Consulting.com
Consulting.com
 

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A 03/09/19

Consulting Accelerator Livestream Q&A 03/09/19

Summary


Consulting Accelerator livestream Q&A call recording from March 9th, 2019.

Want to learn more about Consulting Accelerator?

Click here to get a FREE TRIAL!

Transcript / MP3

00:00
/
00:00
And see a few people jumping on here. Josh Westover, thanks for confirming audio and video is working good. Awesome. Well, if it's your first time on one of these calls, welcome, uh, how these calls go is I do one of them almost every single Saturday and they happen on Saturdays at 3:00 PM eastern time. There's the time in New York and you can just put it in your calendar to repeat every Saturday, 3:00 PM eastern time. And we go for two hours. So three to five. And what you do is you just ask questions in the comments box and then I just go through one by one sequentially and we just do Q and a and hang out for an hour, hour, two hours. So that's how it goes. And please, when you type your question mate them a clear and concise and don't like, just give me a huge block of text, right? Because I will have to just skip over that because I need to go through and answer other people's questions too. So please be clear. Okay. So Nick Krantz of it says, do you think it's a good idea to create a Facebook ad or group post in a survey or poll format? Where I ask you is is about the main problems within my niche? Anyone done that successfully? I think at group post in a survey or poll format is a really bad research tool because for one you're stating the options, right? And then that's already biased. You, the best thing about research is open ended questions. We're, that's where the, that's where the really good insights come from, not when there's just people are choosing from predefined options. So I think that the Facebook polls are terrible. They don't reflect reality at all. And more than that, there's a feedback loop present with them, which creates a massive bias. We're by pretty much, as soon as one becomes popular, one of the options becomes popular and more people are likely to select that one and it rises to the top and it gets real Bergen. So it's just not, it's not an accurate experiment. Uh, it's not real research. So no, I don't think that's a good idea. I think a Facebook ad, not a good idea. And then a group post in a survey, uh, in a, in a poll format. No, not a good idea. I think what could be a good idea though, it would be a Facebook ad saying that you're doing some research, are you in this niche and you could do a giveaway where you give away a prize for people answering some questions, uh, or you could pay them like a certain amount of money or give them a certain prize, like an Amazon voucher or something for answering the questions. I mean that could work because that would be a good way to get in front of the people you want to get in front of and ask them some questions and exchange something in return. But not so much. The other ones, what you could do in a Facebook group has post in there and just say you're doing some research and ask people a question and then get them to write their answer. Open ended. It's not from a predefined sit open ended just in the comment section and then you could scroll through there and get a good idea. The key is to have it open ended. Gabriel legacy you see is what is your best advice to handle worrying and it remuneration about future events, especially at wake up time. So it's important to just get going, right? Like if I was to wake up first thing in the morning and just lie there and think, then it would be pretty depressing because you know your at first thing in the morning you're like, oh I don't want to get up or I want to go back to sleep or I've got all of this work to do. You can't let your mind just start going around like at that time in the morning and just got to get up and get going. And so that's why I liked to go to the gym as soon as I wake up, put on my gym gear downstairs, gym. And by the time I'm sweating, you know now my chemicals in my body and my brain and everything that they've, they've fired up. You know, like when you first wake up in the morning and you're not, you're not right to, your brain isn't warmed up, your body isn't warmed up. Like you need to just get going. I think one of the best things to do is exercise in the morning. It really, it really just puts you into a bit of mood. So Toby clients is, how do you get the most out of the books you read, do you underline or highlight words or sentences? Do you make notes or are you just reading some paragraphs? Then taking a break to think about it? Um, yeah, so what I do as I like to read physical books. All right, like I literally have one right here, physical book. And the reason why I like physical books is because they are, they like the physical and I can underline them and write things in the margins and things like that. And I'll show you what that looks like. I'll just show you a book that I've marked up. So okay, I'll give you a perfect example. Here we go. See how these underlining and the circling and arrows, right? This is what I like to do. I like to mark up the book and you know, I do that quite a lot. And so that's why I like physical books. I find when I read the book and it's physical and then I also underline it and circle things and write things in the margins, I find that my retention and comprehension of the concepts and things taught in the book is much higher. And it's, it's like it's night and day compared to say a kindle or the worst I think is an audio book. Like an audio book doesn't, I swear I've listened to some audio books and I can't even remember what was in the book at all. Like audio books, they're like a lazy, a lazy option and you just do not get the same comprehension. You do not get the same, uh, the same retention. And in the worst part I think about audio books is that you can't refer back to them. Like, because you've just got this, there's audio book that's virtual online or on your phone or something, but with a physical book, it's in your shelf. So, you know, whenever you, uh, faced with a problem or a certain circumstance, you can go over to your bookshelf and you can look at the books and you can, it's clearly categorized. You can be like, Aha, I remember that book. I remember reading that. Then you pick it up and then you go through it and then you can see the different things you've, you've underlined and circled and those are the key points. So it's more longterm thinking to read physical books and to mark them up and underline them and then to store them in a bookshelf. Right, because you're not just thinking about, now you're thinking about in the future, like how are you able to recall that and categorize it and find particular parts of that information at a time later in the, in the future. And with an audio book, you just can't do that because one, you're going to forget that you read it. And then if, let's say you're faced with a problem, you're not able to just look at your bookshelf, right. And then let's say that for some reason you were able to remember that you had read this audio book and then you pull it up and now you're looking for the key points in it, which you just can't find because it's damn audio, right? So that's what I do. I read the physical book, mark it up, and then typically what I do is at the end of reading the book, I will open up a Google doc, like a, a Google doc, uh, and then I will type the title of the book. And that's the name of the file. And then what I'll do is I'll just put bullet points down and I'll flick through the book at the key points that I underlined and circled. And I will just add those as bullet points. And that's like the, the key things that I extracted from that book. So once I've finished reading a book, I have the physical copy categorized in my bookshelf, it's marked up and underlined, and I've got like the 80 20 summary extracted in a Google doc. Right? So I do all of that. Um, and that's how you retain the most. Okay. Peter Wickstrom sees in order to increase cash flow, I've looked at a deal with a payment service that would offer my clients a 12 month payment plan with no interest. I would receive the whole summit minus 2.85% plus bed. Do you think it's a good deal? Um, potentially. I'm not sure. I've never done this or never really looked into it. Uh, I would look for other use cases. I can tell you that, you know, we don't do any kind of like, Any type of finance or dealing with a payment service thing. I mean, we do offer payment plans and you can offer people payment plans, but we don't deal with any of that other stuff. And our cashflow is fine and we still get plenty of customers if, you know, if you can't get customers, it's, it's not necessarily because you're not offering people credit. It's probably because there's something that isn't right with the business and you want to fix that instead of trying to just, you know, put a bandaid on it by offering people credit. Joshua whist overseas. I've been building out Facebook's golden mean to prepare for ads and choir. My potential audience reach is coming out as 45 million and you recommend 20 million in the training. My Tower of Babel is 1.1 million in size with 4 million monthly active people just in the U S which I plan to target first. Do you think my tower of Babel is too large and what should I use for affinity audiences? What would you recommend is the best way for me to get my audience reached down to 20 million? Uh, I think what it's showing is here in choir. I think, I don't know if that will be what it actually is. Once it's in Facebook, I would just launch, launch it as it is now. Don't get too hung up about it and see how it goes. Just just launch it, put it live. See what happens. Chris Mccarthy is what does robot to do on vacation? Well, I, what do I do? I mostly like read. If a, if I got to choose what I, what I did, I'd read books or just go for a swim or hang out on the beach. Um, but I just pretty happy reading books and then, um, my wife will typically want to do all of these different things. Like she would, she'll want to go to all of these different places for like breakfast, lunch, dinner. So we do all of that and then she'll want to do some different activities and she'll typically go out and play all of that. Sometimes I want to do activities, but I'm not much of a site see it. So I don't really like just going around and looking at things. I prefer to do something like, uh, what's an example? You know, like if it's jet skiing or if it's some type of thing where I get to do it, then it's fine. Or snowmobiling, which we did recently or skiing. I like those, but I don't, I'm not a big fan of just sightseeing. Casey us is, I have sent out 170 outreach emails. The open rate is pretty good at around 30% but I do not have any strategy sessions. What do you recommend to do? I help family lawyers to get more customers through digital marketing and sales process. 170 outreach emails. The open rate is pretty good, but I do not have any strange decisions. Yep. So just keep going, you a few things could be happening here. One, you could just have not reached out to enough people to, you might need to hit them up more than one time. So maybe send them an email or wait two or three days, send them another email. Right, right. Uh, yeah. Another thing is that you might not just have been doing it for long enough, so keep going consistently for a longer period of time. And then as you start to collect feedback, you might need to iterate your message a bit and that might change things and all of those things could be going on. You just need to do more of it. John would see. Is it, will you hire in house recruiters or will you always rely on external specialists? Recruit recruiters. Do you think at some point you will see the need, uh, to have an in house team to do this? It consulting.com. So yeah, I think eventually, like we will need a in house recruiters, I'm sure we will still use, uh, outside recruiters. But basically what we have is our process. It looks like, you know, we've got about seven different recruiters that we use the, you say all of these recruiters and then what they do is they all feed in applicants into like our system. And then we have like a, a process that comes along like this. Yeah. And maybe you can't see any of that. And then this might be like a 30 minute phone screen. Well, actually the first thing we do is we would scrape their resume. So this one would be like a resume screen. Then we do a 30 minute phone screen, and then we would do a, uh, one hour like technical call where we would assess their, like, technical abilities. So let's say they're, you know, if they are a media buyer, then we would assist the technical understanding of statistics of probabilities of uh, you know, how to use excel and different formulas and things like that. And also their understanding of, you know, how to analyze data and all of that. Uh, here, we just looking to make sure that they're like that this smart in it and they've, they're, they're like worth talking to it. We're just making sure they're there. We're talking to. So we might drop out a lot of people here at this point, we're seeing that like location works and that, uh, why they are interest in working with us. And also, um, we're trying to assist them and their philosophy and how they think. So like is there thinking clean? Are they, how good are they at like observing things and how good are they at a finding causality and different things here. And we basically making sure that they're smart, they've got clean thinking and they don't have any issues and they're, um, the location works and that they're a good fit for our culture and team. Then here we're ceasing technical ability on the phone. And then if all of that goes well, then we'd give them a four hour like test. And this is like a, a technical test. So they would choose a time and a date that they do it and then we email it to them and then they've got four hours to send it back to us. And this is a real, here we're just doing a technical kind of assessment on the phone. But here we actually, we give them a real practical test that's reflective of what they're going to experience, like in the real world doing the job. And then if they pass this, which almost no one does, and we would do a two hour in person and here they would come into the office, meet the team and hang out with us. And uh, basically we would see what it's like to work with them and see if we get long. And then from there we would decide with the, uh, we wanted to hire them or not. And then there would be an offer and then hire. Yeah. So that's how perverse is. Now we use recruiters right now, like we've got about seven of these to feed the pipeline because no one who comes in from a job board is going to be good enough. Like so you know, typically you would post a job ad on, I dunno like indeed or monster or some crap like that, right? Like those people wouldn't have a chance. So we have to go to recruiters and they source the talent and then they feed the men here. And then we're getting at the point now where this pot, all the, this pot here of the pipeline. So the resume screening and the 30 minute phone call. This piece is getting really intense. Like you know, we might have to do 30 30 of these calls like a week and they say that if we do 30 of those calls and we'd probably need 60 resumes coming through and to dose 30 30 minute calls a week and grade 60 resumes a week and the communication that goes along with that, this is pretty much a full time job here now. And so because this has now become a full time job, I'm thinking I'm probably going to hire someone to be an in house, a technical recruiter and they will manage this piece and also interface with the other recruiters. So it's not like by hiring this one that we're actually going to not need these. This person's main job is to communicate and, and give feedback to these people based on like the outcome of that. So his feedback and then so these people can optimize what's going on and also to handle the, the, uh, the load that's coming through the front of the pipe. And so yeah, that answers your question. But this is also helpful for people. Like when you start thinking about hiring, you don't need to have a process this intense. Like we only did, like at first when we were hiring people, we would just post in the consulting accelerator Facebook group and we'd just be like, hey, we're hiring. Do you want a job? And people would apply. And we actually got really good hires from there. For example, Nick Hauser, community manager, Jesse Clark, general manager, uh, Rhett Coots, who's, who started in support, then became my personal trainer and it's like living with me and helped me with nutrition and all of that. Then started helping with social media, then started doing sales calls and now he's like, how top sales rep, uh, all of those people came from the Facebook group and we didn't have a process like this. I hired Rhett without even meeting him in person. Because what happens is in the beginning, you don't need specialized senior like technical talent. You're mostly looking for really hungry young people who are hungry to learn and they're willing to get across all sorts of different things. And then, you know, those are the first people you hire because they learn how all of these different things work and they're willing to do anything. And the work that needs to be done isn't that intense. But once you start needing technical people or more like senior people who have 10 years or more experience and really refined technical expertise in different areas, that's when you start to need to form something like this. There's two stages of hiring, really. There's the, you know, just getting an initial team of generalists together and growing with them. And then once you've done that and you've got enough people in there, it's about like hiring good managers and good technical people and that's very difficult to do. And that's when you need a whole process like this. So let's keep going. Jeremy Jane's Sears question. I'm working with a sales person that desires more clients in your training. You say not to touch Facebook if I don't, proof of concept. So how would I go about getting clients for them and how would I monitor if my efforts are working for them? Yeah, so I say not to touch a Facebook yourself personally if you haven't got a proof of concept and got there at least one to three paying clients, right? However, if you are helping, if you are helping a client to get clients right, then that means that you have a client. And so then this, this thing that I talked about, you're helping your client get clients with Facebook, right? So you're looking to see if your client has a proof of concept, like does your client have at least three paying clients? If your client doesn't have at least three paying clients, then your client doesn't have a high probability of succeeding with Facebook ads, right? And so you're looking at it from the wrong perspective. Like you want to see if your client has a proof of concept and you're looking for the fractal patterns present in your clients and data sets not in yours. Andrew Lam says, love your cause. Question, I plan to hire our Facebook ads manager. Do I need to set up a contract when hiring them? How much should I pay them monthly? Yeah, so this first of all, if you're going to like, if you're going to hire a Facebook ads manager, I recommend do it yourself first, right? Like it is. There is almost no one out there that knows how to do Facebook ads properly. And if you don't know how to do it yourself, you are not going to know how to identify who knows what the fuck they're talking about and you're going to get taken for a real ride and you need to learn how to do it. Honestly, like I've never seen it work well when someone doesn't really know what's going on in the need to hire someone who they think they know that this person knows what they're doing, but they never do because this person can't see it. It's like this other person's in a different dimension and this person can't see that dimension. It just, it blows up. It's, it's a spectacular disaster and you, I highly recommend doing it yourself first. You've got the training, I show you what to do if you just follow the training and consulting accelerator in like week five. Um, if you, if you truly follow that, watch all the videos, take all the action items and do it, you will be better than most of the people out there that call themselves Facebook ads experts. And that is what you should do. And honestly, you should be doing your own ads up until the point that you're making like a hundred grand a month or more because pretty easy to do. And so if you're making more than a hundred grand a month and you want to hire someone to do your ads, sure, then you should join up level. Uh, and you can learn more about uplevel level by going to week seven in accelerator. And then an up level, we show you how to hire a Facebook ads manager, how to train them, and also how to manage them. And it you want to home grow somebody. So you want to find somebody who's good, who's got rule brain horsepower when it comes to quantitative analysis. So you want to find somebody like who's fresh out of college or something from a background, from a, like a course in statistics or a course in, um, like economics or supply chain analysis, some form of, of quantitative analysis. Because if someone's good at statistics, so supply chain analysis or economics and they've got a really strong analytical quantitative mind, there'll be good at statistics, uh, excel probabilities. Um, they will be re, they'll have the roar components that will make them great and then you just need to teach them and you'll know how to teach them because you know yourself. You can teach them the strategy and the platform and the ins and outs of that. And then they will learn through experience and from your guidance. And also they will have that raw intellectual horsepower. And when you combine those three elements together, you'll have somebody that is very dangerous and you'll have somebody that is so much better than anybody else out there that calls themselves a Facebook ads expert. They would annihilate anybody that calls himself a Facebook ads expert. But you want to find someone who is quantitative in, knows like raw statistics and things you, most people who call themself Facebook ads experts, they're creative extroverts that know how to get attention and persuade. That is not a Facebook ads expert and ads experts into persuasive, extroverted, charismatic person who's very social and also, uh, the considers themselves good at Facebook ads. That's not what you're looking for. You're looking for the other side of it, which is raw. A quantitative, intellectual horsepower. Adrian, some more seeds. Should I go to university? I'm in my last year of high school and I'm paralyzed with this decision. I do fine in school but I hate it. I feel like I'm wasting time then. It totally depends what you want to do, right? If you, if you're 100% sure that you want to be an entrepreneur and then it, you should just get started with your own business, don't go to university. Right. And it fully just depends on what you want to do. If you want to be a lawyer, then okay, probably good idea to go to university because that's probably the best path right now. Um, and then if you want to, if you want to be a doctor, probably a good idea. Dentists probably a good idea, but then you know, if it's something, if you want to be an entrepreneur and start your own company, then it's not a very good idea. The training there is not the best for how to do that. The real world is a much better teacher. Okay. Andrew Lam sees or would there be another group outside of your course? I went to hire an experienced baseball ads manager for my niche and nutritionists and Dietitians. Okay. Yeah. Just I, I think you asked that question before I gave my answer. So just do what I see. Nick Krantz said, when we are working on creating our VSL and Facebook heads, what is the priority of Alan tensions? One, persuade believers of the problem that I have the best solution or convert natural or neutral thinkers or those who are on the fence into believers. Okay. Yeah. So all you're doing with the VSL, well with the Facebook ads, you're just trying to first of all, get the person who you're supposed to talk to his attention, get their attention first. That's done through the image and the headline and the first few, the first one and two lines of the body copy. Get the attention first. Then it's to keep their attention and to talk about the problem. So they're like, oh, I have this problem. And then talk about, uh, like the nature of it. So they're like, oh wow, this person really understands it. And then to talk about like the solution to it. So the person is like, Oh wow, this guy knows what he's talking about. This is good information. I want more. And then you go with the call to action. So if you'd like to learn more, Dah, Dah, Dah, Dah, then click here to get free training and the person's like, okay, he's earned it. Click comes to landing page. Then you're just trying to get the optin. So you're repeating the headline again, you're teasing the main points of the information and then you're asking for the email and then they opt in. And then once they've opted in, you just want them to watch the video and the video should provide them more detail on the problem. Why it is a problem, the nature of the problem, why no one has solved the problem, and then the solution and why it's different. And then once you've done that, it's call to action and you're getting them to apply for a strategy session. That's what you're trying to do, Dave Anansi is do you believe in today's Internet marketing space being less salesy, then everyone else gives one a huge competitive advantage given they have better products and results? Yeah. Well I think if you look at, like if you look at the history of pretty much of everything in business, the company that always wins over the long term is the one that has like the best product and the best team. But not only that, they, it's not enough to just have the best product because you could have the best product, but be totally financially irresponsible and run out of money and go bankrupt, right? So you have to have the best product and good people on your team, and you also have to sell that product to generate money. And you have to watch the numbers to make sure that you're not losing money and make sure that you're making money. If you can do those things, then you'll win. Uh, and I think that it's a balance. Like you don't want it to not be salesy at all because the way to do that would be to never sell anyone ever. So you have to do some sales. It's important to sell people stuff because that's what you need to do. But at the same time, you don't want to be over salesy because then you just look sleazy and you'll be burning most of your energy just trying to sell shit instead of building great stuff. So it's a balance. I sit more on the side of like the product, like if there's two extremes on the continuum and you've got like, let's say you've got product here, sales here. I sit. So I said product here, sales here. Um, I sit pretty much like towards the product side, but not so jammed on the product side that I totally forget about selling things and making money and all of that. It's, it's a balance. Rhea says I'm having trouble producing my first 30 strategy sessions. So far I've only produced 10 over a course of six weeks. So far, I've seen two of a 300 outreach emails, 17 blog post accompanied with videos, bumble matches, et cetera. I'm running out of options to produce sessions quickly. We'd like your advice on how to speedily producing strategy sessions. Yeah, so if you've done 300 outreach emails over six weeks and you've only generated a 10 strategy sessions, I would try doing more like more outreach emails in. Also try reaching out to people on Linkedin, Facebook and things like that. Tried the social channels as well. You might get a higher response rate. Cricinfo says Facebook keeps a mistake. Question. It just went past. Ask it again please.Okay, Dave and answers. Do you get worried at all if you see clones of you on the Internet trying? No, I don't. It's, it's like it's so much more than what it looks like. Like a lot of people might think, oh, that's just, oh, just make a product like, like Sam's and then make a funnel like Sam's and then run some ads. I, it's just a product, some funnel and some ads. Right. And how hard can that be? Well, yeah, from like the outside it doesn't look too hard but it's like quite a lot of work and I think it's the thing that got the thing that acts as a moat, like most of the time is just the sheer amount of work that it takes to, to actually do it. I mean there's, there's a lot of work that's involved and it's taken me a long time and a lot of self discipline and drive and determination to do it. And so that x is the moat and a lot of these people that just copy you and then try, they have a go at it. They're like fly by night people. They're trying to make a quick buck but it, they won't make a quick buck because the game that, you know, the game that I'm playing is like long term and I push everything in the, in like the marketing, the advertising and everything to be quite razor thin. So it's very hard to come in and take and get it and make a quick buck because I've taken that market right down to where the margins are quite razor thin. And so like it, it's going to be very hard. And that doesn't mean that no one can do it. Of course someone could do it. But the main thing that acts as a moat is the difficulty because most people aren't willing to give it everything. And that's basically the only thing that, that I, I know protects me quite a lot. It's just copycat clones. They're not going to put in as much as I have because if someone copies someone and they don't care about that thing as much as that original person did, how someone like beat someone else is by coming up with something that truly they love and it's their creation and then that person's dangerous because they're willing to put everything right. But that really happens when someone just emulate someone else and tries to make a quick buck. The people who are dangerous and the people who I would worry about like truly other ones that have fully committed come up with something unique and like game changing and go all in and a hungry and determined and they're willing to pay it, play the long game and they don't care about making a quick buck. Those are the people I'd worry about. Not the people who copy stuff. Daniel Buddha says, what happens when my company grows? I'm the face of the company and customers want to talk to me, not to my team. Should I just simply sit to the expectations up front and to tell them that you can contact me x hours a month or that you can have more hours? Okay. Yeah. Don't, don't worry about this because first of all, your company has to grow before you even need to worry about this, so right now you just want to keep the main thing, the main thing, which is just getting more customers, just grow it. Don't worry about hypothetical things in the future, like what you're doing right now. As you're thinking of something out into the future, you're then thinking that you know what it's going to be like when you don't cause you can't even predict tomorrow, let alone the future. And then your then worrying about something which is wrong. And then based on that false delusion and the worry about the false delusion you were coming back to now and making a strategic decision and changing things now based on something that's false in the future. And you shouldn't do that, there's a really bad idea. You should just focus on getting more customers and growing. And when you get to that stage, I think you'll find that it is quite different than what you had imagined it. And then you can react to that when it's there. Nick [inaudible] says what questions to ask and a 15 minute chat. Um, you just basically ask the questions. Actually people ask this all the time. I'm pretty sure we have an article on this 15 minute, Chad, I'm just seeing if I've got it here. All right, here we go. Yeah, I'm tired of US answering this questions that you can just read this. Oh, perfect. Someone has added it. Good. Someone asked that question again. Let's just keep posting it thing so I don't have to repeat myself. Uh, what's next Sconda a most is how do you remember what you read and learned? Do you have a process? Yeah, I answered that question earlier. Uh, nick [inaudible] does living in the country where my market is, make me more credible or doesn't, or it doesn't really matter. I think it, I think at like probably helps a little bit. So a lot of the time I think it's best to start in the local market that you're in because you understand it better. You're a local there and all of that, right? Plus Facebook also has a bias for giving local, um, local businesses in the local market a unfair advantage against international because it's trying to promote that sort of stuff, right? So if I'm a New Zealander in New Zealand using New Zealand dollars on New Zealand time trying to advertise via Facebook ads to New Zealanders, then I'm going to get better, uh, prices and things. However, if I'm an American, uh, with a mirror and located in America with uh, eastern time and USD, it's going to be more expensive for me over there. It has these types of dynamics to it. So I do recommend starting with your local market. However, if your local market is impossible to start, and for example, let's say you're in like a third world country and you have this really valuable skill that is needed in the United States and no one in your third world country needs what you have truly objectively, then of course, yes, break the rule, go and market to the United States and deal with the shitty time zone conversions live. John says, do you have suggestions on how to get more strategy session calls? Since I'm looking for school parents whose child does not thrive in school, I can mainly apply for Facebook and partly on Linkedin. When I daily invite 20, I get consent from one to two. This week I was only able to start a dialogue with two parents. Yeah. Maybe I would post like on your own personal Facebook profile and try that out. Like try posting some things because the thing is so many parents, there are so many parents in the world that have children that are at school. All right, so your market is, it's not real specific where we can't use their own personal network to tap into it, so I would just try that because you need some warm referrals and then from there the people you start talking with, they can refer you to other people and you can start to map through the network that way Daniel Bu dice is. Do you think it's possible to outsource the done for you service to a team with the testing and learning part would be great to have a team that could improve our service by time while I do the sales and marketing job of the company. Do you think it is possible to outsource the done for you service to a team with the testing and learning part would be great to have a team who could improve our service by time while I do the sounds of marketing or coming, no. Like I do think it's worth doing yourself first. Like, I seriously recommend to that because one, you just said you're going to have to do the sales and marketing job for your company. If you know how to do it for your company, you'll know how to do it for their company. If you outsource that to someone else, they probably don't know how to do that for themselves. That's why they have, that's why they've got you as a client. And so, but now they're responsible for doing for your client the thing that they can't do for themselves. Therefore they're not going to wear it. Be able to do it for their client, for your client and see, see how this works, right? So it, if you can do it for yourself, your best equipped to do or for your clients, and then when you've totally maxed yourself out and mastered it and got a proof of concept and, uh, like workflow that that is optimized, then you can start to find some young hungry people, hire them as full time employees and train them and then get them to deliver it for you. And then you can improve. That's the best way to do it. I don't, I'm not a fan of outsourcing things that are mission critical. Like that's your company man. That's your service delivery. If you're outsourcing there, what do you have? Indigo middle says I'm wavering on message. Never quite feeling like I nailed it. How long do I wait for proof of concept before I can start tweaking my message? Yeah, it's always going to be changing and moving a little bit. I mean provided these things never really changed though. What is the niche? So people, uh, let's, I'll use an example here. Let's say what, who is the niche? Well, it's people who have a fear of flying, right? Then what is their problem? Will they've got a fear of flying? What is the solution? Well, it would be them not having the fear of flying, right? Those three elements, who problem solution, those three elements don't change the object oriented things that do not change. And what does change is just the language and the words that you string together to try to explain the combination of those three objects, right? So yes, you're going to be tweaking the hell out of your message, but are you really going to be changing around these objects that often? No. Maybe if the objects are wrong, yes, you've got to change them around a bit. But if it's just the wording of, of your message that is changing like that, that's, that happens a lot. Joshua waste overseas. Uh, I saw, uh, the discussion about the copycat guy in the group who's even copied your blue suit. I looked at his webinar and it also called seven steps to seven figures, like one of yours look so dodgy. Do you consider it an issue at all? No, I don't. I am, I'm happy like, because I would like, I, it's just, it's funny like to watch and I mean I would like to compete with him and I'd like to watch how long he lasts for before he just gives up. Okay. Like he's, I'm not even remotely concerned because I, like I said before, the, the thing I would be concerned about is if someone came up with something new and radically different and innovative and this other than what I've got and they were hungry and they seem to be, you know, they seem to have a completely different paradigm that I can't even comprehend, but somehow it's working better and now I'm terrified. Right. That is what I would be worried about. But if someone just makes a shitty version of what I've got and like why would I be worried about that Marco Austin is I'm helping nutrition coaches to get more clients with Facebook ads. I try to use some kind of fragmentation funnel to get them strategy sessions with uh, with $1,500 ad spend per month. What if they do not have a offer more than one k? Can this funnel still be profitable? It might be. You've got to try it. Like I do recommend having a price that's up around one k or more, but if they don't give it a go, see what happens. You can always try it. Mottos says, my niche, a wealthy CEO wanting to invest their funds and capital markets to keep it primarily safe, liquid and increase its value. My question, how to gain trust in this field if I don't have any testimonials from it, niche participants, France market is extremely careful and there's no way anybody would invest with me just for free without trust. Risking his own money introduced it as, yeah. Well, that's a good question and you should know the answer to that because like do you, you should know, like if you don't have testimonials from people that have invested money with you and you've done that, that thing for them, then you should have an example of your own investments proving your strategy, right? If you don't, if you haven't invested yourself and you have no proof for yourself and you don't have any proof doing it for other people and all you have is a theory and you're wanting people to risk their money with you on a theory, then yeah, it's not going to work. You need to get some proof somehow. Do it yourself first. Use yourself as the Guinea pig. That's the best way to do it. Albert Louis is a client comes to me for how they are a health and supplement manufacturer. Facebook even rejects them opening an account three times. And the reason for is for the nature of the business. Do you think I should take it? Any strategies? Probably not. Like it looks like trouble. If there'd been rejected from Facebook three times, I wouldn't, I probably wouldn't do it because the chances are you're just going to get, they're going to get rejected again and again and you're going to spend your time like just creating new accounts. It's going to suck. Holly Gene Cincy is, does nick, how's the JC Clark, Rick Coats, et Cetera, have ownership in consulting.com I love everything they're doing. But what's the thought process to work under you rather than the owner business? It's a good question. And so in the beginning, no, they didn't have any ownership at all. They started on very like low salaries. I'm pretty sure all of them started on $50,000 a year working full time with no commissions and no equity, no stock, nothing. They were, um, that's how they all started. They're not on those salaries anymore, but they all started there. And the reason why they wanted to work here is to learn. I mean, they thought we'll, I'll get paid money, so that's good. And also I'll get to learn a lot of things. Right. I would, the main reason a lot of people come work here is to learn. And then once they get bitter, right, you've got to make sure that the company can stretch them because otherwise if they get better and they learn and they can't keep learning and keep getting better, then of course they're going to leave. So, you know, Nick Hauser went from, um, he started in community management, then he started doing the Q and a calls and now he's gone and done customer interviews. And he also does a little bit of sales calls and strategy sessions and things. And he works over different parts of the business now. So he's taken on more responsibility. His salary's gone up, he gets commissioned on some things and then writ, he, uh, you know, he went and we, he became like my personal trainer who was doing social media. You've got a little bit of a pay rise when we did that. And then he moved into doing sales calls and now he gets commission on the sales calls. So he's making quite a lot more now. Um, for example, in January he sold $350,000 worth of products for us as a company. Now he gets 10% commission. So it's like $34,000 in a month. Right? There's quite a lot of money that, and so, you know, he, he makes good money and he's learning and we're stretching and still same with houses, same with Gac, same with all of them. And so, you know, that that is why they keep staying. But also we are doing a stock options this year, so we're, we are going to give them a percentage of equity in the company, uh, for all of our key team members. So to get people in the beginning, the main draw is just to learn and then to keep people, you have to make sure that they continue to learn because if someone doesn't continue to learn, then they're not going to want to stay. But also you have to keep challenging them and you have to make sure that the reward they get keeps increasing because they deserve it. Yeah, Tom Tidwell's is generalist and specialist. I'm scared of becoming a jack of all trades, master of none with the strategy. When you say generalist and specialist, I'm assuming with regards to business, you mean master of mental models and become multidisciplinary. However, I'm really struggling with deciding what to specialize in with business. Uh, I thought about marketing, et Cetera. Do you have an institution's? Yeah. So what I mean by that is this isn't a good question. So what I mean by that is you want to pick a niche, right? Let's say this is accountants. You want to pick a niche, accountants, you should be interested in this niche. They know you want to find a problem, isn't it? Chairs, niche problem. And then you want to identify the ideal like solution by the perfect solution, right? So now you thoroughly understand this niche and you're interested in that. You've, you clearly understand the problem and you've thought about what the solution would be. Right now you want it to be a specialist in this, your specialist in this niche, you're a specialist in this problem. You're a specialist. And the solution that is what you're an absolute specialist. And because you are not going to learn all of these different niches and all of their different problems and all of the different solutions, you're this just impossible, right? But here's where it gets interesting because to solve this problem for this niche and help them get the solution, you actually need to know quite a lot of things, right? So let's say along this path we've got, um, along this path we might have mindset, it might be sales, there might be some marketing, they might be some like a data slash. Matrix. Slash. Accounting. They might also be some like fundamentals and frameworks, right? So in order to help someone get from here to here in this specific niche, you might need to know about a few things about mindset and typical like typical, um, mental and psychological issues for people within that niche that inhibit them from getting that solution. Like that's big for entrepreneurs because entrepreneurs always having mental issues. And then sales, you need to know a little bit about that. How are they going to do the sales calls? Marketing will like, maybe it's some finals, maybe it's Google ad words, maybe it's Facebook ads, right? And so in order to actually be like an your an expert and you're a specialist on the niche, the problem and the solution, that's your specialist thing. And then in order to actually solve the problem for them, you need to be a generalist. All right? Because you need to know all the different parts. But we're not just learning everything for the sake of learning in everything. We are only learning the things that are critical to achieve the solution for the niche, right? So it looks like this, it's like t-shaped. So you've got very deep specific knowledge when it comes to the niche. Bye. You've got general knowledge when it comes to like the, um, what would we call this, like work to be done. Alright, so that is what you want to become. I'll give you an example of this. May I help people start and grow a business, right? And so when it comes to this niche, I know a shit load about it. Like I've talked to so many of, of the people who are trying to do this, I've done it myself and I've looked in at the psychological elements of it. I've looked through history and how people have done it. I've looked at all of the information and courses and books and everything out there. I've looked at a lot of the like, um, false beliefs and the prevailing biases and the delusions and all this stuff. So I've gone absolutely like, you know, forensic detail on this. But then if we look at the accounting niche, I don't really know that much about the accounting niche at all. Andrew Argue knows a lot about the accounting niche way more than I do. He could tell you, he could speak to for days or weeks on end about all the ins and outs that accountants face. All the problems with accounting. He knows that niche better than anyone else. I know, I know this niche better than Andrew, but he knows that and it'd be the mean. That's where we're specialized. But when it comes to like the generalist kind of things here, you know, Andrew knows about mindset specific to accountants. He also knows about sales and marketing, data metrics, accounting fundamentals. That's what you want to do. It's like you have to be a specialist on your niche. You don't want to be a generalist niche person like, oh, I do. Um, I do everything for everyone. Like you don't want to be a generalist there, but you can't use that same thinking for, oh well I don't want to be a generalist and what I'm doing because like accountants need to get clients. But, and I'm going to put the accounting niche, but I'm only going to help them with Facebook ads because if I helped them with more things other than Facebook ads, then I'm going to be a generalist. You have to learn more than Facebook ads. If all you know is Facebook ads and you're the best in the world are there and you're just trying to help accountants, it's not going to work. We're just looking for the minimum number of elements that we can combine together to achieve an outcome for a particular niche. Right, and it just so happens that there's never really one element. There's always a few and that's where the generalist thing comes in. Yeah. Sconda sees how do you already answered the June? It would is I'm trying to start hot retargeting campaign or the option I need for the strategy session apps isn't showing. I thought it was pulling from our audience says we created, where is it pulling those pixel options from for targeting? I have no idea what you're asking me in that equation. You are going to have to ask that in the Facebook group and tag like Jesse and nick in it and put a screenshot in there because okay. The wording you used there doesn't accurately describe the functions of the platform. Carissa sees my niches, restaurants who wants to increase employee retention and reduce training costs. My question is regarding the alchemic conversion script, part five gather data cause pain. Do I still need to ask the client how much money are you making per month with this business right now? Yes. Paperwork. Strom says, I've got my first five clients. At the same time I have been offered to be the CEO of a startup and they completely different field. I would be part owner of the company without a monthly salary in the beginning. Do you think it is best to only do my own consulting business or go in as CEO for the startup as well? That's a good question and it totally depends on the nature of the startup, right? Like first of all, why are they wanting to make you the CEO of a startup? Because the founders should pretty much always be the CEO in the beginning because it's they, they came up with this ship, they invented this ship, the building, this ship, they should be the captain of it too. Otherwise it's a bit concerning. MMM. So that's concerning. Like I would think, why isn't the founder, the CEO and then like, why do they want me, how much equity am I getting in this? Do I really believe in this thing? Because yeah, if it's, if you think that this founder of this startup is like the next mark Zuckerberg and his idea is radical and world changing and he's a genius, right? They say that that's true. And he wants you to become his, um, cofounder and take care of the management and people side of things. Right. Which I can understand that he wants to just go and submerge himself in the technical and the science and all of that. He wants someone to handle the people management side. And if that's the case, do it 100%. But those things are very rare. So if it's not like that, then in a few, if it's not a radical idea and the founder isn't a genius and then I wouldn't do it. Adrian Somos is, what's your opinion on cold shower? Should I do it every morning? Yes. You should do things that suck deliberately because then you get better at dealing with things that suck. Right? It's like as if you adversity if survived makes you stronger. Right. So like sometimes the people that go through the most adversity, they come out the other end like way stronger and way bit of for it and in like two examples of this, I can think of a big George Cyrus and Henry Kissinger, they were both five year old Jews in the Holocaust and they survived that. Imagine that experience at five, right? You're going to come out of that. Nothing is really going to phase you after that. Like if someone hangs up on you on a strategy session and you survived the Holocaust. Yeah. Okay. You see what I mean? It's not, it's nothing compared to that. And so we often, a little bit of a tangent here, but most people are too soft. Like they don't want to eat a salad. Oh, it doesn't taste yum. They don't want to go to bed on time. They don't want to wake up early, they don't want to go to the gym and they are soft in the week and you want to make yourself more disciplined in tougher. And the cold shower is a perfect one of those because your brain goes a bit crazy at first. It's like you turn it on, it's cold and you start sitting there on the standing there on the side and you were just thinking about it and thinking about it and thinking about it. But you can't think yourself out of that one. It's like standing on the edge of a swimming pool. The more you stand there and wait, the worse it gets. So you just got to go in and deal with it and the more you do that, it trains your brain. Same with me to Taishan. It's like you don't really want to do it. You might want to quit early, right? And not finish the 20 minutes, but you do it and you're training yourself to like put yourself through things that you don't want to do and that makes you stronger and it will honestly start changing your life everywhere. Plus it's also has some health benefits to you as well. Like it wakes you up, it does good things for your skin and your hair and all sorts of other things. But I do it mostly for the psychological advantage. Benjamin tanks, he's another question. What's your opinion on my, what's your opinion? My offering a one to two week trial. Um, probably don't do it. Peter with Strom says, how do I make sure a student with a payment plan doesn't get bored or distracted during my coaching programs and stops the payments as I understand it is only 20% actually finished consulting accelerator. Okay. I don't know where you got that number from, but Oh, 20 Pete, 20% success rate. And by that I mean people getting a $2,000 client. Right. That doesn't mean the amount of people that finish the payment plan now than people that finish the payment plan is like 95% or something. It's like pretty much all collected. You don't want to offer a really long payment plans though, like don't offer 12 months. Try to make it as short as possible. The shorter it is, the higher the collection rate will be. Chris, how does C is developing a niche offer? Hypothesis just got so that Aarp, when realizing someone I thought would have no money, said they paid five k to a coach a month earlier related to the niche. I'm circling, I'm restarting accelerator with an updated niche. My takeaway from their callers to reserve judgment with who my niche is and who has money until I've done enough due diligence. Is this an accurate takeaway or am I creating a new story in making my consideration of who to talk to too broad or am I thinking about this all the wrong way to get it Ikea for far more bounce to the truth than being right, so we'd love your input. Okay. Yeah. The key lesson from this is that your prediction mechanism in your brain for whether someone has money or not to pay for a course is very bad and very wrong. I learned this one too. You started to look at people's surveys and then look at their Facebook profile and their pictures and be like, Nah, this person doesn't have enough money. Like what a stupid thing to do like and then I noticed a lot of these things started happening. I thought the people who really had a lot of money, because they had themselves standing in front of cars and shit, I thought, and they said they were making all this money and how awesome they were and how they had all of these books for sale and Barnes and noble and Shit and how they were so amazing and talented. I was like, Oh wow, this is a really good prospect. Didn't buy probably because they're lying and they don't have any money and they suck. Right. The people who are outward like that often are hiding something inside. And the people who aren't very outward like that often just don't give a shit about what anyone thinks about him because they know what it is. And so I learned this one and honestly I was shocked. A lot of people who I thought didn't have any money and they even put income $0 million like they would buy full pay and be great clients and be successful. And because someone could have US business, they've just started, right? And it's making $0 million but the, they might've had a job for a long time and saved up money. And so just because their business is making $0 million doesn't mean they don't have any money. They might have more money than someone who has a business for a long time. You cannot predict this thing. You are best to just take calls with people and Reserve Your judgment and just see what happens. And then you'll start to notice things. I don't discriminate on the money thing. What I do discriminate on is someone's attitude, right? So if somebody is like has a massive ego and that's why I introduced this question, it says, why should we work with you over the other applicants? Right? Um, and that's, that's the best question. It's like a trigger. It triggers people with big Egos and they typically say two words. Like it will be me who is choosing to work with you, not you choosing to work with me. That is the, that is the textbook answer. If I ever see that answer, we just delete this strategy session and just say see you later because that, that person like there, it's this psychological thing. Uh, it, that's the only thing I discriminate on. I don't care about anything else. If someone is open and honest, doesn't matter if they don't have any money or whatever, like I'll do the strategy session with them. But if someone has a big ego, then know like, cause they can't be helped. They need to, they need to get their ass kicked first and then, um, learn how to be a little bit more humble, which only really comes from a big ass kicking, which they bring on themselves usually. And then they like a bit more normal and then you can work with them low to have cs. At what point do you recommend we start doing quarterly retreats after 10 k a month or before too? Um, honestly you could do them like at any income amount you cause they don't need to cost money. Like you could just take a week off at your house, right? And just read books and just, and you're not working, you're just, you're just taking some time to relax and think. So you don't need money to do it. You, it's just a good pattern for taking some time off and not doing your day to day work. Taking some time to reflect and read and think about things Frances Rodino sees I'm offering done for you solution consisting of one, set up the client attraction platform, research funnel, tick designed script copywriting, et Cetera and two, subsequent Facebook advertising to drive traffic and generate leads. Do I charge a setup fee and then ongoing retainer or is it retainer from the get go? Can you help me with this structure around pricing? I would probably charge either, um, two months upfront or a setup fee because you want to make sure that you don't do all of this work, set them all up and then they quit after one month because then that wasn't really worth it. So either of those two options. Brandon Thomas is between this week and next week I have three research interviews with individuals within my organic niche, which I've decided to stick with. How should I go about finding 17 or more people within my chosen niche travel agents to interview by the 25th of this month I found Facebook groups with travel agents and them, but 90% of the discussion with those groups mark it as Pam in the comment section. And I haven't gotten many responses through linkedin. Sure. So just email some people or call some people like just email and call some travel agents. Simple. Adrian. So most is, what do you think on it while looking at your vision board with some successful person? I econ I can, are you imagining that you have his strengths? Oh, it's just, you know, you learn different things from different people. I kind of see it like it's kind of like your make your life making this new creation, right? Like at your building this new species of thing. And what I'm trying to do is I'm trying to pull together, oh, what I'm basically trying to do is I'm trying to like this is me, we'll just put you, and then I'm trying to pull these different elements to give her yeah. To make this new species. And so what I think is stupid is when someone just tries to copy someone identical and be a carbon copy of someone else. Because if you think about it, no one can be better at being themselves. Then the original, well I guess it's, that's why he's copying it really dumb ass strategy. But what you should try and do is mix some things but you learn a lot from different people. So for example, like um, I can, yeah, I learned a lot about finance and I learned a lot about like corporate writing and analyzing p and ls and balance sheets and really like synergies between different companies. And I also learned a lot about the financial markets. And how hostile takeovers happen. And the, uh, I learned like a lot about financial markets and all of that. I also learned a lot from Warren Buffet, probably just as much, honestly from Warren Buffet. Then from icon, I learned a lot from him, uh, and they would all be out to do with like the finance side of things. And then when it came to sales, I learned a lot from like a spin selling and all of those different books. And I had some mentors that helped me with selling. And then I learned a lot about, uh, Facebook ads from different people. And then I learned about like, what's another element or mindset, right? I would study like neuroscience and I would study, uh, for loss philosophy and psychology and all of these different things. And then I would study all sorts of different things and I'd pull from different people, different elements. So, you know, Carl Icahn's a corporate raider, I'm not a corporator, I'm not trying to copy Carl Icahn, but there's elements that I really like about him and he's a, he's a mastermind at some different things. And so on. And to pull those pieces in and then someone else has real good at these elements. So I pulled them in and I find these different elements and I pulled them together and it makes a unique thing. And so that's how you do it. I mean, Jeff Bezos has been a massive influence. Uh, you probably know by how often I talk about him, like his principles or different things like that. So that's, I forgotten what the original question was, but that was the answer to it. Okay. Okay. Hmm. Rich Roberts is what kind of music do you listen to? All sorts of different stuff. Sometimes if I'm focusing on one thing for a long period of time, like if I'm just going to work on one thing for more than an hour or two hours, I'll listen to binaural beats. Uh, if you go to youtube and you search for binaural beats, I listened to those quite a lot and I'll actually link you to one. MMM. Well, um, where is it? Hmm. I'm just linking to one now. So I listened to this stuff quite a lot when I'm doing long deep focus work. But then sometimes if I'm just working on different tasks and in between things and I'm not going deep into like a a concentration state, then I would just listen to different songs on Spotify and things is a collection of all different genres of music. I don't listen to one genre. I mixed it all up and there might be like some rocks, some old rock too, like rolling stones or led zipline. And then I might listen to like rap. I might listen to some like drum and bass music. I listened to all sorts of different stuff because it just depends on like your mood and what you've gotten used to and sick off. So now it's time to change it a bit. Um, yeah, I mix it up quite a lot. And then binaural beats, if I get completely sick of music and I can't find anything to listen to, that's when you use binaural beats and then it sounds perfect. And then when you're sick of binaural beats and you're like, I can't fucking take another binary or be, then you go back to Spotify and play some songs in. It sounds like you've never heard it again. It's, it's good like that. It's kind of like if you eat healthy all the time and then you going eat like some, some fast food or like, like a burger or some fries or something. It tastes so much better. But if you, all you do is eat that all the time, then you get sick of it. So you just change it up a little bit. George EMC is, do you still use a Yeti? Um, I don't personally use a Yeti. What? I have like a UTI for your first Mike Phone is the biggest, I used one of those because they're cheap. They're great mikes. But then I use now just this thing which is called a rode podcaster and it's, it's still a USB just plugs in like that. Um, it's more expensive, but it's a, it's basically like in terms of a user, you can pick up quite a lot of noise from all around the room and things going on outside and all of that. This one's a little bit better at at reducing it. And I think the quality is also a bit bitter in the audio. However, it's more expensive. So if you're just getting started, the the Yeti is, is great value for money. The years he just blows it out of the park. Daniel bu diocese. How do you see yourself in your business three years from now? Um, just closer towards our goal. Like, you know, the, the longterm big plan is, you know, to collectively educate every human on earth. So I would like to be further towards that, uh, in my business. What would that look like? Well, it would mean that we would have, it's right now my main focus is growing the team, getting really, really, really next level people on our team. And I kid you not, if you want to know how insane my standards are for the people we're hiring right now, there are people in our pipeline who we've got a nuclear physicist turned software engineer. Um, we've got like an astrophysicist. We've got like chemical engineers. We've got like people with PhDs in artificial intelligence and biological self organizing systems. We've got a, okay. Yeah, those are like some of the, those are the sorts of people we've got. Um, and really I'm trying to bring together some really, really, really smart people and try to get like some really good talent in the company so we can start to innovate, uh, on lots of things. And so how do I s my company will be, it'll have a team of like geniuses and it will be bigger and its team and everything and we'll be all together and our new office in La, uh, we will have educated more people and be further towards our goal. And we, myself personally, I will have changed more from a, like I've been in the trenches doing work for like almost 10 years. Right. I started my first company when I was like 21 years old. I'm 29 now, so not even 10 years, like nine years I guess. But in the, and those years I've clocked 30,000 hours of like work. So I've, and it usually a person only works 10,000 hours in 10 years. So I did 30 years of work in nine and that's been a huge, that's probably the main thing that's taught me so much so quickly. It's probably not that I'm any smarter than anybody else, it's just that I've worked so much harder. Um, and so I've learned, I've been doing a lot of the work myself and now I can see what's to go to that next level. I have to be, I have to hire a team of smart people and enable that team to create things. So I'm going to be more focused on hiring people and managing people and setting the right environment and also working with the team as well. It's going to be a balance of doing things and managing and hiring and yeah, that's what I've been working through recently. But the cool thing is, is there, the best person to manage and hire is the person who's done it. So you know you are, the way I see it, the best way to advance your career as an entrepreneur or an employee or anything is you've got to put in 10 years of hard work somewhere. If you never put in those 10 years, you'll never be good at the skill and you'll never be good enough to manage. So you need to really get some technical in the trenches experience in and under your about mastery. And then you can do it and teach people how to do it and hire and manage people to do it as well. And you can't ever do this if you've never done that. So that's, that's the shift that I'm going through now that I can see, and I've read a lot about it from like a reading books by like, um, Bill Gates. I mean, Bill Gates was the mastermind behind like Microsoft and all of its software and everything. But you know, he got to a point, we're very quickly where he couldn't do everything. And so he had to hire and train and mold a team that could, that could innovate and build. Uh, and the key is, is you don't want to hire people and train them to just be as good as you. Or if you hire and train people in, they're not as good as you, then you've absolutely failed. But you've even failed if you hire and train people to be as good as you. You want to hire and train people to be better than you and that's the hardest and so I'm learning how to do that, so that's how I would change personally. Derick sermon is I want to start out using Facebook ads to attract potential clients. Would it be better to create a fan page with valuable content and followers first or just no, you should go and get clients organically. Get a proof of concept by getting at least one to three paying clients organically. Then start doing Facebook ads. Chris, how does his started and meet up through meetup.com to validate there was a market need for my expertise at the end of the meetup that you often free calls and live into? People live in to of the 24 people signed up the strategy. Oh, sorry, I missed your question. Can you ask that again? It was quite long and I missed the last part. Dave pensions is if our business is centered around Facebook ads and funnels, should we go through week five? Yes. Seriously. Even if your business is centered around Facebook and funnels, I bet you that you're going to learn a lot about Facebook in front of us by going through week five. Holly Johnson says, uh, I already answered that. Nick Gogi FC is, I bought all three of the copywriting books you recommend is the beginning of copywriter. Which one should I start with first? Well, I don't even know what three I recommended, but probably start with, I'm, I'm sure one of them I recommended was breakthrough advertising. Start with that one. Um, and Kish see is I help aspiring entrepreneurs to make more money then they have before while creating the lifestyle they want with proven step by step strategies. Mm. It's convoluted. You don't have like we've got the niche aspiring entrepreneurs. What is the problem? What is the problem you'll miss? You haven't talked to the market and you haven't identified the problem because you're, what you're saying the problem is is the solution. You want to help aspiring entrepreneurs to make more money than they have before. And then because we've got a really weird problem that isn't really a problem, then the means towards that end is corrupt. So then you were saying with approved, like while creating the lifestyle they want with proven steep posted yet you need to talk to your market. Dude. It's obvious that you haven't talked to these people. Find out what their problem is and then your statement should say, I help these people to solve this problem and get this result. J oshua, we still overseas before I go into ads and need to make sure I'm pricing my services right. I've been selling my fear of flying course for 1000 bucks. I've had two clients tell me that they would have paid two k. Do you think I should raise it for ads? I would raise it like you try it. Yeah, sure. Give it a go. It's not very hard to change because it's not like it's in your funnel and your ads. It's not in your value video. It's not anywhere. It's just a word you say on the script so you could test it. Sure. The Jeremy Jane says, question, how do we monitor or find out our processes? Working with a certain client? They would say they only sold one extra unit, but they actually sold four units with our policies. How do we manage this? Cool. I don't know what your process is like. You know if you're running ads for someone and you're, you don't have a conversion event and you don't have access to their data and their backend systems to see how much sales from there, then you're relying on their word like, or how many sales did you make? And they might say, oh, we just made one. Then how do you know that they made four sales? How do you know that? Because like it's, it's, that's where you can get into trouble here you need to very clear ways to measure and you should never rely on someone's opinion because people's opinions are wrong. And also people can lie and people can do all sorts of shit. And so I would never put myself in a situation like that. I would want to make sure that, you know, I see what the truth actually is. And that's why I let all of my media buyers that work at our company. Everyone in our company can see how much money we're making ever. It's all transparent because I know that no one can do the job without seeing what the fuck is going on. And that's probably one of the reasons why like how media buyers do good. Our sales reps do good because we can see what's going on. Their visibility is important. Walter Nealon says, I'd be stoked to come and do sales for you. Let's make it happen. Well, I mean you're welcome to send an email to [email protected] and tell us, prove it. Why should we hire you to do ourselves? You've got to prove it to us. Like it's one thing to say it. You've got to prove it. Nasa Ahmed sees, uh, what level do we need to get to, to come and meet you is quantum invite only? Um, quantum is not really invite only like anyone is welcome to apply to join it, but it's probably only a good idea for people who are making like at least at least like 20 grand a month to join. At that point quantum becomes a good fit. Um, if you're making less than it then it probably isn't a good fit and in up level or accelerator would be a good fit. Once you're making 10 grand a month, like upper level is absolutely best fit and then up level help you get beyond 20 grand a month and then then you can join there. That's the best path to go through it. Zoran Shah's is do you recommend I take an online course on digital marketing and what books would you recommend? Dude, you enrolled in a course that covers digital marketing. It's called consulting accelerator and we show you how to do it. So watch all the videos in detail and implementing everything and learn by watching the videos and then also doing it. The combination of those two will make you really good. Eli shot sticks is I help singles get and into and maintain healthy relationships. I have seven clients nonpaying who have gone through my seven week coaching program. I have testimonials and I have Facebook group for potential clients. I'm still working on strategy sessions to get my first paying clients. Should I wait to get 10 paying clients before other people will go into up level after five paying clients just go into our believable now honestly by the uplevel will help you like the moment you are able to join it, like it's obviously going to help you. I just join it now. Okay. If our business is centered around Facebook ads, I already answered that. Zoran Shasta is, I'm halfway done with week four of consulting accelerator since since week one without any bias or the influence of the digital marketing bonus. I chose the online tutoring market and mostly all of the independent tutors are facing are lack of clients and customers is the biggest problem. I understand this niche and I'm passionate about this. It is, I believe I can create value for them, but here's the problem. I have no experience in digital marketing, but I'm willing to learn and master it. I just dropped out of college because I couldn't pay tuition and I have no experience in any kind of work. How much, how do you suggest I go about this? Yeah, it consulting accelerator. It will show you how to do digital marketing. Jeremy Jane says, how do we monitor our results to what the client is actually getting? A, you should have a, you should have a really good way to have visibility into the sales and tracking and all of that, that that's the best way. If you don't, then you're going to have to rely on him to tell you and I would never really rely on that, but it's the best. It's better than nothing. You know, there's seeing what it actually is. Then these hearing the client's opinion of what they believe it is, which is not the biggest, and then there's nothing. Alright. They opinions better than nothing, but the best is just the actual thing. Brandon's [inaudible] who is one person you admire and model after in wine? What do you see one person like there's multiple people. Like I don't, I'm not just trying to be one person. Um, there's elements I take from different people. Like you know, Jeff Bezos taught me a lot about a longterm thinking and customer obsession and also, uh, really how to think big. And then from like Carl Icahn or Warren Buffett for example, he taught me a lot about finance and value investing, which led me to Benjamin Graham, which he taught me a lot about that and how to really clearly articulate and measure value. Um, there's all sorts of people. I look up to an a Maya just for different things. I don't, I don't like just believe in one thing, one way. I like to make a mix. I'm in quiche. Says, Dude, you said way too much. It's like a thesis. I'm not going to read that Daniel Diocese, every successful to people say you must start with one niche only. That, how about big companies like Amazon, they started with books and now sell almost everything as a company grows. And they get into more niches or how it works. Yeah. I mean you said it yourself. Every successful person says you must start with one niche and Amazon started with one niche. They started with books, all right? They did not try to do something else until they absolutely nailed books and it took them years to nail that. So they started with a single minded focus on one thing. Walmart, which he ended up selling all sorts of shit all over the world with all of these different stores and like 2 million employees, no kidding. That meaning they started with one store and one employee. You want to start small with one niche so that you can focus and get the proof of concept right. You need to sit to the initial conditions correctly for the next as to form and for this thing to grow like the right way. If you never form that Nix is correctly in the initial conditions askewed and mutated, then you just going to grow some hideous thing that's going to, there's going to cause it like all sorts of damage, but as you grow you can start going into different things like you can absolutely do that. I started with one niche, like one thing I did and then I started spanning it out. Like I first helped people who were head consulting businesses to grow their consulting business. Then I started helping people who wanted to start their own consulting business start while I was also helping people who already had one to grow and then I started going to more countries and more and more, more, more, more countries. And then I started opening up what consulting actually meant, like coaching too and any kind of service based business. Starting to open it up and then I dropped the word consulting and then just went help people start and grow businesses wider, gain more countries again. Right, so like you start small and then you start going out. Right now I have three products. We'll two products, one mastermind. We're in multiple different countries and um, the niche has expanded quite loud. So you start with one and then you go out later. But you must master the one thing first. I actually first started off by mastering helping plumbers get hot water cylinder repair clients in Oakland, in New Zealand using Google Edwards. Do you know how small that is? There's like 13 participants that meet that criteria. 13. Okay. And I still got to 10 grand a month with them. Okay. Eli Shaw stacks is, I help singles get into and maintain healthy relationships. I have seven clients nonpaying who have gone through my Stephen Week coaching program. I have testimonials and I have Facebook group for potential clients. I'm still working on strategy sessions to get my first plan client. Should I wait until I get 10 paying clients before. All right. Audience with this, you just joined up level, uh, ed and bbcs. So you're saying that I should take strategy calls if someone doesn't have the financial resources? Yes. Practice. Just practice. It's worth trying it out. I'm in Keirsey's the client's outcomes or to make anything from. Um, but what is your advice on how to actually create the state by state process into an educational online format? Do I create all the steps on a piece of paper first? Oh, okay. So you're wanting to make a course. Yeah. So you need to join up level then go to week seven and consulting accelerator and it talks about up level up level is where I show you how to create a course. Like literally in all of its detail, like consulting accelerator shows you how to get started and how to pick a niche, how to get your mindset right, how to sell, how to market, how to come up with an offer, pick a niche, those sorts of things. It's basically how to get your first few customers starting from scratch. And mostly it's to do with people that are doing online, I'm sorry, a done for you or one on one type services. Then once you've got a few of them, the next step is to create a program or a course and that's where [inaudible] comes in. So go and two weeks even. And uh, join up playbook. Adrian's. So Moz is how would you find companies? We've already come up with a solution to a particular problem, which I'm trying to solve. All right. So yeah. Yeah. What you can do here is you didn't tell me what any of the details were. Sorry, I have to kind of work with ethics that basically what you're looking at is like, if you will in a Ma, if you pick a niche like this. Yeah. And let's say within this niche, all of these different people you talk to, the widespread problem that groups all of these different businesses within this niche together. And let's say that this is, um, they say that this here is plumbers, right? So plumbing niche. And I talk to plumbers and I asked him about the biggest problem and they tell me that it is getting clients. And when it comes to like digital marketing, so getting clients, you say, yeah, let's just make it real simple. So then that just plumbers, I talked to them. The biggest problem is getting clients. So this, there's two variables in this equation for how we identify these people. What one of these looks like if we zoom in on it is it actually looks like plumber and then no clients, right? He in all of these look the same and this combination, it means that they're a plumber, was no clients. Debt is the problem, right? So then how do I identify someone in my niche that has solved the problem? I'm trying to figure out. Simple. You're looking for someone who is Pete, why alright. A plumber with clients like so you need to keep, you need to talk to these [inaudible] and ask them there any p wise out there anywhere in the world like have you ever heard of a plumber with clients? Of course there are like there. And then who's the best at it? Like you know? Sure. The big problem is that every, pretty much everyone you talked to as a plumber who doesn't have enough clients, that doesn't mean that every single plumber in the world doesn't have enough clients. All right? You just have to find the rare outlier that does and is the biggest. And you've got to figure the, you know, what really makes this why, like what are the constituent parts of why is going to be different elements to it, right? And then how do they string together these pots and sequenced them to achieve y. And then we want to look at in and one of the constituent parts of in, and it's probably going to be the complete absence of that. And so then it's really obvious to you, well shit, this person is a p y and they have this and everyone else has a pen and they have the absence of this. So it was pretty easy to assume that, well the presence of this string means that this change is that the presence of the string is the differentiating factor that changes a pee into a PGY. Everyone design, everyone has a pen, they desire to be a p y therefore every one should have the string. So then your job is to sell the string and distribute the string to the participants. That's how you do it. And it's universal across any niche. So that's how you find out Eli answered that were fantasies. Can you clarify the difference between consulting principle number five, lean and frugal and living with an abundance mindset like leaving the lights on in to the island for the billionaire you've visited? Yeah. So there, let me like, let me give you an example. So I'm not like on one side of extreme of frugal. Like you'd have somebody who, you'd have somebody who literally reuses the same tea bags, so they'd use a tea bag and then they'd hang it up on like a clothes line and dry it out and then they use it again. Right. And they would be so frugal that they would never spend any money ever. Like the absolutely extreme [inaudible] to the point that it's probably stupid, right? But then on the other end of the spectrum, you have somebody who is completely reckless and stupid. Like somebody, um, who did what Mike Tyson did and bought fucking tiger and basically spent like $400 million on drugs and prostitutes and unique, exotic wild animals and all sorts of other things. Right? And these, the somewhere in the middle here, there's a good, there's a good place to be at. And so I don't really care about a light being lift on and I don't care about using a tea bag once or even paying $4 or $5 for a coffee every now and then. Right. I don't really care about that. But at the same time, I am definitely not wasteful. Like I would never pay like a lot of money for like alcohol or anything like that. I didn't drink any of that. I hate paying lots of money for food. Like if I go out, I really dislike fancy restaurants because the food isn't even that great and it's really expensive and stupid and I don't like fancy clothes and I don't like, I don't like, like just blowing money on stupid shit. Like anything that's Louis Vuitton or Gucci or any crap like that. I think there's, this is just the dumbest thing in the world. And so, but at the same time, I don't really care about a light being lifted on, I'm not going to get too hung up on it. So you want to be lean and frugal, but not to the point that it's stupid like cause you've got, I, I'm quite bold with how I invest in the company. Like I'll pay a lot of money to hire really good people. I'll pay a lot of money for new technology and for the different software and tools we use. I invest a stupid amount of money in the company. Why? I'm like very bold and when it comes to investing in the right things, but when it comes to the other things, like I'll be a real tight ass about it and not move at all. It just totally, it depends on the thing. Okay. For example, like some people spend like $300 on a tee shirt, right? The maximum amount of money I'm willing to spend on tissue, it's probably about 40 bucks. If a t shirt costs will knit stupid. Adrian. So is, how would you find, come I already answered your question. Okay. Nasa Ahmed sees, how do we already answered that question already answered this generalist specialist question. Israel Mesh gs is Sam. Do you think your subconscious mind, our subconscious mind is connected to the universe? Like that question is flawed you, it's too vague. You don't know the objects you're speaking about. So first of all like what do you mean by the subconscious mind? You mean like cause the subconscious mind is more of like the psychological things that emerge from the limbic system and that's kind of how subconscious so like which piece are you talking about? The physical part or the, the emergence of the electric properties. The Kim Chemical Electric Properties that come from the physical brain matter and then to the universe. I'm in the universe, everything. So of course your subconscious mind is part of the universe because the universe is everything. So like if you're talking about a whole and your apart of the whole, then of course they're connected. Like this question is not, you need to be very clean with your thinking. I used to do this a lot when I was younger. I would think just in terms of vague entities in vague things. And as you get totally confused cause you don't even really know what you're talking about or thinking about, well you don't even really know what you're trying to do. And so you need to really define the objects that you're talking about, like subconscious and the universe. What are these two things mean? Because until you get real clear on that, you can't even attempt to answer that question. Kin Venite says, have you tried using float tanks? Yes I have. I've used one how many times? Like probably like five times as a it. I quite like them. Like it's, it's good. The only thing I don't like about them is how I have to go somewhere to use one and then like sign a form and wait and wait and then I'll go in and then I have to go back. I don't like all their Edmund Shit. So if I was going to use one a lot, I'd probably just buy one and put it in my house. Um, but I liked me to take because it's like, it's like a float tank that you can do without a float tank every single day without paying money and screwing around with all of that other stuff. Okay. Francis, Mo Morrow Taran sees how you distinguish important stuff from things you don't need. Eg. Stupid stuff. Good question. Last question I'm going to cover, but it's real simple. Like you just have your current situation and then you have your desired situation. This is your goal. You want to make sure this is very clearly defined, right? Like to uh, to get to $100,000 a month, right? This very clear. And then what does my current situation, where my current situation is, you know, I'm making $10,000 per month and my desired situation is I wanted to get to $100,000 a month. All right, well then the only things how you determine if something matters or not or something is important or not, whether you should do something or not is purely based on the actions output. Like when it is combined with the current situation. So if we take this and we apply, this is the output we get from here any closer to here. All right. So for example, working on my logo. Well if I apply a pretty logo to my current situation, do I get any closer to my desired situation? Nope. Okay. Probably shouldn't do the pretty logo then. Um, if I go out and drink alcohol with my friends on the weekend, is that combined with this going to get me any closer to this? No. Any we can just work through it like this. Like as like as reading this book on quantum physics going to get me any closer to this? No, like maybe read it for fun, but it's, there's sure as hell is not going to get your closest to this. So what is going to get me closer to this? Well, it pretty much just going to be doing more calls. Okay. How do I get more calls? Will I need to generate more strategy sessions? How do I do that? What will you could do some ads? Well, I don't even have money for it. Well then you've got to get clients organically. How do I do that? Well, you do direct outreach, but I've tried that didn't give me enough grants, do more of it, but I still tried it and it didn't get up on more, more frequently, more often, more consistent, better, more, more channels, iterate your niche, all of that stuff. Those are the actions that when you combine those actions with this, you're going to get closer to this. But if the action, you combine it to that and you get no closer to this thin, it's waste. You're just purely measuring the actions, ability to make progress along this path. That's like all you're trying to do. Um, that's, that's how you, you do it. All right. Well we're at the end of our time now. We've gone for two hours. Like I said, we do these every Saturday. We go from 3:00 PM til 5:00 PM eastern time. It's the time in New York. Now. If you enjoyed this, just click that like button, click like give me some feedback and I'm going to tell you if we're doing one of these next week looking at my war map. Yeah. So there is not going to be one of these next week. So on the 16th of, what is it? This will be a march on the 16th of March, which is an extended day. There isn't, there is not going to be a live stream Q and. A. And the reason why is because I'm going to Joshua tree with my wife just for a weekend trip and then a Q and a calls. We'll resume on the 23rd of March. So next Q. And a. You can put it in your calendar 23rd of March, Saturday 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM eastern time. So thanks everyone for attending and have a good weekend. And I look forward to seeing you on the next one. Seven. Okay.

Comments