Consulting.com
Consulting.com
 

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, August 18th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, August 18th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for August 18th, 2018. 


Transcript / MP3

00:00
/
00:00
Sam: All right. I see a couple of people jumping on. Just let me know in that comment box if you can see me and hear me. Just make sure we're good to go first. Just let me know, somebody in their comment box, if you can see video, hear audio. Can see Allen Duval joined. Romeo. A.J. Andrew Brownless. Mohammad's on. All right, let's start with Mohammed's question. Well actually, if it's your first time on one of these things, how they go is, I do one of these every Saturday and they go from 3 PM to 5 PM and that's Eastern time, which is the time in New York. If you want to know what that is, just Google time in New York and if you can put it in your calendar for Saturday, 3 PM till five. Right. And how these work is you can just show up and ask me a question in that comment box and I will just answer it live. And I go through the questions, first come first served. And I don't do them every single Saturday, but almost. So for example, next Saturday I'll be moving to a space in LA, and so I won't be doing one of these next weekend, uh, but almost every one we do. Now I'll start with Mohammed's question. He said, Hey Sam, what time during the day or week do you go into learning mode, if you even do that. When do you decide to watch videos or read books to consume new information or review older input? So it's a good question. And honestly it's not structured like that. It's not blocked out and chunked out, oh, for this many hours on this day I'm going to be learning and for this many hours on this day I'm going to be working. I'm mostly working. And if I don't know what to do because I don't understand or this is new territory, then I have to learn to do. And so doing is always the priority. But sometimes in order to do, I need to learn. And so when I can't do, I learn until I can do and then I go back to doing. Also sometimes you can get yourself into a spot where you don't, you've set all these goals and you've gone and you've hit them all and now you're at this point, and then you need to search for new horizons. You need to look for what's the next step that you're going to take. And sometimes when I get to those intersections I don't even know what's next and I don't even ... And because I don't know what's next or how I'm going to stretch to the next thing, I'll often read books and I don't even really know what I'm trying to find. I'm just curious. So I'll just start reading books and through reading those things I might discover new goals, new opportunities or new horizons to go after. So that's how it happens for me. It's dynamic and doing is the priority. I don't stop doing what I know I need to do just to read, it's not like that. I only read so that I can know what to do or do something better. And so what that means is in the early stages of your journey, you're going to be learning and reading a lot more than you're going to be doing, because you don't know exactly what to do. And hence why you need to learn a lot. Right? Only when I first got started, I would spend honestly the vast majority of my days, every day, learning and then I'd be doing some things, but because you don't have all of these customers and all of this stuff to manage, and because you don't have all of these team members and all of these complexities that come with success, you have so much damn time, and it's not like everyone's trying to email you and everyone's trying to get your attention. It's like nothing's happening. So you have so much damn time. And you don't exactly know what to do with it, so that's why you learn a lot. And I would say it's been probably 80 to 90 percent of my time learning when I first got started and now it's totally gone back the other way. It's probably like 80 to 90 percent of my time has been doing and 10 to 20 percent is spent learning, and it is not evenly distributed over time. So that doesn't mean in a week, I sit an hour block of reading and then some hour blocks of doing. It just dynamically happens like that. You just got to learn to view things not so black and white. Like, oh, I'm going to stop working for a two hour block of reading. It's done as needed. Danielle Christine says, Hi, Sam, loving the course. Question. When I duplicate an ad set and only change the budget, do I need to be concerned about competing with myself? Not really, honestly. Once you've duplicated lots of ad sets, you have more of a chance of competing with yourself. But if you're only bidding in small, if you're, if you're not spending that much money and you're only duplicating a few ad sets of something like, you're going to be fine. And if you're worried about it, you can just change the age by one year. Right. That can confuse the algorithm that sits the bidding, picking order and if you change the age by one year and then you change the budget a bit, the algorithm will kind of confuse it as a different ad or different ad set, and it might get a different spot in the bidding pool and treat it as somebody else. Or it might put it in a totally different option. So you'll be fine. Joshua West says, This is all good with sound. Thanks, Josh. Thanks Zach. Muhammad. A. J. Adam Borsky says, what do you think about Grand [Caton's 00:07:06] opinion? I guess you mean Grant. Do not buy places where you live? Just lease them. So I think it's semi right. I would word it differently. I would say don't buy places that are dumb to buy. So for example, if I lived in a town where the mortgage was less than the rent payments, then I'd probably buy it. Right? Because if the market was cheap, or if I lived in a town where I could buy a house, like a hundred grand, I'd probably just buy it. But if I want to live in a luxury place, then it doesn't make much sense to own it, because the market to try and sell it back is very limited. Trying to sell luxury things is harder than trying to sell mass market things, and also the valuations of luxury things can swing massively compared to mass market things. So I think if you want to live in a nice place that's expensive, you should absolutely rent it. However, if you want to live in a small, very cheap house that's cheaper to buy than it is to rent, I would buy it. That's what I would do. But most of the time it means that renting is the better option. Honestly. And this year in a part of the world where prices of houses are so low, then you just buy it. Chris Watson, Tobias, Romeo. Cool. Thanks guys. Thanks Robert. All right, I can see Rob Lalley's question. Hi, Sam, I'm loving the course on community. I am in the job interview coaching niche. I was speaking to a prospect on a 15 minute call and when I tried to set up a strategy session, the prospect explained that he will be interested in being coached on interviewing after he has finished his studies in 18 months time, as he doesn't see the point in doing it right now. It's hard to know if I could have still got him over a strategy session, if I could have handled this objection. How would you tackle this objection? Thanks in advance. Sure. So you're in the job interview coaching niche and you're speaking to a prospect and you set up a start, on a 15 minute call you're trying to set up a strategy session. The prospect explained that he will be interested in being coached on interviewing after he has finished his studies. Yeah, so I mean he's not a fit. This isn't an objection. He is just not a good fit. So remember, our first job isn't to sell. It's to diagnose. And if we diagnose someone and we think we can help them, then we should offer our services to them. But it looks like what you did in this scenario is you are diagnosing and the diagnosis was that he didn't really need to start practicing his job interviews now, because he had 18 months of studies left. Sounds like a fair answer. So there's not an objection. It's just a fact. Then it's fine. Move on to the next person. It seems to me like you are, the mindset you are in is a bit too scarce, you're clinging to people. Most people aren't going to buy. That's the fact. Most people have a strategy session with one by, and you've got to get used to that. That is normal and you've just got to forget about them and move on to the next person. This is seven, almost eight billion people in the world. You can just move onto the next one. No need to get hung up about one person. Jawar says, what is a good way to sell a consulting offer to businesses which are used to paying consulting companies daily or hourly rates for services. These are usually medium to large companies with not very flexible mindset. Do you think it's better to focus on startups instead. What is a good way to sell a consulting offer to businesses which are used to paying consulting companies daily or hourly rates? Do you think it's better to focus on startups and stay in my office to help businesses hire the best tech talent using my market knowledge and experience? Yeah, so the typical way that that's done in that niche is not by hourly rates. It's done mostly on whether you find a successful candidate for the [inaudible 00:12:20]. They usually take a percentage of their first year salary. That's generally how it works. And it's usually done on a success basis. Unless you want to help them as a consultant and you're not really being a headhunter for them, then it might be different. The bottom line is you just need to explain to people that it's silly that they pay you for hours, because then you are incentivized to do the work slower because why should you do the job faster when that means you get paid less. So that's why I think that the industry is so rotten with accountants and lawyers. Those guys are literally incentivized and paid more money to do the job slower. Right? That should not be the case. They should be incentivized to do the job faster, but they're not. So if they're really good and they do it fast, they get less, that's not fair. It's back to front. You should explain it like that to people and explain that it's the solving of the problem that matters. It's the achieving of the desired situation that matters, not the time that you put into it. That variable is of no use to anybody. Now as people ask questions, sometimes these questions fly past so fast that I might miss one of them or a couple of them. So if I miss your question, it doesn't mean that I ignored it or anything like that. It just means that it's flowing past my screen, I can't see it. So just ask it again. All right. Please try to keep the questions short, concise. I'm not going to be reading questions that are this damn long, so keep it short. Make it concise. Zach Richard's already gotten that question. They are going fast. All right. Danielle Christine says, did you study copyrighting and do use those tactics in your emails or do you just say what you're thinking? If you learned, can you recommend a resource? I struggle with wondering if I'm doing it my broadcast emails, right. Yeah. So I've learned about copywriting. I'm not a certified expert. I didn't go to college for it or anything, but I've read about copywriting, how it works and all of that. And I actually talk about it in the Consulting Accelerator program and it's in the Facebook training week, which is week five, Fractal Facebook Evolution and it's the module called creating your ad hypothesis, your ad hypothesis, right? That's the module. In that module, I talk about copywriting, I explain it in detail and I give you resources, what books to buy, examples, everything. So go to week five and then go to the module about your ad hypothesis. Watch that and you'll see. A. J. Shankus says how would you recommend going after restaurant owners? They are extremely busy and they seem to not respond a lot. I find it very hard to get a hold of them. Yeah, and I can see why too, because restaurant owners, they're running a restaurant, their main priority is serving the customers, which is physical. They have to be present to do that. They're not so much hanging out on the internet and checking emails like other business owners are. Right? So you have to think about that. And so I'd probably think about times that they're not busy, but they're also in the restaurant. And I know what times those are. And it's the morning. So it's the time before lunch. From lunch on, they're busy. But before lunch, they're generally all right. Not too close to lunch, because they're busy preparing for it. I would say in between eight and 11 AM in the morning is probably the best time. And I would probably try the phone instead of email. That's what I'd do. And then Brian T. Lowe says, I help transitioning military veterans leverage their skills to acclimate in the civilian world. I have found websites that offer free services. Would that cause a huge problem? No. Don't be so sensitive to such small things. How many things out there are about consulting? There's universities like Harvard and all of those things, these Boston Consulting Group and all of that. There's about a billion free websites, there's about thousands of books all over the place. And then there's all of these different courses and then some of them are free, some of them pay. I don't really even look at that. The only thing that I have my eyes on is my market. Right? And if my market has a problem, I don't care about who thinks they have a solution, because the problem exists. And if a solution truly exists, then there wouldn't be a problem. So just by that very simple logic, I know that an opportunity exists, right? So if you can find a market and you can identify that there is a problem, then it doesn't matter what other solutions are out there. So let's run this equation on your scenario. You're helping returned military veterans, let's just call those veterans, who are having trouble adapting to the civilian environment. Right? Is there a problem that exists in that market? Yes. It's pretty severe. It's actually very severe. I don't know too much about it, but I've heard that it's posttraumatic stress disorder. The amount of the suicide rate, the unemployment rate, the depression rate of of returned military veterans is through the roof and it's a massive problem. And so what I think that, just because a website exists that offers free advice, that I should not solve this problem. How does that make any sense? You see, when you put it like that, it makes absolutely no sense. You won't help all the military veterans who can't climatize to the civilian environment, because there's a website that has free information. Does it make sense. If the problem exists, an opportunity exists, regardless of the perception of there being a solution, does not matter. Eunice says, hey, Sam, curious what size your email list is. It's about a million people. If it's all cleaned, duplicates removed and we delete a lot of people, that's a fully cleaned list. It's about a million. If it wasn't fully cleaned, probably like 1.4, 1.5 million or something. Collard Ali says, question on Facebook. I'm working on a campaign for a client and a [inaudible 00:19:51] times. Some ad sets when I checked within the last four days, they are outside of KPI, but if I check for eight or 12 day period, they are within KPI. Should I still delete them away? Yeah. So if they've been outside of KPI for four days, the last four days, then that means that their trajectory is going bad. Right? So we cut them. Donald Dans says, so I have an eCommerce client and he sells true crime custom tee shirts. I'm having trouble compiling 30 different audiences, because it's quite a small niche, but that niche, it. I just missed your question. And also that question was probably too long. You need to make it a lot more concise and a lot sharper, because there's a lot of people on this call today and these things are flying past quickly. Some questions will get missed. All right. So Eunice says, hey Sam, let's say I have an ad set that works well. Sometimes when I create a new ad within. Holy shit, this is getting hard now. If I miss your question, it is honestly because these things are just flying. And now I'm just going to scroll down, hit a few so that hopefully I can stay in front of it. Do you think, and so this is from Alan Duval. Do you think in the beginning it's better to position your personal brand as relatable or mythical? Should the customer want to be you or are they more likely to buy if they can relate to you? A customers should never want, nobody should ever want to be you. No one really wants to be you. Everybody wants to be themselves. I don't know anybody really that truly would like to just be somebody else. Even their hero, they still want to be themselves. They just want to be a little bit more like the hero. So never think that anyone wants to be you. There's a silly thought. They just want some attributes that you have. And so you've just got to find out what those things are and then enable them to be themselves, but have those things that they want. That's the key to it. Ellen Combs says, hi Sam. I have over a thousand connections obtained while doing consulting, but when I ask them the biggest problems they have, I get about just a handful of responses, one percent. So I'm not getting the 30 responses you recommended to know the pain. My niche is helping engineering software companies increase sale in the automotive industry. What do you think to increase the responses? Honestly, what you have to do here is you just have to look, you have to learn, right? You have to do what a learning thing it does. So you have to look at, you've done a thousand, you're getting a one percent response, right? At least we have some sort of signal. So we look at the signal. So let's go to the one percent. The one percent of the thousand that did something. You need to look at those people. I would put them in a Google doc, a spreadsheet, and then I would try to look at those people's websites, look at those people's LinkedIn profiles, look at those people's Facebook profiles, all right? Maybe look at their Instagram profiles, if they have those too. And then try to write some attributes that these people have in a separate column, different attributes, right? Maybe it's geographic, maybe it's age, maybe it's industry category or subcategory. Maybe it's all sorts of different things, right? Whatever those attributes are, write them down and then you need to try and find if there's a trend or if there's some similarity between the people who responded. And if there's archetypes that you can identify within the responders. And then you just want to take a random sample. So you could just use a random number generator to feature, I dunno, maybe 50, 50 out of the other 900. And then I would look at the, it has to be random, make sure it's a random sample. And then I would do the same. I would look at their attributes and look at their Facebook profiles and all that. And then I would compare the two things, and I would see what is going on here. What is the difference, why are some people responding, why are some people not. Is there any trend here, is there any person here, and if there is, then if I can identify some similarities between the responders and then if I can identify some similarities between the non-responders. Then how do I talk to less of these people and more of these people. And then as I keep doing that, I start to uncover more attributes. And the signal I start receiving is stronger and now I'm able to draw a much clearer picture of the archetype that I wanted to go after. And also a much clearer picture of the archetype I don't want to go after. And along that journey, not only does that clarity start presenting itself, but the words I use in my message when I'm actually talking to them improves to. So I'm iterating a bunch of things. I'm iterating my selection of the participants and I'm also iterating my use of communicating with them. And both are getting better and better and better with time and that can only go one way. And that's going to just end up getting you closer and closer to perfection, closer and closer to a massive business. That's what happens and you just got to. That's how learning happens, that's what all learning things do and so you just need to do that. All right. Joshua [inaudible 00:26:46]. Hey, Sam. I was watching a movie the other day and it was part of the soundtrack sounded exactly the same as this. Is that where you got it from? Yes. Often when I'm watching a movie, I will, if something really jumps out at me, and I'll remember it and I'll like to use it somewhere. If anyone's seen my webinar, is that eye that goes, blinks the front. I got that from a movie because when I saw it I was like well that's cool. So I remembered it and then I got to use it later on. That's what I do with everything. If I see something that I think is really cool, I'll remember it and then alter, I don't know where I'm going to use it, but then later on I'm like, aha, this is where that thing would would be perfect. I'll put it in here. And yeah, that's basically what we do. And you can see the logo behind me, the consulting.com logo on that box, it'll be interesting to see if anyone can guess where I got "C" from. It should look familiar to you. But it's a symbol from somewhere. Because that's how all creation happens. No creation is truly new. It's just a new combination of paths that would learn from another thing. So for example, all the words that exist are built upon the numbers. Sorry, all the words that exist were built upon the same letters in the alphabet. There hasn't been a new edition that will lead us to the alphabet, but all these different words emerge and then using those words, all of these different sentences emerge and then using those sentences, all of these different topics emerge, right? All of this stuff derives from the same stuff. Same with music, same with business, same with everything in the world. And it's just new combinations of different things. Nothing is truly new because you can't find something that hasn't derived from something else. Jawar says, in your meditation, do you aim to reach the no thought state or do you think about your goals and aspirations? Dude, I aim to just think about nothing, which means that I don't even aim to do anything. There is not an aim in meditation. There is an aim when you sit down to meditate and that aim is to meditate, but once you start meditating, your aim is to not think of anything and to not even have an aim. Fernando says I'm helping bicycle shops get more clients and sell more bikes with Facebook ads and Google ads. Any special advice for consultants that work with retail instead of services? Yeah, I mean it's going to be heavily location based, right? Unless this particular bike shop also has a massive online distribution channel, which they probably don't. I don't know, but it depends which ones you're trying to help. If they're local, then your ad strategy is going to be heavily local. That means you're gonna be using a lot of geographical stuff. If it's national and online, then you're going to be using totally different targeting methods. You really just need to learn who is the market and otherwise all the other things that we teach you in this training, they're the same. It's universal. So Fernando says, any special ed, I already answered this one. Nathan Seward says, Saturdays are for documentaries. What are your favorites? Well, I've already told you the one that I really liked was The Defiant Ones. It's really good. The Defiant Ones, if you haven't seen it, go watch it out. And then what else is good? I like all of the Michael Jordan ones. I like the Kobe Bryant one, Muse. There's lots of Michael Jordan. Michael Jordan To the Max is good. I like any pro athlete. Right? I like watching those. What else have I watched multiple times? Defiant Ones is the only one I can remember recently that I've watched more than once, because I thought it was that good. Nathan Misagi says, Sam, what do you put in your protein shakes? So there's just protein powder and then there's almond milk. I don't eat or drink dairy milk. And then there's some other things Brit puts in. I think there's half a frozen banana, maybe some frozen blueberries. And then maybe there's some almond butter or something. Yeah, it's pretty simple. Khalid says in the last video in week five when escalating, you recommend when visited value video, but no survey hit 1000 times. Then we use a lookalike audience, but there are many options in a look alike, one to 10 percent. Which one do you recommend? To start with a one- PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:32:04] Sam: ... Which one do you recommend? Just start with the one. You can start with the one, and then you can go to higher ones once you've got more data. [Zack 00:32:09] Richards said, "Hey, Sam. I help video game addicts find greater purpose in their life by a proven eight-week coaching program. Can you help me figure out how to get clients organically? It's kind of a touchy subject, and it's not as easy as finding dentists, [inaudible 00:32:26]." Yeah, so, one thing you could do is you could join different video ... I bet there's video game addiction Facebook groups, right? Or I bet you there's video game addiction forums, or video game addiction blogs. I would find those things. I would go and look at them, and then I would try to look at the people in them. And then I would probably try to just start talking to them and adding them as friends and I wouldn't be so directly trying to just get a client. I would be more trying to learn and map out this territory and understand it and understand what's going on here. Through that process, you'll also probably find a client or many. Josh [inaudible 00:33:21], question's too long. If questions are too long, I'm just not going to answer them, because there's too much activity here today. Joshua [Fong 00:33:31] just joined, awesome. [Jen Thackery 00:33:34] says, "Thank you for doing these. You're certainly on a whole different level than anyone else I've trained with. I've spent about 10K. Appreciate this much." Thanks, [Jen 00:33:41]. [inaudible 00:33:41] he has a very difficult time to make improvements in his business and personal life. "I mean, whenever I try to make a new change of movement in my life and business, I experience anew challenges and get stuck for a long time until I feel hungry again. Then once I start making improvements again, then I face bigger challenges. Would you give some tips on how to overcome the cycle?" Yeah, so, here's the thing. When you change something, you make challenges. That's what causes chaos, you know? Especially when you're an entrepreneur, life is always a cycle of you have to create some chaos to grow. That's how change happens, you know? You have to shake things up and that makes chaos happen. Chaos is basically when things are in flux and you don't really know what's going to happen and there's uncertainty, but you know that it has to be done to grow, right? That's the only way growth happens, is through chaos and uncertainty and the unknown. So, it's normal. When you're in that state, there is lots of challenges coming at you. That's what happens. When you go to play at another level, like in a video game, you go to play the next level up, it's harder. That's what happens. So you've got to expect it to be more challenging. You've got to expect chaos to happen, but you know that that means that you've got to work through it. You order your way through all of that chaos. You calm it, and then you have conquered that next level. And then you invite the next lot in. I'll tell you how it happened with my business recently. When I first moved to New York into this apartment, I started my business up over here, there was lots of chaos that I invited in. There was the US market, there was the currencies, there was having a new place and trying to understand all of this stuff over here, and trying to set up a new house and then trying to set up furniture and visas and all sorts of things, right? You have all sorts of chaos all over the place. It's total unknowing. It took me a while to organize all that chaos, and then once I had kind of calmed it down and conquered it, I was at a new level. I was making more and I'd learned more, and I was there. But then you're bored again. You're like, all right, well, time to let some more in. So then I opened up an office and then started hiring people and going to that next level, and then that was absolute chaos for a long time. Then once we got to that next level, then I was like, all right, time to throw in another product. Chaos again. Then, all right, time to throw in another traffic source. Chaos. Time to throw in this other thing, time to throw in this other thing. Then we conquered all that, and now recently, it's been like, all right, well, it's time to go to that next level again. We're going to need a lot of people and we're going to need a lot of really smart people, and we're going to need a really good culture, so let's just go to LA, because everyone would rather live there and work there. Not everyone in the world. I mean, I asked the people that work at our company, and they did. Most of them did, so it was a better move. And then that's inviting lots of chaos right now. I just set everything up and calmed it all down. I got the office, I got this whole team, and I've got this apartment, everything. I'm properly set up here, and our company is making a ton of money. It's going really well, but I'm purposefully shaking it all up and causing mayhem to go to the next level. That's just what you've got to understand, and it's going to bring in tons of challenges. There's already tons of challenges that have come in and blindsided me. But that's just what happens when you grow, and you've got to expect it. It's normal, and also, from your sentence that you said, you said when you face a challenge, you don't feel hungry and so you stop until you feel hungry again. Right? So, you can't base your actions on your feelings, because that means that you're basically basing your business success on something that's wavy and all over the place. It's like basing it on the weather, you know what I mean? And so you need discipline. Discipline is what keeps you going when you don't have motivation. Motivation, you're not motivated every day, all hours of every day. Nobody is. What makes a winner keep going when others give up because they're not motivated is discipline. It doesn't matter if you're motivated or not, you have to keep going and you've just got to push through it. [Ola 00:39:21] says, "Hey, Sam, do you think this is a strong message? I help medicine estheticians to get more clients by doing bespoke funnels and Facebook ads." I help medicine estheticians to get more clients [inaudible 00:39:36]. Yeah, so, I don't know if you need to say "by doing Facebook ads and funnels." I don't think that's necessary. You can just say, "I help these people" ... Sorry, the question's long past. I've already forgot how to say it. Medical estheticians or whatever it was. "I help those people to get more clients." And then their reaction to that might be "how?", to which you say how you plan to do it. And then Josh [inaudible 00:40:08] says, "Was the I from Blade Runner?" No, it wasn't. Sasha says, "Hi, Sam. I'm doing market research and user research in a big tech for UX designers and product donors, and I've worked with many different cases. Can I now already give a tailored-made advice to UX designers, including frameworks, [inaudible 00:40:30], guidelines, on how to do research as my service? Am I not jumping too fast through consulting evaluation stages?" Yeah, so what you're basing this off of is kind of messed up. What you're doing right now is you've been helping a company with UX research and so, based on that, you've assumed that other companies need help on UX research and so you should give it to them. That might be true, but it hasn't evolved the right way. You want to do it a different way than what you did. You want to go to companies, the companies that you want to target ... Or, first of all, you have to identify the niche. Who is your niche? That's where it's getting murky, first and foremost. Is it technology companies? Is it design agencies? Is it games designers? What is the niche? Identify what that is, and then I would talk to them and find out what their problem is. If their problem is UX design or something related to that, then you can pair your skill in UX design to the problem to create a solution and provide value, which means that they will pay money in exchange for that and you have a business. You have to do it that way around. It starts with the niche. Then it comes to the problem, and then the solution to that problem is what you provide, and that creates value and that's a business. But it has to go like that. It has to go do-do-do. It can't get all convoluted, like some weird other way. That's like trying to derive an avocado from a rock, you know what I mean? It just ain't happening, so you need to make sure that the lines that you're deriving things along are not all tangled around. Mark [Gilday 00:42:57] says, "What does that C come from?" Not saying. Someone has to guess. That's how this works. [Ola 00:43:07] says, "Hi, Sam. Thank you for your patience. LinkedIn and Reddit are growing very fast recently. Do you think there will be a chance to get more knowledge on how to run ads there in your programs?" I will teach it when it is something that I think is worth doing, and I won't teach it when it's not something that I think is worth doing. The way I know if something is worth doing or not is by doing it and measuring the results. We've tried ... What did you say? We've tried LinkedIn, 100% we've tried the ads on that. It works all right. We've actually made it work. But, in comparison to Facebook, it is nothing, so I'm not going to be recommending it. Reddit, I think my media advisor looked into it. I think we're going to experiment with it. I don't know if we've fully tried it yet, but I don't know any use cases of anyone using it at the scale we do and having the results we have, so therefore I'm not recommending it. How I choose what to put into these courses is based on what I do in my company. How I know whether something comes into the course or not is whether I'm doing it. It's the best acid test. Should I recommend ClickFunnels or Unbounce? Well, which one do I use? If I'm using Unbounce and I recommend everyone else to use ClickFunnels, then there's something going on there. People would be like, "Why does he say one thing and do the other thing?" All right? And that's true, people should think that. It means that I'm basically lying. I'm like, "Hey, all you guys should use this, but actually I use this." That's the easiest way to tell if someone's lying to you or not, is whether they themself eat their own cooking, you know what I mean? We use Facebook ads. It's our number one traffic source, and we've done it for a long time, and so that's why we recommend it. The moment that changes, I'll recommend that. That's why you don't need to worry about all this other stuff. I mean, you're welcome to just go and experiment, right? I always think people should go and experiment with whatever the hell they want, but if you want to follow the path that I think is the most proven right now, then it's what's in here. When it changes, I'll change it. [Sterling Cooley 00:45:36] said, "I found the biggest pain point has been work stress causing lack of potency with their spouse, but I do executive coaches. How do I talk about that without becoming that type of coach?" Here's what's going on here. Your niche you've selected is executives, right? You've so far talked to them and identified that their biggest problem is that they have potency issues with their wife and you have somehow found that this might be caused by work-related stress. Really, if you help somebody with work-related stress, that's the main thing that you do, but the byproduct of doing that is that they, one, aren't as stressed. Two, they might be healthier. Three, they might have more time with their family. Four, their potency might be increased with their wife, right? Those are the byproducts of the thing you do for that person to solve that problem. If somebody else is just helping anybody with potency issues with their wife, that's a different person. You're doing different things, and you've got to choose which one you want to do. Do you want to help the executives ... The way you're looking at it is you think the problem is the potency issue with their wife, but really, that wouldn't be a problem if they didn't have work-related stress. If you solve the work-related stress, they wouldn't have the potency issue with their wife. If you solve the potency issue with the wife, then maybe you wouldn't solve the work-related stress. Maybe you've just found out a way to bandaid it and cure that symptom, but you still have the root cause. You see what I'm getting at here? You've got to trace this line down in the line. It starts with the executive, then it goes to the work-related stress, and then from here stems symptoms. You've found a symptom and you're like, "Should I just focus on the symptom?" No, you should remain focused on that root cause and the byproduct of which is you solve all the symptoms, and it doesn't make you one of those coaches. A bunch of questions flew past again, and I missed them because they're just flying past. If I missed your question, sorry. It doesn't mean I'm avoiding it on purpose. Just ask it again. Also, keep them short. There's some questions I can see that are just like essays, and I won't answer those, because there's too many people on here to do that. [Ola 00:48:41] says, "Hey, Sam. I'm creating a logo for my new business and was wondering if you think my name and surname should be included in it there below or should I just be" ... I've already missed it. I think your logo when you just get started should just be so simple. Just find a font, honestly. Just look at different fonts. Type your name and just find a font that looks nice with your name, screenshot it, logo. Done. Still to this day, that's what the Sam Ovens logo is. All right. Bobby ... We'll go to Nathan. "You mention that if everyone is teaching in the same niche that the edge and the niche" ... Oh, my God. These questions are going fast. [Sterling Cooley 00:49:34] says, "Why don't you ever talk about relationships and marriage? That is a subject with lots of skewing away from truth." So, that's just not my thing that I'm saying that I sell. You know what I mean? I help people start and grow consulting businesses, get clients, make money, do all of that, and everything related to all of that. You know? I don't do the other parts, nor do I really claim to be an expert in those parts. I'm also not the best person to get social and emotional advice from, because that's not my strong point. I'm more analytical and more ... I'm heavily skewed toward analysis and logic and all of that, and so I'm working in the area where I'm the best. Other people work in those areas where they'll be way better than me. That's why we do it. I just focus on the main thing, which is the consulting business and helping people start their own and grow them and all that. Khaled says, "Regarding one million proven winning audience, what is the daily budget you recommend, and once the combined audience works better than the split one, should I delete the split audiences even if they're within KPIs?" No. Never delete anything that's within KPI. It makes no sense, you know? Unless you've got so many things that are so much better that you have the luxury of doing that, do it. But I doubt that's the case. Daniel [Lamberth 00:51:23] says, "In your niche picking, if the target group might not have a lot of money but it's still a painful problem, should you go ahead and expect your offer to make them fine money or should you consider it a bad niche?" No, I think for the most part, the problem, like the seriousness of the problem, if you have a solution, people will find the money. You know? Zack Marcus says, "How much discipline is too much? I.e., being inflexible and adaptable." It depends who this discipline is on. Discipline on yourself to do what you say you're going to do to yourself, you should really try to stick to that. The worst person to lie to isn't somebody else. It's yourself. You want to make sure that what you say you're going to do to yourself, you do it, because otherwise, you start not believing yourself, and then you end up in a world of mess. Tobias Klein says, "What's the name of the documentary you came across with the forensic psychologist who's working with you now?" I'm not going to tell you that, because then you'll find out who the forensic psychologist is. We're not supposed to ... Unless he wants me to, I'm not going to start broadcasting his name around everywhere. Daniel [Lamberth 00:52:51] says, "Hi, Sam. In your niche picking, if the target group might not have" ... I already answered this. Zach Marcus says, "How did you get your wife to become your girlfriend back then when you first met her?" Well, I didn't. When I first met her, she was a stranger and I didn't even think of making her my wife. That took like three years for that to evolve. When I thought it was the right time, I just asked and she said yes. That's how it happened. [Jen Thackery 00:53:33] says ... All right, this question is ... "I've been in health [inaudible 00:53:38] for 15 years. I've also been an equine nutritional consultant for years. My past 20 years have been spent on health and dressage horses. There is billions spent in this industry as there are big riders spend on their horses. I have not been able to come up with a problem of more specific niche. Should I just leave my passion as a hobby and try to find a niche in some other industry or stick to what I know and am considered an expert in? I feel as though the health market is a saturated market." Yeah, you should not base your decisions on whether something is saturated or not, you know? That's not how you make a decision. If you look at people selling courses using Facebook ads, you might consider that insanely saturated. Does that mean that you can't do well in it? No. That is not the defining point. Is something saturated? Yes. Does that mean I will do bad? No. The two things are not even really related. If the problem exists and you solve it best, you win. That's it. Everything else doesn't matter. Pablo says, "My niche, football clubs openly recognize their problem, low attendance, and tell me my offer is attractive. However, they've been historically fearful on marketing investment and innovation and they don't have a lot of cash. Any advice on where to focus to make them pay a decent amount for my advice?" By the way you phrased that, you said that they are historically fearful, which means that that's based on previous knowledge, maybe not even your knowledge. Maybe an assumption from something you read somewhere which was an assumption from something they might have read somewhere which was an assumption from something they heard, which might not be true, so we can't base anything on this. You have to do it. Don't worry about anything you read anywhere. Don't worry about anything anyone ever told you. Don't worry about any historical figures or anything. The only way you can ever know anything is by doing it, so stop worrying. Stop trying to think what's going to happen. Just go out and do it and see what happens and then you come back to me with what happened. Then we can start doing something. Nick Tan says, "Is it better to focus on one business or open up a couple at the same time?" It's better to focus on one. Seriously. Zach Richards says, "Came across a video where you said you would email 10 people a day to help them fix their websites if you had $0 and had to make 5K in a month. In this situation, would it be better to focus on my niche, video game addicts, which is struggling with momentum, or do both at the same time?" Focus on your niche, man. You're either selling websites to people or you're helping people who are video game addicts. Just focus on one, honestly. Daniel [Lambert 00:57:02] says, "In your niche picking, if the target group" ... I already answered that. Allison [Delahan 00:57:12] said, "Sam, I'm between two niches and have done equal market research. One, nurses who are stressed versus two, nursing homes who can't keep staff. Gut wants to go with one, but can't see how I can charge individuals high price. Niche two is more likely to have that kind of dollars. Would love your sound advice." One, nurses who are stressed versus nursing homes who can't keep staff. I would honestly go with number one. Just honestly, most of the time, it's better to leave money out of your assumptions, because passion influences how much work you do and how into it you are, and how much work you do and how into it you are influences how much money you make. So, you'll actually end up making more money if you do one, because that's how it works. I bet you, by solving one, you'd probably by doing it just naturally solve number two as well. Justin Atkins ... And it's a cool niche, by the way. I can tell that you actually did the work to find that one. Tobias Klein says, "What's the name of the documentary" ... I already answered that. Jesse says, "Do you like books by Napoleon Hill?" I don't know. I've only read one. It was good. I read it years ago, and it was good. I haven't read any others. Zach Marcus says, "What traits do you admire about Jeff Bezos?" One is his obsession on customers. Making sure he just optimizes relentlessly on the customer. He's not doing what's best for Amazon financially in the short term. He's doing what's best for the customer, which the byproduct is what's best for Amazon. He's got long-term thinking. Customer obsession, one. Two, long-term thinking. When he started Amazon, he was thinking 20 years out, 30 years out, and he just could see that, and he stayed relentlessly focused on that for like 20 years straight. So, long-term thinking, focus, and then he's just got massive determination. That dude has been just charging and he's been relentless and never given up, and he has conquered massive, unfathomable chaos. He's just charged through for 20 years straight and succeeded. Those are the three things I like most about him. Max [Perzon 00:59:52] says, "I help people start and grow Amazon affiliate businesses from scratch. How would you do organic marketing for a broad niche like that, being people on forums and Facebook groups?" Yeah. Here's where you get confused here. You help people start their own Amazon affiliate business from scratch. What problem are you solving? Who is the niche? Because if your niche is people who want to start an Amazon affiliate business from scratch, and you're solving it by showing them how to start an Amazon affiliate business from scratch, then somehow you would have to have communicated with someone who wants to start an Amazon affiliate business from scratch. If that was true, then you would know where to find them. And then, if you knew where to find them, you would have no problem doing organic outreach. By the nature of your problem, it looks like you didn't base your decision off a niche or their problem. It's more based on what you think people might want, maybe, and now we don't know who or where they are or how to find them or contact them. That's what happens when you don't ... When you just get those things out of alignment, you just make a mess. I'm not saying what you're doing is wrong. You might be able to sell how to start an Amazon affiliate business from scratch, but it's useless unless it's attached to a problem. We're always selling solutions to problems. That's what we're doing. Muhammad Ibrahim says, "I've been struggling for a long time with finding what's my purpose to help people start ... What's my purpose to help people start my business. Please answer me." Dude, that question makes no sense. "I've been struggling to find for a long time with finding" ... I honestly don't understand that question. It needs to be clearer. Oh, I get it. There's just not a comma there. "Find my purpose to help people and start my business," yeah. The thing is, you can't do all three at once. That's very hard, so I can see how you've been struggling with that. You can't be trying to find out what's your purpose, also what business you're going to start, and also what you're going to help people with and how all three of those things can just click together with your first pick, right? Ultimately, sure. That's what we're looking for, but that is so hard to find. No one finds it on their first try, and if they do, it's a fluke. Instead, you've got to just focus on one of these things. That one thing should be, first of all, what is a niche you're interested in? That's where it starts. Number one, step one, pick a niche. You pick a niche based on something you're interested in, so it has a chance of being related to your purpose because you have affinity to it, because you're interested in it, so that's a good start. Now, once we've picked that niche, now we find out what their problem is and we find that from talking to them. If it really is a problem and then we're able to solve it for them, then we're able to create a solution. The solution, people will pay for. That exchange creates your business. So by doing it in that order, you kind of find something that has affinity or is close to your purpose. Might be, might not, but you're on the right way to finding it. Two, we solve a problem for other people. Three, the byproduct of doing those is we get a business. You've probably just been looking at it wrong. You have to just focus on one thing at a time. Pick a niche you're interested in. When you're picking a niche you're interested in, you're not thinking about you or your business or- PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [01:04:04] Sam: You're not thinking about you or your business or a problem they might have or anything. It's a clean thinking exercise, "What niche am I interested in?" That's it. Picked. Now, we're trying to find out what problem do they have? When we're trying to find out what problem do they have, we're not coming in and doing that analysis with preconceived ideas about what we think they should want, because now we're going to just ruin our whole experiment. We have to truly find what they want. Once we've done that, if the solution to that creates value that they're willing to pay money for, then we get a business. But at each stage of that thinking, it has to be clean. There cannot be any distortion, otherwise you'll just end up basically asking people loaded questions to get the answers you kind of want, and even if they don't give you the answers you want, you're not going to hear it anyway, and all you're going to hear is, "Yep, I knew it. This is what they want. Actually, screw it, I don't even have to talk to anyone. I know what they want. I know what they want so bad, I don't even need to look. I know what they want, I'm just going to do that." That's what stupid people do. So don't assume anything and start with picking a niche that you're interested in, find their problem, if you can create a solution to that that adds value, then you've got a business. Go in that order. Tobias Klein says, "Hi, Sam. My niche is athletes, and after talking to 11 semi-pros and almost everyone mentioned the problem that they have a hard time to find the motivation to practice on a daily basis, so I could find a solution to this problem and message it to them, yet their desired situation is not to practice fully motivated every day, but to win a medal, to become a pro, et cetera. So do you think my solution and my message should be a little more general in the first place, like I help athletes to do what needs to be done to perform better in their sport?" Yeah, so this is an interesting one, because you found that the problem athletes have is that they don't have motivation to practice every day. Understandable. But you found that their desired situation is to win medals or be a champion or be the best in the world. Those two are closely related. The reason why they're not that is because they can't do that. And doing that creates that. So if I was you, I would say, "I help ..." I would just go ... I would just experiment with it. But I would say, "I help athletes climb to the top of their game by developing ... By being able to have motivation every day," or something like that. That those words are not what you'll use, that was just really rough, because still, nobody has motivation every day. They need to develop discipline. You'll find that even the best athletes will not be motivated all the time. They just have the discipline to keep going when they're not motivated. So that's what I would do. Crystal says, "Hi, Sam. Just curious if you've ever spoken or used a psychic to acquire information?" No, I haven't. Never seen a psychic or spoken to one. Mohammed says ... I've already answered your question. Gerald says, "Any advice on when to quit your job and go full time. In my business, it's in the early stages now, and the numbers are not predictable as yet." Yeah, I mean, just do it, honestly just quit. You don't ... Waiting for conditions to be perfect is how nobody ever won anything. Conditions are never perfect. And often, the person who waits for perfect conditions doesn't start and doesn't get anything. So just do it. I'm glad I did it, and I didn't have one client or no money. But it forced ... I don't think it ever would have gotten done if I didn't jump in. So I just recommend do it. Allison Delahan says, "Sam, I'm between two niches and have done ..." Already answered yours. Donald Dang says, "How do you position a problem, product, solution for a custom T-shirt printing business in a certain niche? Although most people need clothes, we can easily go down the local strip mall and get them at a quarter of the price. I'm trying to figure this out for a client." How do you position a problem, product, solution for a custom T-shirt printing business in a certain niche? Yeah, so clothing is largely to do with identity. So that's the problem. I want to express myself. I want to be unique. I want to show people who I am and a vehicle for doing that is my clothing. And if this clothing allows me to express myself, then I get to solve my problem. The normal clothes down at the local strip mall might not allow them to express themselves. And so clothing you get that a lot. And that's what the problem is. If we really did buy clothing for functional warmth purposes, there would be ... Like it wouldn't be ... It would just all be wearing like mountain gear, climbing gear, or it would be totally different. People don't buy clothing just for true functional logic purposes. Most of it is self-expression. So Joe Defrine says, "My question is I already have a business making 20 to 30 K per month and ..." Oh, that question's gone. Sorry about that. You'll have to ask it again. And Mohammed, if you asked your question one more time, I'm going to ban you from the Facebook group. I won't just kick you off this call. I'll ban you from the whole group. So don't do it. And if anyone else spams their question, you'll get banned too. And you won't get let back in. Stuart Bradley says, "How do you respond to this at the early stage of direct outreach? So what can you do for me/offer me?" Well, we don't know how to do any of that until we've diagnosed. So that's what I would say. If I just reached out to someone, say I reach out to someone called James, and I'm like, "Hey, James. I help people with this. Is this something you're interested in?" And he says, "Oh, well how can you help me?" I'd be like, "Well, I don't know yet. I don't know what problems you have or how I can help." I need to first of all, diagnose. I need to ask questions to find out one, what their current situation is, two, what their desired situation is, and three, what's stopping them from achieving their desired situation. Once I know those things, then I can tell them how I can help them. If I can't help them, then I'll tell them I can't help them. If I can, I'll tell them I can. Simple. Allison says, "Thanks." No problem, Allison. Max Person says ... Already answered that. Sterling says, "Do you think you'll be doing more work with neuroscience and EEG in the future? If so, why?" I don't know. I'm not ... I don't hold attachment to industries or like things, or like tools or trends or technologies, or anything like that. I'm not technology-oriented or industry-oriented. I just like problems. So I like to look for problems, and I like to solve those problems, and whatever tool or technology is best to do that, I like that. So neuroscience and EEG are tools. And if I have no purpose for those tools, I have no interest in those things. And if I do have a purpose for them, then I'll be very interested in them. That's kind of how it goes. But I don't get too attached to the tools. Because the tools come and go and you change them and you use what tool's best. That's why I said when Facebook is no longer the best method for getting clients online, I will honestly, I won't even care. I won't even be sad at all. I will just be like, "Cool, let's use this other thing. Let's get good at that. Done. Right, well now we know how to do it. Let's teach it to everyone else. This is the way to do it." Done. No attachment. Danny Mekic says, "Which service do you use to transcribe your videos?" So we use Rev.com. R-E-V.com. But the one I recommend that's cheaper is called Temi.com, T-E-M-I.com. T-E-M-I.com, it's really good. Danny also says, "How to transform a seven figure consulting business on technology and innovation for boards of multinationals into something scalable. It's a lot of work to maintain what I've built, and I'm looking for ways to maintain it, scale it, even grow it, while putting less effort in it." Yeah, so if something at a small scale is taking a lot of time, energy, resources, and maintenance and it's got complexity in it, then at a large scale, what do you think that's going to look like? If scaling ... It's like what do you think it would look like if I took this, La Croix, and I took and then I scaled it by one thousand times? It's going to look like this, it's just going to be a thousand times bigger. That is it. So if you take your business that you got right now, and it's very complicated, time-consuming, and you scale it, it's just going to be bigger version of that, I.E, more complex, more time-consuming, more maintenance, way more time put in. So if you want to scale it, then ... Well, if you want to scale it and put less effort in, then first of all, you need to look at how you can put less effort in. That's the number one problem. And you need to simplify it. You need to turn into a system. You need to make it somewhat self-sustaining. You need to turn it into like a machine. What I've got here with Consulting Accelerator, it's very optimized and it's very systemized to the point that we can run it at a lot of scale and it's like not too demanding. And where it all began was when I started helping local businesses with their digital marketing. That was time consuming. I couldn't scale past like five, ten clients doing that without totally burning out. To manage like 10 clients in done for you, I swear it would be more effort than managing what I've got now, because it's just so complex. And if I was to scale that to these numbers, oh my God, I'd need like a million people. And so it's not the scaling part that's hard, it's re-engineering the entire business so that it's scalable. And so obviously if commuting is a requirement, then commuting doesn't scale. Commuting has to be obliterated. If a phone call is part of the thing, it's got to be removed. Phone calls don't scale. Driving to clients doesn't scale. Proposals don't scale. Meetings don't scale. Emails don't scale. Any form of done for you doesn't scale. Anything really where a human is doing anything, or even thinking about anything, doesn't scale. You have to truly rip everything out of it. And so you have to look at it and strip every piece out of it and think how you can replace you, or another human, with something that does the same thing. Because we're not removing the value. We're just removing ... Like so how I looked at it was, "All right, if I consult somebody, I give them value. But if I consult somebody, I need to be physically present and talk to them. And that doesn't scale, because I can't do that." "Well, does the person actually require my flesh to be sitting next to theirs and exerting energy and transferring this information into their ears by the use of my mouth? Is that really what they're here for? Or is it really that they're just here for this information so that they can use it to get a result for themselves?" Well I thought probably the information. I was like, "Is there any other vehicle on earth that can transfer information to somebody's ears and eyes other than my body and my mouth?" And yes, I found there was videos, and videos seemed to do that. And then, I was like, "Okay, well the internet's pretty good at this. Video is pretty good at this." And then, started working through it. And I basically simulated what I was doing physically using an atomic structure as a human being, I simulated that environment on the internet using bits. So it's a simulation of atoms with bits. And bits are scalable, my atoms aren't. That's how it works. That's all a good course is. That's why tell you that you have to start with done for you. That's the only way you're going to learn anything. But how do you make a good course? Well, you're good at doing it. A doer is going to be the best teacher. A teacher who has never done is called a liar and a fraud. Only a ... Nobody should teach who hasn't done. And so the best way to be a good teacher, I don't even ... I've never studied how to teach someone something, how to be a good teacher, how to be a good communicator. I don't even think I'm actually good at any of those things. And all I focused on was being good at doing, and so happens that the person who's best at doing is also the best at teaching. Whereas the whole world seems to have gone confused and think, "Oh no, teachers are good at teaching, not the thing they're supposed to teach people on." But then what are they teaching people how to do? How to teach nothing? Messed up. Most people don't know how to think. Thinking is messy. And so you need to look at your business and analyze it and be like, "What things, what inputs are people taking that give them value?" Is it information? Is it .. What are the things flowing? And then, what are the things producing these flows? If they're humans, does it have to be a human? What if that human recorded stuff or created documents or systems or something, and what if another human could take from that piece of information what a human would usually deliver to them? You're just restructuring the whole thing. And you're trying to remove human elements from it to make it more scalable. You're never going to create a complete system that has no humans anywhere. Consulting.com scales really well and does well, but we still have support, which are humans. We still have the group calls, we have all sorts of things. It's just structuring it in the most efficient way possible. And that's what you want to do. And if you want to know how to create a course that is like what I'm telling you right now, then that's what we show you how to do in Uplevel. In Uplevel we show you how to create the ultimate course by simulating atoms with bits. Justin Adkins says, "How do you structure a business partner relationship and would ... How would you structure a business partner relationship and would we need to buy two courses to have access to the Facebook group and the program?" So how would you structure a business partner relationship? Well there's no one best way. I mean, the best way is the fair way, right? Now, what I can tell you is two people are almost never equal. And they're equal human beings and their rights are equal and all of that, but their inputs into something aren't going to be equal. So two people start a business. Honestly one of the worst mistakes people do is just go 50/50. Unless you truly do think and you really do believe that both of you are going to put in the same amount and really love it and care for it the same amount, then do it 50/50. But you want to split the business up based on the input someone's going to put in. And then if it's truly the same business, and you're truly business partners, then you're fine with one login. You don't need to buy another one. But if they're separate or in any way, then you need to buy more than one. Carla says, "In my Facebook campaign, every four days I'm adding new audiences from my sheet. And now I have 12 ad sets that are within KPI every time, so can only test one new audience every four days, which is a bit slow. What can I do in this situation?" Every four days I'm adding audiences from my sheet, and now I have 12 ad sets that are within KPI every time, so can only test one new audience every four days. I don't know why that means you can only test one new audience every four days. You can test as many audiences as you want, any time you want. The only restraint on which is the amount of money you have. The real constraint and advertising is money. And if you don't have much of it, you have to move slower and you can't play with as much stuff. If you have more of it, you can cheat time. Money buys you time in business. And if you don't have money, you go to put more time in. If you have more, you can shortcut time. It's kind of how it works. Fernando [inaudible 01:23:41] says, "At what point did you decide to include Instagram as part of your market strategy?" It was only this year. I kid you not. If you look, if you go to my Instagram profile and you scroll all the way to like the first post I did, you'll find that it will be this year. So I built my business up to like $18 million a year without Instagram at all. Zero posts. So that goes to show you don't need it. But then what started happening is we did a survey, we noticed that a lot of our customers wanted to see behind the scenes, they wanted to know is Sam a human or is he a robot. Some people thought I was a lizard. Some people thought I was a robot. Some people thought I was a paid actor. Some people thought my apartment was a green screen. People thought all sorts of shit. And so there was that problem that existed, that the public opinion was kind of distorted. Also, we did customer surveys, and people wanted to see behind the scenes. And also, I had a team, which meant that I could delegate lots of stuff. And so when those three things came together, I was like, "Okay, I can probably do some Instagram to show people behind the scenes to solve their problem of wanting to know behind it through Instagram." And I had enough time to do that, because I would never sacrifice doing really important work for social media, ever. So that's why I did no social media for a long time. If you ever are trying to decide between, "Should I help my clients get more results or should I get better at what I do, or should I try and get more clients, or should I work on my business, or should I use social media?" It's never social media. And you can neglect that thing and just focus on these. But once you've got people helping you and all of these things are good, then you can do a little bit of it. But honestly, I totally dislike social media. I hate it. The only reason I do it is because other people want it. I wish other people didn't even want it. Because then I could just focus on building things instead of doing that. So that's why ... I think it's honestly a waste of time. I don't know why anyone else follows anybody else. The only person people should follow is like themselves and their journey. You know what I mean? And then they might need to get motivated from some other people, but just blindly following anyone is kind of seems like a waste of time. And then Tobias says ... I think I've already answered your question. And if you guys have social media apps on your phone, delete them. Delete Facebook. If you've got that Facebook app on your phone, delete it. Delete the messenger app, delete Instagram. God forbid if you have Snapchat, delete it. Get rid of everything. If you have ... What are those apps? That messenger one? WhatsApp, delete it. Delete everything. Honestly, it'll change your life. It'll make you so much more focused, so much more happy and so much more productive. Social media doesn't really help anybody. Honestly, I think what they're going to find pretty soon is that this social media thing basically like ruined everybody's brains. Jen Thackray says, "What do you think about a biz helping newbie MLM'ers get to sign up and customers? I feel that the MLM industry is a terrible training and only few do well in most companies. There are so many out there." Yeah, so if you want to solve that problem for MLM, you should do it. But you've got to ask yourself, "What do these people who are doing MLM really want?" And if it's to have a business and freedom and to do something they love, then you have to ask yourself the question, "Is MLM the best vehicle to achieve this thing?" If it isn't, then you shouldn't teach them how to do MLM. And by the way, I bet you it isn't. So probably don't teach them that. I'd probably show people doing MLM not to do MLM and build their own business, because I think that's a lot better. But if it's some MLM company that's really legitimate and actually has a product that actually helps someone and actually adds value, which I think is very rare, and I think in that instance, it wouldn't be called MLM, it would be called a business, then yeah. Just be ... You've got to always analyze it. Don't think that you have to stay within the framework of MLM to solve their problem. Because their problem is not to succeed in MLM. Their problem is to succeed in life, and quite often that means that they shouldn't even be doing MLM in the first place, if that makes sense. Dan Bolton says, "How do you adjust Facebook's golden mean for a local context? Much smaller audience and budget." Yeah, so you just decrease the variables. Like, if it's a local audience, then you're not targeting interests. You're mostly just going to be tightening a radius around it. Like the guy asked before, "How do I help bike shops get clients?" You don't really need to select all these interests, like their interests in bikes and all of these things. I would just select the local audience. I would say, "How far away do you think your furthest customer is?" And they would say they probably know, and then that's in miles. What's the address? All right, let's draw a perimeter around like 20 miles from X, circular. That's the audience. Now, what's the youngest you probably get somebody? What's the oldest you probably get somebody? Put in those parameters. And then, that's probably all I would do, honestly. And then I would just try that one audience, because the audience is so defined. And then I would try like three angles with two images per angle and just experiment, play, see what happens. Zach Marcus says, "What has helped you to stick to your work for 12 hours, six days a week, without sacrificing efficiency from your work due to mental fatigue?" Yes, this is a good question, and honestly, you have to love what you do. If you really don't like doing what you do, then no hack is ever going to allow you to do that. No anything will allow you to do that. The thing that helps you do that is when you just really like what you do, because then you don't want to do anything else, so it just happens. So it's like that's really what happens. And you don't actually have to try, it just kind of happens. But mental fatigue, sometimes ... Like right now, I can go 12 hours a day, 6 days a week without getting mental fatigue. It's how I came up with those numbers. But you also have to remember that I don't do all sorts of different things. I don't have a massive busy social life, I don't have to run errands, I don't have to do all of this demanding stuff that other people have to do, because that sucks so much energy out of you. And it's so many decisions. And so I don't do any of that. I also don't have any social media things. I don't watch TV. I don't read the newspaper. I don't look at the news. I don't have to do really any email. I don't answer my phone. I don't really need to call anybody. And I don't go and party and do ... I don't have massive social life, and so I don't have lots of the baggage that most people have. And so because I don't have all of that baggage, that doesn't eat at my motivation, and I get to just channel my motivation into things I want. That will help you a lot. I mean, you need to cut off all the baggage. You'll find yourself getting like five times more energy. You also need to make sure you love what you're doing, that'll give you like 100 times. And then, you need to ... You can't drink, honestly at all. That gave me a huge boost when I stopped drinking completely. Like no glass of wine, not even a beer, not really ever. In the past year, I've probably had like two glasses of wine or something. And that will make honestly one of the biggest differences in your entire life. You'll get so much clearer. I don't know, I think that'll be another thing that we find out in a few year's time, is that social media has been disgustingly mutating people's minds. Also, alcohol is literally poison that people have been just drowning themselves with. I think those two things pretty likely to be found out very quickly. Because when you analyze it objectively, that is what it is. So you've got to cut off all of that stuff, get rid of the baggage, and just get rid of all of the peripheral stuff that just is distracting you and pulling your attention and your energy away from you. A lot of it is saying no to everything and just focusing on one thing, and then you just ... You get into the zone and you forget that you're even working, and then 12 hours is just gone. C. [Chell 01:33:59] says, "Why do you think people want a better self? I noticed people are too lazy, force of habit, to change something, and also pay for that. They want the poor me." Yeah, so you asked a good question. This is the human condition that you've found here. But humans want something, but they're not willing to do what it takes to get it. So that is why they're unhappy. This is the simple equation. It's like, "This is my current situation, this is what I want. What I want isn't what I have. And I'm not willing to do what it takes to get what I want, yet I'm still willing to stay here and be unhappy because I don't have what I want. And somehow I'm not willing to do what it takes to get what I want, and that makes me more unhappy." And when you think about how fucked that is, it's like that's what all humans are doing everywhere. That's just a human issue. It's because they can't think properly, they're distracted, they're drunk, and they're on social media, and basically they can't think longterm and their instant gratification things. Instant pleasures and instant gratifications just ruin a person. Once a person's used to getting such fast feedback and such quick fixes on things, then it's almost impossible for that person to do any constructive work towards a longer term goal. That's what happens. To really work on achieving long term things, you have to deprive yourself of actions that give you instant gratification. And what is the number one one of those? Social media. Another one? Alcohol. All of these things are the things that get you used to and hooked on instant gratification. And once your on that stuff, you can't do anything long term. If you think about it, if you want to work on a longterm goal- PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:36:04] Sam: Cause you think about it, if you wanna work on a long term goal that might be one year, two years or something. That isn't even long term. But let's just use that. If you wanna work on something that you're gonna achieve in one year or two years, then the actions your talking now you're not really gonna see that the massive results of this action until a year from now or six years from now. Sorry, not six. Might be, not four, three months, six months or a year or two years from now. So you do the action and you're doing this work and you're not getting any feedback and you're like, this sucks. Then you go onto Facebook or Instagram and you get instant gratification. You most something, poof, likes coming at you. Now you're like, oh I do this action I get this. I do this, I get that. [inaudible 01:36:53] and then you get bam. Kicks you. You're now feeling different. You eat chocolate, bam. Hits you. Something is dangerous when feedback is really close to it's action. Once you get hooked onto that you can't do what it takes to achieve something long term. So you've gotta deprive yourself of those things and just focus on the longer term things. Deli nation says, I'm between niches too. Wants to either, one, help parents solve underrepresented minorities, improve the odds of success for their children to gain access to top tier colleges. Or two, help small firm lawyers get high ticket clients. I prefer one. One sounds like it definitely is more of a personal interest compared to helping lawyers get clients. Those two couldn't be different. So I would number one. For sure. Cause it sounds like it's something that you're actually passionate about and interested in. However, I would challenge you on whether that's really what's best for them. So if you're helping parents of underrepresented minorities improve the odds of success for their children to gain access to top tier colleges. Alright. So let's say we have underrepresented minorities. This is the niche. Then let's say we have, what do they want? Is it really just to get into a top tier college. Is that gonna make their life better? Probably not. Or it might make their life better. But is that as good as their life could be? Probably not. Well actually, no way. They can shoot way higher. Maybe they don't even need to go to college. Maybe they can start their own college. Maybe they can do anything. So why limit it to just getting into colleges. I would think bigger than that. Don't ... that doesn't mean that ... what do parents want for their kids? To be successful and happy. Does it mean that if someone gets into a top tier college that they're gonna be successful and happy? No. That's not gonna guarantee. So you're really fooling yourself about what you're actually helping these people do. So I would challenge you to think of something that is actually real. I help people become successful and happy is way better than I help them get into top tier colleges. If someone could guarantee me to be successful and happy I'd take that over getting into a top tier college. Cause there's no guarantee if I get into a top tier college that I'm gonna be successful and happy. You see what I'm saying? Mohamed says that's my problem. I can't find that niche. I tried everything over and over and still nothing so now what? Well, you just haven't tried hard enough. How can there be any other explanation? It's not that you're doomed. It's not that you are the only human on earth that can't find a niche. It's not that there's no niches that are possible to find. It's not that some weird force is just coming over you in the universe and rendering you incapable of picking a niche. What else can it be? You just need to pick a niche. You're probably overthinking it. What are you interested in? It's impossible for a human not to be interested in anything unless they are dead. If you're a live you're interested in something. Look at your computer history. Go to your browsing history and look at it. What websites do you spend most of your time on? What do you talk about the most? Ask your friends, hey what will I not shut up about? That will tell you. Ask your parents, what do I not shut up about? Just try to find what you're interested in. Look at your YouTube video viewing history. What are you watching? What do you spend most of your time doing and thinking about? That is probably what you're interested in. There's no way you can't find that unless you are dead and if you are dead you wouldn't be able to ask me this question. So we solved it. What is that thing? [inaudible 01:41:42] says, already answered that question. Joe Defrain says, hi Sam I had landed three clients before joining your program. But I couldn't bring them results. I know that I know more and I got into your Facebook Ads module. I know I can bring my clients results. My question is this, I already had a business making 20 to 30k per month. I wanna build the consulting business now. Is it okay if I go into the paid ads now since I already landed three clients int he past before your course. I just couldn't bring in results. Yeah. So what is missing from this question here is the most important components that could possibly be in this question. Which is what is the niche? What is the problem? What do you think is the solution to that problem? We don't have any of these. All I have is that you've got three clients and a lot of stuff about Facebook Ads. And stuff about another business. I need ... I can't do anything with these things. What's the niche? What's the problem? What do you think the solution to that problem is? That's all. Walter says hi Sam I'm looking into underprivileged ... that's not a word. Underprivileged I think it meant to say, youth with low self esteem and I think the government would sponsor it. Oh no, not the government. I'm told it's a really bad look to take a lot of money from a government organization. Making money out of underprivileged kids may give a backlash. Yeah. This question is very tangled. We've gotta just look at it plainly. What is the niche? Well, it's underprivileged youth. Do they exist? Yes. Do they have a problem? Yes. Alright. Good. Now what is the solution to that problem? What do you think a solution to that problem is? Or you said helping them with their self esteem, which is good. So I know that is true. Self esteem is a huge thing with underprivileged people. It's probably one of the main things. It's the hardest thing to get out of too. That's like mindset right? Now where we get weird is going into the government. Right? That blows this equation up. Because that's not the only place that you can get money from. There's lots of things that you can do here. There could be ... you could think of how you could make this a business that makes money but not necessarily the money has to come from the underprivileged youth. Right? Because that's gonna be hard to do. But the money could come from some other stream. It doesn't have to come from the government. There's all sorts of ways to do this. But where you're blowing up this equation is just thinking of the government because then you've only got one way. You're basically just trying to get money from the government to then try and run this thing. You gotta think about it differently. Exclude the government from the equation and just think how can I solve this problem by helping these kids with their self esteem and somehow make it into a thing. To give you an idea, I haven't thought about this for more than one minute. So this is not the solution. But what are some ideas that you could do? You could, yeah. Okay yeah here's some things you could do. One thing you could do is help underprivileged youth with self esteem, you could help coach them and everything and then help position them in jobs. Part time jobs or a job on the weekend, job after school. Or depends what your considering youth. Youth might also be categorized as people are not at school and you could help get them into jobs. Then by putting people into jobs, different companies might pay you a certain amount of money to put someone who's qualified into a job. When I say qualified I don't mean university degree. I mean someone who can learn and be motivated and do the work. That's just what I came up with in one minute, right? The money flow doesn't have to come from that person. You could do that and it might help them a lot with their self esteem to have a job too. So you might be killing two birds with one stone. There's all sorts of things you can do here without just resorting to the government and trying to just ask them for money. There's way more efficient ways to do everything than touching the government. That's kind of the, oh I give up, give me the money mister government. That's the give up part. There's a way better part. Sterling Coley says I changed my message from helping managers because it was too bored and I changed it to businesses ... sorry I changed it to business leaders who want to be more effective. How does the word potent sound? Potent business leader. Sounds fine. I wouldn't stress about a word. Seriously. I think you should ... if you like it, do it. If you don't like it, don't do it. But just see how it goes. Only an experiment can tell you what will happen. I can't foresee what's gonna happen if you use that word. But if you like the sound of it, give it a go. Yeah and then you can already see that Ian Mansell has replied to your comment and shared what he thinks when somebody uses the world potent and how he correlates the word potent to Viagra. Right? Not everyone is going to do that. In fact, I bet that that is actually quite rare. So you've always gotta be careful who's advice you listen to. Never listen to one individuals advice because every individual associates different things with different things. When someone hear potent they might think something totally different than someone else. You've just gotta try it and see if it works for you. If it works, do it. If it doesn't it doesn't. Molly Pierce linked temi.com. Yeah the transcribing thing that's really good is temi.com. Good to hear Sterling. Ian Mansell says ... sorry I'm reading people's replies to other things. Dan Pierce says can you share any details on your growth plans in Venice Beach in LA? Well yeah. We plan to grow. The plan isn't even to grow the number of people on my team. That is not my plan. My plan is to grow and help more people. If that means that I have to grow a bigger team than we do that, which is quite likely. So that's what my main focus is. How do we help more people do what we do here? Cause what we do here seems to work quite well. People work on their mindset, they start a business, they make some money, they make a lot of money and then they start liking what they're doing. So I think everyone ... not everyone in the world, but a lot more people should be doing this. So we're just gonna try to grow it. Then we chose Venice because the weather is just way better there. We like ... it's cheaper there. Some people were saying on that post the other day that it wasn't cheaper there. Well, it depends. Right? It depends on all sorts of things. If I am to move from here to Venice, our office rent will be cheaper. My personal rent will be way cheaper. My living expenses will be way cheaper. From what I calculated, almost everything will be cheaper. That doesn't mean it's the same for everyone. Also a lot of our employees. Our offices right now are in Manhattan but almost all of our employees live in Brooklyn or Queens. And some of them live in Jersey. Right? So they've gotta commute. A lot of them commute an hour or more each way. That costs money and it's wasteful. So we're trying ... we were thinking about a place that where we could go that would be nicer weather, nicer environment, save people money so that they could get places that were cheaper for renting and also closer to work so there's not like a huge commute. Yeah that's what we decided to do. Chris Watson said I just got a big promotion at work. I had to take it due to family needs but now my business is thrown off. I'm not completing daily actions or making progress. How to get back focused? Yeah well this is the reaction of your action. Right? Promotions generally come with more work. With more work comes less work from something else. When you take something away from something, it doesn't do as well. We're seeing it not do as well. You knew this would happen. You have to either sacrifice more personal time so that you can give the time back to the business that it needs. Or you need to sacrifice the job. Something needs to come from somewhere and yeah it's either gonna be your personal life that you take time away from or the job. But it needs to be topped back up. It sounds like the thing that's anchoring you to the bad decision is family needs. I would really think about how you can solve the family needs. I don't know what family needs means. But as long as you have that then it's gonna force you to do these other decisions and that's gonna force you to have these sacrifices in other areas and it's not ... I would try and fix that. I'd really work hard to fix that. I don't know if it's fixable. Everything is fixable by the way. So just try and fix that and then I would ... then it sounds like you could then focus all of your time on the business. Then you'd probably be good. Alright well we're at 4:57. Almost 5 p.m. These calls go from 3 p.m. till 5 p.m. every Saturday. Or almost every Saturday. I'm gonna do a few more questions here and then we'll wrap up. So Karen Roberts says hi Sam my niche is helping small business owners transform their current hiring and employee management practices. My initial [inaudible 01:54:32] offer is a compliant and inclusive employee handbook and performance management templates. Do you think that and this is an offering I could then up sale to transforming their onboarding process? No. I don't. I can tell you why because it sounds like this idea came from your head and not the mind of the market. Because I am your market. I'm a small business owner and right now one of my biggest needs is hiring great people and onboarding them. And the last thing in the world that I want is a complaint and inclusive employee handbook and performance management template. I can't think of a day in my life or anybody's life where I'd want one of those things. Cause that doesn't help me. I don't get good talent if I have a complaint and inclusive employee handbook. My problem isn't solved with that thing. That thing is unlikely to solve any problem. I've never met a human being on earth where they've held up their employee handbook and said, man this thing is awesome. This thing made me so much better at my job. This employee handbook, it helped me get ... I chose this job because they had the best employee handbook that was complaint and inclusive. Never heard it. I think we're quite unlikely to hear that. So I think that you should talk to the market, which is small business owners that are trying to hire people and onboard them. Right? And you should try and find out what their problems are. Really understand their problems. Don't think anything in your brain about what you want to give them. Because that will cloud your judgment about what they want and what they need. Because if I know how to create a compliant and inclusive employee handbook and I really wanna sell it to people and then I go to do my market research and start asking people questions then I'm gonna have a massive bias. And I'm basically gonna be asking questions like, so what's one of your main problems? So you basically need an employee handbook right? And they'll be like not really. I didn't say that. But then you'll be like, yeah that can really help you because of this. That's not research. That's just manipulating the questions to get the answer that you want and so what you have to be very very careful with is that you just let go of and detach completely from everything that you think that they want and everything you want to give them because that's the only way you'll understand what they actually need. Once you truly understand their problem then you can think about things that you could offer to them to solve their problem. If one of those things happens to be that employee handbook than so be it. I just think that that's very unlikely. But, if it is then you can do it because that's how it works. Yeah that's what I would do. But remember to always base it on the market and their problem and all we're doing is giving them the best possible solution to their problem. By doing that we create value. By creating value we get paid. The combination of all of these things is a business. And I'll do like one more question here. Alright Donald Dane says do you usually do mindset then go to the gym to go to the gym then mindset? Do you work fasted before your first meal? Will it be a good idea to do mindset while doing some light cardio. I think that ... well what I do is just go straight to the gym. As soon as I wake up I go to the gym. Right? I quite like doing that cause you just get it done with. I don't like doing it later in the day cause it's on my mind. I have to have a shower before beginning the day anyway. I also have to have a shower after going to the gym. So it pisses me off if I have to have two showers when I can bundle that into one. Right? Cause I usually have a shower before I go to bed and then I have a shower in the morning after the gym when I wake up. But if I wake up and go to work that's one shower. Then if I go to the gym in the middle of the day that's another one. Then I'm still probably gonna have one before I go to bed. That's three damn showers. That's too many showers. That's wasteful. So I do it in the morning and bundle it into one. I just do that immediately as soon as I wake up. I wake up at 6:50 in the morning. I'm at the gym by 7. Within 10 minutes of the alarm I am doing something. Then I work out for one hour at 8 o'clock I come back and then I have a shower. Then after that I have my breakfast. So yeah I work out with nothing in my stomach. Then I meditate. So it's at 8:30 after my breakfast. Meditation goes for like 20 minutes. Now it's at 9. My day starts at 9. I work from 9 in the morning all the way through about 9 p.m. at night. Then I'll plan tomorrow today at about 9. That takes me about 15 minutes. So at 9:15, 9:20 I'm done with my day and I plan tomorrow today and then I will go to bed and then I'll usually be asleep by 11. So I stop work at 9 and I'll be asleep by 11. That's what happens. So that's it for today's call. Just click that like button if you enjoyed it. If you thought this was valuable click that like. If you thought it sucked, tell me that it sucked. Zach Marcus says, do you still overthink or face uncertainty like how you did back then when you first started? No. I still face uncertainty, absolutely. No human being doesn't face uncertainty. It's impossible to be certain about everything. Nobody is. Nothing is. So I still face it and I face a lot of it. But ... and I probably face more of it now than I did back then because I'm just trying to do things now that are quite challenging and big and quite often I'm navigating out into uncharted territory where I ... there isn't a template or there isn't a training on how to do this thing. So it is a lot of uncertainty but it's my reaction to that that's changed. So I'm a lot more calm and rational and I'm not reactive. So if I see something or if something happens around me I don't just panic. I used to do that. So if like something bad happen I'm like, oh my god. Now my mind's shutting down. Anxiety's coming over. Now I'm overthinking it. Now I'm not working. Now it's getting worse. Now I'm overthinking about why it's worse and why I can't do anything about. Now before you know it, I'm screwed. I'm just way better at controlling my response to things. The things still happen. The uncertainty still exists. In fact, more things happen. More uncertainty exists. Right? But I'm just way better at controlling the response. So people shouldn't try to not have uncertainty. The only way to do that is basically, there's no way. The only way to do that is to be dead. So you shouldn't try to remove uncertainty. Uncertainty is good. It's the response to things that is the thing you have to work on. Bad things still happen. Failures still happen. Mistakes are still made. Setbacks still happen. Challenges are bigger as you get better but your response to all these things improves. That's why it's fine. It's just working on your response. Alright. Well thanks everyone. Thanks for attending this Q&A call. Next Saturday I'm going to be traveling to Venice so we won't be doing one of these next Saturday but we should be good to resume the next one after. I'll do a most in the Facebook group in the week leading up to that just to let everyone know. So thanks everyone for attending. Look forward to speaking with you soon. Have a good weekend. PART 4 OF 4 ENDS [02:04:22]

Comments