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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, December 8th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, December 8th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for December 8th, 2018.

Transcript / MP3

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Sam Ovens: 00:00:18 Can see a couple people jumping on. Brandon Mulrenan. Welcome beach. Trista, sorry if this is my name room. Welcome Brian Raymond. If someone can just let me know if my audio and video is working, if you can see me and if you can hear me and just let me know before I get started. Sam Ovens: 00:01:03 Yep. Working. Awesome. Thank you. Well first of all, welcome. If it's your first time on one of these calls, welcome to concerning accelerated. Welcome to add these live streams. And so how they work is I do one of them pretty much every single Saturday and they go from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM eastern time. That's the time in New York. And uh, you should put it in your calendar like repeat with Google calendar so that you remember a three to five on Saturday. And also as somebody suggested last time I did one of these that we posted in the facebook group a pate apart and also in our content portal if you go to community can when I call. So we're also posting it near so now you can find it in the group and in the portal. And you can put it in your calendar. All right. And they had been pretty much every single Saturday, I would say one out of every, every bout eight weeks. Uh, I missed one of them, so pretty much all the time. So how they work as you can ask a question in the comments box and then I will go through them in the order they asked and announce them. So let's get started. Brendan, Melbourne, cs. Sam Ovens: 00:02:30 My current business is at 20 k per month am now part of people on my way to 100 k per month. I currently have 82 students in my training program. I do three to four strategy sessions per day. And also I'm rebuilding my entire training program at the same time. I work out four days a week and work from 8:00 AM to 7:30 PM. Six days a week. Yeah. I would just Sam Ovens: 00:02:59 like, that's those hours. You can work those hours without getting burnt out. You know, you can work 12 hours a day, six days a week without getting burnt out. What you have to do to make sure you don't get burnt out is not working longer than that and make sure you actually take the Sunday off. Make sure you actually stop at that time and also make sure that you get eight hours of sleep each night. You know, the biggest causes of burnout is lack of sleep. That's it's hands down. That's what kills everyone like they. It's not the long hours. It's not the hard work. It's not any of that. It's just that they don't sleep enough. If you get eight hours of sleep, you can easily handle 12 hours of work every day, but it's also good to take one day off each seven, every sequence of seven days. Sam Ovens: 00:03:59 Do that exercise which you said you're doing. Also drink lots of water and have a healthy diet and make sure you get like a little bit of sunlight each day. Like I'm at least 20 to 30 minutes of sunlight on your skin and helps you vitamin D, and if you do that, you should be good. Brian Ramos sees why do a Webinar and make things schedule a time and jump through those extra hoops. Why not just a landing page with the webinar video and clear offer below? It is a good question and the thing is is is a balance, right? Like on one end of the spectrum, we could just have a facebook ad that just has a link straight to our schedule once calendar and they could go straight from facebook to our calendar and booking immediately. Now if we do that, we are going to get more scheduled strategy sessions. Sam Ovens: 00:05:01 That is true, right? But the quality is going to be decreased because there's not enough friction. Right? And so sure we'll get a lot of them, but the quality will suffer. However, if we do like a landed a landing page with a vsl or a Webinar or whatever, and then the strategy sessions will get less of them, but the quality will be higher. And so your. It's always a balance and a trade off between two variables like quality and quantity. Right? And if you just go for quantity, you want when and if you go too hard for quality, you also want when both sides of the spectrum are incorrect, if they taken to the extremes, there's a, there's a real optimal point to sit at in between those two points and that's where we're trying to be, because you know, if you have, what you're aiming to do is try to get a full calendar of strategy sessions, but have them be really high quality. That's what we're aiming for and that's why I designed the funnels the way that they are. That's why we use the fragmentation funnel. We have the facebook ad to the landing page, then to the vsl and then to scheduling a strategy session and then to a survey. Right? That's why, Sam Ovens: 00:06:31 and honestly, I wouldn't want to reduce the friction any more than that because I would rather not talk to somebody than talk to somebody and waste an hour of my time and energy and have them not be a good fit. Right. I think there's more downside in talking to someone who's wrong to talk to. Then there is to not talking to somebody who might have been good that the friction eliminated from my funnel. Right. That's why it's designed the way it is. Simon Lou. Oh sorry. And sometimes what happens on these will actually not sometimes every single time they're like, the questions move quite fast and sometimes I, I missed him. So if I miss you, let's just ask it again. Ryan Ryan sees. Why do, why do you, why did you decide to charge 1997 for consulting accelerator? Um, it's a good question and Sam Ovens: 00:07:31 honestly it started back when I was selling. Other courses are like still on the same topic, but I had like the consulting blueprint and cashflow consulting, all of these things. And at first I chose 1997 because that was what, like the other people in the market we're doing. And that was a price point that, that I knew you could sell courses yet. So at first there was not much science to it other than I was just kind of matching the market. And then with time I kept making it bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter. And I just didn't change the price. Right? So that's Kinda how it ended up the way it is. Uh, what are some realistic expectations to have when doing direct outreach in terms of qc or conversion rates and how do you affect to the fleet judge if your direct outreaches and working optimally so that you can change something about it and not waste your time spending your ties on something that is not working. Yeah. So it's honestly just like it's trial and error and time. And if you, Sam Ovens: 00:08:45 if you record your, if you record your metrics and you track things and you remain focused and consistent, the things that you need to change make themselves known to you. Right? Like I can't really describe a particular process to do it. They will jump out and you will know what to do. It just takes time. And a lot of the time people are looking for those things and if they don't know what they are and they're doing the work and they're tracking the metrics, then one of these things hasn't presented themselves to you yet. And it will, will. You just have to keep going. CISA Coconino says, today, I saw your mastermind video on youtube. You often say that meditation has changed your life. Could you please recommend any material to understand how to do it properly, books, videos, et Cetera, or how did you learn it? Sam Ovens: 00:09:36 Yeah. This is a really common question. I'm gonna. Write this down that I should do a blog video on this thing because I swear I answer this every single time on one of these calls, how to meditate because it's really funny how it, how it actually works because I haven't read any books on meditation. I haven't watched any videos on meditation. I haven't read any articles on meditation. I haven't done anything to because you just have. Once you know what meditation is, you just do it and all it is is sitting like you just. I just sit on the edge of the chair because you don't want to sit with your back leaning against something. You want to make sure that you sit on the edge of a chair and that you have your spine straight and your hands like this. Just on your. On your knees, so I'm not doing that thing on the position, on the ground. Sam Ovens: 00:10:31 I just sit on the edge of my chair and then you just close your eyes and I use my iphone. I put it on airplane mode so that it's not buzzing or anything while I'm doing it. Put It on airplane mode. Go to the stopwatch thing with the countdown timer. Go to 20 minutes per stop, put it down in front of me, close my eyes, and then you just breathe in through your nose and out through the nose and you try to feel like the the breath going past your nostril here and you try to feel that sensation on the like going through your nose and then out and you try to like scan your body for tenseness and you try to relax and make sure you've got a straight posture and then you try not to think about anything. So you're focusing on your breath and not thinking about anything. Sam Ovens: 00:11:23 And if you. What will happen is your, your mind will wander like it'll. It'll start going out and you'll be thinking of this thing and the net thing will trigger that and then before you know it, you've gone down this rabbit hole of thought and then when you catch yourself, you're like, oh, bring it back now focusing on the breath again and then you'll focusing on, you're focusing on, you're focusing and then it's drifted off again. Catch it, bring it back, and then you'll focusing in is going to drift off again. Then you bring it back. That's all you do and I think some people believe that when you do meditation, that you should just be able to sit there and focus on your breathing and never have a thought for 20 minutes straight. That is not true. Even the base of meditation, people in the world is still going to have them. Sam Ovens: 00:12:08 The meditation is about the skill of catching the thing and bringing it back. That's what it's about. It's not about the pure essence of the thing. It's about the catching of it and bring a bit because that's focus and concentration and awareness and that's what meditation is for. You do not need to read a book about that. I just told you everything that you need to know about it and all you need to do now is do it and you do it. The trick to it is to do it every single day consistently and I like to do it before I start work, so before I start any work in the morning, I do my meditation. Right. That's it. And then with time you'll get better and you'll notice that okay. Proceed to self regulate your emotions and your thoughts and things like that will get significantly better. Joe would seize. It's challenging to have meditation and the same discipline on Sundays as well as the rest of the weekends. Do you do meditation on Sundays too? I'm not always. I try to, but a lot of the time what happens is on a Sunday I'll wake up a bit later because it's not a work day and then my wife and I will immediately go out to brunch or something. If I wake up and there's enough time to do it, then I'll do it. Really? You should try to do it. Honestly. I, I should be doing it on Sundays to consistently, but if I'm being honest with you, I don't do it every single Sunday, but I should. Sam Ovens: 00:13:50 Ryan Ryan, this is what's the best time to sell your program without a strategy session. A honestly, you want to stay doing the strategy session. Believe me, it is very, very hard to sound without a strategy session extremely. And so I would just stick to the strategy session once you get to like $500,000 a month. Asked me about it then, but before that don't do it and I'm all slim your questions too long. I not going to answer that. So if there's real long questions, I just can't read through them at the pace that these things go. So be concise. Use is a minimum number of words as possible. Ryan sees. If your plan was to take over the entire health and fitness industry, how would you personally build out the offer and how would you change? Sam Ovens: 00:14:54 Sure. Well, I would want to do. I'd want to find out what the problems are. Like I'd find I'd want to find out what the biggest problem is. I would go looking for problems and I would try to solve the big problems that no one else seems to have solved. And if I succeeded in doing that then I would win. That's how it works. So that's how I do it and how much I would charge and how I would build out the offer that's relevant. If you just solved the biggest problem you went and then you say, do you invest your money in anything outside of consulting.com? Uh, at currently? No, I hold cash and I have money in consulting.com. And that's how it is currently because you know, like first of all I like holding a lot of cash because you don't even know what's going to happen. Sam Ovens: 00:15:54 Right? So it's, so it's like it's security and it's a war chest that gives you opportunities and things like that. So I like doing that and then it's like Warren Buffet and we'll have them too, you know, they keep always more than half of their money in cash light because it's very important. And so I do that and then they're like, I've got a lot invested in consulting.com and them growing that and it's all and I haven't seen any other opportunities that I think they're good. However, I'm sure some will present themselves when I'm like. And when they do, I will invest in him. One thing I was looking at the other day was office space because we've, like, I moved to La and I'm going to have to get an office soon. And so I was looking at debt and there's some. No, there's some areas in La that are pretty low actually. Sam Ovens: 00:16:59 It's quite fascinating. I will tell you how I noticed this pattern, but in, you know, in the area that I'm in, which is like Venus there, the housing is pretty expensive and, but the commercial property is extremely expensive to buy and read. Now if you go out into the, into the light rougher areas of La, the house prices only get cheaper by a factor of two. So if a house, if a house would be 2 million here, then over in a, in a rough area, it would be like 1 million, right? So it's about half the price. But if you look at commercial property in the Syria, let's say that, uh, it's, it's $50 per square foot, like to rent for a year. Then if you look at that commercial property in the rough area, it's $1 per square foot. So what's interesting is the house prices only differ by a factor of two, but the, but the commercial property prices differ by a factor of 50. Sam Ovens: 00:18:14 That looks interesting. Really interesting. So you know, I think that will, I'll probably end up buying one of those just because it, it makes a lot of sense and I need one anyway for myself. So instead of renting one, I'd just buy the building. But yeah, I like to look for things like that. And if only, if something looks extremely good, will I ever touch it because what I like to do is only buy things that the absolute worst case scenario, like the absolute worst is fine. Alright. Because I'm, I know that I'm not smart enough to think that I've found something that is a sure thing. So the last thing I ever want to do is be basing on something we're, we're, I think I'm going to win and if I don't win I'm screwed. So I like bidding on things that if I lose I'm fine. And that's what this one looks like. And you also said, what temperature do you sleep at night? It's around 68 degrees Fahrenheit. This what I like. And then Dan says, when can we expect more of your shareholder letters? Just read the one from 2017. I look forward to more. Yeah, well I mean I'll probably write one like around the end of the year because that's when they typically write them. David Lawrence is, he works with personal trainers in a 90 day period with a recurring monthly payment in the service agreement. Do I continue? Sam Ovens: 00:20:13 Do I continue to work with clients after the official end of the agreed time as normal or would it be beneficial to have a formal conversation around whether they would like to continue to do the work together? Sam Ovens: 00:20:24 Yes. So it depends what you state in your agreement, right? If you say like, you know, your card will be automatically charged every 30 days afterwards and lists you say to cancel in. It's what you do, but if your agreement doesn't say anything about that then you have to have a conversation with them about it because if you were just to keep assuming that they're going to pay building and there was no, they weren't even made aware of that and there's sketchy. So you're going to make it clear. I'd probably just have the call with them to be honest or set up an email that goes out that they can reply to. Where did you learn it? The current situation, desired situation and the social circle diagram in the week one, module three, evolution of a consultant. Is there any specific book talking about it, which I can go deep into it? Yeah, so I, I made it up like the current situation, desired situation and that circle thing, I just created it. Speaker 2: 00:21:32 Um, Sam Ovens: 00:21:35 I didn't get it from anywhere I go, I got it from my brain. Have you ever researched, fled earth thoughts? Speaker 2: 00:21:42 Um, Sam Ovens: 00:21:43 I mean I've looked at it like a video because I was interested to see what was going on. Um, and I think it's quite funny because it's just, it's very, I can see why it's like, first of all, I don't think the earth's flat like it's, it's quite noticeably round, but what I find interesting is how it's gained so much momentum because, you know, it's turned into a big, a big thing on the internet. Right. Um, and I think it's because it's so shocking that it had the, it attracts attention and then with the algorithms online on Youtube and facebook and all of this, they, they get fooled by that sort of stuff. So like it's just, it's the perfect sort of thing to go viral on the Internet because it's shocking and it causes a lot of controversy in this huge polarization. And there's a battle between two sides. It's like the perfect thing to go viral online, um, and that's why I think it's built up so much momentum, but uh, but I, I think the world's round, Sam Ovens: 00:22:58 um, mostly is how can I stop being so hard on myself all the time. I've noticed this pattern throughout my entire life, such as in sports, academics and now my pursuit of getting clients for my consulting business, how it works is I'll put a ton of pressure on myself to perform a certain way or achieve a certain outcome, and I ended up deciding and I ended up treating what I do while I can certainly discipline my way through this, whoever I usually end up creating what I do even more and break down mentally, which happened many times throughout my entire lifetime. I ultimately want to become more happy, carefree and confident with what I'm doing without caring. If I suck, screw up, we don't achieve anything. However, just yeah, this is a good question. So I'm like this too, right? My standards are extremely high. Excrutiatingly high. Most people would say that they're unfairly high. Right? And I expect that of me and everyone around me. And so when you do that, two things happen. Number one is you will be hard on yourself and you'll never meet your standards because they're so damn high that you'll never actually achieve the perfection because it's impossible to achieve it. Right? And that causes a bit of pain and anxiety and things like that. But the second thing that happens is that because you're striving to achieve that level you, Sam Ovens: 00:24:29 you would go further than you would if you didn't have those standards. Right? So by having them, you achieved more than the average person, but you don't achieve enough to get to that point. Right? And so if you're thinking about it, like, do I want to be happy with mediocrity? No. Why would I want to do that? Because if you're. It's like all people who are very good at something will be very hard on themselves like that. And it's actually a necessary thing to be great at. What you do and it's upside is, is that you get really good at it and its downside is that you'll never really satisfied with your performance. Right. And you just have to choose which one's more important to you being satisfied with your performance or being the best and I would choose being the best in day. So that's why I just just don't mind about the, the other thing because think about what you were asking me. Sam Ovens: 00:25:37 You're like, I just want to be happy and not care if I fail or suck. Like, come on, you should want to care if you, you shouldn't being. It's like, you know, if you break your leg and these pain, that's a signal that you need to like be more careful next time. Or if you fall over and graze your knee, the pain. It's feedback, right? Without the pain. People just go around doing dumb stuff and they wouldn't even know if they've got a broken leg. And so really high standards are like that too. Is that pain if you don't achieve it, but that drives you to not make the mistake. Again, it's an. I think the two things come together and you should just think about it like that Sam Ovens: 00:26:28 I would say is do you think running facebook ads for job adverts would work? Yes, I do. I think that would work very well to is. Have you read enough by Michael Gerber? Yes, I have. It's a good book. What examples of Kpi you track for your team members that to make sure that they're producing the results you want excluding the ads manager? Trekking and Matrix? Yeah, so we've got lots of things and they differ based on the department. So for example, like how facebook people obviously get measured on total revenue, total cash cost per acquisition and Roi on terms of revenue and cash. And they get measured on that, right? A sales reps get measured on the uh, uh, they conversion rate, so how many calls they did and how many people they sold and what the conversion rate is there and how much of that was collected and revenue, how much in cash. Sam Ovens: 00:27:22 Right? And then on customer support people, they get measured on a how many replies per day. So how many tickets if they sold today, and not only that, but how many, what was the happiness score because you could do a lot of tickets but solve them with bad answers. So it's not only do they hit their ticket count, but did they get the satisfaction score? So for example, all of our team and our support team should handle at least 100 tickets a day each and they should do that at a happiness school that is like above 86 percent. That's the standard. And then I won't tell you every single department, but every single department within my company has the metrics. They know what their things are. Sam Ovens: 00:28:25 Joe would say is did you stop drinking lacroix after the news about the pesticides in them or was that just a hoax? I haven't stopped drinking it. I looked into it like I researched it a bit and it was both sides. You know, like some people were like, it's a, it's, it's true. And then some people were like, it's a conspiracy. I mean, I'm still waiting to find out what the exact thing is, but actually what I'm actually going to do because. Because I know that you can easily find out I'm going to do this for fun. You can just seemed a lacroix to a lab. All right. That's the only way to know for sure because if you read articles or look at people's comments on the Internet is full of misinformation. So you know, I'm sure somebody has actually seen one to lab because a lot of competitors, including Coca Cola is scared of Lacroix, right? Lacroix Bit Coca Cola in the flavored sparkling water market and so they're a big company and a lot of people don't like them because they kind of dominating in this new category of, of, of consumer drinks. And so A. I'm sure a lot of people have analyzed these drinks in the lab. That's like the first thing people do. And Sam Ovens: 00:29:49 so that's one reason why I haven't stopped, but the second reason is that a lot of people are short lacroix stock and then try to arbitrage it. So what happens is they will create like a research paper that's, that's like makes a claim like lacroix is the stuff and it's drink or the Croix is committing fraud. It's been, it's been done multiple times. They've had, goes at it and they produced this paper and then they send it out and then it Kinda goes viral on the Internet and then the stock goes down and they make money from it going down because they've got a short on it. It's classic like arbitrage. It happens all the time. And uh, and I think that was another one of those. But ultimately I don't know the answer. So, but I want to know the answer. So I'm going to say in one to the lab and then I'll let you know what happens when I get it back. And you can do that with anything. By the way, if you really want to know what's in something. And I, I've kind of always wondered because it says I've got one right here and it is a naturally isn't right? It says ingredients only carbonated water naturally isn't. What the fuck does naturally isn't to me. I've always been kind of interested in and so we'll find out and you can seen stuff to a lab and they'll tell you what's in there. Sam Ovens: 00:31:14 Darrin says, I'm trying to better define my niche statement. I help airbnb hosts launch and make at least 45 percent above the average host through a proven management system. I have not had any clients who ever I have developed and tested this process on two of my own properties over the past four years. Okay, so you didn't really ask me a question then. I think honestly, what you need to do is just stopped. Try get clients do it. You'll refine it with time and practice, not by sitting in a room with a pencil. Um, most days when doing website work in digital marketing retainers, you recommend picking a niche instead of going after many different niches. However, would it be wise if we go after a few different niches first? Then slowly hone down on an itch. I think it's honestly easier if you just pick one first and then just presuming on it and just master it. It's the easiest way to gain competitive advantage. And standout from the rest of the crowd, which is the number one problem, you know, startup businesses have, I would say is I found when meditate I have more control and keeping myself from bad habits and posters such as chicken, linkedin feed or facebook notifications. Is that in effect a you have experienced from meditation? Yes. That's what it does. It enables you to, like I said, when your mind wanders, Sam Ovens: 00:32:54 you can the back military. Okay. Sherry, on cds. Do you believe a person can sell ideas as an itch? Well, it's not really a niche. You know what you do isn't a niche. A niche is a group of people. Speaker 2: 00:33:14 Right? Sam Ovens: 00:33:15 So like if you see it, you've got it wrong. Like a niche is a group of people. It's got nothing to do with ideas, selling something or anything. It's just a group of people that have a problem that you serve and solve their problem for them. All the niches my cows is that a CEO cancel on me 15 minutes before the strategy session without an apology, but then he asked questions by email and his pa suggested a new day in person. Their office is not far show any scheduled it for 30 minutes. When I arrived, he lets me wait for 10 minutes, the whole meeting last 20. And despite my best attempt to dominate the conversation, he asked about price and said he has to think about it. At which stage should I have done anything differently? Good question. Like it was foreshadowed from the beginning. He scheduled a strategy session with you in 15 minutes before he cancelled without an apology. Speaker 2: 00:34:12 Alright, done Sam Ovens: 00:34:14 right there. He's done. So if anybody cancels a strategy session and or no shows and they don't give at least like two hours notice like of of why Speaker 2: 00:34:29 done, Sam Ovens: 00:34:30 don't talk to them again. They gone. You can't let people walk all over you like that. And once they do it, once, they're going to do it again and again and again and again, and each time they're going to do it harder and they're going to dig their heels in. Right? So just don't. As soon as you see it happen, cut them. Julie and mark says, my child is 17 years old and loves the course and wants to be a consultant. Now, any issues with this? No, I wish I got started when I was way younger. Honestly. If you gave this course too well, I reckon if I can. A cool experiment would be to give this course to like a six year old. Speaker 2: 00:35:15 Yeah. Sam Ovens: 00:35:16 Because the younger you get started, like why not? People can handle so much more than what they think. You know, we try to shelter people but I can just just throw them in the deep end. INOPSYS is. Can you role play how you handled common objections you used to get on a strategy session call. You did this a few months ago and it was really valuable. Yeah. So your question is too vague, you know, you need to ask me something specific like tell me I experienced this objection and I don't know how to handle it. How would you handle it? That is a question that I can answer. What you have asked me is kind of a vague request for a broad set of knowledge. So just ask me direct stuff. Turn is direct outreach on linkedin. I've seen 600 to 700 invites of the past month to my niche medical practices, but I only get two and a three percent acceptance rate so far. Zero sales. How can I get these numbers up? I think my niche off it is fairly straight forward, but not sure my numbers a lot. You need to figure out why and so the base person who can figure that out as you because you've been doing it. So Sam Ovens: 00:36:39 like try to figure out first why are the people you had a strategy session with? Why didn't they buy? What was their objection? List them all out. Right? And they look at all the people that had a strategy session with you and then all the people that didn't. And then ask yourself, what is the difference between the people that scheduled a strategy session with me and the people that didn't one characteristic do they share in common that differentiates them from the one characteristic these people share in common because these people didn't do it. These people did. Why that'll, that'll teach you something. There's an answer there. And then you spoke to these people and then they all said no, why? Find out why handle that, why change it so that, that why won't exist. And then find out why they scheduled that call with you and like doubled down on that. Why to improve the schedule. Right? And then remove that. Why to improve the conversion rate. It's just finding these whys and addressing them almost is. What is your biggest regret in life in general or something that you wish you did differently that would have totally changed the course of your life forever? Um, it's an interesting question. I don't have any real like massive regrets because Sam Ovens: 00:38:05 like Sam Ovens: 00:38:08 it, that's not regret to kind of a bad thing to have, you know. And sometimes what happens is something you think's real bad at the time ends up being good for you later. Right. So I don't really have regrets but I mean if was, if you asked me that if we changed the language of it a bit and you said what would I do differently? There's some things so I would have just, you know, it's so hard to do in hindsight because you know, you don't get another go at life. So it's, so, you know, everyone can sound like a, like a genius in hindsight. But um, I would, I just would have gotten, like, would have gotten smarter younger because, you know, I was just screwing around drinking beers and doing nothing for a long time and I only really started getting smarter when I was 20 years old, 21 years old. And I honestly don't think I'd even read a book until I was 21 years old. And so I just would have started younger. But it doesn't really matter that much anyway, but yeah, Sam Ovens: 00:39:36 say first is I still haven't made a sale and I'm near the end of the second week. Is they still hope for me? Yes. That is normal. You know, don't want like different people are going to make sales at different times. You know? Is it possible to make a sale on day one? Yes. Is it common? Not a. So it's possible to do it in record times, but is it, it's not common. Right. And forget about it. Like just the main thing you need to focus on is like, I always think about it like this. Do I want to make sure that I get it for sure and definitely achieve it. What do I want to make sure that I get it quick? I always want to choose the definitely get it right and when you're trying to get things quick, most of the time you don't achieve the thing that you're trying to do in the timeframe you have given yourself. Sam Ovens: 00:40:32 Then you get demotivated and you'll give up and you go looking for another one of those things. And it's just a perpetual cycle where you end up always losing, but if you just stick to something and you just think, I'm just going to do whatever it takes and however long it takes, I'm just going to hang on. Then you know you're going to get it because you know the only way you can possibly lose is by giving up. If you choose not to ever give up, you've already won. It just is going to take some time. We don't know how much time, but we've already got it. It's, that's the way I think about it. I'm just like, all right, I'm going to get onto this thing. I'm going to hold onto it and I'm not getting off. I'm not letting go of it. And it will be done. Ryan says, I love your style. Simplicity with one funnel and one product approach for my health and fitness program. Should I do the same? Or is it nice to have a tripwire offer? Just focus on one thing. One thing. It's hard enough. Most people can't even do one sec, right? So just do one once you have absolutely mastered one annual board, then try do to that until you can do one a through and through. With mastery. Don't do too. Sam Ovens: 00:41:53 Nihilist is at what point do we get a salesperson at the point that your completely booked up like all hours everyday of the week with strategy sessions and you have closed more than 30 clients and you've absolutely proven your model, you've proven, you know what to do, you're a master and you can generate strategy sessions with a's. That's when you get a sales rep. Ryan Ryan said sleep's important. What type of beer do you have? A. I've just got like a, like a wooden frame. And then the mattress we have is called a purple mattress. You've probably seen those ads. It's actually pretty good by those purple mattresses are actually pretty good. And the price quite good too. Like some mattresses are ridiculously expensive, like those ones that are a good price and they're actually good for your back and everything. Sam Ovens: 00:42:53 Brian Ramos, do you know there is no law anywhere? Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Is that you don't have pay personal income tax? Um, yeah, you, you have to pay personal income tax if you don't like just try not doing it and then just see what happens. Right. Which is probably not a good idea actually. It's not a good experiment. Like you just don't screw with those things. You, you should try to be smart and like, you know, do your books in a way that and run your business in a way that you minimize how much taxes you're going to have to. Oh, but you don't try and escape the, like paying taxes that you actually owe because that's how you get into trouble. Sam Ovens: 00:43:48 Holly Jameson says I'm doing facebook ads with a hair cell on after reviewing your 30 audience training, there's a big trade off because they only have a small area they can service. I can't really target. Yeah. Okay. So I get your question. Yeah. So if you're doing facebook ads for local businesses where their market is going to be within a radius of so many models to get the 30 audiences, then forget it. That's the only instance where you just get, you don't, you just don't even think about that. All you need to do is find the age range and then just sit the mile radius and that's it. One audience, that's the audience run it. It's, it's totally when you're doing it for a local business that is restrained by locality. Ryan Ryan, missy is lady boss does a two part phone call, closed system with $50 positive first call. Uh, this is for her. Private coaching is not, it's not necessary. I mean it's different, but like what we do works and you know, I've made it work and continue to make it work and so hundreds of my students will probably thousands of them, hundreds of them have made it work to a very, like, big degree. Some of them have made it work into the eight figures. So it works. There's no reason to screw with it. Sam Ovens: 00:45:25 Quick question on direct outreach on linkedin. I've already answered this question. Hey, stop spamming the questions thing. Seriously. You're spamming like a bloody ESA in here. Diego or I joined up paypal now and I'm still at the beginning of classes. What advice do you have to create a massive sales process with low ticket? My product is, and the cost per lead is high to scale, different from consulting. Yeah. So I would. Sam Ovens: 00:46:09 It's hard because I don't have much context here. You, I don't have much information to draw from here at all. Um, I would just say go through the training and you'll see what you need to do, like you'll have to adapt it a little bit to what you're doing, but the principles and enrolls are still the same. Go through the training and you'll probably answer your question and if you still don't have the answer, ask on one of the, uh, uplevel consulting called because I will be on those ones and you can ask me and give me more context and I can learn more and give you a more direct answer. But on here I can't unmute you and ask you questions on the q and a calls. I can unmute you and we could spend half an hour nailing that question. Sam Ovens: 00:47:17 Lionel, laces in the niche of helping entrepreneurs transform their existing company to a self managing company, how would you approach to finding prospects? Yeah. Well, here I can tell. I'm just going to turn this light off of it, so here I can tell that you haven't engineered your business the right way, like first of all, you see in the niche of helping entrepreneurs transform their existing company to a self managing company. How would you approach finding a prospect right now? This is an interesting thing because if you had followed the process, it starts by picking a niche, identifying a group of people. We find that group of people. Then once we have located that group of people, we talked to them and we researched them and we find out a common widespread problem that exists amongst this group of people. We talked to them to find this out too, and then once we found the problem, our business should be created as a solution to that problem. Right now, when you go through that path and you do it that way, how could you then have the solution ready and then not know how to find prospects? Sam Ovens: 00:48:40 You see? It's impossible because you couldn't have got there in this. You started with them, so I know that by the nature of your question, you didn't start with them and they were never in the picture, and so you have a bigger issue than just not then just not being able to find the prospects you need to restart the entire process starts with the market. That's the only way it can work. Amen. Is What do you think about reaching out to potential clients on instagram? I find way more potential clients on instagram then linkedin. Sure. Go for it. Test it, try it, do it for consistent number of days, record it, track the metrics and see if it works. If it works better than Linkedin, use that instead regarding your post, about what are you interested in. You mentioned that research and the main character of particular movie. The movie you really like helps you find clues to what you're interested in. Can you give examples of how knowing this can help you find out what type of business in life to pursue? Sure, so it's just a little clue like into Sam Ovens: 00:49:53 what you identify as as like a, as a person, right? Like your character and so you know some people who choose lot you will, first of all, if you want to see it work just in a. If you want to see proof that it works, ask people, men and women like what their favorite movie is and then find out who the main character in that movie is and I guarantee you that the woman will chose movies where the main character is a woman and the main will choose a movie where the main character as a man, right. That's, that's because obviously they identify with those characters more because they are more like them. Like a man's hero is more commonly going to be a man and a woman's hero in is more likely going to be a woman not all the time but pretty much all of the time. Sam Ovens: 00:50:46 And so, but it goes deeper than that. It then goes into like ethnicity. So you know, people like, like they're going to like, people like them, you know what I mean? So not just the cx but it goes into the ethnicity as well. And then it goes into the characteristics of that person. Like, are they more of a extroverted person or an introverted person? Are they more known for being like, like social and caring or are they more knowing for being very analytical and like, uh, in strategic, right? And so you can tell a lot about a person by that because you can see what they think of themselves now if you ask them what they think of themselves, they're not going to reveal that to you one because it's, it's kind of like not something you'd tell people most of the time. And two, they might not even be fully aware of it themselves. So as a proxy to get to that library and their brain, I go through the movie and it works really well. Nathan says, how are you able to guarantee a, uh, how would you handle? Are you able to guarantee as a line clients? I would say no because like you don't want, like, you can't guarantee that sort of stuff because it's, Sam Ovens: 00:52:15 it's an unknown variable and it would kind of be wrong to guarantee that. Do you know what I mean? So what you can, what you should guarantee on though is the work that needs to be done and the standard of the work that needs to be done and you know, if you don't do that then it's your fault and you should have to face the consequences. Right? But if you do do everything that was promised to a degree that was promised and even better then you know, then you shouldn't get like punished for doing that, you know what I mean? And so you should structure your things in that way. What are some traits to develop to become more resourceful in business? And by resourceful he means having the ability to find answers to things like I'm going to say that it's just practice honestly. Like, and what I've learned though, after studying a lot of people and studying myself and looking back from hindsight is that adversity is a good thing for like not you shouldn't put other people into adversity, but if you had, if you faced adversity, it's actually better for you than what you think. Alright? And so Sam Ovens: 00:53:45 like generally if you look at really successful people, a lot of them have had hash like a experiences throughout their life, like pretty testing things and the more of them they have and the more often they sit in those testing grueling environments, the tougher they get. And we see this with, uh, you know, we see this a lot like the children. Like if you look at the, if you look at the rich list in any period of time in, like you'll know you'll, you'd imagine that the rich list would mostly be people who inherited money and whose families were rich because they would have to know an advantage, right? Because they appearance would teach them and they would know how to teach them how to do it. And then they would have money which is surely going to help them. And then they would inherit all of this stuff and they wouldn't have to face any of this adversity. Sam Ovens: 00:54:43 So surely these people are going to occupy most of the rich list. You'd, you'd think that, but it's not true. Like 85 percent of the rich list is actually people who started from zero and so it's not what you think. So being, being like being raised from a rich family is not very good for like, for you if you want to be like successful in business, but being poor is actually real good for you because it teaches you how to fight and it teaches you like how to develop thick skin and all of that. And so that's really, you know, like uh, that's why it is that way. And then facing challenges in business though, the more you face and the harder the environment, the bitar like George Soros is one of the richest people in the world and he was a five year old Jew in the Holocaust, right? So you imagine if you were a Jew in the Holocaust at five years old, you know, people think that making cold calls is tough. Imagine that, that you going to be pretty damn tough after you come out of that alive. And so Sam Ovens: 00:56:09 what I'm saying here is that you shouldn't avoid challenges. Like you shouldn't aim to be feeling fine. You shouldn't be aiming to be feeling happy and not stressed and feeling in your comfort zone. That's actually a bad thing, but I swear a lot of people think that like the point, like I hear this all the time will the point of sometimes I'm, I'm stressing out with something and it's hard and I have to work hard and I'm getting like I'm getting worn out and people often say to me like, why do you do it? Like isn't the purpose of life to just be happy? And I'm like, you don't get it. This makes me happy. Like right now I'm suffering, but this is the, this is the process to get the thing and I wouldn't want to just be lying on my. Like if you want to be happy then just go like, you know, go and lie on your couch and then just start medicating yourself with some drugs and shit and you'll stop. Start trying to feel happy all the time. Right? It's impossible because even if you do that with medication and just lying on your couch and being lazy and eating whatever you want, doing whatever you want very quickly, you're going to get miserable and so you know you shouldn't aim to. Sam Ovens: 00:57:37 You shouldn't aim to like be happy and never ever be unhappy or uncomfortable. You actually achieve happiness through struggle and unhappiness. Right? It's the same way the gym works. Like why do you go to the gym and Exhaust Yourself? Sam Ovens: 00:57:56 Well because it's actually good for you, but to, to achieve that, it's hard and it's not that fun. And why do you eat healthy food when you could just eat like cookies and ice cream? Well sexually beautiful you and so everything has this relationship basically. It's like, you know, you don't, I don't like when you face challenges in life, just take them straight on, head on and don't complain. Like just ask for more and don't ever like don't ever start thinking like I want to be in my comfort zone. I want to do this. Get way out of your depths, you know, like go way, way out. And then when you think you have tasted yourself to the furtherest level ever double it, and then when you think you can't take on anything more, take on more and just keep going and you'll be pretty surprised what happens with yourself. What were you think your limit is? It's nowhere near there and you can go way harder and then you'll actually start to enjoy it. Right? And so I would pull that traits like grit and thick skin and you know, that's, that's what you need to succeed and how you develop that as by just going straight through like adversity. Now a lot of people, the things that a lot of people avoid and wouldn't want eva, I actively seek out those things and try to do more of them. Like that's how you get good. Sam Ovens: 00:59:41 Ryan sees what motivates you to focus and work so hard every day, the way you do. What's your primary driver? Sure. Well they no. The thing is, is it's like what, Sam Ovens: 01:00:04 what, what am I going to do? The, the main question is, is like what? What am I going to do with my life? Right? And what is my purpose or whatever, right. That's like the main question that that's the first thing. And you know, I really like what I do and I actually think that my purpose is actually to, to change education. And so then it's like, alright, well if that's what it is, then why would I not do it? Like if I'm not doing it then that's kind of not so I want to do it and so I want to do it as much as I can possibly do it before I can't do it anymore. And so that's what I do and I actually enjoy it and I liked making progress and I actually want to see it through to the end and the, if I'm being honest with myself to actually do that, it requires obscene amounts of if it, you know, I'm not just trying to make some money, I'm not just trying to even make a billion dollars, like trying to change education. So like that's a lot, lot harder than that. That's extreme. So it's gonna, you know, extreme requires extreme, like no one achieves something extreme and profound with average input. It takes extreme and profound to get extreme and profound. So that's honestly what it takes. That's the reality of it. And if I truly do want the thing, which I do, then that's what is required. And so that's what I put in. Sam Ovens: 01:01:39 That's how it works. And like the other thing is, is I actually would way prefer to be working then be on vacation. Vacations to me are boring and the only reason I do them is because like my wife, like they good, they good times to spend quality time with my wife and they're also good for resting and relaxing and taking a break and that's good for your house and all of that. So that's why I do them. But like if I had the option, which I already do to like always be on vacation, it boring and like if I had the option to go out and like hang out with, with my friends, that sounds boring. Like what do I achieve by hanging out with my friends? They're really achieved much and quite often the conversations that aren't very interesting at all. And so Sam Ovens: 01:02:41 I'm just like, why? And then I just, I'm like, well, I'd way rather be doing this, there's a like if I do this work, then I help a lot of people. Right. And if I do this work, I make progress and if I do this work then I get bitter and I achieved this goal. So would I rather do that or would I rather hang out with them? Yeah. Okay. Chris. And not really achieved the goal that I've set for myself. So when faced with these two options, it makes no sense to me why I would choose the other option. Speaker 2: 01:03:14 That's why Sam Ovens: 01:03:20 what ads convert higher ones from consulting.com or ones from Sam ovens are the ones from Sam Ovens. Personal works at facebook as a personal place I would say is what do you think of niche related social networking events? Are they worth investing that time? And if it. I've gone to a couple and don't get great Roi, but I don't want to be judging because I'm an introvert and it's possible this is my eyes telling me to avoid going out. Yeah. If I was you. So I know what niche you're in, you're in the like I'm software engineer recruiting niche, which I know a lot about because I actively work with like recruit is in this industry pretty much every day. So Sam Ovens: 01:04:05 what I've found is I've been to some of those events too and what I was hoping I might find there would be software engineers, but instead what I found there was just a bunch of recruiters hoping to find software engineers and so I was like alright well I'm not going back to these and so I stopped going to those. But the ones you do want to go to other software engineer meetups. So for example, like a particular coding language like Golang or Java or react or something, right? So let's say that you want to like say that you, you want to be really good at recruiting software engineers to do with Java Golang or react. Then you want to find specific niche meetups to do with those languages and entertained those and then get to know the engineers and then that's how you've got an advantage. Now you know them and then you should also get to know the businesses, the people looking for those people, and then you can start matching them up. Speaker 2: 01:05:13 Right? Sam Ovens: 01:05:15 No to think differently than the average person. Cmcs. How was the wedding you went to last week? Nice. To get away for a bit. Yeah, it was good. It was the first wedding I've ever been to and I'm married. So it was, it was, it was good. I've always wanted to attend the wedding. I haven't wanted to have one personally, but I've wanted to attend. One oldest is I have started a program, got to fight week five tested proof of concept by selling my off on a live event from 70 people on the event. 20 seven board. Does the account and would you recommend moving towards facebook ads or selling online coaching program? Yeah, so I think what you should do is I think 27 sales counts as proof of concept, right? So if you're selling the same thing, then you can now go to facebook ads that counts. Thomas says, uh, I've switched my niche and now I'm a copywriter for coaches and consultants. Where do I find consistent clients for me without spamming coaching groups? Um, this is, this comes back to the question again, like how did you come up with this business idea for coaching, for doing copywriting for coaches and consultants if you don't know how to find coaches and consultants, right? Because you have to have talked to them first to find out their problem and then you have to have done that to find out your solution into a picture niche. So it sounds like you've just an engineered this the wrong way. Sam Ovens: 01:07:06 Joshua Western overseas. How do you get over the objection? I need to check over my finances over the weekend. Yeah. So no, I would just say look, don't like just be honest. Like I'm sure you know what your finances alike and you know, whether it's like a yes or a no. Sam Ovens: 01:07:27 And you know, they could say, oh, well I think it's this other thing is that you just need to get an answer from them. It doesn't matter if the answer is not. No, it was a Beta than maybe I would rather have a note and maybe this isn't the best, but knows a bit of the maybes, so just get them to be honest with you and give them an answer and give you an answer because then you don't have to follow up and play cat and mouse games and you get, you get to find out, you get a conclusion, checks and sees. I'm restructuring my health and fitness alpha and wants to be all right. Yeah. Can you just stop spamming this message thing please? Otherwise I'm going to have to kick your ass out and I've always wanted to kick someone out. So no more Sam Ovens: 01:08:43 short sentences. Do you remember some of the plumbing companies you've got hot water clients for it? Yes, of course I do. How would I forgotten that? And then Ryan says, what are your thoughts on Kim trials and Jerry engineering I think came trials, uh, mostly like a conspiracy theory, but I do think that there's a lot of, like a lot of stuff in Geo engineering that's not good, right? So team trials is just like what happens when you put a turbine, cheap propulsion engine through the atmosphere at that altitude and the sky is blue, right? There's, it's like a Kim trail, right? And sure planes do cause pollution, but it's not like we have an electric plane yet and it's not like we have a, it's not like we can just stop planes, people need to move around. So I think people mostly cause it a conspiracy over that. Sam Ovens: 01:09:38 But then geoengineering, yet we only eat organic food and so like, you know, I think most food in America is disgusting. Like uh, you know, like Americans, like most of them are very sick and I'm not surprised because the inputs are horrific and is very, very weak rules for what can and can't be done to food in America. So yeah, I think with geoengineering in terms of food is horrific and you should look at the ingredients and stuff and you should buy organic stuff and you should really not eat beef at all really because it's horrific what they put into their crap. Um, and be careful with that. But the came trials mostly a conspiracy. You'll really enjoy conspiracies, man. You're asking me about flat earth and Kim trials and shit. You gone, you've gone down some rabbit holes on youtube. Damn, I just missed some dudes question who was from New Zealand? Um, I don't know who said that, but will you say to something about uni take and should I drop out of school or do something? Um, make sure you ask that question again. I, I can't see it because I just missed it. But make sure you ask it again. I want to answer it a Steven Cortez is how much, how much should more, how much should more our own a make over employees should employees ever make more than owner of a company? Sam Ovens: 01:11:22 Um, it depends what you mean. Like, you know, in terms of salary, um, Sam Ovens: 01:11:34 in terms of salary, like I don't even have a salary so my technically my employees make more money than me. Right. But I mean I have the company so like I own that equity in net worth. And then also the, the prophets, if I choose to bring them into my name. I mean their mind, but it's different, so it depends what you mean on a salary level. Short, like Steve Jobs was famous for paying himself a $1 salary. Right. And you don't want to have a big salary. You. And who cares if your employees make more than you, but you know it, you own the company, so it's different. Sure. I would say is what questions did the recruiter to ask you when they decided to help you find engineers and what is the one thing which made you decide he's the one to help you? Sure will. Really. What interested me about him is that he's not a recruiter. He's an engineer, so he's a full stack engineer, has experiences with the backend. He knows databases, he knows a Java and he knows object oriented languages in a good depth of detail. So he's an insider. He's one of them Sam Ovens: 01:13:07 helping companies find engineers. So he's different and I liked that someone who isn't an engineer and knows nothing about engineering and has the objective to hyatt to find engineers. There's going to have a lot of problems doing that. And so I liked that, that was different. And then w we just got real specific. I said to him, look, we looking for someone who has xyz traits, right? And what we look for is, you know, we, we want senior full stack engineers that like uh, have at least 10 or 15 years experience. They have a bias towards the back end and they understand object oriented languages and the specific language we like to go. And so if they know go, they're good at databases and architecture and, and like they've got a bias towards the back end but no front toe. We like we'll hire those people. So we got very specific and then I was like, if you find me these, I'll pay you money. And he did it. But I honestly didn't fully trust them and think this is the one until he found me somebody. So he still had to prove himself. You need to get real specific. Like, you know, saying I help people find engineers is just too broad. This soul, many types. And then that's just for the back end, right? For the front end. We'd. And we want like react engineers and so that's totally different. Speaker 2: 01:14:35 Um, Sam Ovens: 01:14:36 and you need to get very specific and you also need to know the industry you need to know really well and you need to speak to the engineers language. If you ever go for a swim in the ocean or run by the ocean, I can tell that you're your Myers Briggs profile is definitely an f. you're definitely a feeler type. You asked me how I enjoyed the wedding and whether I go for a swim and run by the ocean that you got to be an f type. Speaker 2: 01:15:16 I'm, I'm, Sam Ovens: 01:15:20 I just like the, Sam Ovens: 01:15:23 I do it on Tuesdays and Rit. Rit. You know, I used to, in New York I used to do cardio on the, on the bike or the rowing machine or the treadmill. Right. But now we do cardio on the beach by the water and we do a like what is it called? Interval training sprints. So yeah, we do that and I have been swimming but only like twice because then I learned that this, it's like infested with sting rays out there and not like, you know, if, if, if one person got stung by a stingray, like every four months, okay, I'm willing to take that risk, but I'm not kidding. Fifty four people got stung by a stingray in a single day. Right. When I see those numbers, fuck am I going in there? But I think they might go away later. It's just a seasonal thing Ryan sees. Do you think you would have made more money overall if you have a nine, nine, seven price point this whole time? I have no idea. I have. If I, if I had an answer to that, I'd just be completely lying to you because I've got no idea. Sam Ovens: 01:16:46 Mohammed sees. What would you tell your students and marketing agencies making six to seven figures that have staff, et Cetera, to do before a recession. What would you do differently during orientation? During a recession? I don't think people, uh, yeah, so this is, this is a good question because yeah, I think there definitely is one coming. So it is a good question and the key is, is to, is to like Sam Ovens: 01:17:19 always run everything lean, right? So for example, the worst thing that you can do in life and in business is build like it's called lifestyle creep and it's basically we're use your lifestyle gets more and more and more demanding, right? And it starts sucking up more and more and more money. So you know, it's like, you know, you've got these expensive cars and you keep getting the latest model and then you keep buying more cars. Then you might buy a boat and then you might start flying on private jets and then you start like buying expensive food and champagne and going to restaurants and buying like Gucci belts and all sorts of stupid shit. Like that stuff is what ends people. And you don't want to have lifestyle creep. You want to make sure you contain your lifestyle and that's the number one tip I'd give for you because a hungry lifestyle is, is very, very catastrophic. So I always try to have a very lean lifestyle. Um, so like I, we're just t shirts and shorts and only have one pair of shoes. No kidding. And I, I'm like don't have fancy cars. I don't, I don't have anything that's very extravagant at all. Like they're like my expenses haven't really moved. Personal expenses haven't really moved, Sam Ovens: 01:19:03 like my personal expenses are honestly about $20,000 a month and that's for me and my wife and I Sam Ovens: 01:19:17 make like two to 3 million a month. So think about it that way. Right? You, you want. And because I make more it doesn't mean I'm going to increase that number. If I made 100 millenia I'd still want my personal expenses to be 20 grand a month. Actually what excites me is making 100 million a year and getting my personal expenses down to 15 grand a month. That would be cool. So you want to try and you want to try and shrink the personal expenses, keep them contained. That's the main thing that gets people. Uh, and then on the business side, you just want to make sure that you're, you keep cash, like people who run paycheck to paycheck and never hold much cash, you can get into trouble doing that. You want to be holding some cash and that's basically what I recommend because if you have, if you don't ever demanding lifestyle and you run it and you run lean and you've got a lot of cash, then you can go for ages. Like all my money could stop and it could go to zero. Let's say there was a catastrophic disaster and my income goes from like 30 million a year to like zero. Sam Ovens: 01:20:36 Then I'd be fine. I'd be able to live the same way. I'm living right now for decades. So Speaker 3: 01:20:48 fine, Sam Ovens: 01:20:50 that's what you want to look at. But there's some people who if they have one little blip they'd done. If you got to make sure that if a blip ins you, you, you're, you're basically done anyway. It's just a matter of time because blips come, Ryan Ramus says in your course, you mentioned how you're not on youtube or instagram. Why did you decide to eventually hop on those platforms and what other platforms Sam Ovens: 01:21:20 can we find you on? Yeah, so first of all, I never use youtube as a consumer. I personally think or facebook or instagram or anything. If you look at my instagram, I don't follow anybody. I honestly don't look at anybody's stuff either. I don't look at anything. I don't look at my dms, I don't look at the comments, I don't look at anything and I don't follow anyone. And then on Youtube, same thing, don't follow anyone, like watch anything, don't look for anything unless I'm looking for an answer to a question, right? Then I'll use it. Uh, the same on facebook. Same with all social media. Same on Linkedin and everything, but I do use it as a producer. So. And honestly I would, I would prefer not to, but it like it's, it helps me to produce like one blog video a week and post that out. It's just building up like a wider base of content that's out there that people can stumble across me on now, why did I say why was I not doing it? And then why did I start doing it? All of a sudden I wasn't doing it at the beginning because Sam Ovens: 01:22:45 might I? I thought my time was spent getting clients getting better at my craft and helping those clients get results and making money and growing my business. Then it was spent creating content for youtube. Right. And I think that theory cracks me up sometimes when people mock me for, they're like, um, why would I listen to you about business? You only have like 30,000 subscribers on Youtube and it cracks me up because I have 30,000 subscribers, but my company makes $30, million dollars a year, so I've got a thousand dollars per subscriber. But did these two things aren't even related? Right. But like you don't judge someone if they're good on business based on the number of subscribers they've got, but then you find people who have a million subscribers and they don't make any money. They're broke. So it's like, it's, if you want to be good at business, you shouldn't just aim to produce youtube videos and get lots of subscribers, you should aim to be good at business and that's what I did. But then I started posting videos on Youtube later on and the reason why I made that change is because Sam Ovens: 01:24:07 um, because I had, I hired people like I developed this team right, and now I had the ability to take my hands off of some things that I was doing, like I was no longer doing strategy sessions and I was no longer doing like accounting and uh, and payroll and all sorts of things because I hired a really good team and I even got out of doing facebook ads and marketing and you know, so I freed up a whole a huge amount of time. And so then I thought, okay, well now it's worth it to just create one video a week. But you'll notice that I'm very minimal on that. I create one video a week and I use my iphone because I don't want to spend any time doing it. I don't need it. I just hold it up and record, published it done, and so I've only allocated an hour a week to it and then at the beginning I just focused on being good at business and I would recommend you to the same. Ignore social media like going and getting a following of following as a false positive. You know, like the person who has the most followers on instagram isn't the best at anything other than do you think followers on instagram? Sam Ovens: 01:25:30 People don't understand that. They're like, oh, obviously this guy's the best person to learn business from because he's got the most followers. Not True. Like if you want to learn how to get lots of followers, learn that from the person with lots of followers, but if you want to learn how to be good at business, look for the person who doesn't have that many fellows because the act of having all the. The out come of having a lot of followers means that somebody has spent a lot of their time trying to get a lot of followers and that means that if they were doing that, then they weren't doing business and if they weren't doing business, why would you want to learn business from them? I just got to think about it. It makes total sense, but people are kind of Delusional Ryan or way. Amos says, what's the best way to get a ton of likes on your facebook page? Sam Ovens: 01:26:18 Wait, it's ironic that you asked that immediately after that. Who Cares? I think you should aim to, when you're running ads, you should try to get like 5,000 likes because it. It helps with your eds, right? That's the purpose. So it has a real purpose there and the best way to get them is to just follow the training. It's in the facebook training. It's some one module in there, but it talks about how to run a likes campaign and run one of those. You'll get a lot of likes I'm Muslim sees. How do you know if someone is clean and thinking because they, it's obvious that they've thought about things more. It's when the, it's when they can explain why about a lot of things that a lot of people are confused about and also Sam Ovens: 01:27:06 they can go into detail, right? So it doesn't matter what level they take it to. So a very quick way to know if someone is good at something is to ask them a question then here their response didn't go, why, why, why, why, why, why, why? And then just drilled down, down, down, and watch how many layers down they can go. And if someone stops at a certain layer and gets all like confused or if they get um, standoffish, it shows you that there's not much there, right? It's kind of fake. And if someone can keep going down and then starts to enjoy it and challenges, you bet. Then you know that they're. There are a deep thinker and generally deep thinkers, it cleans and kids because you can't go down many layers and this dual, you're doing it in a clean way. Otherwise you'll get lost. And yeah, and they also know why, if you want to see some claims, think is like, listen to some steve jobs interviews. He was very good. Uh, also read like Jeff Bezos, leaders to shareholders. You can see how articulate and well thought out everything is. Also read Google's letters to shareholders. Very good. Read Berkshire hathaway leaders. Does she hold us? Very good. Watch Warren Buffet's documentary. Very good. Sam Ovens: 01:28:34 Yeah. These things, they are cleaned thinkers. They're deep thinkers and clean. Which kind of the two come together. College days. I'm running ads for two clients. Oh yeah. Someone asked me about. So Hans does is do you taste your potential like emotional intelligence? And I'm like Iq and eat, you do taste employees for that. Sam Ovens: 01:29:07 So you know, every company is going to have like a bias towards a particular type of person. Right? So, and that's normal because, you know, a company like a company is going to have some biases towards some things. That's what principals are, that's what values are, you know. And so google, you know, they, they, uh, like engineers and technology people. And so they're gonna have most of, most of the people that work at Google will be t type people. They won't be if time there'll be thinking instead of feeling because it's not like discrimination or anything because know if would want to really work there. And so that's just naturally what happens. So you need to think about what are the type of people that you, that would be best fit for what it is that you do and then try to get them. So with our business we are pretty much all t's like everyone's basically a t, there is a couple of ifs and the ifs that typically in customer support or live chat, live chat on the website or live chat on the Webinar or customer support via typically like half, half, half of the Mathias, half of them are etfs, right? Um, but everywhere else in the business it's just all tea pretty much everyone. And that's because Sam Ovens: 01:30:47 you know, it's very. And like the work we do is very analytical and now our style is very analytical and in the detail and looking at numbers and metrics and concepts and things. So it's just natural forties to, to shine. Then we also, we, we tend to get in t people and in Tj people I get along best with into Jay's and so I'm an I in Tj and uh, we're a lot of the people in our company, a I n t j's or ent js or intp and that's just like if we were doing, if it were to yoga business, right, we would suck it because. Or if we had a, if we had a hospitality business, right, let's say I was like we were running massage therapists meant running massage therapy or a beauty salon or a spa or something like that. We would be, we'd be atrocious. Sam Ovens: 01:31:50 It would be the coldest, like people would go there and be like, those people are like robots and they don't have any feelings. Right. And so we wouldn't be good for that situation, but we very good for this situation. And then an f type person wouldn't be very good for this situation, but they would be amazing at that situation. There is no one right answer to this thing. It's just depends on the situation. So like, that's why Briggs doesn't have a right and a wrong, it's just there's a right and a wrong based on how you combine two variables, the personality and the environment. That's how you combine them. And then we taste for Myers Briggs and things like that. Uh, and then yeah, that pretty much answers your question, but we're not very well, I'm not very good at it. The whole like a feelings thing. And so like that's not what you'd expect from, from my business though. And No, no, no one in our company is very good at that either. Uh, but what we're good at is the analysis and you want to find out what your thing is and the enhanced. Yeah, Sam Ovens: 01:33:19 she says I'm providing all that questions too long. Get the question short. I would say is, would you be open to share with me the profile of their acuity you work with because it sounds like we have quite similar experience in Germany. Speaker 3: 01:33:42 Um, Sam Ovens: 01:33:45 no, I'm not going to share it because he's our secret weapon at the moment. So we don't want to share that at all. But all I can suggest is just start hanging out with the engineers. It sounds like you're just, you're thinking about this too much, you're talking to businesses and you're talking to recruiters, but you haven't been talking to engineers. Go and talk to them. That's probably the missing piece. Logan Reyes, he has dropped out of high school in year 12 and take a uni tech studying business for a few hours a day or just stay in school. I'm extremely passionate in business and I have great successes for my age. I feel like 90 percent of what I'm learning is being taught so damn slow and it's pretty pointless, but I'm not ready to drop out completely. Honestly. Like here's what I know to be true based on the situation. If you're in year Sam Ovens: 01:34:58 12, right? Which is in New Zealand, that's like that year 13 is the year before you go to university. If you're in year 12, which means you must be like 17 years old. You have purchased this course. So if you're in, if you're 17 and still in school and somehow you found out about this course and then purchased it and then started doing it and you're passionate about business and I can tell you that you were ready to drop out of school completely. You don't need to go to university and you do not need to be in school late. Okay? Seriously, you will fly way faster and way higher if you leave. Now, the only way it can go wrong is if you is. If you just go off the rails and like start playing xbox all day long and smoking lots of weed and being an idiot. That's the only way you can screw it up. No one is going to care about your resume. No one's going to care about like your degree. These things, no one will really cares about them and it's only gonna get worse with time. So honestly just quit, dropout and go all in and business. You would definitely really just based on the fact that your you have this course Sam Ovens: 01:36:24 hints is. I recall you said you're all in on your business. Does that mean you have absolutely no other investments like real estate stocks, et Cetera? Yeah, that's what it means. Like all my attention goes here. All of my time goes here. Well My, if it goes here and like I don't have investments in anything else. Um, it doesn't mean that every single dollar of my cashes in it though. Well actually every single dollar of my cash is like within company, but it's not all out there invested in things. Right? Because it'd be a bit risky. It's not that risky when you don't have much cash because if you've only got like five grand and that's playing in this fine, right? Even up to 100 grand, you're going to be bidding a lot and then as soon as you start to have a 100 grand, you'll start to be bidding probably in fifties. And then as you get up to like a million, then you'll probably be playing with like 300. And if you have 200 grand to a million, you'll probably be playing with like 700 grand or a million. The more you get, the more you play with, but you always hold some back as reserved. But yeah, that's what I mean. Basically. Sam Ovens: 01:37:43 Joshua Westover can do. You mentioned about a potential recession coming in. I'm getting it. I'm still getting started. My niche is helping people with the fear of flying. Do you think this is the kind of niche affected by this? No, no. Really gets fully affected by a recession. It's only people who have lots of like expenses and lots of debt and lots of risk that get affected by recessions. Right? So in some businesses get better in recessions. Speaker 2: 01:38:20 Um, Sam Ovens: 01:38:21 people still need to fly on planes and rotations. Right? And people are still going to have a fear in a rescission of flying. So like those things will still be the same. You just need to make sure that you don't be stupid and all of your um, and just put every dollar you got into stupid things and get a demanding lifestyle. Sam Ovens: 01:38:51 Yeah. Homes, the seas. Do you taste your potential employees for the personality or do you have any other tips on what to teach your people about it? So I like to get people to complete some psychometric tests like Myers Briggs and things because it's a good thing to know about somebody, but we would never make a decision based on that. Like we're not going to hire someone just because they're this or just because they're not this right. The only way you can really know whether to hire someone or not is you have to develop a really good process of, of like recruitment and you need to know where to find the people and then you need like how to advertise to them, how to find them and how to source candidates. And then you need to know how to screen them on like a phone call. So you shouldn't go immediately from like Joel bed to resume submission to the in person interview. You should go with a 30 minute screening. Cool. And then you should be asking them questions and trying to filter them out there. And then only the people who you're really happy with after you've, after they've been through that, then you get them in for like an impersonal. And honestly, what I like to do is Sam Ovens: 01:40:08 I like to really test a few things and the first thing I like to test is, is this person in love with they craft and what they do. So I will ask people, Speaker 2: 01:40:23 um, Sam Ovens: 01:40:25 I'll ask them lots of questions about how did you get started doing this, why do you like it and then why do you think you'd like it? And then I asked all sorts of why questions about why they do what they do and if I start to hear people like really get excited and passionate and they've got an awesome story and it's kind of like a romance thing, like that's a good sign cause I like people who really love what they do because that's a prerequisite to be good at something, right? And then I like to taste paypal's depth of knowledge and how and their philosophy. So I like to ask people, you know, like let's say right now we're hiring for a product manager, right? Um, and so I like to ask them questions like, what is your product management philosophy? Now someone who's just got a job, they haven't developed a full blow and philosophy for what they do, they just do it to get paid, right? Sam Ovens: 01:41:31 They do not think about it deep enough to develop a full blown dem philosophy. So I asked that question and I like to see that they have really thought about it. They're like, oh wow. And they get excited and they're like, well really these five key principles that I like to adhere to and they are x, y, Z and the reason why this is because of those and the number one thing I like to optimize for is this and you know, these are the things that I believe. And then I asked them about what are your processes, right? Like what are your processes for doing product management? What are your methodologies that you use, where did you find those methodologies, why do you use that? And like just just probing questions about all of this. Because someone who's very good at what they do will be very passionate about it. Sam Ovens: 01:42:21 They will even use the word love, right? So the word love will come out a lot because people usually use the word love for people, right? When a person uses the word love unprompted, when talking about a thing that isn't a human, it means that they've got an actual love for it, the same way a human would develop love for, for another human. They do that for um, they do that for like they have, they have an actual love for what they do. And then they will also have thought about it enough to develop a philosophy and methodology, principles, beliefs, systems. And then they'll know. They'll also know a lot of books. So I asked them like, what the rate management, right? If someone can't tell me one, I know that they suck, right? And they just out. If somebody tells me some books that aren't product management books out and if someone tells me some books that suck out, like I know the books that the good ones would have read and then that will tell me them and then I'll probe them about those books and find out if they know the depth of them. Sam Ovens: 01:43:39 And then like you just, I just learned the things that really smart people would know and then I checked that that person knows those things and if they don't then you know, they're not smad and they're not good at that thing and you need to, you need to develop a process like the one I was telling you about. Right. But what's interesting is I don't really hire for skills. Well I guess you could say it's though like for having a philosophy and methodologies and things, the skills. But I guess what I'm saying is I don't hire for direct experience. So for example, I'm a product manager, you know, what we do is we make online courses and we have our own content portal which has some software that hosts that courts. Right? So really you would think that we should hire a product manager that works with a course company and online education. Right? You'd think that, but I'm, I don't really care about that. What I care about more is their passion and their philosophy and their dedication to their craft and the depth of knowledge and their level and depth of intelligence. That's what I care about and so I've talked to people that have worked at elearning companies and courses and things like that and I've also talked to some people that work at car companies, like one guy who works at Honda, right, and he's a product manager for for cars. It's not at all what we do, but Sam Ovens: 01:45:22 he has the philosophy and everything way better and so I don't care. I would hire him over the the elearning person any day because I'm looking for the things that can't really be taught and making sure they've got those and I don't care if they don't have the things that can be taught and truthfully everything can be taught, but you no one's going to learn these things unless they care enough about it. That's what I mean, so and they don't care about it so they're not going to be able to learn it and so I'm making sure this person both cares about it and his learned it and then I don't care if they don't have that extra piece. It's hiring good people is honestly, it's a real. It's a real complex hard thing that takes a lot of time and experience to learn. Um, and like I learned all of that from practice by the way. So when I first hired people, I didn't do any of that zero and I wasn't very good at it. So it comes with practice and time. Francis Francis Richard seats. When you run your likes campaign on Facebook, do you use your personal or public figure page? Use Your public figure page. Sam Ovens: 01:46:51 Angela says, I hear mono tone and your voice to more people like that. So I don't do anything based on what people like. I just like, I talk like this. So that's the way I'm talking. Seriously. That's why it's like this. And I don't really think about that either. I just think about who cares about the tone of my voice. If the information delivered solves the problem the viewer has, that's all that matters in my mind is am I providing a solution to the problem that works? If so, in who gives a shit about my voice? Naila sees what are the signs that there is going to be a rescission. Honestly, like recession just happen, it's a cyclical thing, right? So it's like, Sam Ovens: 01:47:52 it's not like a one off thing like they always had been and they will forever happened because the world moves in like in cycles and so you know, it just, the reason, the way you can tell they will probably be one is because it would have been a period of time since the last one and that period of time is usually around like eight to 12 years, right. Roughly 10 years. And generally the markets will be very hot and by hot I mean is a lot of, a lot of high valued companies. Right. So extremely high valuations. And what have we seen recently? Well there's never been trillion dollar companies in the history of the world. There have been like two or $3,000,000,000,000 valuations this year. So yeah. Okay. There's some high valuations. The stock prices are through the roof and the uh, the market cap compared to like the earnings is extreme. Sam Ovens: 01:48:57 Right? And also there's, so that's another sign. Markets are hot and there's a lot. Like money is cheap. So, you know, interest prices are low and is uh, you know, there's a lot of, a lot of debt going around and there's a lot of um, there's a lot of like IPO activity and things like that. We've seen a lot of that and then things generally a pretty expensive. And so I'm not joking. I've seen, I see that juices and stuff costs like 15 bucks. So when I see that a juice cost, 15 bucks and then some person is buying it, I'm like okay, Sam Ovens: 01:49:41 something's going on here. And yeah, that's how you. No one's coming, but you can't predict when you just know it will. And so the best way to prepare for one is to like, it's not something you'd do. You don't think our decisions going to happen here. So I'm going to start preparing now. You should permanently be living in a state like you should always be fine permanently. That's how you do it. Because if you wait until you think that it's about to happen, like it's all like you, you're kidding yourself. You want to just make sure you don't ever demanding lifestyle and that you're good at what you do. Like the businesses that get crushed and recessions are the businesses that aren't doing anything really. They're like fake businesses. So that's like the.com boom and bust. Right? So like companies were valued extremely high and a lot of them weren't even really doing anything of any value and they were just pouring money away and it was like they were losing huge amounts of money and it was like, what is this company even do? And they were worth a fortune. Like those companies, when recessions come, they get crushed and. But the businesses that just provide value, they always fine. Like if you help a niche solve a problem and you actually are good at it and it provides value and you don't have obscene personal expenses in, you'll find in any market you can go through any storm. Sam Ovens: 01:51:28 Jaylen Brown says I am an e if do you think that will be perfect for personal trainer and health and Sam Ovens: 01:51:37 yeah, like, so what you'll find is know personal trainers quite often will be they like extroverted because you're dealing with people all the time so that, that works and if type that works too, like the thing you'll notice with the patient phyto, which you are, is that you've got to be disciplined on your, um, with like your scheduling, your planning, your discipline and time and all of these things because he pays like two Hayes Hayes and not as good as organized as Jay's and so provided that you just watch out for your organization thing and then you're good. Was this is what types of businesses you think are best suited for any piece? Sure. So like you'd be great at any business that is going to be like. So here's the main thing is people who Sam Ovens: 01:52:46 are extroverted are good at things where there's going to be human interaction. Alright and hold on. There's a lot of Sun leering and people who are feeling tight, we're going to be good with is also human interaction because they're going to be, they're going to be like good empathy and, and be able to emotionally connect with people. Yes. I had a business like to do with something to do with like yoga or, or health and fitness or nutrition or anything that you're going to have personal connection and um, and your clients are most commonly going to be if type people. So the people who like yoga the most are f's, right? If you go in and you look at a yoga class and you were to get everyone to do the icebergs, they would pretty much all be ifs. And so like people who like dancing and stuff, it's people who like cooking if's like. And so you're gonna bond. Well with other apes because if like other ips and so, um, yeah. Any business where you're dealing with clients that are, that are, if types, you can really thrive at that. Because I'm a t type and I'm extreme on the t side, so I'm like 98 percent on tea. It's extreme so. Sam Ovens: 01:54:16 Well, and if, if I'm talking to an f type, sometimes they can think I'm rude or me and it's because what happens is I see somebody's idea and their work and their results as a separate entity from them. Right? So if someone tells me their idea or if I look at their results or their work and I tear it to shreds, then I'm not actually being mean. I just don't see. I don't think you are your, your work. And so I'm criticizing the work or the outcome, not your baton. If will think that I'm just going for them and then I'm just trying to tear them down. Right? And so that's how you get a clash like that. And so, and I learned this because my wife's in here, right? So I know all about this one Sam Ovens: 01:55:11 and so I probably wouldn't be the best at running a business where I'm dealing with if type clients all day, everyday I'm best suited to a business where it's just gonna be a, I'm going to be appreciated for like strategy and analysis in calculation. That's where I'm going to be appreciated most. All right, well we're pretty much at the end of our cool now. So like I said, how these go is I do one of them every Saturday and they go for two hours from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM eastern time is the time in New York. If you asked a question and I missed it, sorry about that. There's a lot of questions. They flied pass real quick. So there's a chance I might have missed yours. And in the future if I missed yours, you just want to, uh, you know, you want to post it again. I'm also a good way to make sure that you can get your question answered is to show up early, be here on time. You'll get to ask multiple questions. So if you liked this, just click that like button clicked, like let me know what you think bilateral above sees. Is this q and a weekly? Yes it is. Speaker 2: 01:56:28 Um. Sam Ovens: 01:56:30 Oh. But this is a cool question. I wanna ask, I just saw Bonnie Manhattan sees curious on your perspective on not having a wedding. Speaker 2: 01:56:42 Yeah. Sam Ovens: 01:56:43 So I didn't have a wedding. Well I can't like, it depends how we define a wedding. I had obviously I'm married so if we define a weeding as if we define a winning is like being married. That happened. Um, but what I mean by I didn't have a wedding is I didn't hold a ceremony with a bunch of people and catering and food and, and walking down the aisle and all of that. Right. And the reason why is actually at first I said to Ashley like, Sam Ovens: 01:57:21 well do you want to have a wedding? And she said yes. So I was okay, well you said a wedding. And then she was like, well I don't want to have to plan it all. And I was like, all right, well let's hire a wedding planner. And then. So we hired a wedding planner and then she had, she realized that she still had to do a lot of work to work with the wedding planner and she was like, I don't want to have to do all of this work with the wedding planner. And I was like, well fuck, I'm not going to do this work because I don't like if I have to do that work, I don't want to have a wedding. And she was like, well I don't want to have dual his work. And I was like, well, should we just not have a wedding? And she was like, yeah, he's not having winning and that's how it happened. And then. So if my wife really wanted one then I would have had one, but she was fine not having one. I'm also, what I liked is I had a vw, that's what I called it, a minimum viable winning. So Sam Ovens: 01:58:19 what I did is I looked at the constituent parts of a wedding and I listed them out and then I thought, what, what ones are important to us and what ones aren't important to us. So instead of like what most people do is they just have a wedding because everybody has a wedding and of course they have a cake and they have a venue and they just, they just follow tradition and routine and ritual. But what we did is we looked at a wedding and we re engineered it and so the pieces we cared about was the ring, right? And the dress. She wanted to have a dress, she wanted to have a ring. She also wanted to have nice photos like wedding photos and she wanted to have a nice. She wanted to be in a nice location and have some nice food and have a nice time. Sam Ovens: 01:59:12 Those were the important things. So what we did is we. We chose a nice location. We went to Queenstown in New Zealand, we stated a nice place there and then I got her a nice ring and then I got her a wedding dress and then we went out to some nicer restaurants. We didn't invite any people and we on the day we got married, we hired a helicopter and started flying through these mountains and we landed in the mountains and started getting photos like in these mountains and we hired a wedding photographer because we end a good wedding photographer. So really what we did is we just re engineered it. We went big on the things that were important to us, so we had good food, good ring, good dress, good location and good photos. Those things we did better than any one really does for weeding, but then everything else we just didn't even do it all. We didn't do it at all. And so really what ended up happening is we had a wedding that only took about two hours to plan and prepare for and it costs about one third of what the average wedding costs and it was more enjoyable than, than having it the other way. So I just re engineered it and I called it the minimum viable winning. That's why we did one of those. And I think that weddings, Sam Ovens: 02:00:48 it depends what you want, like if you want to, if you really want to have one then you should have one, right? But if you don't really want to have one, you're kind of stupid one because you have to do a lot of planning, you have to pay a lot of money. And what's the point if you don't even want one. Yeah. So thanks everyone for jumping on and uh, I will speak with you on. I'll just look at my calendar now. So I can tell you if there's going to be one next week. We are currently December the eighth, so on December the 15th there will be a q and a live stream tonight. So you can put that in your calendar next Saturday, December 15th. They will be one of these and it will be from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM eastern time time in New York. Thanks everyone and have a good weekend.

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