself in the future. How do you know what gave you the conviction that you could get there? Love your stuff. Changed my life." Well, it happens in steps, right? The way you get conviction on stuff is through track record, right? Not track record that other people have of you, but track record that you know you have of yourself. When you really set your mind to something and then you achieve it, then it builds it a bit. Then, you do it again. Bam. Again. Bam. Again. Bam. As you start to stretch these things and then you start pushing it, then you're like, "Oh, this goal seems pretty lofty, but let's just try it." Then, when you get there, you're like, "Whoa." Then, you keep pushing that thing bigger and bigger and bigger. Then, after you have quite a track record of yourself doing that, it starts to get really strong. It's just practice. It takes practice, time, repetition, and a track record of you achieving the things you tell yourself that you're going to achieve. Imagine if you had a friend and they kept coming to you and they were telling you, "Oh, I'm going to do this thing." You're like, "Okay." Then, they didn't do it. Then, they came back and they were still like, "I'm going to do this thing." Then, they didn't do it. Then, they said, "I'm going to do this thing." Then, they didn't do it. "I'm going to do this thing." Then, they didn't do it. If they come back to you and they're like, "I'm definitely going to do this thing." You'd probably be like, "I don't think you will", because the track record doesn't look very good. The same thing happens with yourself in the conversation you have with yourself. If you say to yourself, "I'm going to do this thing." Then, you don't. Then, this other thing and then you don't. Then, this other thing and then you don't. You start to distrust yourself. Just like you would distrust the friend. It's really important that you start to build that trust with yourself. Like you say you're going to do it, you get it done. You say you'd get it done, then you keep building it up. Then, you really start to trust yourself more than you start to trust anybody else. Then, that's why you want to bet on yourself, bet on your business. Make the bets bigger. Because you've built up that trust and that track record. Grace Reynolds says, "Sam, I've developed a business at the moment doing retreats." Oh, no. Sorry there's one before this. Tucker Wells says, "I want to let you know your 'Alchemy of Self' helped me tons." No problem. Glad to help, Tucker. Grace says, "Sam, I've developed a business at the moment doing retreats restoring people's souls after torment and setbacks. I now wanted to take this to the corporate and business world to help them with their staff. For some reason, I am floundering with the language to use to attract the market." Use the same language. People are people, right? It doesn't matter whether they're in corporates or whether they're not in corporates. They're still people. The wording is the same. You're just going to be targeting a slightly different segment. Don't try and think that these people still don't have the same drivers, because they do. MD Rockman says, "Hey, Sam. I'm reaching out to my market via LinkedIn. When they accept the connection request, I say to them that I am doing a research in this field if they wanted to help you or not. If they say yes, then I send them a marketing question. So far, one of them answered and two of them are working on it. Do you think it's a feasible strategy? What are your thoughts on it?" Yeah, dude. You're doing market research. You want to do market research. You're doing it. It seems to be working. To me, it just seems like you just need to do more of it. Don't think you need my opinion and my validation of it. Ask yourself. Am I doing this? Is it working? Yes. Should I do more of it? Yes. Keep going. Keep pushing. Get what you need and keep going. Julian says, "Sometimes when I read the 'Alchemy of Self' my vision and information seem so unreal, especially when I'm in a bad mood and I feel I can't read them. Or when I read them, I don't believe in them. Do you ever experience this? Any tips for that?" Yeah, dude you're really emotional. I can tell by all of your questions. I'm guessing you're an IF type on that Myers-Briggs thing. What you need is practice. Just understand that the one thing that's going to be your biggest obstacle is going to be your feelings. Whenever you feel your feelings, you've got to be aware that that's your thing. That's the thing that's holding you back. You've got to develop awareness about that so that you can sense the feelings coming on and then know what's going on. Then, just keep pushing forward. Don't let your feelings dictate what you do. Because at the end of the day, you choose what you do. It's not your feelings that make you not do it. You don't do it because you chose not to do it. It's you doing it. You've got to understand that. You've just got to choose not to react to the feelings. Tucker says, "Sam, how important is a business plan when starting a business? Do you have advice about your experience on a business plan?" You don't need one. Just follow the training program. Go through week one. Then, week two. Then, week three. One video at a time. Do the action items. Take action. It will work. You will get clients. You will start a business. Just trust that process. Julian says, "I often feel guilty because other people make less money than me. It keeps me from making more money. I feel it is unfair somehow or that I don't deserve more money. How, if you've ever experienced this, how did you overcome this?" As soon as I feel something or sense something, I analyze it. Let's analyze this. You're making more money than somebody else. Let's analyze this with myself. I make a lot more money than pretty much everyone I know, especially my friends, my parents, and all that. It's like do I feel guilty? No. Well, should I feel guilty? No. How am I making this money? By helping people. Am I really helping them? Yeah. Do they want to give me that money? Were they happy they gave me that money? Yeah. What am I doing with the money? Well, I'm reinvesting it back so that we can help more people, right? How would I feel guilty about that? It doesn't make any sense to feel guilty about that. The way the money is being earned is by helping people. The way the money is being reused is by helping people. There is no reason to feel guilty about that. You just have to analyze it. Then, see the truth in it. Instead of just reacting without knowing why you're reacting. Chris Belote says, "Hey, Sam. Approaching 15k a month. I'm curious when you were at, or close to, this stage, did you hold back 20 to 25% of gross revenue for taxes. Also, how did you find the best tax person and company to work with to make sure they were taking care of you? I've used a, what I consider, a decent tax person for the last three years. My company is a single member LLC, so I'm just paying taxes for myself since it's a single member LLC as a pass-through. At what point do you recommend moving to a C-corp [inaudible 00:39:02] per month? Any books or resources?" I don't know the ins and outs of your business, but what I would say is you should get a C-corporation immediately. Because if you have a C-corp, you only have to pay corporate tax. Trump changed the tax rules, so now that's quite low. Then, if you've got a single member LLC, that corporate tax rate doesn't even ... Trump lowered the corporate tax rate and you don't get any benefit from that, because you're just paying personal income tax. A single member LLC is basically a person. It's not even really a company. You want to have a C-corporation. Then, you want to keep all of your money in the company. Then, you want to reinvest it in the company. Then, you want to personally take as little as possible. Then, you want to reinvest the money and just pay tax on the corporate tax rate. That's it. Zach Marcus says, "Hey, Sam. How do you overcome perfectionism and learn how to know what's essential and what's not? For example, when I read, watch your modules, and do market research, I assume every detail is important and should be taken note of. If I miss out on the details, I get frustrated." It depends, right? If you're getting things done and you're making progress, then you're probably not a perfectionist. A perfectionist is someone who can't act at all, because they can't get anything done. If you're getting things done and you're moving things forward, then that's really good. As you release more stuff, as you push more stuff out, and get more stuff done, you'll probably become less of a perfectionist. Sometimes, I'm perfectionist about things, but I use perfectionism as a tool. Some things demand perfectionism, because that's a business strategy. If I'm going to create my courses and things like that, I'm going to be insane on the detail of it. I'm going to look at everything. I want to do that because I want to create good programs. If it's like other things that don't demand or need perfectionism, then I'm quite scrappy with them. For example, Instagram posts, Instagram stories, things like that, I don't care about that looking really fancy, so I'm rough with that stuff. When it comes to things that count, I will be quite ruthless with the details on it. Provided you use it as a tool, it can be a good thing. If it's freezing you from doing anything, then yeah, it's an issue and you need to just get over it and do it. Get it done. Push it out there. Shelly says, "I agree with pouring almost every sink because into building the business. I'm curious if you have created a business in the United States. Are you still using the company you started in New Zealand? How are you handling your taxes in the USA?" No. I've got a company in America since I've moved to America. I've got a complex structure that we use. We've got a company in Ireland. We've also got a company in America. The one in Ireland owns the one in America. It's a complex structure. The cool thing is taxes aren't really an issue when you put the money back into the business, because you're not making that much. You don't want to aim to make ridiculous profits, because that's kind of stupid. Because you've got to use all of that money to pay tax. Now, you've got this money sitting in your bank account, which is kind of useless. Then, also making a lot of profit leaves you wide open to competitors to come peck you off. If you start making huge margins, then you leave room in the market for someone to come in and make less margin and eat you. If you leave your margins a bit lower and you keep funneling that money back into the business, it's hard for people to come along and fight you, right? Because they get in there and they can't figure out how to even make it work. This happens a lot with us. In some areas of our business, we run things razor thin. It's all a very strategic design so that it's extremely hard to compete with us. Because people will come in, have a go at it. They can't make the numbers work. That's good, because then they bail out. They come and they try to fight. They can't make it work, so they bail out. You don't want to just try and make a lot of profit. No good company was ever built by trying to milk profits. There was a prime example of this called Valiant. You should watch the documentary on this. Valiant was this pharmaceutical company. This investor, hedge fund manager, had this genius idea ... Genius is said sarcastically. He thought that he could cut the R&D department out of a pharmaceutical company. By not spending money on R&D and scientists and labs and research, he figured he could cut a huge amount of the costs and then just start making insane profits. That's what he did. He bought one business, cut R&D, and made all this profit. The investors were like, "Oh, wow. This guy knows what he's doing." They invested. Then, he bought another one and another one. He just kept cutting off the R&D departments. It's almost insane to think that no one could see this coming. These are investors and smart people and they couldn't see it. Obviously if you cut R&D off a business, it's going to catch up to you. It won't be immediate. Year one, you probably won't notice it. Year two, probably not. Year three, you're going to get it. It's going to get you. What do you think happened to Valiant? It's growing, growing, growing, growing. Explosion. Everyone lost their money, right? If you look through history at all of the best businesses, all of the worst businesses, the ones that did the best reinvested in R&D. They made things better. They innovated. They kept trying to serve their customers better than everyone else. They kept adding value. They were relentless in pursuing perfection. The companies that just tried to enrich their owners and their shareholders, they all failed. Just based on that, there's enough evidence, so you probably want to do that. Wendy says, "Hey, Sam. Thanks for taking the time to answer my question. I've been a ghost writer who writes books for entrepreneurs, CEOs, and individuals for the past eight years. It has been a do-with-you type of business. I have people on my team, independent contractors who help out with formatting book covers and looking for someone to help with that marketing. The problem with ghost writing it it's not scalable. I can only do so many projects at a time and I have clients who need me at different levels. Coach, editor, ghost writer. I can eliminate the editor and just do the coaching and do the ghost writing. Nick House advised to do the niche that has the most need. However, both of these niches ... Uh, oh. I just lost your question. Can you please write that again? Sorry, it just jumped up all of a sudden. Zack Marcus says, "Hey, Sam. I'm lost. Can you explain more about what starving your thoughts is when it comes to combating your thoughts, negative urges, and anxieties?" Sure. What you've got to understand is that a thought and an emotion and things like this are like imaginary friends. Little kids, they might have an imaginary friend who they talk to and who they communicate with, right? That friend isn't there, but they act like it is. They play with it. It twists their reality to the point that they're communicating with an imaginary friend. A thought is an imaginary friend. Because imaginary friends are thoughts. What you've got to understand is that a thought, if it pops into your head and it's bad, it doesn't mean that it's true. It doesn't mean that you should do anything with it. It doesn't mean anything. Most thoughts most people have are completely just useless. You've got to learn to disassociate yourself with your thoughts. If you ever thought you could just let it go ... Have another thought then let it go. You just focus on doing what you need to do. If you have a thought that makes you feel anxious, you have to catch yourself and be like, "Oh, what am I doing here? This isn't helpful. This is that stupid, dumb thought. Why am I even thinking about it? Why am I even having emotions in response to this?" Gone. Keep moving. What happens is the way you get rid of an imaginary friend is by not talking to it. When kids stop playing with their imaginary friends, over time, that imaginary friend fades. It fades and then it disappears. The same thing happens with your thoughts. If you're really associated with them all the time, then it's like they're right there and they're controlling you. As you start to starve them out, they disappear and they fade off. Then, you'll find that you're very focused and you don't have that many crazy thoughts popping into your head and distracting you all the time. It just takes practice. Darren Kevin asks, "Hey, Sam. Loving the program. As a film director, marketing coach, and consultant, I am curious what your favorite movie is and why?" That's a good question. Favorite movie. I quite like Shawshank Redemption. I quite like ... What else? I like Shawshank Redemption because it just seems like a really good movie. It's got a really good twist. The first time you watch that movie, you don't know that that's going to happen. A lot of the time, I can pick the twist from the beginning. I can figure it out. I know what's going to happen. I get it right. It's annoying. That one, I can't see coming at all. I like movies that do that. I'm like, "Whoa." That one was a good one. Then, I quite like the Batman ones. Peter says, "What if you submitted a golden game plan business proposal to a client and they take it, use it, and cut you out? Real situation. Demanding MDAs from your prospects." It's a business plan, man. Business plans aren't responsible for massive business success. Execution and team and action is responsible for business success. You can't demand an MDA on action, right? If you give someone an idea and they take your idea and they execute it and it works for them, they don't owe you anything. People don't understand this. Ideas are pretty much useless. What wins in business is execution. Ideas are stolen ruthlessly all the time by everyone. You have to win in business by execution, not by ideas. I wouldn't worry about it. I would change what you're doing so that you're not just writing business plans for people and giving it to them. I would change what you're doing so that you're solving a real problem for people. I would talk to a market. Find out what their problem is. Then, I would reverse engineer from that and create a business around solving that problem. Corrine Robinson says, "I'm three days away from the end of my first 30 days. I've had a total of 16 sure decision booked. Five were no-shows. You've got another four booked so far next week. Still no sales. Is there anything else I should be doing other than iterating my message, practicing my sales script, and repeating for the next 30 days?" Just keep going. Keep pushing. Just going to have a quick break here. Michael Block says, "What's your why? What type of legacy are you building?" My why is that I just really love building things. I used to build tree houses. I used to build cars. Then, go-karts and things like that. Now, I just build businesses and products and teams and things like that. It's just I like building and that's why I do it because it's actually fun. I'm not trying to really achieve an end goal or make a ton of money. I like making money, because I can use that to build more. I need the money to get builders and to get tools and to build faster and bigger. That's what I do. It's not anything really more than that. I just really like doing it. It's fun for me. Then, Sharon says, "Hi, Sam. Can you clarify something please? Everything you teach on week five on how to get your own clients is that the exact same procedure I use to get my clients?" Yes. Exactly the same. Simon Knight says, "Hello, Sam. I'm new to the course and currently on week one and loving it. I'm also a co-owner for a start-up company, which provides online portals and hosted software to secure companies to make processes. My thinking is we can combine what I learned from your course with what we already do, which provides solutions to specific problems within a specific niche or niches [inaudible 00:53:30] businesses though. I'm wondering if we can charge $250 per month for an online hosted application to make things affordable as they are paying for a ... I couldn't see the last of your question. Really what you're looking at, you're looking at it the wrong way. You're looking at it from your point of view and what you do and what you've already got. You're trying to think of what you could give to your customer, right? It's traveling the wrong way. That vector is going from you to the market. It should be going from the market to you. It needs to do a 180. You need to talk to the market first. You need to ask them, "What is your problem? What are you struggling with? What do you need help with?" Then, you should reverse engineer from there. Create a solution for them. Offer that to them. James Beady says, "Sam, what's the long-term vision for consulting.com? What's your thoughts on building the company around you? How do you mitigate the [inaudible 00:54:30]?" My long-term vision for consulting.com is basically to rebuild the world's education system. It is reliant on me right now, but way less than it was a year ago. Two years ago, there was only me and the business. I'm slowly making it less me. It used to have SamEvans.com. Now, it's consulting.com. I used to be just me, now we've got like 50 people. Now, we're still a while away from completely removing me as the key man, but that's what all businesses have. When you're starting a business, you're a lot of it. You have to build, build, build, build. You have to find good people. You have to put good systems in place. It's a process to build your way out. That's what I'm doing every single day, but not completely done yet. Tina says, "Hey, Sam. You've given me so much hope. Humbled. Thanks. I do the work. How can I go about helping innovative entrepreneurs wanting to make a difference to scale their business when I don't already have knowledge of digital marketing? I'm in week five trying to figure out if by implementing your course to the letter, will I be able to do so after?" Yeah, if you do my whole course and you apply it and you learn it, you will know how to do digital marketing and get clients. Now, you're not going to 100% know how to do it until you actually do it in reality. You will know what to do. You will know what to implement in reality. You will know how to troubleshoot what you're doing in reality. You will be able to get it done. You've just got to believe in your ability to figure it out. Just never give up, number one. Number two, believe in your ability to figure it out. You've got a course here. You've got the Q&A course here. You've got the community here. You've got everything you need to get it done. Just trust yourself and do it. Miguel says, "A potential client offered me 25% for every amount they make with the client. Should I take this or stick to the fee?" I think you should stick to fees. It's just simpler, right? Otherwise, you've got to police everything. You've got to measure all the clients you get people. This is like ... Equity deals are complicated. You need lawyers and all sorts for that. Then, profit-sharing deals are complicated. Even revenue-sharing deals are complicated. It's really complex. The best way to do it is just charge a fee and keep it simple. Deliver the value. Donald Dang says, "In your niche definition worksheet, you talk about finding ... That question is too long. I can't read a question that's that long. Try to make it shorter. Joshua Westover says, "I'd love to go to New Zealand sometime. It's my dream destination to visit. Do you have any recommendations for a first-time visitor?" Yeah, it's a good place to visit, although it's a real pain in the ass to get to from America. If you're in America. I don't even know. If you go there, you've got to go to Queenstown, number one. Auckland, number two. Auckland is the main city. That's where I'm from. It's good to just see the city and everything from there. Then, I'd go to Queenstown, which is nice nature and stuff like that. Another good place, when you're in Auckland is to go to Waikiki Island. Waikiki Island, Auckland, and Queenstown. Those are some good spots. Mark Logan says, "Hey, Sam. When is the right time to scale by creating an online course? I believe I made five figures last month with my new program, so I know the market is there. I'm not sure where I should be going before going bigger." If you made five figures last month ... How much is five figures? It's like 10 grand, 20 grand, or it could be 99 thousand. I mean, if you already have a course and you've already sold it, then you definitely are ready for uplevel right now and you should join, because we can show you how to make the course better. We can show you how to scale the hell out of it and really take it to the moon. I'm really good at that. I sell a lot of courses. I really know how to dial in to all those little processes. I would definitely go to week seven and I would look at the training there. I'll also reply to you and tag Rich so Rich can talk to you about that too. Chris Belote says, "Hi, Sam. Before taking your program, I was a generalist SEO and PBC marketer for 12 years, instead of taking on anyone in a niche. Now, I help local businesses, specifically local home service repair companies. My question for you is that I get a lot of word of mouth referrals because I've been a marketer for so long, and sometimes these are leads and niches that I haven't mastered. Concrete contractors. What would you do in this situation? My gut is telling me I should keep moving back toward the generalist side and I need to stay focused 80/20 on the two to three local businesses that I have a lot of experience in. Maybe at some point and I can join uplevel and really make a killer course for local businesses, because every local business I've helped, I've gotten results for." Yeah. If these new businesses that people come to you with, actually mean that you have to relearn everything ... You have to learn the ins and outs of this entire new industry and you have to test and iterate things all over again as if it's like starting from scratch again, then you shouldn't take these clients on. However, if it's easy for you and it's just the same thing, but they are in different industries, then it's fine. You can keep doing it. It's really the same thing, it's just got a different label on it. That's how I'd make that decision there. If it is hard for you to do it in the other niche and you've really mastered this one niche, then I would say no to those new niches and I would join uplevel in week seven and I would turn your knowledge and expertise into a program that can help those niches. Because that way, you can scale. Zack says, "Hey, is it a wise decision not to read a book a week only when you're trying to solve a problem and focus on your course?" Yes, 100%. A week a book ... Sorry, a book a week is insane anyway. That's really a lot of reading. The only time I've ever read ... There's only ever been a few fluke times in my life that I've read a book in one week. The priority for me is executing. Doing what I know needs to be done. That's priority number one. Sometimes, reading can be a distraction. I go through periods where I know what I need to do. The only thing that's important is doing it. In those situations, reading is a distraction. I only like reading when I've achieved that little sprint of work that I've had to do. Sometimes, by the way, those sprints last two years. Sometimes, when I know what I need to do and I'm just burning through all of this work, getting it done, and then I arrive and like, "Bam, I've done it." PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [01:02:04] Sam: Burning through all of this work, getting it done, and then I arrive, and I'm like, "Bam. I've done it." Then I need to search for new horizons. When I need to search for new horizons, I like reading a lot, and so I might read a lot of books. I might read like one of them in a day, or then the next day I might read another one, because I'm searching for new horizons and new places to take my business, and I need inspiration and ideas and changes in thinking to get there, but when I know what I need to do, I'm just getting it done. One a week is insane. I think if you just read one a month, or like what we're doing right now at our company is, I've got a book club going on where my team comes over like on Saturday, like we did it this morning, and we read a book every two weeks. Then we meet up about it, and we discuss the key ideas from it and all of that and how we could apply those key ideas to our business, and so a good pace, I think, is one a month, or, if you're a good reader, like one book every two weeks. A bunch of questions just shot up, and I didn't have a chance to answer them, so if that was you, just ask them again. Paul says, "Sorry my question wasn't clear earlier in the eCom Shopify. After analyzing the strategy session applications, I realized that 80% of the people in the newbie category didn't even know about Shopify before we spoke about it. That's why I'm asking how to define, or clarify, or narrow who my niche is, because the make money niche is so huge." Yeah, so you shouldn't really say like just, "How to make money." Right? Because number one, it's not really a focused niche, and number two is, you're going to get annihilated on Facebook and AdWords and all of those things, because that's literally what those algorithms are trained to find and shut down. I would pick something. Like if most people want to make money, then what do you believe is the absolute best way for them to make money? If that is the eCom Shopify thing, then you should teach them how to do that. Don't just, your niche isn't, "How to make money." Your niche is the best thing that you believe for helping people make money. That's the niche. You've got to decide on that and do it. Stop trying to keep your options open. Decide. [Rodney 01:04:29] says, "Good morning from Auckland." Good to hear from a Kiwi. "Brand new to the course and working hard on week two. When you wake up, what comes first for you, reading your Alchemy of Self [inaudible 01:04:41] or exercise?" It's just exercise, man. When I wake up first thing in the morning, I don't feel that great. I don't think anyone really feels that great first thing in the morning, so the best thing for me to do is just go to the gym, because then, in about 15 minutes, I'm sweating, and now I'm starting to feel good. Then after the gym, I have a shower, and meditate, and all of that, and then I will look at my goals, and I will read through it. At the point I'm at right now, I don't read all these affirmations and spend a lot of time on mindset, because I'm not really blocking my own way right now, because I've done a lot of work on myself, and I built up a lot of momentum, and right now, I can just turn into the zone and go. It's important for me every single day to look at my goals so I don't lose sight of what I'm trying to achieve, but I don't need to spend a lot of time trying to hype myself up or trying to get myself to do something, because I'm ready to do something immediately. In the beginning, it's really important that you read that Alchemy of Self, but I would go to the gym first, because going to the gym first will get your blood flowing. It will wake you up, and it will also, it'll release some serotonin, some dopamine, things like that, so naturally, you'll start feeling more confident and happy anyway, and now you're reading your mindset stuff, and I would do it in that order. [Brandon 01:06:12] has a question. "Regards to the linear progression of consultants through the fragmentation funnel, where ... " Sorry, your question's gone now, dude. Sorry about that. Whoa, they're moving quick. Sorry if I missed your question. You'll just have to ask it again. These things are moving real fast. Charles says, "More than 40 strategy sessions deep since getting the course. Only one client at 1K a month, going through sales calls but running out of time. Anything specific recommended?" More strategy sessions. Honestly, you just need to do more. I don't know why you're running out of time. I mean, if you're thinking like, "I need to get so many clients or make so much money in this timeframe or I'm quitting," then that's silly. You might as well just quit now. You've got to have an attitude which is like, "I'm never quitting, ever." When you have that attitude, then it changes things. It's like people that have exit strategies. That's some bullshit. If you have an exit strategy, you might as well quit. I don't have any exit strategy, and I don't think I'm ever going to be done. I don't want to ever slow down or ever stop building, and that's how you build something good. The best businessmen in the world don't have exit strategies, none of them. [Herb Smith 01:07:47] says, "Sam, I have a business, credit consultant company, and I've already sold my services to over 10 clients at 3,700 that I hired a year ago, but I pay my salesperson 1,000 per client signup. I really need to generate my own leads so I won't have to pay a salesperson so much. What advice can you give me that can help me achieve this goal?" Well, you bought the course. The course shows you how to do it, so the only thing that's left to do, if you have this question, is to do the course, do the work, go through week one, one module at a time, work through the course, do the whole thing, and once you've gone through it, you will know what to do, and then you just need to do that, and then you've fixed it. Christopher [Kobe 01:08:33] says, "Hi, Sam. I'm conducting market research, and I'm finding my niche, architects. It's not interested in done-for-you marketing based on 50 survey responses and conversations with a dozen architects. I am an architect as well. I'm finding they want total control over how everything looks and rather do it themselves. I could go to coaching, but I am skipping the evolution of consultant." Yeah, what you got to understand is that sometimes, there is little nuances to the evolution of a consultant that means that you have to change it a little bit. For example, like someone said, "What if I'm helping people lose weight? How can I do done-for-you?" Well, you can't do done-for-you to help someone lose weight. You can't get on the treadmill, run for them, and help them lose weight. Right? You have to coach them to do it. That's where you start, and so if these architects really aren't willing to give away control and you truly believe you've found that, then try doing the coaching. Try coaching them on it. [Roman Koval 01:09:38] says, "How would you pay yourself if you're keeping all the money in the company?" Just pay yourself a salary, the smallest salary that you can possibly live on. Pay yourself that. Brandon says, "I want to make 1,000 a day. Could I make that with just organic outreach? Sam, I'm listening to your response, and you're talking about low profit margins. Should I be fearful of charging the full price of my services?" No. You want to, having low margins doesn't mean that you have low prices. It just means that you're investing your money back into the growth of the business. Right? If you want to make a profit, you want to have the ability to make a big profit, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you do. Right? Good companies have the ability to make astronomical profits, but they choose not to, and it's their choice. You don't want to have a business that doesn't have a choice to make a profit and just doesn't make any, but that's not a good business. Right? It's a choice. It's an option, and it shouldn't influence how you price your services. Donald Dang says, "What would you do on daily commutes? I remember you on the replay advising against listening to podcasts and whatnot, but I've heard of others that listen to podcasts when on the road, driving, running errands, etc., to continue to acquire knowledge. Would you listen to stuff like audiobooks?" I would, honestly, just read a book, unless you're driving. If you're driving, I would listen to an audiobook. If you're a passenger on a train or something, I would read a physical book. That's what I would do. Just make sure it's books, because podcasts are noisy and messy. So are YouTube videos. Noise. Facebook, noise. It's just so much noise. I never look at Facebook. I don't look at social media. I post shit on social media. It doesn't mean I look at other people's shit. I wouldn't post it on there if people were smart enough to not want it. Right? But they want it so bad that they demand that I give them it. That's why I do it, but I don't consume any of the crap on there, like from other people. I don't follow anyone. I don't listen to anyone. I don't read anything on there at all. I'm never on it. I'm on no one's email list, no one's podcast, no one's YouTube channel. I never listen or care about what anybody else is doing. The only thing I do is read good books, because that is nice, clean information. It's not just noise and people just rambling, just trying to make some noise on the internet. Brandon says, "What is the progression of a successful student? They all have begun just like us, but how do we follow them to make our success right? We have all the same information, but how come they succeed and others don't? Can you please explain your thoughts on this and explain where I don't want to go as a consultant, what I don't want to do where I'll die broke, so I don't go there?" It's simple. The people who do the best, number one, they never give up. That's the first thing that they have. The number one thing that losers have in common is giving up. The sooner they give up, the more they lose, but even if anyone gives up at any point, then they're not going to be successful. The people who do well never give up, even in the face of things that are nasty and gnarly and would crush people. They're still hanging on. The really good ones get excited in those moments. You've got to, first of all, never give up, and then second of all, you have to sacrifice a lot of things. Right? Like if you're going out on the weekends, and if you're playing lots of Xbox, and you're socializing, and you've got all of these messages going on social media, and you're constantly talking to people all the time, and if you're watching TV and Netflix, and you're drinking on the weekends, and if you're doing all of this crap, then it's taking bandwidth from you. Everything you do, everything you think about, every single little thing you do takes energy. If something takes your energy, then it takes it away from something else, and so people who have these big, demanding social lives and all of this stuff going on, they don't have anything left to put into good work. Right? The really good people, the ones that make seven and eight figures, they cut away all of this crap. They get rid of it. They sacrifice it. They just cut it off, and then they focus their energy here on building. Then they never give up, and they're relentless, and they work really hard. They'll work 12 hours a day, six days a week, years on end, and they reinvest the money in the business, and they get hungrier and hungrier. They get smarter. They get sharper. They move faster. They gain momentum, and they just stick to it, and they don't get distracted. They don't see a new course over here from this person, or they don't hear a podcast with this guy over here who says you should be using hashtags on Instagram. They don't hear the noise. The noise is there, but they just ignore it. It's like they have selective hearing and selective vision. All this crap is going on, and they just don't see it or hear it. They just keep building. That's what the good people have in common. Nobody really has that when they start. It's a learned habit, and it's a learned behavior. You have to acquire it. No one has it. It is learned, so you've got to learn it. [Grace Reynolds 01:15:38] says, "How do you pay for where you live and the necessities of life if you keep putting it back into the business?" My apartment is paid for by my business, so I rent this apartment. I would never buy this. It'd be the dumbest thing in the world. My business pays the rent for it, and then at the end of the year, my accountant balances it out, and I have to pay personally like 50% of it, so 50% of this expense goes on the business, 50% I have to pay for personally, and it's rented, and then even my, I've got a [inaudible 01:16:16] and all of that, but the [inaudible 01:16:18] goes on the business. A lot of the stuff goes on the business. The food and a lot of stuff, because I can put it into research and development, because I am the subject of my experiment. I'm testing these things, and the findings from these experiments get put into my programs, because I'm trying to find optimal ways to live, eat, and perform so that you can do better. A lot of the stuff, I can put on the business because it's research and development. If I travel somewhere, a lot of the time it's for business. Sometimes, if it's pure vacation, that's a personal thing, but when you're focusing on your business a lot and working on your business a lot, it'll be surprising to you how little personal expenses you actually have. I don't have many personal expenses. [Sanila 01:17:14] says, "Thank you for your time. What are some books that completely changed your mind, really helped you think differently? What books do you recommend?" Yeah, so first of all, do the course. Right? If you haven't done the course in full, don't read any books, because you bought the course, you should do it. Then if you're looking for books after that, I would read Made in America by Sam Walton, Ray Dalio's Principles, and then Psycho-Cybernetics, Blue Ocean Strategy, and then Amazon's letters to shareholders 1997 till 2018. That's a PDF. That ain't a book, but it should be, read those. Then [Zack 01:17:56] says, "When you mention believing in your ability to figure things out, I realize that I struggle with this a lot of because of the overwhelming fear of being wrong. How do you go about dealing with this struggle?" Yeah, well, you've got, like for me, if I really believe that I'm wrong, and analytically, like logically, I do think I'm going to be wrong, then I won't do it. Right? There's two different things to me. There's a fear of being wrong, and there's a knowing of being wrong. If my analysis shows me that there's a really good chance I can do this, but I have a fear of being wrong, I will do it, but if I have a fear of being wrong, and my analysis shows me that I am most likely going to be wrong, I will not do it. You've got to understand there's two things. There's fears, and then there's convictions that are grounded in clean logic, clean reason, and clean evidence and data, and really strong evidence. Right? If I really have conviction in something, but I still have a lot of fear, I'll do it, because I trust my analysis and my foresight into things. Right? If you really believe you can do it, and the logic makes sense, just do it. Push through the emotion. Brandon says, "Also wanted to give you a heads up, because there's people who are pirating your course." Yeah. There is some people that have done that. If you find one of those people, just let me know about it on Instagram or something, because then we can get my enforcer person to look into them and get them shut down. Yeah. Just report them, or the email is [email protected], [email protected] If you tell my team, they will take care of them. Peter [Tahoe 01:20:04] says, "The biz proposal did solve the problem. That's why they stole it. Anyway, on to the next." Yeah. Just move on, figure out how you can engineer your business a better way. You shouldn't be giving someone the value until they've paid you the money. If you're giving them the value, and then they get the option to pay you later, then they might screw you over, so get paid first, deliver value afterwards. Then Brandon says, "Sam, SnapInspect, what did you learn? Are you still running SnapInspect? I saw the application is still available and the website is up. Did going through helping real estate agents help you learn anything?" SnapInspect, I don't own that company at all. I sold all of my shares to my business partner, so he owns the company, and he's been running it himself. It's still an operation. It's been growing. It has customers. It's probably way different than it was when I was there, but I have nothing to do with it. What I did learn from working with property managers is that I wasn't, I didn't love it. I chose property managers because I was just like, "Oh, this will be a good niche," and then I found a actual problem in that niche. Then I actually built a solution to that problem, and then I actually sold it to them. Then I actually had a really great product, and it made money, and it was a successful business, and it still is, but I wasn't in love with it. What I was in love with was like the consulting, and so I turned my focus to that, sold my shares out of that, and just went all in on this. Monica says, "Hi, Sam. In direct outreach method template, you say you send a message and then ask them for a 15-minute chat. Why is that ... Somewhere else in the course, it's different. You say, 'Send a message or use ads, and direct them to the funnel.' Can you explain, please? I understand we can send a message and direct them to the funnel." I've never said that. I've never said, "Message someone and then send them a link to the funnel." That is an error. If I really did say that, I'm sure I didn't, but send me the snippet of the video and prove it to me, because I'm pretty sure I didn't. Then what else? Yeah, so what you do, sorry, in that situation is, when you're messaging people on direct outreach, you try and do the 15-minute chat. Then on the 15-minute chat, you're asking them the questions that are basically from the survey, because the 15-minute chat acts as the replacement for the survey, since it would be rude to just send them a link to a survey. Not just rude, but it would just be weird. Right? If you come to someone and you start messaging them, then you send them a link and tell them to go over there, it's kind of weird. Get on a 15-minute chat. Qualify them. If they're a good fit, schedule a strategy session with them. Then do the strategy session to close them. Don't just send them to your funnel. That's silly. [Darren Cavanagh 01:23:12] says, "Sam, the movie buff, I bet you like Shutter Island as well. Leonardo DiCaprio is my screen hero, Wolf of Wall Street, in The Revenant, classics." Yeah, I've seen all of those ones. I quite like all of the DiCaprio movies as well, but Shutter Island, it's kind of like twisted and a bit dark. I try not to watch those movies too much, because it kind of plays with your mindset. You don't want to just be addicted to just watching dark, twisted psychological thriller movies, because if you do that, then it starts to build up in your subconscious, so I try not to watch things like that. I got no problem with watching them. I'll watch them, but I try not to make it a habit to only watch one type of thing. Brandon says, "Sam, mistakes, mistakes, mistakes, what mistakes did you go through your progression to a $20 million consultant? Basically, I'm asking, what advice would you give? What lessons did you learn?" Yeah, I've probably made, well, I've definitely made more mistakes than everyone else in this entire group. That's probably the reason why I probably make the most money. Right? Mistakes and success, and failure and success, are like inseparable twins. How I figure out what to do is by trying things, then they don't work, so then I iterate, and then they don't work, and then I iterate, and then they don't work, and then finally, it works, and I'm like, "Aha." How I find what to do, and then how it do it better and how I keep growing is by not having a fear of making mistakes and doing, making a lot of them all the time every day. Right? You've got to view mistake, like you don't want to view things binary, like failure and mistakes, and success, they're opposites. They're not, really. It's really just the same thing. You've just got to make sure you don't make mistakes that take you out of the game. For example, if you make a mistake that sends you to jail for life, yeah, probably pretty bad mistake. Now, you don't have another chance. If you make a mistake that's a huge financial bet that you shouldn't make, then yeah, probably going to get in trouble with that one. You want to make sure that your bets and your mistakes can't take you out, and you can live with them, and then just make a lot of them. By doing that, you can figure out what works without getting taken out of the game. That's really how it works. If you want to know how to avoid the mistakes, if you want to know everything I've learned, well, that's in the course. That's why I created the course. The premise of the course is like, "Learn not to make the mistakes that everyone made and that I made, and learn how to just shortcut it to success." Doesn't mean you won't make any mistakes. You'll still make them, but you'll make way less of them if you didn't have the course. [Bertina 01:26:10] says, "Thanks, Sam. You've given me so much hope. Humble thanks, and I do the work. How can I go about helping ... " Oh, I think I answered your question. Yeah. I already answered that. Joshua says, "Hey, Sam. I landed my first client yesterday for the helping people overcome their fear of flying niche. Do you think I should focus on getting the results for this first client or keep trying to land more clients at the same time, or is that personal preference?" Just try both. Try to do both. One client shouldn't take all of your time. Right? Do both at the same time. Get more, help the client. Brandon says, "Also, Sam, you know the compounding effect, the snowball effect of how your actions are coming back to you from two years? Go in your own business, in Consulting.com, how long do our actions come back to us? If I read a book today, will I only get paid for it two years later? Can you explain this compounding snowball effect thingy?" Yeah, so first of all, you can't look at it like, "I know that if I read this book, then two years from now, I'll make money." All right? It doesn't work like that. It's not that simple, but you do know when you read a book that's good that sometime in the future, that book's going to help you, and you do know that when it helps you, it's going to help you make money and be more successful. You don't know when that's going to occur. You don't know how, but it will. Right? That's what you've got to understand. The work you do today, you don't know how it's going to help. You don't know when it's going to kick back and start paying you a lot of money, but it will, and you've just got to trust in that and understand that. I'm not saying you're going to be doing a lot of work for a long time and not making any money and then making money. You can start making money and getting clients pretty much immediately, but the big spikes, your massive growth curve, that's going to come with years. Getting to seven figures in a year, it doesn't happen if you're starting from absolute scratch. If you've got some experience in the niche or you've had a job which is highly aligned to the niche, or you have been successful in another business, and you're getting started in this, which is a different business, then it's quite likely you can get to seven figures in a year, because you've already got some experience here, but if you're starting from absolute scratch, seven figures ain't going to happen in a year. You can prove me wrong, and I want you to prove me wrong, but I'm just being realistic. It's not a very realistic expectation. You should aim to make $100,000 in your first year. If you do that, that's really good. You can do way better than that, but that's what your aim should be. Once you get to 100, make it 500. Once you get to 500, make it a million. Once it's one, make it two. Once it's two, make it five. Once it's five, make it 10. Once it's 10, make it 20. Once it's 20, make it 50. When it's 50, make it 100. When it's 100, make it a billion. Right? Just keep moving it up like that. Christopher Kobe says, "Thank you. I hope you're [inaudible 01:29:23]." Thanks, Christopher. Oh, no, you were replying to someone else. They've changed the user interface of this thing. [Celina 01:29:32] said ... Oh, no, I've already answered your question. Sanila. Donald Dang says, "A, sell websites, get a bit of money, take massive action, or B, get a job, live minimally, take massive action. C, sell [inaudible 01:29:48] retainers and something close to eCommerce, take massive action. D, take time, build slowly, take careful, calculated action." I can't really make up your mind on this, because I've just got these options here, and I don't know the context of them, and I also don't know you very well, but you know you very well, and you know the context, and you know the situation. I would tell you that you already know the answer to this question. Right? You already know what you should do, so just play gun to your head. Just imagine you got a gun to your head. You got to choose, right now, what is it? Whatever that is, choose it, stick to it, and do it. Brandon says, "Also, Sam, when it comes to failure, how many times do I need to fail to make a lot of money? I heard lots of people make 50% of their decisions wrong. Warren Buffett says you need a safety margin." Yeah, dude, I can see where your problem is. You have all of these cobwebs in your brain. Your brain has been tainted by other people's thinking and what they've said. All of the people like Warren Buffett and all of these different people have said all of these different things, and you have taken it too literally to the point that you're too scared to start. There is no absolute rule where we know like if we take an action today, when we're going to get the results. There's no rule that says, "If we start now, we'll make this much money in this much time." There are no rules to any of this, and no one can predict this stuff. If they think they can, they're wrong, and they're delusional. No one can predict the future. Right? You need to forget about all of this noise in your head that other people have told you. What you need to focus on instead is just doing. Right now, you're thinking and worrying, and you're not doing. The only thing that's going to get you anything is doing, so you need to do. What you want to do is just pick a niche, find that market. Them look inside that market, find what problems they have. Then, whatever that problem is, look at what a solution to that problem could be. Then once you've found that solution, then validate it. See if the niche with the problem is willing to pay money for the solution. If they are, sell it to them. Once you've sold it to one, sell it to two. Once you've sold it to two, sell it to three, and then scale up from there. Now you're making money, and now who cares what Warren Buffett said about decisions? Now, you're making money. Now, you're moving. Right? Don't get trapped in other people's thinking and these little phrases that people say. No one can give you a rule for life. I mean, the only real good rule that you should live by is like, "Never give up," because if you do that, then your chances of success are pretty damn high, and the second one is just, "Just believe in your ability to figure it out," because if you do that, if you put one and two together, then you'll be fine. The main reason why most people don't do well if they try is because they didn't even really try, or they might have tried for a day. Right? You've got to understand that these statistics, like 98% of businesses fail, is because 90 [inaudible 01:33:04]- PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:33:04] Sam: These statistics, like 98% of businesses fail, is because 98% of people don't even try. It's honestly so rare to find someone that actually tries hard and is dedicated and committed and doesn't give up. Those people are rare. That's all you really need to do to be successful, just develop that character. No one is that person at birth. It's learned. It's trained. You can acquire it for yourself. [inaudible 01:33:32] says, "How do you respond when someone says, 'I'm not sure,' to your initial outreach message? Do you give them more information on your service or offer to get them on the phone?" It's simple. I would say, "Okay. What are you not sure about?" "Not sure" doesn't tell me what's going on. I don't know what to do if I don't know what's going on. The first thing I'm trying to do in any situation before I make a decision and before I act ... In my brain, what happens is I need to first of all understand. Then I need to think about what I should do now that I understand. Then I need to do it. It goes in that process. If I'm trying to decide if I should sell this person what I've got and determine whether the thing I have can help this person, and if I ask them a question and they say, "I'm not sure," then my response is, "Okay. What are you not sure about?" I find out the answer, the reality, what is going on in their brain, what is going on because "not sure" doesn't tell me anything. You shouldn't make a decision based on "not sure." You need more information. Nicole says, "Hi, Sam. I've been a freelance copywriter, but life circumstances have required me to get back into a job where I'm also doing a lot of copywriting. I have private copywriting clients as well. I'm now thinking about becoming a coach to help others who want to start their journey as a copywriter, but I'm not sure if I can maintain my private writing clients, do my day job, and build a coaching business." Yeah. What you need to do is you need to get rid of something. Something needs to go here. I would say if you've got private copywriting clients and you've got a job, you've got two things. Now what you want to do is create a course on copywriting. What I do first if I was you is I would get more copywriting clients. That's what I'd do. Get more of them. Then I would quit your job. Now it's simple. Now I've just got a bunch of copywriting clients. Then at that point, I would create the copywriting course. That's what I would do in that order. Donald Dang says, "Through research, I've discovered the people who have had great success in coaching and creating courses started by building two to three profitable Shopify stores. Should this be the path I should be taking?" Yeah, you need some experience, right? The people who make good courses, they're good doers. This is this doer-thinker thing which I was sharing from Steve Jobs earlier. The reason why I have a good course, Consulting Accelerator and [inaudible 01:36:27] Consulting, and the reason why these courses have made lots of people lots of money, and the reason why people keep coming in greater and greater quantities to keep buying these courses from me is because they work. The reason why those courses work is because I did it first. I spent a lot of effort, a lot of time figuring out in the trenches myself how do we do this. I didn't just speed through it and then just get a little understanding and then decide to start teaching. That's stupid. Anyone who does that won't have a good course. I didn't then just go copy from somebody else who's doing this. That's stupid. Even if someone copied me and just copied my exact course, it wouldn't work for them because they don't know it. The only way someone can know it is if they've done it. That's what makes a good course. You first of all have to be a doer. You have to master it, and then you turn that knowledge that you can only know and only learn from doing into training. The best teachers are doers, and the best mentors are doers, all right? You should never learn from someone who hasn't done. Ever. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever. Only learn from doers. The cool thing about doers is they can see fakes from a mile away. If someone says they know a lot about Facebook ads or something, like in four seconds I can figure out whether they're full of shit or not. Same with sales, same with anything. I can just see through it. That's the cool thing about being a doer is that it's harder for you to get fooled, and you can see through a lot of people. You also know exactly what to teach even if what you're teaching is completely opposite than what most other people are teaching. Because you know that you're right because you've done it whereas all of these other people are over here teaching this because this is what's popular. What's popular, people just feed off each other because they're like, "This guy's doing it so it must be right. That guy's doing it. It must be right. If everyone's doing it, it must be what we should do." Everyone who's clustered over here is often wrong, and the person who has the courage to stand down here and say something different, that person often is right, only if they have good results, right, because you can be a person down here that's delusional that just thought that they'd try to be different without any evidence. But often the person who's done it and knows it will have a totally different opinion of things than the people over here who are popular. A lot of the stuff I teach is at complete opposite ends to what other people out there tell you to do because I know that I'm right, they're wrong, because I've done it. I know that a lot of those people just teach what's popular. If you want to create a good course on a Shopify store, then you need to either start your own Shopify store and make it successful, or an easier way to start would probably be to consult some Shopify stores and help them improve their stores. Then by consulting them, you're going to learn a lot about them. There's why consulting's awesome because it gets you behind the doors, and it helps you learn. Then you're helping them, you're getting paid, and you're learning all at the same time. Then you can consult a few other people. Then once you feel like you've mastered it, then you can start your own Shopify store, make that successful. Now you're in an awesome position to sell a course because you can say, "I consulted these people, helped them grow. I started these stores, had these results. From everything I've done, this is what I've learned." That's what makes a good course. [inaudible 01:40:21] says, "Hi, Sam. I want to offer coaching services in fitness for young mums. Can you explain to me what is the difference with traditional coaching service?" Coaching, consulting, same thing. Honestly, it's just words. Like, what does a coach do? They help someone achieve a result. What does a consultant do? They help someone achieve a result. Same thing. What I teach in this course works for coaching, works for consulting, works in any scenario where you're helping someone solve a problem with advice. That's what happens. [Mark Kerry 01:40:55] says, "Hooked: How to Build a Habit-Forming Products, good books then?" Yep. I've read that one. It's good. Ellen [Cortez 01:41:03] says, "Hey, Sam. How did you meet Tai Lopez?" Through a mutual friend. His name's Sean Vosler. Sean knew about me. I think Sean had bought my course or something. Sean knew that I had really good conversion rates and really good product, and I was helping people get results. Then Sean knew Tai, and Tai had a massive list. He was really famous and popular, and he could drive a lot of traffic. Then Sean just put two and two together. He was like, "Oh, Tai, you need something to sell. Sam's got a really good course. I know it converts well. I know it's got good results for people. You guys should do a promotion." That's how it happened. Honestly, good promotions will come to you when you do good work. If you're really good at what you do, promotions will find you. People will come to you and want to promote your stuff. You don't have to go out looking for JVs. You don't have to network. I've never networked in my life because when you focus on creating value, all the people find you. The people who are out looking for partners are often the people who don't create value. Then they've got it totally backwards. [Chris Pelote 01:42:24] says, "Thanks for all your insight today. Last question for you. You had mentioned weeks back that you were going to pick a niche and define its problem. Did you do this? If so, where could we find it?" Yeah. I've been thinking about doing this. I've been thinking about ... For the next version of the course, I've been thinking about choosing some random niches, like out of a hat, finding problems in them, and then pitching them solutions and validating them just to prove to people how it's done. But that's a while away. I've gotta do a few more projects before I get to that. I'll let everyone know when that new update's out. Brandon says, "How do we sell well when it comes to physical products? What is the call script about physical products, but in copy?" It's the same thing, man. Just do the course. I can tell by all of your questions that you haven't committed. You haven't done the course. If you'd done the course, you wouldn't ask those questions. Ruth says, "Hey, Sam. I'm in week one. You say to start with monthly done-for-you or coaching. What are your thoughts on one done-for-you such as web design?" Sorry, "What are your thoughts on one-off done-for-you such as web design?" I think it's an okay place to start. I got my first few clients doing websites for people. It's an okay place to get your first clients and get into the game, make some money, but very quickly websites don't scale. They're complex. There's a lot of back and forth. You can't do lots of them at once. I would move out of websites as soon as you can. Donald Dang says, "Also, I'm trying to figure out how to start a profitable Shopify store and through trainings on Facebook ads. [inaudible 01:44:18] e-com niche is different than yours. I tried yours to no ado. Should I start with the strategies to get approved concepts [inaudible 01:44:25] to scale?" They're the same stuff, man. If I wanted to start an ... really, I have an e-commerce store. This is what I find funny. What is an e-commerce store? It's a business that has a shopping cart on the internet that sells a product that is physical. What do you think Consulting Accelerator is? We ship it. We fulfill it. We sell it on the internet. We are an e-commerce store if we wanted to classify ourselves that way. We do it really well, sell shitloads of it at a really high profit all day, every day, all around the world, every hour, every minute. I know it works because I'm doing it. The business fundamentals are exactly the same. You find a market. You find a problem in the market. You find a solution to it. The solution might be a physical product, software. It might be a course. It might be coaching. It might be done-for-you. It might be anything. Whatever the solution takes form as, it's still a solution. Then you sell it to them, and that's it. But you probably haven't found the right problem, the right solution, or the right method to connect all of those dots. Don't think in your mind that these things are totally different and that these principles won't work. They do. [Zach Marcus 01:45:52] says, "What is the main principle you live by when it comes to making decisions?" Really, it is to embrace reality. I try to figure out what really is going on, and even if it's not fun to look at, even if it is scary, and even if it means that we have to change and do a complete 180 and sacrifice everything we've done, we'll do it. I don't make decisions with a bias on what I'm good at, what is going to make me money in the short term. I won't even make decisions based on ... I will make decisions that literally cost me money. I'll lose millions of dollars if I think this decision is going to the best for me in the long term. A prime example of that is allowing everyone from the old Accelerator to upload to the new one for free, then shipping out boxes to people who hadn't purchased the new course. That cost me more than $200,000 shipping those things. Also, I sacrificed there millions of dollars. All of those people would have bought Accelerator, but instead I made that decision based on what was best long term. I knew that if we had really satisfied customers, and if we had people that were blown away by the product, then people would talk to other people. I knew that people would then buy other things that we sell. I knew that, while I would lose money in the short term, in the long term it's what's best for us. I look long term. I don't care about making money in the short. I'm even willing to lose it and burn it. I don't think about myself. I think about my customer. I think what's best for my customer, and then I do that, not what's best for me because I know what's best for me is what's best for my customer. But it takes the long term for that to work because what's best for you in the short term is often at opposites to what's best for your customer right now. You've gotta learn how to balance all of these things. When you're first getting started in business, you need to make money because you need to survive. Once you start to have money, the businesses that don't ever think long term and aren't willing to sacrifice in the short, they never go very far. I'm willing to lose to win, and a lot of people won't do that. If I tell you my main principle, it's just to embrace reality and really think about it across time. Not just now. I think across years, 10 years out, and I think about the implications my decision's going to have. I will do what I think is best based on that reality. Ben says, "Hey, Sam. Do you recommend keeping a morning routine the same? Training, meditation, mindset on your day off. What about on your [inaudible 01:49:15] break?" I don't train every day. I train about five days a week, so I take like two ... Sometimes if I'm tired during the week, I'll take three days off. I'll work out a minimum of four times, most of the time five times a week, two to three days off. Then I will meditate every day. I track this, so I know how often I do it. In the average month of 30 days, I won't meditate about once. There is the odd time when I might be running late, and I need to be doing something, so it has to be cut. I don't have time for it, but it's very rare. I try to do it every single day. Then mindset, I try to look at my goals every day. Sometimes I can't look at it for as long or in much detail, but I try to do the best I can. Try to just do it because it's just doing it, even if it's just for a little bit, that builds the habit and gains momentum. Mark Kerry says, "You should buy some blogs, Sam, and use them to recommend your own service. Might save you a bit of cash." Yeah, I mean we've looked at that option. What we found was best was just to build our own. We keep creating new content. Our SEO keeps improving. We get more traffic from SEO month after month, and we keep making more money month after month. I think we make more than $100,000 a month right now just from organic traffic. This isn't from organic social media. This is just from people typing into Google and finding us without an ad. We're definitely moving forward and making momentum with it, but it's a long-term thing, that thing. In 5, 10 years from now, it'll be big, but right now, we're just laying those bricks. Wendy says, "How can I make my ghostwriting business scalable? Should I continue to write books?" Oh, yeah. That's right. Sorry. I remember you asked your question before, and I didn't answer it. Let's get it this time around. "Should I do coaching? My real love is writing." Well, to tell you the truth, you can't really make a ghostwriting business scale unless you hire more ghostwriters. You might have ghostwriters beneath you, and then you might get clients and then give them to them. You could scale that way, or you could create a course on how to write your own book because you should know that because you write people's books. You could create a course on how to do that. You could also create a course on how people could become a ghostwriter because you know how to do that. Or you could decide that you want to become a writer for yourself and write your own books and do that. Now, any one of those things works because there's people out there doing all of them and making money doing all of them. I would do what you are most passionate and have the most conviction about. I don't know what that is, but you'll know what it is. If you've already been in this for a while, and you've seen the landscape, and you've been doing the thing, you should have pretty good instincts about what to do. I would trust those instincts and do it. Sharon says, "Thanks for answering my question. If I'm going to do exactly the same thing I do to get my clients to get my clients clients, and I charge them $2,000 per month, they will actually be paying double that potentially with Facebook ad costs, right?" Yeah, so if people are paying you $2,000 a month to manage their ads, then ad spend comes on top of that. You've got a management fee, and then you have the ad spend, right, so it is on top. [Tanya 01:53:19] says, "Hello, Sam. I took another look at my message after talking with you two weeks ago. I'm now saying I help tech and retail firms increase profit margins by amplifying morale, increasing productivity, and lowering turnover. I was wondering after week four, after four weeks of training, what you would suggest for direct outreach, whether Linkedin or go for for personal email. A lot of the big-time people that I need to speak to aren't listed on websites." You're helping retail firms increase profit margins. I would find the best way to talk to them whether that is through ... It's probably just going to be direct email, right? I would just find out who the owners are, find out what their email addresses are, and just direct ... just a spearhead straight into it. Just go direct. It's often the best way. Right. It's 4:56, and what we do with these calls is we go from 3:00 PM til 5:00 PM. I'm going to do a few more questions here, and then we'll wrap up for today. Rodney says, "I'm busy drafting my identity and manifesto section of my Alchemy of Self journal, and I'm curious how far into the future and how big must one dream. Obviously, if it's too far out and too big, the mind won't believe it, and no action will be taken. If you could do it again and know what you know now about the power of the mind has over character, how much bigger would the Sam in the garret with $500 in the bank have envisioned? I guess my question is: At what point do you know when it's too unrealistic?" I think ... That's a good question. You know, knowing what I know now, if I went back then, I would think bigger, but you can't do that. I can't go back in time. Even if I tell you that, you still might not believe that you can do that. I think you should think as big as you possibly can, but still have it on the edge of reality because if it's totally out of the stratosphere, and you just think this is a dumb idea, and you've got no belief in it, then it probably won't motivate you. But you also don't want it to be small. So think as big as you can, but right on that limit where it's slightly unbelievable, but almost believable. That's where it should be, slightly unbelievable. You should think, "There's a small chance of this happening, but I've got some inkling or some feeling that I'm pretty sure I can do this, but it still seems kind of insane." That's where it should be. [inaudible 01:56:14] says, "Just had a [inaudible 01:56:16] call to offer digital media marketing services plus set up their sales funnel. I tried to close today, but the client asked for another meeting tomorrow where they want to see a financial plan of what outcome on investment they can expect, how much money for ads, et cetera, before closing the deal, and they want to see case studies, who I am, proof that I can do, et cetera. I don't have any case studies. How can I handle this? How could I have done the call better?" It sounds like these people just have doubt in you, and they want to see proof. So it's probably not something you said. It might be something you said. I would listen to the call recording, and listen to your words and everything and your tone and your voice. If you said something that made them seem uncertain, then it's probably those words. But what I would say that has done it more than any words or anything is just your conviction. When people are brand new, and they're not sure of themselves or what they can do, the person on the other end can just sense that uncertainty. They can sense it. In response to that, they're skeptical. They want to see proof, and they want to see everything. Really, you don't get people asking these questions when you have total conviction. When you have total conviction, there's something just happens and they believe you. Sometimes they don't, and they still want to see proof, but way less of the time. The only way you can learn that is with practice. Everyone starts the same with uncertainty. It takes practice, practice, practice to get to that conviction. So how are you going to get yourself out of this situation? I would just tell them the truth. I would say, "Look, I don't have any case studies, but I know I can do this for you. Here's my projections, but you've got to understand, these are projections. I can't guarantee this. What I can guarantee is the work that I'm going to put into this. I'm going to do the work, and the work's going to be done to a high standard. I'm going to give everything I've got to make this work. I'm pretty sure it's going to work, but I can't guarantee you. If I did, I would be stupid." It's like the weather forecast. You can't forecast the weather. Anyone that totally absolutely guarantees you on anything, it's silly. It's actually best to just be honest about that. Then what else would I do? Then if it's your first ever client, I would just give them a little guarantee. I would say, "Look, I know I don't have case studies. I know you're taking a bet on me, but what I'm happy to do is if this doesn't work, then I'm happy to refund your fee." I wouldn't offer to refund them the ad spend and everything. There has to be some risk taken. There's always risk taken in business. That's what business is about. But you could reverse that risk by offering to refund them their fee if you didn't get results. Because even if that happens, you still win because you've still made progress forward. You want to always just be making progress forward. Sometimes that's not financial progress, but it's still progress. All right. Well, now we're at 5:00 PM, so we do these calls every Saturday from 3:00 PM til 5:00 PM. If you just asked a question now, and you didn't get me to answer it, it's because you showed up too late. If you want to ask questions and get me to answer them, show up at the start. That's 3:00 PM. Some people on this call today probably asked me 15, 16 questions. If you want to have the ability to get answers, show up on time. 3:00 PM til 5:00 PM eastern time, New York. Now next Saturday ... Which date is that? Well, whatever next Saturday is, I'm not going to be here. I'm going to be in California, so I won't be holding one of these calls next Saturday. But we'll resume the next Saturday after that. The Q and As with Nick [Hauser 02:00:39] and [Jesse Clark 02:00:41], they will be happening on the usual schedule, which is like Monday and Friday. If you have any questions until then, Facebook group is the best place to go. Just give me a like. Just click the like button if you enjoyed this, and if it helped you, and you got value out of it, and you want to do more of these. Then thanks everyone for attending this call. I look forward to seeing you on the next one soon. Have a good weekend.

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