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Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, April 28th, 2018

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A, April 28th, 2018

Summary

Livestream Q&A call recording for April 28th, 2018. 

Transcript / MP3

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Sam: I can see a couple people jumping on. Just let me know in the questions box or the comments box, just say if you can see my scree and you can hear the audio. Just let me know if we're good, and then we can go ahead and get started. We're good. Thanks Lucas. Hey [Adern 00:00:56]. I'm doing good, thank you. [inaudible 00:00:59], awesome. Thanks. Corey, Tammy. Awesome. Well looks like we're good to go. Before we get started, we're going to go for two hours. We do these every Saturday from 3:00 PM until 5:00 PM. Make sure you put that in your calendar so you can remember. What we're going to do today, like the other times, is just some Q&A. That seems to be the most interactive thing to do. It seems to be the thing where people get the most value. Let's just do some Q&A. If you've got a question, just type your question in that comment box, and I'll go through them one by one. Let's start with Kristin. "Hey Sam. Your honesty and level of support are next level. Thank you. I would love to hear your feedback on my niche. After starting to think that I couldn't break into my niche of female coaches, I think I stumbled across a problem which is that a lot of these female coaches hate selling. They don't know what to say on the call, how to lead the conversation or how to handle objections to sell their coaching packages. I would love to master the art of selling and know I'm naturally good at it or at least better than many coaches, and I've enjoyed doing it with the practice calls. I've also spoken to female coaches on Facebook who paid $5k for similar programs, so I know there's a market. I would love to hear what you think of it. Does that sound like a good problem to solve? My message would be something like this: I help frustrated female coaches to learn how to sell their $3k coaching packages and close the client on the sales call with confidence instead of feeling icky about selling." Yeah, well what you've got to remember is that my opinion doesn't really matter. No one's opinion matters. The only thing that matters is whether your market, which is female coaches, actually have that problem, it factually exists, and they see value in what you're offering. The way that that is confirmed and validated is when you sell someone and they pay you money. Not even one, but like three to five because one can be a fluke but five can't really. It looks like you're looking for a little bit of validation. If you want my guess, then it looks like, yeah, that would be a problem. It's a problem for pretty much everybody, and there is value in solving that problem for them. My opinion is that it looks like a good offer, but it doesn't really matter. You've got to go and sell it, and that's the only way to really validate. Just go out to the market right now and start trying to sell it. Start trying to sell it today. Go into some Facebook groups, add some women coaches as friends. The ones who accept, some of them will accept, there will be people online today. Message them. Get them on the phone. Just try and get a client today. That'll solve all of your anxiety, all of your thinking. Just do it. [Joward 00:04:25] says, "Sam, I have made three strategy sessions in this niche, and in the process of generating more, I quit my job this month and I'm looking for another one because it's easy to find a better paying job as a software developer, but I'm thinking of not actually doing that and just going all in on my consulting business, which is training recruiters in difficult technologies to resonate better with candidates and I've seen another person offering this, and I'm confident about this niche. What do you think?" Again, this is another one of my opinions. I know it's a problem because I've been in your niche's shoes. Like most of our platform or all of our platform is custom made. The consulting.com eLearning portal, our billing system, all of those systems, we sell one thing. That was a big build, and I've had to hire a team of engineers and developers and things, and it was hard. I know that pain exists, and I know finding the 10x developers, I know finding those really good developers is hard. I was willing to pay a lot of money to just find a damn developer. I know that that is a pain and it definitely exists. Developers are in extremely high demand right now. Developers are probably in higher demand than any other skill on earth right now, especially like the machine learning ones or any type of developers actually in high demand, but especially machine learning. I think that's a good niche. If you don't need to go get another job, don't do it. If it's a question of survival, like are you not going to be able to make rent next week and you're not going to be able to put food on the table and you're truly going to be screwed, then probably get a job, but if you're fine, if you're not actually screwed and survival isn't even ... don't get a job, because this in the long term is going to pay you way more. Sure, in the short term, you might make a little bit more money if you go and get a job because you'll collect some paychecks, but in the long term, this is going to make you the most. If it's not a question of survival, just don't get another job. Tammy says, "Hey Sam, after your feedback last week, I went back to the drawing board and got much more clear on who I serve and how. I would love to hear your thoughts. I help women recover from childhood and relationship trauma so that they can get the love they want through my 12-week transformational coaching program." I think it sounds good. When we sell a program, I typically leave off the "through my 12-week program." My message, it's I help people start wildly profitable consulting businesses. I don't really need to put in that other piece unless that piece is a unique thing, so I think you could leave off the "through my 12-week transformational program," and you could just say, "I help women recover from childhood and relationship trauma," and then I'd just get a little bit more clear on what it is that you mean by so that they can get the love that they want because that's kind of vague. Love could be from friends, from family, from their children, from their partner, from their husband, wife. It could be so many different things that I'd just get that a little bit clearer, and then you're good. Neffer says, "Can you give a few more examples of destroying your identity? I know you said do your opposites, but it's such a strange thing at first. What was a big ah-ha moment when you started doing this?" Well I mean I'm just forced to. For me, achieving my goal is so important that I'm willing to do anything. Anything that's not ridiculous. Provided it's legal and stuff, I'll do anything even if it's painful. What that means is when I first got started in business and I was an introvert, I didn't like talking to people, well I had to talk to people to get to where I wanted to go. I wanted the end and the means to get the end was to be confident and on the phone and stuff. That's just what I had to do. Honestly, the academic part of it, the theory part of it is doing it on paper and it's philosophical. You're like, "Oh I'm an introvert and I don't like talking to strangers and I'm not outgoing and extroverted." If want to get my goal, I've got to be outgoing and extroverted. That's the end of the academic analysis of it. You can't fix yourself and change yourself by just working academically. You only use the theoretical part in writing things down and doing the exercises to just know what you need to do and remember what you need to do it. You don't actually change at all until you do it. That's what you've got to keep in mind. No amount of paperwork or thinking exercises are going to change you. Only action will. What happens is at first, it's painful and it feels awkward, but then it just gets easy. A prime example is I'm introverted and I don't like doing live stuff, I prefer not to talk to people. I quite like reading numbers and spreadsheets and stuff like that. I like to work with data and quantitative stuff instead of a lot of emotion in things, but when I looked at this customer survey of what the customers were telling me and also of the public opinion and what they thought of me, I knew that I needed to change and I needed to create some videos and put them out there on the internet, and I also knew that I needed to do live things with my customers and I needed to interview my customers. I needed to do some social media stuff to help with the opinion that was getting created from my ads. Now I realized that by doing the mindset kind of exercise, I was like, "Okay, I need to change my identity a bit." I need to be more human. I need to be more outgoing and a little bit more extroverted. That's the end of that. I had to just do it. At first, it was a bit awkward and a bit clumsy and a bit painful. I remember at first, I was really nervous about doing anything and I'd overanalyze everything and be a bit of a perfectionist about posting anything. Now it just happened so fast. I have no fear about doing these live Q&A calls. I go to those Instagram stories without even thinking about it. I just press record, bam, done. Not a perfectionist at all about it. Doing a lot more of that stuff. It's amazing once you start doing it because you look back and you're like, "How come that was hard?" It's actually really easy. Now it feels so easy and like nothing, but back then I was like terrified of it. It's just changed. Humans get really stuck in their grooves. If they're just used to doing this sort of thing, then they'll get very used to doing this sort of thing and when you try and change that path, it is a ton of resistance. It's just doing it. The sooner you do it, it's like the sooner it gets easy. Edward [Tang 00:13:24] says, "Hi Sam, what are your thoughts on note taking with a pen and paper versus typing on a computer and a laptop?" Dude, I like to use just Google Docs whenever I make notes and things. Yeah, it doesn't really matter. The only reason why I like to use the Google Docs thing is because I know I can't lose it and it's searchable because I can put keywords in and it's digital, so I can search for things. I would prefer the simplicity of pen and paper, but there's just no search function on that and so I'm just less sufficient. I kind of mix things up. I use my [Walmart 00:14:12] calendar to plan my month and my days and all of that, but then I'll write my daily schedule with a notebook and a pen and paper, and then if I read books, I'll read physical books and I'll use a pen to underline and circle things. Pretty much everything else I do is on the computer. It's kind of weird little mix. [Vanita 00:14:42] says, "People want all the info in a 15 minute chat." Is that a question Vanita or is that a statement? I don't know what to do with that one. Joward says, "Question. One of my niche competitors offers exactly what I want to offer them in the form of group training courses where he goes onsite to their offices and teaches them. What can I do to compete with him and pick up clients? Why would they choose me over his more professional looking, more fun looking approach while I'm just on my own offering one on one coaching?" This is a good question. First of all, you're assuming that everyone in the marketplace knows who this guy is and actually thinks that he is the best. If that was true, then yeah, you couldn't compete, but that's not true. It's impossible. Nobody has full saturation on any market, and especially in the type of work you're doing, no one can serve the whole market. It's impossible. You're thinking and just totally wrong because you've got your eyes fixated on the competitor. Forget about the competitor. Completely forget about him. Just look at the customer in the market and just do your best to solve that problem. They don't even know that he exists probably. Before you know, if you start out you will be a little bit worse than him. If he's been doing it for longer than you, then sure you will be. How do you think I got started? I was probably the worst consultant in the world because I couldn't even get clients for $200. I couldn't even call anybody, and I was broke living in my parents garage in New Zealand and I had no qualifications. That's not what you call a competitive consultant. I had to start there, and I started off with tiny little clients where I was pretty much just doing slave labor, helping them with websites and things like that. You start small and then you work your way up. Before long, you're good at it. Just take your eyes off the competition and focus on the customer. Know it's such a stupid thing to do to look at the competitors because they actually don't matter. The only thing that matters is the customer. Competitors don't send you money. Competitors don't help you in any way. All that matters is the customer. You want to impress them. You want to get them. Just take your eyes off them and focus on the customer. [Aidan 00:17:43] says, "I have a question. How do you think these sound like? I help filmmakers to reach their audience and make money on their films by making sales funnels and targeted campaigns, or I help independent documentary filmmakers reach their audience and make money on their films after they are done in festivals and television by making sales funnels and targeted campaigns." Yeah, it's funny when people first do this exercise. They put so many words in there because they want to get everything. This can be way more simple, and I get what you're trying to do. First of all, filmmakers and independent documentary filmmakers can be classified as filmmakers. Done. We can simplify that. They're both really the same thing, so let's call them filmmakers. I help filmmakers distribute their films and make a profit online, something like that. Just something way more simple. I help filmmakers distribute their films online and make a profit. Just something just really simple like that because it's just got to be a small little piece where someone's like, "Oh that's what I do," and then they'll have some extra questions to dig in and find more detail, and that's when you can tell them the more detail. This is a good niche and I can tell that you're interested in it. You've probably got some sort of connection. I know you do actually because I saw that you applied for the videographer job at Consulting.com. It's a good niche because you're interested in it because this is what you do. That's a good start. You obviously know that a problem for them is distributing your films, so good. A way to do that could be, well the way to distribute pretty much anything these days is through the internet. Yeah, it looks good. I know that's a problem and you're obviously passionate about it, so it's good. I would get to it immediately. Go get a customer. Try to get one today. Mark Carey says, "Hi Sam. My video ad to plumbers isn't converting but I know it's good. Can you see if you can see anything wrong please? Thank you brother." Yeah, you'll have to give me a screenshot of your ad. Can you do a screenshot of your ad and then send me a private message on Facebook just so I can pull it up? Otherwise, if you do it in the comments, I'm not going to see your comment for ages. Oh shit, would you look at that? You sent me this a while ago. Speaker 2: Hey what's up? Sam: I just had a look at it. Tell me via the private message how many clicks have you had? How many clicks have you had on this? How long have you been running it for? From looking at this, I still haven't heard back, but it could be a few things going on here. The first one is that you might not have given it enough time. Time is important. Time needs to happen. You can't tell if an ad is a winner or not immediately on day one. Often it takes time. The other thing is it takes volume. You need enough clicks and you need enough traffic. In order to judge your landing page, whether that's working or not, you need at least 100 clicks. You can't get 20 clicks have no one opt in and be like, "Oh my landing page doesn't work." You need 100. That would be the first place I would go. The second place I would go after that is you sent me one ad and you said that you knew the ad was good. We don't know whether the ad's good or not. The only way you can tell if the ad's good or not is if it works. Your ad doesn't work, well at least we know that it doesn't work so far. Therefore, we would assume that your ad isn't good, at least so far. Only the proof and the facts can tell us if something is good or not. I could say, "Oh my program's the best in the world," but if no one was making any money with it, then I'm delusional. You'd have to look at the facts. I would try more things. You sent me one angle with one image. In the training, I get you to do at least three angles with at least four images and try out a bunch of audiences and things. Have you done that? Have you followed the process in the program? If you followed the process in the program, you should be good. Also, I wouldn't do your video ad. I looked at it. I don't think you should run that. I think you should keep it more simple. Just have an image and then some text. Just have an image of a plumber or someone working on plumbing stuff. Just keep it simple. I tell you in the training to first of all just stick with image ads and just stick to the simple stuff first, because if you can't get an image ad to work, you ain't going to be able to get a video ad to work. That's why we start with the simple stuff. A lot of people think you need to do chat bar ads, you need to do video ads and all of this crap, but you don't. You can experiment and do whatever the hell you want once you've made your campaign profitable, but when your campaign isn't profitable, you're not in the position to go out and try experiments unless you just want to do it for fun and you don't care about blindly wasting your money. That's what I would do Mark. I would just look in the training or probably ask it on one of the Q&A calls where the guys, Jesse and [Hauser 00:26:10] can help you in more detail. Vanita says, "What do you say when most people ask HP?" What is that? Detail. Vanita, you've got to control your thumb or your finger, whatever is hitting that enter key. Just write a clear question. Angie says, "Good morning Sam. I have a potential client I was talking to on a research call. They are very interested in hearing about Facebook ads. They currently use radio. What is the best approach to take to quantify Facebook over radio? How much do I charge a month including the ad costs? Also, a restaurant is interested in my vegetarian recipes. Do I sell them? How do I value that, or they would use the recipe under my brand? Thank you in advance." Well let's stick to one thing at a time. If you've got a potential client that's interested in Facebook ads and they're currently using radio, you're wondering how can we quantify it. There's no way we can really know until we do it, but if we're to look at signals elsewhere, there are more companies successfully getting customers with Facebook than there are people successfully getting customers with radio. I would say as a general rule, Facebook works a lot better than radio, and it's a lot more measurable, it's a lot more optimizable, it's a lot more quantifiable. It's better in pretty much every way, shape and form. We don't know that for a fact because we don't know this specific client's case and who their market is and what they sell. It'd be very rare that radio is going to outperform Facebook. I would tell them that argument. It's a very clear argument. It makes sense. Any rational person would understand that argument. Then let's say, "Let's give it a try because that's the only way we can really know." Then I'd just give them a price and I would just price it at say $1,000. If it's your first client, just do it cheap. $1,000 and then ad spend comes on top of that, and recommend that they spend $1,000 in their first month. Break that out over 30 days, $33 a day, and see how you go. Then with the vegetarian recipes thing, I don't know how that would sell and all of that. It sounds like that would be harder to turn into a ... I really don't know, but my assumption is that that would be a lot harder to turn into a predictable, repeatable business than selling the Facebook ads. You may as well ask them, "Well what are you willing to pay for this?" If they're willing to pay a lot of money, sure, sell it to them, and then see if you can sell it to others, but focus on one thing at a time. I would make your first priority selling the Facebook ads to this company that's interested. Donald [Dang 00:29:38]. This is a good one. "Took your advice and quit school. I have 10 leads in three days, two strategy sessions tonight and four on Monday." This is what I like to see. Good work Donald Dang. How does it feel to quit university? Let me know in the comments. Edward Tang, "Sam, how do you deal with uncertainty in life or in business when things are just not going your way?" This is quite a broad question. I mean the thing I like to think about is that I wake up every day expecting things to not go my way. I wake up expecting things to be really damn hard, and that way if they are, well I'm prepared, but if they aren't, then I'm like, "Sweet. That was easy." I just expect things to be hard, and I expect things to be more challenging that I assumed, and that's just what I expect. You just have to stick through it. You've got to remind yourself that to get to the high levels, you have to go through more shit, and you have to go through more pain than anybody else. How you climb up in everything is by going through more stuff. When I'm going through real challenges, and sometimes these things last for ages, like I go through bigger periods of uncertainty and pain now than I did when I started. When I'm going through those, I just remind myself everyone else is going to have to go through this. All of my competitors, if they ever want to catch me, they're going to have to go through this hell. How they perform when they go into this hell is going to determine what happens. That makes me kind of like it. I'm like, "Well I'm glad this is painful because I know this one's going to just roast everyone else who tries to come." You've got to think about it like that, think really competitively. Think that everyone else is going to have to go through this, and if you can get through it and get through it well, then it's going to get everyone else, it's going to give them a hard time too. Your question is very vague, so I can only answer it vaguely. If you give me a specific example, like right now what isn't going your way? Then we look at it. Pretty much the way you do anything in life is by trying, failing, analyzing what went wrong, then having another go, trying, failing, analyzing. Trying, failing, analyzing. Trying, failing, analyzing. It's repetition, and you keep going like this again and gain and again and again and again, and then you get some little close and then you get closer and closer and then bam, you've got it. That's the way it happens. If you want a perfect example, just go and find any computer game on the internet. Just google online games or whatever. Just pick a random game you've never played before, and then just try and play it and watch what happens. You'll suck. Then you'll die and then you'll try again and then again and then again and then again. Then you get better. You learn this piece, you learn not to do that, and you just keep going. The way you get better is with repetition. That's it. That's the same thing in business. It's the same thing in anything. You've just got to keep going, keep trying. Joward says, "Doing checkout for Xavier, he's in a similar niche." Sue Bergman, "Question on direct outreach on Facebook. I'm a little sketchy on how the process works and how to go about it. You mentioned friending 40 people a day, how do I choose who to friend?" I would go back and watch the specific video, the live Q&A that I did where I explained it in detail. Basically what you do is ... and if anyone watching this right now remember the exact Q&A recording where I explained this process in detail, then if someone can just message it to Sue because in that video I explain it in detail. Also, listen to what was her name? Juliette [Tangin 00:35:03]. Listen to her customer interview. Find that Q&A call, watch it. Listen to Juliette's interview, watch it and then you'll know what to do. Basically you need to find Facebook groups where your niche exists like whatever Facebook groups your niche is in, join those groups and then go to the members list and start looking at the people, and if they're in your niche, then you can add them as a friend. That's how it works. Vanita says how to handle these objections? How much lead cost will be and lead quality and guarantee? You just tell the truth. I mean if they say, "Well how much are leads going to be," well if I know in their niche, then I can tell them. What do I tell you guys in the Consulting Accelerator program? Leads can cost anywhere from $3 to $10, sometimes they can even cost $15, but $3 to $10 is a good range. That's how much they cost. Let's say if it's a different niche. What's an expensive one? Personal injury attorneys in New York or personal injury attorneys in some expensive city, on Google AdWords. That might be way more. That might be $1,000 a lead or something. You tell them what it is. If I was you, I'd just figure out what the lead cost is and tell them that. Give them a range. Then what about the lead quality? Well we're going to be getting them leads that are in their niche and that are interested in what they offer. We can actually do it with quite a lot more predictability and precision than most other channels. It depends what they've tried in the past. Will it be as hot as a referral? No. Will it be better than a radio lead? Will it be better than some other type of lead? It probably will be. Then the guarantee, if you have a guarantee, offer them the guarantee. If you don't, then say that you don't. When you're getting started, it can be a good idea to offer one if you're really worried about it. You don't need to guarantee the ad spend. If I was doing a guarantee when I was getting started, I would say, "My fee is $1,000 a month or $2,000 a month or whatever." If we try this out for two months, and it doesn't work, then I can refund you for one month or whatever. That's what I would do, if you're really worried. Don't offer to refund them anything at any time because you don't want to get like 12 months in and then have someone do something weird on you and ask for that. Just make sure that the guarantee is rational. We cover a lot of this in the program, how to deal with guarantees and all of this stuff. Katie McIntyre says, "What does your diet look like on a normal day?" Well I have a chef and a personal trainer and money. Right now my diet is the best it's ever been in my entire life, but it's not practical. No one could have a diet like this if they were buying their own groceries and cooking their own food and all of that. Just wouldn't happen. It would, but you wouldn't have any time left. I can tell you what it is, but don't think that you need to do this because it's probably a bit too hard. In the morning I have a smoothie. I don't really know what's in but there's protein and other things that are good in there. Then I pretty much have no bread and no wheat or no gluten. One thing we've noticed with me is that any type of gluten or wheat, it makes me actually bloated, and you can even see my face will get puffy within 24 hours, and I get tired and lethargic and I don't think clearly. Getting rid of gluten is huge for me. That would be easy to do. That would be a win that I would do for most people here. The other thing is sugar, getting rid of sugar and then getting rid of processed foods. Anything that isn't just natural. Anything in a wrapper, anything that's in a can or anything that's processed. I have quite a lot of meat, quite a lot of vegetables and things, but not much carbs. No wheat, no gluten, no dairy, no sugar. That's about it. If you just get rid of wheat, gluten, dairy, sugar, when in saying that, that's almost impossible because what food can you eat that doesn't have those things in it that's sold on the street? Nothing. That's why I said, it's hard to actually pull it off. You have to have someone actually making your food, watching everything. I don't know how much money you're making Katie, but if you're making more than $10,000 a month, I'd get a chef absolutely. If you're making more than $10,000 a month, get a chef. Best investment ever. Matthew [Doctor 00:41:05] says, "Hey Sam, you said in the video that we shouldn't be afraid of picking a niche, that we can always change later, and you wouldn't be where you are now had you not just got started and pivoted along the way. Your latest video said, however, that we must stick to a niche because the grass is only greener where you water it. How do you determine if you need to stick with a niche or move on to the next?" That's a good question. You're going to change around when things aren't working, and you've had a solid crack at it. It's like what I tell people in the program. You can't judge a niche until you've done 30 strategy session calls and pitched 30 people. If you've done that, and you don't like what you see, and you think the niche isn't good, then you can rationally be like I'm going to look at another niche. That's a good decision. If you've gone into a niche and you haven't done much and then you're pinging off to another one, that's when you're starting to do the whole shiny object thing. Basically jumping without collecting enough evidence. Obviously to stick to something even when it's not working, even over a long period of time, that's just getting stupid. I have to give up on lots of things and change tax all the time, but I make sure that I give it enough time and enough effort so that I factually know that this thing doesn't work before I pivot. Also, if you have an option that's just radically better than the one you're currently in and not judged by your opinion or somebody else's opinion, judged by facts, then pivot. Prime example for me, I was doing Done For You Digital Marketing, I pretty much had an agency, and I was making good money, and I was growing and my clients liked it. Had an office, had everything, but then what happened is I launched my first course, and I sold a lot of that, and I was making a lot of money with my course. It seems to be way hotter, way easier to sell because of the story and all the stuff that had happened to me. It's not that programs are better; it's just people are actually coming to me and asking me all the time, "Hey, can you teach me how to do this?" Then they were loving the training. In that moment, I had a decision like, "Should I keep going with this thing that's good, or should I go and do this thing which is actually proving to be way better?" You jump in that case. There's the main rule is only jump when there's proof, and it's smart. Don't just jump because things get hard. Don't just jump because you don't know. You've got to know that you're making a rational decision and not being stupid. That's a good question. Carol says, "Hey Sam, in the Market Research, the worksheet says how aware is the niche of the problem. My niche seems not to be aware that there is a solution to their problem and go with a traditional approach of physiotherapy, et cetera. Is this a good thing that they're not aware or is it better if they are aware?" If they're going to physiotherapy, then they are aware of the problem. They're not aware of the solution that you have. Your market is problem aware, they are aware that they have this problem. If they weren't, they would not be going and buying something, but they're not solution aware. Which means that when a market is solution aware, that would be a market like, what's a good example? That would be a market like, which one is price competitive? Like online electronics. I'm going to buy a pair of headphones, or I'm going to buy a laptop or something like that. That market is problem aware and solution aware. They know exactly what they want, and it's very price sensitive. At that time, it's mostly about price. In a market that you're explaining, they're problem aware, that's good, so your messaging is going to be more around an alternative solution. The physiotherapy isn't the only way. There's this other solution, and a lot of what your messaging has to do is polarizing the physiotherapy and saying why that one is nowhere near as good as whatever you've got. That's most of the heavy lifting your message has to do. If your market wasn't problem aware, most of your heavy lifting is going to be trying to convince them that they have this problem. Why we want to ask these question is to understand the state of the market's mind, and understand what our objective is with the message. For you, you need to really polarize physiotherapy and whatever you're offering and why it's better. Joshua says, "Hey Sam, I was wondering whether there are any typical problems consulting businesses generally face during recessions and downturns, and if there are any good ways to fix?" Dude, this is so ... why even ask this question? That's so irrelevant. That's worrying about something in the future that you can't even control. I wouldn't worry about it at all. What your mind's probably doing right now is looking for reasons why this won't work. It's looking for reasons to not take action on something. Forget about it. I think they're actually good businesses in those times because you don't carry a huge amount of cost. If you go into a real, let's say you go into a depression. It's not a bad business because you don't have heavy overhead. You don't have all of this equipment. You don't have all of this burden holding you down. I think it's a good one. Another thing is the way I think about it, in a recession people aren't making money. They need customers more than ever. If you're in the business of helping people get customers and make money, doesn't matter what the season is, they need it. Don't worry about it is my main point here. There's nothing you can do about it. Kyle [Cantor 00:48:17] says, "My niche cut, dried, edited, I help doctors get more patients. I've been running into screeners, administrative staff and [inaudible 00:48:27] on a video presentation from an admin marketer who has closed a big group made up of quite a few CA members and present he said 80% of LinkedIn ACs inactive." There's no question in here. Ask a question. You just told me a blurb. Matthew Doctor says, "Hey Sam, my niche is helping desperate fathers make up to $400 to $600 a day carpet cleaning, even if they have no money, no equipment and no experience." Yeah, I mean if you base that off facts, if you've actually done ... It's interesting. I've never heard someone pair desperate fathers with carpet cleaning, but if you've got some sort of evidence as to why that's a good combination, then that would be great. Again, you didn't ask me a question. Remember guys, if you're going to post something, you got to phrase it as a question. I can always tell the state of someone's confusion based on how clear the question is articulated. When the question is dead clear, then the person's mind is very organized, and they're very close to the solution. When there's no question, and it's just a tangle of variables, that's the problem right there. Most of the time when you can define the question, the problem is solved. Keep that in mind. Try to always write down the question that you're looking for because most of the time you'll solve it yourself. Marcy says, "Great to see you live." Thanks Marcy. Vanita says, "Direct outreach, if someone says I'm doing well in my niche, will you still try to get them on a quick chat?" I mean yeah. Are they interested in doing better, that's the question. A lot of people think doing well means that someone doesn't need help. I'm doing the best I've ever been, and I've never invested more money, and I've never been hungrier to learn, improve, get advice from other people and grow and get bigger. Just being good doesn't mean that the person doesn't want help. Most of the time that means the person wants more. A lot of people, here's another example, I created the training on this mindset stuff. In Accelerator, it helped thousands of people with their mindsets. You might think, "Oh well Sam, because he taught all these people how to have good mindsets, he must not need any help with his mindset." Well I still have a forensic psychiatrist that I see every second week, and I still am trying to improve. You're never ever done. Ever. The moment you think you're done, someone's going to get you. Matthew says, "My niche is I hope [inaudible 00:52:06] ... " Okay, yeah. You need that question. [Alaric 00:52:13] says, "Sam, how do you identify the most painful problem in a niche. Like if you were getting multiple signals, how do you identify which problem you want to niche into?" Well I would ask them. I'd be like, "All right, well you guys have told me these two things. You've told me this, and you've told me that. Which one is the most urgent for you to solve?" That's all you need to do. Base your decision off what's most urgent for the people. Joward says, "My niche is to help recruiters and grow successful tech recruitment businesses. So far I've had a few strategy sessions. Every time my prospects are skeptical about the results I am promising to get them, I actually lose confidence and start doubting my ability to help them. Should I actually try and start my own tech recruitment business and leverage the tech skills I have to prove that it works, or should I just stick to the niche and build this confidence as I go?" Here's the golden question. You said you've had a few strategy sessions. How many is a few? Private message me right now Joward, tell me how many strategy sessions you actually have done. When I see that come in, I'll be able to answer that. I'll answer when I see how many you say you've done. Tammy Joyce, "Awesome." Paris [inaudible 00:54:15], "Question. If you are currently full time and have done a few consulting and want to keep that client, how can you then scale it down in terms of hours simply through working more efficiently? My aim is to double my salary per hour in the next six months." I mean you said it. You answered your own question. You said how can you scale it down in terms of hour, and then you put hyphen, simply through working more efficiently? That is how. You know what to do. You need to just analyze what you're doing, and you need to figure out what inputs you're putting in, generating the outputs. Most of what you'll be doing right now, I can guarantee you it's not really doing anything. There will only be a small amount of things you're doing that's actually moving the needle. You want to find out what those things are and just focus on those and start getting rid of everything else. That really is what efficiency means. Efficiency is basically eliminating waste, and so that's precisely what you need to do. I've already answered that. [Elia 00:55:46] says, "I'm in a situation where I need to make money fast. I've been trying to get clients to do digital marketing. I was wondering if you had any advice how I can get that or help me get clients fast." Well it doesn't matter whether you're trying to work fast or slow. There's only two things that give you clients. Generating strategy sessions, doing strategy sessions. That's what you need to do. If you want to go fast, you need to do a lot of it in a small amount of time. You should be joining Facebook groups, adding members as friends. You should be direct outreach by private messaging them. You should also be on LinkedIn, finding people who are in your niche, adding them as connections, direct messaging them, working all of those chats, trying to get them onto 15 minute chats. Then trying to get them from the 15 minute chat to a strategy session. Doing the strategy session. Trying to sign them up and trying to get them as clients. You need to be doing a lot of that all the time every day. That's all you need to do, and you can start right now. If you're really in a hurry, you don't even need to be watching this live video. You know what to do now. Just get off this video, quite out of all of your other tabs and just get to work. Start doing it. It's the only way it happens. Ryan [Hoick 00:57:06] says, "How much coffee do you drink every day?" I have just one. I get jittery if I have more. If you want to see why a lot of coffee is a bad idea, then you should look at what happens to spiders when they give them caffeine. You should be able to find a scientific video somewhere on the internet. When the spider doesn't have caffeine, it moves slowly, and it makes a perfect web, but when they give it caffeine, it moves extremely fast, but it makes a mess. It doesn't even make a web. Quite often, that happens with humans. If you give a human caffeine, they have the delusion that they're actually more productive because they're moving faster, and their brain's going zap, zap, zap, zap, zap, and they're trying to multitask and do all of this crap, and inside they feel like they're actually being productive. When you look at it objectively, they're just making a mess. A little bit of caffeine is nice in the morning, but people who drink it all throughout the day, they're mostly a mess. Kyle Cantor says, "80% of LinkedIn accounts are inactive, that's where I get some leads." There's a question before yours. Adern says, "The problem I have with marketing documentaries online though is that it is in the cross point of information and knowledge and entertainment, so I find it difficult to create a typical value hero journey that will attract audience. Besides independent documentary filmmakers are usually low paying, so sometimes I think this niche is too hard, but it is my field and expertise. I'm in documentary." Yeah, it will be hard. Dude, cracking anything is pretty hard. If it's not hard, then it's probably not much reward, and it probably isn't even worth cracking. Remember a lot of the time that the harder the problem, the harder the thing to crack, the more the reward. It will be hard, but there has to be a way to do it. A lot of it will probably be through distributing content or building free Facebook groups or something like that. It's probably not going to be through a webinar or something like that. It's probably going to be more building a community and building a group of people who are interested and then doing something like that. There has to be a way to do it, absolutely. Just start researching. Google best launch strategies for movies or how do you launch a movie? That's where it starts, just googling shit like that. You'll be amazed at what you find. I think right now what's going on with you is you haven't committed to it. You're still in purgatory with it. Just commit. It is a good one, and I think you should commit to it, so just do it. Figure it out. Kyle Cantor says, "80% of LinkedIn accounts are inactive. That's where I get my leads. Is this claim correct? Also, I've had problems getting into direct contact with doctors because most are not on social media. Talked to a few employees who told me they have to sign." This is just some dude's opinion that 80% of LinkedIn accounts are inactive. I wouldn't listen to that because first of all, this dude, unless it's Reid Hoffman, and that's the own of ... or not the owner anymore, but that's the founder of LinkedIn, unless that came out of Reid Hoffman's mouth, I call bullshit. I think he's just made up some crap. How can an ordinary dude have private information about a company that isn't his? He doesn't. I wouldn't believe that. People use LinkedIn all the time. I've seen hundreds, thousands of instances of people using LinkedIn to get clients. I would take that fact over this dude's opinion. Just do it. Stop seeing little bites of information and freaking out. You've got to put things ... every time you see information, you have to weigh it. A person's opinion means nothing. You have to weigh this opinion. For example, every day thousands of people say that I don't know what I'm talking about, that I'm a scammer, that I'm a fraud, all sorts of crap. If I looked at that and believed it, I'd be screwed. I'd be ruined. Instead, what I have to do is I just have to weigh their opinions. Most of the time, they're not even anybody. They're just generally sour poor people who just are jealous of people improving their life, and so I just dismiss it. If it was my customers telling me that, then that's a fact and then I need to change. Every time you see a piece of information, you got to weigh it. Don't just freak out at things. When I weighed that dude's opinion, he's not Reid Hoffman, he doesn't own LinkedIn, he doesn't know. My response to him would be prove it. Donald Dang says, "I'm an introvert. I can definitely switch to a more extroverted personality if I need to be, even though my natural tendency ... " You just told me a statement dude. There's no question. Matthew Doctor, "My niche is [inaudible 01:03:10]. My two questions are I would like to solve this problem for them by creating a course, as my time is very limited, and I can sell more and serve more people with the course as it's much more scalable. You said you've never seen people make a good course until they've done a "done for you" service." I've done this myself. That's why I wanted to teach it to others. Does that count? The only "done for you" way of doing this would be coaching, but again, my time is very limited. I can't give up many hours a day to coaching people. What would you suggest?" Well I would start by just coaching one person. You're thinking into the future too far and thinking, "I can't do one on one coaching because it's not scalable," but you're not scaling it. Scalability isn't in the equation. You're just trying to find out if this works. Start with one on one coaching. You don't have to give up your whole life because you're only going to have one client. If they get results with it and it's a good little proof of concept, sure, build the course, but never build a course until you've started with one person, at least one person. Never ever do that. You just won't know what to put in the course, and chances are you'll make a bad course. All the course is really is it's a simulation of what you would do with the person one on one. If an everyday person who knew nothing about business came to me and was like, "Sam, I want you to teach me how to start a consulting business and get a client," and if they came into my house every day for months and sat down on the couch, and I had to teach them myself, what's an accelerator is exactly what would happen. You don't know how to create a good course until you've done it and then all the course is is a simulation of the flesh relationship. Second question, "An online question is only a one-off sale?" Irrelevant. Forget about it. Your thinking needs to be isolated on the now, which is you're thinking about recruiting, or you're thinking about scale, you're thinking about your time. You're assuming that all of this shit's going to go amazingly well. Now we don't worry about that stuff until it is a worry. All you need to do right now is see if you can get one client. Ben [Resti 01:05:44] says, "Do you have a general rule of thumb or questions before you start working with a client?" Yes I do. Look in week six. It's in week six, and it's like minimum viable service delivery or something like that, and I've got a questionnaire I give people, and I give you best practices for client relationships. Vanita says, "The question was what do you do if they want all the info on a 15 minute chat?" Well I would ask, "Do you have about 45 minutes," because that's how long this conversation will take. If they do, and they want to do it now, then we do it. We jump into the strategy session and we do it. Duncan says, "Hey Sam, is there any way I can see your example website critique video? I'm doing website critique videos." I think I included one in the training. If I didn't, just send a private message to Nick Hauser and ask him if we have one. I'm pretty sure we have one. Joshua [Westover 01:06:55], "Hey Sam, I'm in the eCommerce niche offering Facebook ads. I've noticed that people don't always say that they're store owners on their profiles. Do you have any recommendations on how I can start a conversation with them to find out if they do own a store?" Yeah, join a Facebook group where there is eCommerce. Join an eCommerce Facebook group. Start looking at what people are doing in there and start looking at their profiles, and then adding the ones you know are an eCommerce. That's what I would do. Keith Kruger, "Hey Sam, just a quick hello and to let you know how much I'm enjoying your student interviews and finding them very useful, just like these Q&A sessions." Thanks Keith. Austin [Fontin 02:17:56] says, "Are you on NZT?" I'm guessing you mean that drug that that guy has in Limitless. I don't know that was real, but if it is real then send me a link to it because I thought that was just fake. Mark Carey says he just did it. Awesome. Peter [Lombare 01:08:17], "Hey Sam, just curious if you're able to share any details on the pixel technology solution that you leveraged to identify people that are stealing your IP and content in video format. I'm working on creating a couple of video courses with IP. I have over 15 years of experience in my industry, and I'm just exploring if it's something that makes fine fiscal sense to me to do at this point." You're worrying about it. Don't worry about it. Just make sure that you identify the people in your course when you sell them, and you make sure they're not using fake names or fake emails and things like that. Then make sure you use a good content portal so that your information's protected. At the end of the day, there's not really much you can do, like pirates will pirate stuff. They even, in China, they make rip off MacBook Pros and iPhones. There's always going to be some piracy. The upside that you get, the amount of money and benefit you stand to get from it totally outweighs the small downside of some pirates. It's not going to matter. Don't worry about it. IP is never really as valuable as people think unless it's some patented AI technology that can build a human robot. Then sure, that might be expensive. I probably wouldn't put that one in a course. Just general information on how to do stuff, you've got to remember it's the doing of it that's the value. You're totally blowing this up to be something that's not really an issue or any cause for concern. Elia says, "Hey Sam, [Ty Lopez 01:10:27] says you like to build businesses behind the scenes. Is that true?" Well what he basically means is that we're very different. Ty is extroverted as I'm sure you're well aware of, and I'm introverted. What I would prefer to do is just look at spreadsheets, numbers, data and run my business that way. I would prefer not to have to do any videos or talk to people or do any of that stuff. Ty on the other hand, doing the analytical stuff for Ty would be like trying to eat a pane of glass because he's so extroverted, he likes the social connection. He likes expressing himself and doing all of that. He doesn't like doing the other one. I'm the exact opposite of that. That's actually why we make a good partnership with those promotions because I've got a really detailed specific course, and he's got a lot of fame, and he gets a lot of attention. That's what he means by that. We're just opposites. Mark Carey says ... Yeah, Mark, I think you've got to try more angles or you've got to do it for a longer period of time or for more specific information, you're going to have to ask on the Q&A calls, because I don't have the time to dive deep into the stuff on this call because I need other pieces of information for you and it just takes too long for me to get there. Luke says, "Do you know a way to automate payments?" I don't know what you mean by that. Automate what payments? Recurring payments? If you're talking about recurring, then yes, that's why we use that pay funnel solution with Stripe. Skyler says, "I'm in week four of the accelerator and skipped the last couple of videos of week three because I don't feel I've learned the digital marketing skills yet necessary to deliver my service, digital marketing, to clients well enough to bring in any more clients. I feel that going through the sales focus portion of the program is too soon for me. What would you say given my situation that it's okay for me to focus on the [inaudible 01:13:02] portions of the program before learning?" No, do it in the order that it's there for. I thought a lot about it, and here's why. Knowing how to sell and knowing to do a sales call, what you're trying to do with digital marketing is that. You're trying to basically generate people for that sales call. Understanding what happens on the sales call and the dynamics of the sales call will make you a much better digital marketer. Digital marketing is like the tactics and the nuts and bolts, like click this button, click that. This or that. Unless you have some sales knowledge, you're not going to know how to do digital marketing. Just go through it step by step. I promise you you'll be a better digital marketer for doing that. David Ogilvy who owned Ogilvy and Mather, which was the largest, best advertising agency in the world back then, he said, "All advertising is is salesmanship and print." All digital marketing is is really salesmanship and pixels. That's all it is. If you don't know how to do the salesmanship part, I mean you just know how to manipulate a bunch of pixels. Useless. Jennifer Bishop says, "Hi Sam, I help companies improve business performance by engaging the staff in skilled volunteering or pro bono engagements to boost leadership development and connect them to accompany mission and values." Whoa, that's a lot of stuff. "It's a tough niche because the decision making is complex. Multiple stakeholders need to agree to have suggestions on generating meetings and in closing the [inaudible 01:14:59]." It's hard because this thing is vague. Very vague. You help companies improve their performance. What's the company? What sort of company? What is performance? Are we talking about profit? Are we talking about growth? Are we talking about cutting costs? Performance is so many things. So is the business. Then engaging their staff in skilled volunteering or pro bono engagements, what is in the trainings? You're saying what we're going to do, but what is in it? Why do they need it? People don't just want their staff engaged in engagements. It doesn't mean anything. Why? Then to boost leadership development, again, what is that? Company mission and values. It's so super vague that I think what's making that hard to close is the fact that no one really has conviction that this is exactly what they need to do. They just probably bounce it around to all of these different people, and it probably just gets lost because when a company needs something urgently, it doesn't matter how big it is, how bureaucratic it is, it's going to act fast because otherwise, it ceases to exist. I think it's more your offer or what you're saying you do. I would get razor sharp on exactly what you do. What mission critical problem do you solve? It's best to start with the problem. See, nowhere in here, in your statement do you mention a problem. All you say is things that you're going to do, but it doesn't tie it to a problem. Problems make things urgent. Otherwise, they're just nice to have. I'd think about it. What's the critical problem you solve? Then I would write that in the chat and let me know, and we can make this thing a lot sharper. Tammy says, "Getting rid of gluten is the best thing I've ever done. Made giving up sugar super easy too." Yep, it is. I have a lot more energy. Every month I'm allowed a cheat day, and so I'll have a burger or something with a bun on it. Now I don't even really bother. I don't even want to have the cheat day because I just feel so shitty afterwards. I feel so bad that I can't even really work properly, and then I'm bloated. I'm just like, "That's not even worth having this damn thing. It's amazing how much sharper and leaner and meaner you get when you cut out that crap. Robert [Sacripenti 01:18:16] says, "Hello everybody. Just got pulling back to the meetings. I just wanted to hop on here and say hi to Sam and all of you guys." Hi Roberto. How's it going? Donald Dang, "What's your opinion on sacrifice? Would you do seven days a week of straight business, neglecting relationships, your family and any sort of ... Would you do seven days of straight business, neglecting relationships or family, any sort of social life?" No, I wouldn't do seven days a week. One, because I have a wife, and I would like to keep my wife, so that's a good reason. Two is because I actually can't work seven days a week straight. Human beings need some rest. We're not machines. It's just like trying not to sleep. I've tried to cut down on sleep to be better in business, and it doesn't work. I get worse at business because you just get stupid, because when you don't sleep properly, literally your brain is just delusional. I wouldn't do seven days a week. I've pretty much, what I'm working right now on average is about as much as I can work and be productive, which is 12 hours a day six days a week. Monday to Saturday about 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM, that's how much I work. I think about work all the other time even though I'm not working, but I'm just not actually working. That's about as much as I can do and be productive and healthy and all of that. If a situation demands it, if we have something huge in our business that we need to go all hands on, then sure, I'll work longer than that, and I might sacrifice a few Sundays and work seven days a week for a month straight because that's what is required, but on average, most of the time, yeah, 12 hours a day, six days a week. I sacrifice social life, yeah. I don't really have one. I do in a way with I've got a social life with my wife, with my personal trainer, Rich, which I'm sure you've seen, and I've got a social life with my team, the people who work at Consulting.com, and then I've got a bit of a social life with these communities, what we're doing right now. I already have one. I don't need anything more than that. I don't need to go meet friends for lunch. I don't need to be going out to bars. I don't need to be going out and socializing. I don't do any of that. Zero. I haven't been to a lunch this year. Haven't been to a dinner to go and meet people or a bar or anything for years. I spend time with my family and my wife and my team and all of that. William Perkins has been off sugar for the last two weeks. "Feel amazing, low carbs, [inaudible 01:21:41]." Nice. Nice work. Scott [Blainey 01:21:47] says, "I'm thinking of offering cloud services to clients with under 100 employees, but I'm not an expert in that field. How do I get started if I don't have a track record? I've been in IT for over 20 years, but not specializing in this area. Should I up my skill level or outsource the work?" Well cloud services is very vague. What do you mean? You're saying you want to offer cloud services to business with under 100 employees. What is a cloud service? Are we talking about the clouds in the weather system? Are we talking about the internet cloud? Are we talking about hosting? Are we talking about Gmail, Facebook? I need to know more specific. Why? Why do you want to do this? I'm sure you just didn't have this epiphany. You must have talked to some people and based this idea on some sort of facts. I need more information. Anne [Vol 01:23:00] says, "Hi Sam, I just started the course and maybe there will be an answer, but I come from a very small country, 1.5 million, and I'm wondering whether I should focus on my country or start thinking worldwide right away." What's the country? I should be able to see if I go into your profile. Where is this? Estonia. I would start there. You want to base your decisions off facts, like real data. There's no point in us assuming that just because there's only 1.5 million people there, that it's not going to be any good. That's silly. We should try and market and sell to the local market. If after 30 calls or 60 calls or whatever you find that it's too small or you get as many clients as you can, then we should look at going elsewhere. Just start right where you are. Start in your local market. You can always go worldwide later. I started in New Zealand and I actually started in Auckland, New Zealand, which was even the city I was in. I thought scaling was going into other cities in New Zealand. I was even too nervous to do that. Then I thought maybe if you're real big you might sell to Australia too. Just start small. Just focus on something small and then grow with time. New Zealand only has four million people, so it's not too far off that. Auckland, the city I was in, had one million people, and I could get clients in Auckland, so surely you can get clients in this place. Gabrielle says, "In the Facebook ads in the program, is it going to teach us how to help our niche get clients?" Yeah, well it's the same thing. This is what's cool about learning these things, which I teach you how to do is if you learn how to get clients for yourself with Facebook, then what do you know how to do? Well you know how to get clients with Facebook. You can do what you do for yourself for other people. It's the same skill. The only variable that changes in that equation is who you're doing it for, yourself or the client. You still do the same thing. Yeah, the process you go through is how you help your clients. Gabrielle [inaudible 01:26:09], "Is the Facebook ads ... " Oh yeah, we already answered that. Daniel [inaudible 01:26:20], "Hi Sam, I'm starting a niche in helping people start and grow a transportation logistics company. Have you ever worked in this niche? Any advice?" No, I know nothing about it. I would ask why. My opinion isn't important. What matters is whether this is actually needed in the marketplace. The only opinion that matters is the market's. I wouldn't care if everyone on planet earth thought I was wrong if what I was doing worked because I would trust the results over peoples opinions. Instead of thinking what do I think about it, why did you choose logistics? Have you started a logistics company? Have you grown a logistics company? What do you know about it? Why did you pick it? Why do you think you should do it? I need this information. Kyle Candor says, "Is this a relevant statement to say?" Oh yeah, we've already covered this dude. It's not. Vanita says, "When I do a 15 minute chat, most people want to know how I can get them leads and get annoyed if I just say with my predictable client system. How would you handle this? I feel keeping it high level doesn't work." You have to explain it. If someone asks specifically how, you have to tell them how. Otherwise, they're just going to think you're being silly. You tell them how. You go down another level. You don't have to go into the minute detail, but you go down a level into more detail. You can say, "We've got a predictable client system. What is that? Well what it is basically we find out your market. We find out exactly who they are, and then we want to research their problems, pains, fears, desires and all of that. We want to get to know them really well. Once we know them, and we know how to find them and target them and get their attention, then we design some ads, which we can put in front of them that are going to strike their nerves and get them interested." Then we build a series of web pages with a video on it that explains what you do and how you help and all of that. That video educates them and then it gets the people who are interested to schedule a call with you. Then when they schedule a call with you, you jump on the call, and you're able to diagnose whether the thing that you've got is a good fit for helping them, and if so, you can make them an offer and sell them and get customers. That's the next layer down in detail from that. Then if they want to know ... From there, no one will say, "But how?" They'll ask a specific question. What their mind will do in that instance is they'll be satisfied or if they're not, they'll have a specific question about a particular component. They'll be like, "Where at Facebook, or why Facebook?" They'll go, "Oh wait, these landing pages, why those?" Then you just talk about the detail on that specific piece that they're interested in. We keep it high level so that a lot of people, they might just be happy with the high level. Some people, they might want more detail, so we give them a bit more detail. Then some people will choose a particular area where they want even more info, and then we go down and give them even more info there. If we were to go into that detail from the very beginning, we would lose then, because we only want to provide detail when the person wants the detail. Otherwise, we're talking about things that they're not interested in, and we're going to lose their attention very quick. We keep it like that as an exchange, back and forth, back and forth, so that we're only ever offering them bites of information that they want. That's how we keep them hooked and engaged. [Sidra 01:30:41] says, "Sam, love your program and advice." Thank you. "I have two questions about my niche. Number one, I'm a high performance, brain performance consultant. I help overwhelmed and burned out high achieving women rebalance their nervous system so they can bounce back more powerfully as impactful leaders. Does this make sense, and is it odd to focus on women only or should I focus on both men and women? I've had several men approaching me and asking me about how to improve mental performance." Well if what you do works the same for men and women, why narrow it down? Why? You can help men, so why not help them? If you think that the subjects are totally different, and your method doesn't work as well or whatever, then you've got to have reason for decision. You don't make decisions blindly without reason. That's an odd question there. Then your niche, you help overwhelmed and burned out high achieving women rebalance their nervous system so that they can bounce back. This here needs to be simplified. You don't really need to focus on women, and high achieving is good though. That's a good piece of information. Now they don't care about having a rebalanced nervous system. Most people don't even know what the hell that is. That word is useless to them. It's scientific to you, but it's useless to them. They can bounce back more powerfully as impactful leaders. Well how do we know that they're leaders and how do we know that they want to be impactful? I would leave that out. What I would say is I help high performers recover from burnout and reach new levels of performance through brain science or something. That's something I'd be interested in. That's the sort of thing we look into too, like EEG stuff and all that sort of brains tuff. You help high performance people. They're going to be like, "Oh yeah, that's me, me, me, me." Then recover from burnout and reach higher levels. If their burnout could be the problem, high performance is the group of people and reaching new levels is the goal. How you do it is through this brain science or brain technology or whatever. That makes it way more simple. You don't need the other particulars on there. Question two, "Does it make sense to talk to high achievers and leaders as a group and not to distinguish between corporate careers and biz owners, or is it best to niche down and keep them as secret niches?" Forget about leaders. That word is so vague. There's a lot of people that could consider themselves leaders, and they might not be, and then there's a bunch of people who might not consider themselves leaders, but they are. That word I wouldn't use, and I would use high performance. That's typically the word that a lot of these people use. I know because I've worked with a lot of people in this space. The forensic psychiatrist I work with, he's a high performance person, and he works with the best athletes in the world. He helps them. Some of the greatest of all time people in different fields have worked with him. The word they use is high performance. That's the word I'd use. Forget about it, they might be athletes, you'll work with them. If they're business owners, you'll work with them. They might be military people or firefighters. They might be anything. Forget about what they do and just focus on the high performance because that's the way to group them together. Scott replied back, and he said, "Cloud services equals email, calendar, etc, in the cloud such as G Suite or Office 365. I chose that niche because it's currently a trend that I think offers good potential for growth as well as ongoing income for clients who want someone to manage their accounts." This isn't good reason to do something because you've identified a trend and you think the reason that you should do this is because there is a trend. That generally is not a good thing to do. I would talk to the market and see if they actually want this. See if this solves a problem. This is the confusion you can get yourself into when you don't start with the problem. The problem is ground zero for any good business. You have to start there and then work from there. What you have done here with this cloud thing is it has not started with any problem. It has just started because you saw a trend, that's not a good idea. It has to start with a problem. If you talked to a whole bunch of businesses, and they were crying on the phone to you because this is such a huge problem, sure, now we're talking about something, but not what you have told me. Daniel [inaudible 01:37:15] replied back, and he said, "This is about the logistics question earlier. I do not have experience with logistics company. I was a contracted CFO for a $150 million transportation company, and also my accounting firm manages books and taxes for small to startup transportation companies. My question was more general, if you have ever crossed paths with that industry and best practices to find clients in that niche? Thanks." This is good now that we've got some context. What you don't want to do is show somebody how to start their own logistics company because you don't know how to do that. You know a lot about financials for a logistics. That isn't starting one. It's a whole other thing to start a business and make it successful than it is just to do the books and be the CFO. I wouldn't teach them how to start. What I would teach them how to do though is I think a very valuable course for people in that niche would be how to solve the financial problems that they suffer from in the logistics industry. Forget about people who want to start one, let's just focus on people who already own an existing operational logistics business. That is the niche. You want to start by identifying the problems. You should know what they are because you do their books. The books tell everything. You'll know off the top of your head what plagues these businesses. Probably cash flow decisions. Probably all sorts of stupid things they do financially. Identify those problems and then you could create a training and a course on how to fix those problems and increase profitability in the transportation and logistics industry. Now we're talking. That would be a hot selling course because people would be like, "Well how do you know?" You could say, "Well I was a CFO for $150 million logistics company and for like 10 years I've done the books of thousands of logistics companies." Then they'd be like, "Oh shit, you would." That's how it works. With the starting one, the first question someone's going to be like is, "Have you started one?" You'll be like, "No I haven't." I'll be like, "Well shit, why am I going to listen to you?" It really is that simple in terms of that's how humans think, even if that's not how they articulate it. That's how they're going to be thinking. You want to focus on something that you really know, and it sounds like that's the financial part. That would be a good offer. It sounds cool. Back to Joward, he wrote back to me. This is about the question where he helps recruiters start and grow successful tech recruitment businesses. Forget about start and grow successful tech recruitment businesses. Don't teach them how to do that because you haven't started a successful tech recruitment business. Focus on coaching or whatever, helping recruiters recruit more developers or more technology specialists. I don't know the exact language but do that. Then why you? Why would someone want to work with you? Well you're a developer. You're them. No one would know more than you what the recruiters do wrong when it comes to recruiting you because you're the other side. You know the side that they don't. You're very well poised to offer that advice, and you'd have an in with the people because on their side. You're one of them. You're one of the developers. You know that world. The recruiters don't know that world. You're just pairing the two together. Don't teach them how to start one because you don't know how to do that. Then your other question was that you've talked to some people, and they told you they weren't interested and then you thought maybe this wasn't a good idea, but you've done three. I could do three strategy sessions right now and all three might not bite. Very high chance in that actually happening. Three, dude, that isn't anything. That's not scientific. This was your first three. Your first three. That's even worse. You just need to do more. More, more, more. Don't let your emotions and feelings come into this. It's scientific. It's numbers. How many have you done? You've done three. Who cares how you feel? Do it. Do more. You have to let your logic override your emotion. A lot of the time I feel horrific about doing something, but if the logic and the numbers line up, I'll do it. Michelle says, "I would like to educate on results-based pricing and/or financial literacy for business owners. Do you see a market for this and how would you position it?" This is multiple things wrong with this. First of all, it's not based on any problem, and your language here says I would like to educate people on this, but it's not about you. It's about the market. Then you're asking me if I see a market for me, then I'm not the market. If I was to give you any form of opinion, it would be a lie and a wild guess. My advice for you is to forget about what you want. Forget about what I think. Forget about what anybody thinks. You need to go and talk to the market, and you need to find out what problems they're facing and what things they desperately need. If what they desperately need is what you want to give them, awesome. We're good. You can do it. You have to attach what you want to do with what the market wants. Otherwise, we're preaching to people who aren't interested. We're going to go until 5:00 PM. Again, these Q&A live streams happen every week on Saturday at 3:00 PM eastern time, New York and they until 5:00 PM, so they go for two hours. If you want to get your questions answered in time, make sure you show up early. You can see people like Vanita and stuff have asked me like 50 questions, and I've answered like 50 questions. If you want to get your questions answered, you got to get on here early and put it in your calendar and remember at 3:00 PM. We'll go for about 15 more minutes and then we'll wrap up. [Sophie Mindy 01:44:47], "Hi Sam, how are you doing?" I'm doing good. "I have a question about my niche. Can I say I help singles to prepare you meet your true love? Is it okay to work with women only, single women focused? Can I work with single men as well? What is the best way to do it right from the start? What do you think is the best? What is your opinion for this? Is too much altogether?" You said here, "I can help singles to prepare you to meet your true love." Who just wants to be prepared to do the thing? Imagine if I said the Consulting Accelerator Program will prepare you to make lots of money. You'll be like, "What's the point of preparing if we don't get it?" Talk about the final result, and that makes it way clearer. You help single people meet their true love. Bam. Then the second part of your question was, "Should I work with men or just women?" Well what you do, does it work for both? If it does, do it for both. I honestly think picking one sex is really, really silly a lot of the time because you get biased, and you don't understand things as well because you don't have the holistic view. Think about it like this. This is my take on it, but if you have a specific thing that works remarkably well with women and not with men, then just focus on the woman. If you have to ask the question, "What one should I work with," because is it better to work with one? Only if there's a reason, a very specific reason to work with one. If it works the same for both, work with both, but I always find it's better to work with both because then you understand both sides. If you're helping men meet women, or if you're helping women meet men, then working with both is going to give you all the info you need because you get to see both sides of it. You get to see what the men are hung up with, you get to see what the women are hung up with, and you're trying to get the two together. I mean you've got all the information that's just right in front of your face. That's why with the consulting accelerator, it's for men and women. We pretty much have a 50/50 split. Sometimes it moves a bit. Sometimes it's more women and sometimes it's more men, but on average it's about 50/50. We work with all the age groups. We work with all the countries and stuff because it works the same. Why just isolate on a particular group? Only if there's reason. Richard Norris says, "Hi Sam. I have built a successful property portfolio in 12 months using none of my own money, using a business model that I was taught by a big training company called Legacy Education. I know I can help other people and property investors do the same with the experience and mindset that I had to develop to become financially independent in 12 months, but I feel that there are quite a few people in the marketplace doing similar things. Do you think it is a better idea to dig deeper and find out their specific problems to use to then offer some more [inaudible 01:48:37] and unique solution to them." Never look at the competition. I could have looked at, let's say when I wanted to start doing Consulting Accelerator, I might have looked at the market and been like, well there's Harvard University and there's Stanford University and then there's Oxford University and then there's the London School of eCommerce, and there's a billion other universities. Then there's all of these professors, and then there's Boston Consulting Group and then there's all these other trainings. There's like 400 books on consulting. There's about 20,000 websites on consulting. Shit, it's crowded. Shouldn't do it. Instead, I didn't look at what the competition was or what anything was. I just looked at the market. I could see that there was a massive gaping hole in the market. People didn't know how to get clients. People didn't know how to do things online. People didn't know how to run their business predictably with numbers and systems and machines. People didn't have processes and scripts. People didn't have focus. They didn't have a niche. They weren't pricing right. I saw these problems existing in the market, and so I didn't care what any of the competition was because all I was looking at was the problems. Who cares. The competition obviously doesn't matter if the market has problems. That's the only thing you need to look at. Just take your eyes off them and put your eyes on the market. Talk to them. Find out what they're struggling with, and then help them with that. I'm sure there will be something in there because find me a human that doesn't have a problem. They all do. You're going to be able to find something. Nice. Donald Dang says he's added almost 5,000 people over the past four days. Now he's playing catch-up. "I'm generating leads like nobody's business," so that's some advice. Yeah. You want to go hard Donald Dang, after you've quit university. Get a client. Get a few clients. Todd [Barrett 01:51:04] says, "Aloha." How's it going Todd? Vanita says, "If potential clients offer more than one service, pensions, life insurance, etc, do you just do Facebook ads for the most profitable one service for them? How would you price retainer and ads being for more than one service using Facebook ads?" You got to pick one to start with at least. That's what you do, because it's hard enough to do it for one damn thing. Just find the most profitable one, focus on that. Get it going, and then later if they want to add another one, well sure, come up with another price. Maybe they've got to pay $1,000 more or $2,000 more or whatever you're happy with, but start with one, and don't even talk about doing the second one until the first one's working. Makes it simple. Julia says, "Hey Sam, I quit coffee successfully last January after being so addicted for years, especially during university. I considered creating a program helping people quite coffee. I'm not sure if this is what people want. I'm not sure how to do the market research." Well I'm sure there's people that want to. I don't know, but there's generally people that want to do all sorts of things. There's people that want to quit being addicted to porn, and that's how Hunter started that one. There's people who want to quit being addicted to video games and all sorts of things. I don't know if coffee's one of those ones that people is willing to pay money to get un-addicted to, but I don't know because I'm not addicted to coffee. I would just think this to yourself. Back when you were suffering from coffee addiction, would you have been willing to pay money to someone to help you with it? If that answer is yes, then that's a good hunch to go and find out if more people were in the same position you were back then and if they're willing to pay. If they're willing to pay, now it looks good. Now we should try and sell something to them. A bunch of people are saying, this is in response to the dude that said some guy told him that 80% of LinkedIn accounts were inactive. Dude's tell me that the world's flat sometimes. Doesn't mean that I just immediately think it is. Got to weigh out the facts. Then we've also got Donald here who says he gets a lot of leads from LinkedIn. Joward says 90% of the people he adds on LinkedIn accept his request. LinkedIn works. [Flory 01:54:04] says, "Hi Sam and all. It's early morning down here in Melbourne. How's it going?" Thanks [inaudible 01:54:11]. Patricia. Kyle Cantor, "Sam, if you get this far into the live chat, I called out the marketer give me the 80% inactive statement." Yeah, I don't even care. People say dumb stuff all the time. Doesn't mean we need to get all like gang up on them or anything. You've got to be especially wary of people when they're trying to sell you something, because then of course they're going to believe all of these facts, which make what they're offering you ... Those are the people to watch out for the most. Like I said, the only person I would listen to about LinkedIn would be Reid Hoffman. Carol says, "Sam, you have done a video on flywheel. What is your flywheel? At what stage should we think about it for our business?" I would say when you're making $100,000 a year or maybe even less. Go and look at week seven in the accelerator program. In week seven there's three videos where I talk all about the flywheel and all of the stuff, and I answer your question in a lot of detail in week seven, so go check that out. I'm just reading Adern. "Time to commit?" Yep, I agree. Time to commit. Time to get to work. [Vita 01:55:53] says, "When you are actively creating a new character of yourself, what is the most efficient way to shut out the constant screaming of the old one that's fighting for its survival if it happens to you?" It's just to not think and to just keep doing. Just keep pushing. It's kind of like getting out of the bed in the morning. Of course, you want to stay in bed, because it's way more comfortable. It's nice to sleep in. Then you feel that little feeling you and you're like, "Oh I'll just stay in bed," but then you know that if you do that you're going to lose, and you know you don't want to lose. Then you are just like, "Fuck it, I'm getting up," and then you get up. Once you're up, it's good, but it's the same with going to the gym. No matter how much you think about it beforehand, you're not going to go to the gym by thinking about it. You just got to do it. Get it done, and action drives out thought. Whenever you're taking action, generally thought disappears. You've got to keep at it. Do it. If you're generating strategy sessions and doing them, you're going to be too busy to think about your character screaming at you. You just got to act. It sounds like you've done the academic theoretical part of this. You've designed the character. You know what you need to become and all of this. Now that's the end of that. That exercise was valuable to find out what you need to be and how you need to change, but now the only way to do it is by doing it. You just need to act. I'll do one or two more questions because we're at the end here. Nick Hammond, "Hi Sam, I've started organic outreach. I've done the research and have found my niche's problem. My message has been telling the client about the outcome." Let's see. "Hey Sam, I've started organic outreach. I've done the research, and I've found my niche's, but my message has been telling the client about the outcome and how it benefits them, and how many are very interested but a little skeptical. Since I have no track record, they won't sign up. The niche is social media marketing and networking consultant for musicians. Is this because my message isn't good enough?" Yeah, well something's wrong here because you said, "I've done the research and found my niche's problem," but you didn't tell me what it is. First of all, what is the problem? Then, "My message has been telling the client about the outcome and how it benefits them." What is it? We're talking so abstract here. I'm guessing you're probably being very abstract in talking to them too. Your message can't be there. Surely not. You need to make it real. Talk about realities instead of abstractions. Make it so simple that a four year old could understand it and be like, "Oh that's what it is." Julia [Chas 01:59:18] says, "Hi Sam, after doing several one on one coaching, I've decided that my ideal niche and offer is helping millennial parents kill overwhelm and simplify their life. Parents with kids ages zero to 10, is this too generic? Do you think I should have a more specific stage for the children's age group? I've only had female clients, moms, but I would like to work with men, dads, as well. Not sure if I'm being too generic. Would appreciate your feedback." I think you've just got to identify the part of the niche that has the most present problem. If you found that all parents with kids ... I don't really know that much about this because I don't have kids. You've got to just find out whether the nature of the problem changes when the kids are more than 10. I guess it does because teenagers are very different to babies and toddlers. You probably just want to find the attributes that cluster people together with a similar problem. It'll probably be early state parents or people who have just become parents. They've got children or whatever and they're struggling to be efficient and they're overwhelmed. I can see how that would definitely be a problem, but I think it would be too broad to say you'd help all parents because there's parents with 18 year olds, the nature of the problem is totally different." You're the expert on this because you've been doing it. Find out that cluster and what really bonds those people together. If the problems are all universal within this cluster then focus on that. I'm sure this would be a problem. Having family and children is a huge thing. It has to be a problem, and it has to be something people are willing to pay money for. I think it's definitely a good start. You just need to do a bit more research in there. We are now at 5:00. If you asked a question, and I didn't answer it, then you need to show up earlier next time. We do these calls every single week on Saturdays at 3:00 PM Eastern time New York. If you want to ask me a question, then go to your calendar right now, put it in that 3:00 PM next Saturday there's going to be a call. Put a reminder there. Then show up at 3:00 PM, because if you do, you'll be able to ask like 50 questions and get answers. We're going to wrap this one up now. Thanks everyone for attending. Just click that like button if you enjoyed this, if you found it valuable. Just let me know. Like I said, our next one's going to be next Saturday, 3:00 PM. If you've got any questions in the meantime, you can use the Facebook group and then we've got the Q&A calls happening every week with Hauser and Jesse and all that. Thanks everyone for attending, and I'll speak to you next week.

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